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Taken on January 6th, 2016 at Main Square in Krakow, Poland

  

Krakow is a very charming old town in Poland, and my hometown. Some of my American friends say it's as beautiful as Prague.

 

The main square of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city. It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m2 (430,000 ft2) is one of the largest medieval town squares in Europe.

The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life.

 

The main square is a rectangular space surrounded by historic townhouses (kamienice) and churches. The center of the square is dominated by the Cloth Hall (Sukiennice), rebuilt in 1555 in the Renaissance style, topped by a beautiful attic or Polish parapet decorated with carved masks. On one side of the cloth hall is the Town Hall Tower (Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Adalbert and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument. Rising above the square are the Gothic towers of St. Mary's Basilica (Kościół Mariacki). Kraków Main Square does not have a town hall, because it has not survived to the present day.

 

© All rights reserved.

 

All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, or edited without my written explicit permission.

HBM :)

Taken in January in Krakow, Poland.

 

Krakow is a very charming old town in Poland, and my hometown. Some of my American friends say it's as beautiful as Prague.

 

The main square of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city. It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m2 (430,000 ft2) is one of the largest medieval town squares in Europe.

The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life.

 

© All rights reserved.

 

All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, or edited without my written explicit permission.

Taken on 6th of January 2016

 

Krakow is a very charming old town in Poland, and my hometown. Some of my American friends say it's as beautiful as Prague.

 

The main square of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city. It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m2 (430,000 ft2) is one of the largest medieval town squares in Europe.

The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life.

 

The main square is a rectangular space surrounded by historic townhouses (kamienice) and churches. The center of the square is dominated by the Cloth Hall (Sukiennice), rebuilt in 1555 in the Renaissance style, topped by a beautiful attic or Polish parapet decorated with carved masks. On one side of the cloth hall is the Town Hall Tower (Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Adalbert and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument. Rising above the square are the Gothic towers of St. Mary's Basilica (Kościół Mariacki). Kraków Main Square does not have a town hall, because it has not survived to the present day.

  

© All rights reserved.

 

All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, or edited without my written explicit permission.

What you can't see in this shot of the Main Square in Krakow is the thousands of teenagers who had descended on Krakow to celebrate World Youth Day with the Pope.........

 

Click here to see my other Poland shots : www.flickr.com/photos/darrellg/albums/72157671110605611

 

From Wikipedia : "The main square (Polish: Rynek Główny) of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city. It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m2 (430,000 ft2) is one of the largest medieval town squares in Europe. The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life.

 

The main square is a square space surrounded by historic townhouses (kamienice) and churches. The center of the square is dominated by the Cloth Hall (Sukiennice), rebuilt in 1555 in the Renaissance style, topped by a beautiful attic or Polish parapet decorated with carved masks. On one side of the cloth hall is the Town Hall Tower (Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Adalbert and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument. Rising above the square are the Gothic towers of St. Mary's Basilica (Kościół Mariacki). Kraków Main Square does not have a town hall, because it has not survived to the present day."

 

My Website : Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : Photocrowd

 

© D.Godliman

Interior of St. Louis' City Museum - the Enchanted Caves and Shoe Shafts.

 

From Wikipedia: "City Museum is a play house museum, consisting largely of repurposed architectural and industrial objects, housed in the former International Shoe building in the Washington Avenue Loft District of St. Louis, Missouri, United States. Opened in 1997, the museum attracted more than 700,000 visitors in 2010.[1] The City Museum has been named one of the "great public spaces" by the Project for Public Spaces,[2] and has won other local and international awards as a must-see destination.[citation needed] It has been described as "a wild, singular vision of an oddball artistic mind" and compared to the similarly individualistic Museum of Jurassic Technology in Los Angeles.[3]... The Shoe Shafts were developed from structures built for the International Shoe distribution operation. To get the shoes from various floors to the loading dock, staff would place the shoes on spiral shafts. The Shafts opened in 2003 with one three-story spiral slide, and five years later added a ten-story slide that starts at the roof and goes down to the Caves' entrance." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_Museum

Wikipedia: Kraków's Main Square (Polish: Rynek Główny w Krakowie) is the main market square of the Old Town in Kraków, Poland, and a principal urban space located at the center of the city. It dates back to the 13th century, and — at roughly 40,000 m² (430,000 ft²) — is the largest medieval town square in Europe. The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life. The Main Square is a spacious square surrounded by historic townhouses (kamienice), palaces and churches. The center of the square is dominated by the Sukiennice (the Cloth Hall or Drapers' Hall), rebuilt in 1555 in the Renaissance style, topped by a beautiful attic or Polish parapet decorated with carved masks. On one side of the Sukiennice is the Town Hall Tower (Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Wojciech (St. Adalbert's) and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument. Rising above the square are the Gothic towers of St. Mary's Basilica (Kościół Mariacki). During the occupation of Poland, the square was named Adolf Hitler Platz.

After the Mennonite lunch our tour continued on toward Chihuahua City. We stopped at a major highway intersection service e station for a bathroom break. We could also purchase snacks. One of the items offered were dried apples in various formats. The state of Chihuahua is known as the Apple Basket of Mexico. Most of the apples in the country are grown in the farming area south of Chihuahua City.

This street vendor was set up outside the service station selling apples and other fresh produce..

 

However, all is not well in the basket!

 

Mar-03-2014

Salem Oregon News:

Chihuahua News: NAFTA's Bad Apples

Salem-News.com

Historically an important crop in Chihuahua, locally-grown apples confront a deluge of U.S. imports, which reached 237,000 tons in 2012.

 

(LAS CRUCES, NM) - Facing ruin, apple producers in the Mexican border state of Chihuahua are mulling an anti-dumping complaint against U.S. imports. Ricardo Marquez Prieto, president of the Chihuahua Regional Union of Fruit Growers, charged that unfair competition from Mexico's partner in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) threatens the viability of the local apple industry, which could see tens of thousands of tons of warehoused apples valued in the neighborhood of $65 million go to rot.

 

"We are going to file a suit against dumping if (Mexican) federal authorities don't get on the ball and move to our side," Marquez vowed late last week, after meeting with federal officials.

 

Historically an important crop in Chihuahua, locally-grown apples confront a deluge of U.S. imports, which reached 237,000 tons in 2012. Hammered by unusual freezes, Chihuahua's orchards chalked up a 55 percent production decline in the same year.

 

Contending their troubles go beyond climate issues, the apple producers say production costs are higher in Mexico than in the U.S. According to Marquez, electricity costs incurred by Chihuahua producers are more than three times the prices paid by their U.S. counterparts, or $1.72 per kilowatt hour versus 50 cents per kilowatt hour. Simultaneously, U.S. producers enjoy $400 million in government marketing support, he added.

 

Although Chihuahua growers have recovered from the deep freeze of 2012, meeting 1992's record harvest of 440,000 tons during last fall's harvest cycle, as many as 80,000 tons of fruit could now spoil because of a Mexican market oversaturation from U.S. imports. Moreover, producers claim they stand to lose money, since national juice processors only pay 86 centavos for each kilo of apples that costs more than 3 pesos to refrigerate.

 

On February 26, an estimated 4,000 apple producers, processors and industry workers staged an unprecedented demonstration in the state capital of Chihuahua City. The protestors demanded that the federal government put a brake on U.S. imports, provide a two-peso subsidy for each kilogram of apples, and apply a compensatory fee of ten cents on the dollar on purchases of fruit imported before and during the local harvest.

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Permission to use photo:

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21 Apr 2015

.

Request for Image Permissions, Great Streets Video

  

Hi Ted,

 

I would like permission to use your photo in a non commercial video I am working on at the Project for Public Spaces, an educational non-profit in NYC that advocates for improving public spaces and urban design internationally.

  

The image in reference can be found here:

flic.kr/p/ptPex4

 

The short video is meant to promote the idea that streets are not just for transportation, but are public spaces for people and can feature a myriad of uses and activities. We loved your photo, because it beautifully shows people enjoying themselves on a street that functions as a special community place.

 

Our video is basically a slideshow of examples of great streets, that will be a couple minutes long. Your photo would be one of several dozen photos that would be featured appearing for several seconds. There will not be a voiceover, just background music and overlaid text. The video will begin by asking the question “What are streets for?” and then categorize sets of the images with answers in the form “Streets are for ____” with the blank filled in with an activity describing the category.

 

Examples of the categories are:

• Streets are for snowball fighting.

• Streets are for performing and spectating.

• Streets are for trick-or-treating.

• Streets are for falling in love.

• Streets are for protesting.

 

We will end with the emphasized “Streets are for PEOPLE.” and the hashtag #StreetsasPlaces.

 

twitter.com/search?q=streetsasplaces&src=typd

 

The video would be distributed for free through Project for Public Spaces’ website, social media, and e-newsletter.

• Website: 2,028,972 annual pageviews

• Facebook: 42,649 likes

• Twitter: 36,472 followers

• Newsletter: 36,272 subscribers

 

Additionally, the highly qualified staff at the non-profit Street Films are assisting us with the production of the video, but PPS will be the owner of the video.

 

www.streetfilms.org/

 

It will also be posted to our public Youtube and/or Vimeo channels. As well as, shown as background footage at our public workshops, Placemaking trainings, conferences, and other events. In may also be shared with citizens that contact PPS looking for information and materials to assist them in advocating for public spaces in their neighborhoods.

 

Our current plan is to give attribution to all contributors at the end in our credit reel. However, if you find that method of attribution to be unsatisfactory, we are more than willing to discuss alternative methods with you. We are enclosing a release form we would like you to sign and send back/ we would like to send you a release form that you could sign to give us permission to use your photo.

 

Please let us know as soon as possible if we have permission to use a high resolution version of your photo in our video.

 

Sincerely,

 

David Leyzerovsky, Project Manager

Project for Public Spaces

419 Lafayette St, 7th Fl

New York, NY 10003

212.620.5660 x346

On our day walking around in Krakow we was "blessed" with a complete washed out sky - so instead of the dull white I added here a coffee filter for a more interesting result.

 

From the net

The main square of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city.

 

It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m² (430,000 ft²) is the largest medieval town square in Europe.

 

The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life.

The main square is a rectangular space surrounded by historic townhouses (kamienice), palaces and churches.

 

The center of the square is dominated by the Cloth Hall (Sukiennice), rebuilt in 1555 in the Renaissance style, topped by a beautiful attic or Polish parapet decorated with carved masks.

 

On one side of the cloth hall is the Town Hall Tower (Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Adalbert and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument. Rising above the square are the Gothic towers of St. Mary's Basilica (Kościół Mariacki).

 

This tour sponsored by: Cracowdays

( www.cracowdays.com )

Boston Common

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For other uses, see Boston Common (disambiguation).

Boston Common

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

U.S. National Historic Landmark District

Boston common 1848.jpg

View of the water celebration on Boston Common on October 25, 1848

Boston Common is located in Boston Boston Common

Show map of Boston

Show map of Massachusetts

Show map of the US

Show all

LocationBoston, Massachusetts

Area50 acres (200,000 m2)[1]

Built1634

ArchitectMultiple, including Augustus St. Gaudens

NRHP Reference #72000144 (original)

87000760 (new)

Significant dates

Added to NRHPJuly 12, 1972 (original, in NRHP also including Boston Public Garden)

February 27, 1987 (new, in NHL of Boston Common alone)[2]

Designated NHLDFebruary 27, 1987[3]

Boston Common (also known as the Common) is a central public park in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. It is sometimes erroneously referred to as the "Boston Commons".[4][5] Dating from 1634, it is the oldest city park in the United States.[6] The Boston Common consists of 50 acres (20 ha) of land bounded by Tremont Street, Park Street, Beacon Street, Charles Street, and Boylston Street. The Common is part of the Emerald Necklace of parks and parkways that extend from the Common south to Franklin Park in Jamaica Plain, Roxbury, and Dorchester. A visitors' center for all of Boston is located on the Tremont Street side of the park.

  

Aerial view in 2017

The Central Burying Ground is located on the Boylston Street side of Boston Common and contains the burial sites of the artist Gilbert Stuart and the composer William Billings. Also buried there are Samuel Sprague and his son, Charles Sprague, one of America's earliest poets. Samuel Sprague was a participant in the Boston Tea Party and fought in the Revolutionary War. The Common was designated as a Boston Landmark by the Boston Landmarks Commission in 1977.

 

Contents [hide]

1History

2Notable features

2.1Grounds

2.2Structures

2.3Neighboring structures

3Notable recurring events

4See also

5References

6Further reading

7External links

History[edit]

 

African-American artist Edward Mitchell Bannister painted this vivid depiction of the street and Boston Common area in 1898-99.[7]

The Common's purpose has changed over the years. It was once owned by William Blaxton (often given the modernized spelling "Blackstone"), the first European settler of Boston, until it was bought from him by the Puritan founders of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. During the 1630s, it was used by many families as a cow pasture. However, this only lasted for a few years, as affluent families bought additional cows, which led to overgrazing, a real-life example of the Tragedy of the commons.[8] After grazing was limited in 1646 to 70 cows at a time,[9] the Boston Common continued to host cows until they were formally banned from it in 1830 by Mayor Harrison Gray Otis.[10]

  

Execution of Ann Hibbins on Boston Common, on charges of witchcraft, June 19, 1656. Sketch by F.T. Merril, 1886

The Common was used as a camp by the British before the American Revolutionary War, from which they left for the Battle of Lexington and Concord. It was used for public hangings up until 1817, most of which were from a large oak which was replaced with a gallows in 1769. On June 1, 1660, Quaker Mary Dyer was hanged there by the Puritans for repeatedly defying a law that banned Quakers from the Colony.[11] Dyer was one of the four Quakers executed on the Common and known as the Boston martyrs.[12][13]

 

On May 19, 1713, two hundred citizens rioted on the Common in reaction to a food shortage in the city. They later attacked the ships and warehouses of wealthy merchant Andrew Belcher, who was exporting grain to the Caribbean for higher profits. The lieutenant governor was shot during the riot.[14]

  

Central Burying Ground on Boston Common

 

1890 Map of Boston Common and the adjacent Public Garden

True park status seems to have emerged no later than 1830, when the grazing of cows was ended and renaming the Common as Washington Park was proposed. Renaming the bordering Sentry Street to Park Place (later to be called Park Street) in 1804[15] already acknowledged the reality. By 1836, an ornamental iron fence fully enclosed the Common and its five perimeter malls or recreational promenades, the first of which, Tremont Mall, had been in place since 1728, in imitation of St. James's Park in London. Given these improvements dating back to 1728, a case could be made that Boston Common is in fact the world's first public urban park, since these developments precede the establishment of the earliest public urban parks in England—Derby Arboretum (1840), Peel Park, Salford (1846), and Birkenhead Park (1847)—which are often considered the first.

 

Originally, the Charles Street side of Boston Common, along with the adjacent portions of the Public Garden, were used as an unofficial dumping ground, due to being the lowest-lying portions of the two parks; this, along with the Garden's originally having been a salt marsh, resulted in the portions of the two parks being "a moist stew that reeked and that was a mess to walk over", driving visitors away from these areas. Although plans had long been in place to regrade the Charles Street-facing portions of Boston Common and the Public Garden, the cost of moving the amount of soil necessary (approximately 62,000 cu yd (47,000 m3), weighing 93,000 short tons (84,000,000 kg), for the Common, plus an additional 9,000 cu yd (6,900 m3), weighing 14,000 short tons (13,000,000 kg), for the adjoining portions of the Public Garden) prevented the work from being undertaken. This finally changed in the summer of 1895, when the required quantity of soil was made available as a result of the excavation of the Tremont Street Subway, and was used to regrade the Charles Street sides of both Boston Common and the Public Garden.[16]

 

A hundred people gathered on the Common in early 1965 to protest the Vietnam War. A second protest happened on October 15, 1969, this time with 100,000 people protesting.[17]

 

Today, the Common serves as a public park for all to use for formal or informal gatherings. Events such as concerts, protests, softball games, and ice skating (on Frog Pond) often take place in the park. Famous individuals such as Martin Luther King Jr. and Pope John Paul II have made speeches there. Judy Garland gave her largest concert ever (100,000+) on the Common, on August 31, 1967.

 

It was declared a U.S. National Historic Landmark in 1987.[1][3] The Boston Common is a public park managed by the Boston Park Department. A private advocacy group, the Friends of the Public Garden, provides additional funding for maintenance and special events.[18]

 

On October 21, 2006, the Common became the site of a new world record, when 30,128 Jack-o'-lanterns were lit simultaneously around the park at the Life is good Pumpkin Festival.[19] The previous record, held by Keene, New Hampshire since 2003, was 28,952.[20]

 

On August 27, 2007, two teenagers were shot on the Common. One of the bullets fired during the shooting struck the Massachusetts State House.[21] A strict curfew has since been enforced, which has been protested by the homeless population of Boston.[22][23]

 

Notable features[edit]

 

Boston Common in the fall of 2016.

Grounds[edit]

The Common forms the southern foot of Beacon Hill.

Boston Common is the southern end of Boston's Freedom Trail.

The softball fields lie in the southwest corner of the Common.

A grassy area forms the western part of the park and is most commonly used for the park's largest events. A parking garage lies under this part of the Common. A granite slab there commemorates Pope John Paul II's October 1979 visit to Boston.

In 1913 and 1986 prehistoric sites were discovered on the Common indicating Native American presence in the area as far back as 8,500 years ago.[24]

Since 1971 the Province of Nova Scotia has donated the annual Christmas Tree to the City of Boston as an enduring thank-you for the relief efforts of the Boston Red Cross and the Massachusetts Public Safety Committee following the Halifax Explosion of 1917. In recent years[when?] the tree has been located[where?] on the Common.

Structures[edit]

A monumental inscription at the corner of Park Street and Tremont Street reads:[citation needed]

In or about the year of our Lord One Thousand Six Hundred thirty and four the then present inhabitants of the Town of Boston of whom the Hon John Winthrop Esq Gov of the Colony was Chiefe did treat and agree with Mr William Blackstone for the purchase of his Estate and any Lands living within said neck of Land called Boston after which purchase the Town laid out a plan for a trayning field for which ever since and now is used for that purpose and for the feeding of cattell.

 

Plaque to the Great Elm tree, which had been adorned with lanterns to represent liberty, used as a point of fortification, and used for hangings.[25] It was destroyed in a storm in 1876.

The Robert Gould Shaw Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the Afro-American 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry stands at Beacon and Park Streets, the northeast corner of the Common, opposite the State House.

The Soldiers and Sailors Monument is a victory column on Flag Staff Hill in the Common, commemorating Civil War dead.

The Boston Massacre Memorial was dedicated November 14, 1888.

The Oneida Football Monument memorializes the Common as the site of the first organized football games in the United States, played by the Oneida Football Club in 1862.[26]

Frog Pond, a public ice-skating rink in winter months, is situated in the northern portion.

Brewer Fountain stands near the corner of Park and Tremont Streets, by Park Street Station. The 22-foot-tall (6.7 m), 15,000-pound (6,800 kg) bronze fountain, cast in Paris, was a gift to the city by Gardner Brewer. It began to function for the first time on June 3, 1868.

Boylston and Park Street stations, the first two subway stations in the Western Hemisphere, lie underneath the southern and eastern corners of the park, respectively; both stations have been in near-continuous operation since the opening of the first portion of the Tremont Street Subway (now part of the MBTA's Green Line) on 1 September 1897.

Parkman Bandstand, in the eastern part of the park, is used in musical and theatrical productions.

 

Beacon St. Mall, 19th century (photo by E.L. Allen)

  

Old Elm tree, 19th century

  

Plaque to the Great Elm tree

  

Memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the Massachusetts Fifty-Fourth Regiment

  

Soldiers and Sailors Monument

  

Boston Massacre Memorial

  

The Frog Pond

  

Parkman Bandstand

  

Massachusetts State House/Massachusetts Statehouse ("New" State House)

  

Boylston station

  

Boston Common

Neighboring structures[edit]

The Massachusetts State House stands across Beacon Street from the northern edge of the Common.

The Boston Public Garden, a more formal landscaped park, lies to the west of the Common across Charles Street (and was originally considered an extension of the Common).

The Masonic Grand Lodge of Massachusetts headquarters sits across from the southern corner of the Common at the intersection of Boylston and Tremont Streets.

Across from the southern corner of the Common, along Boylston and Tremont Streets, lies the campus of Emerson College.

Across from the Common, to the southeast, Suffolk University has a dormitory on Tremont Street.

Notable recurring events[edit]

Commonwealth Shakespeare Company's Shakespeare on the Common

Boston Lyric Opera's Outdoor Opera Series

Ancient Fishweir Project Installation Event

Massachusetts Cannabis Reform Coalition's Freedom Rally

Lighting of the Christmas tree gifted by Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Fireworks display on the evening of December 31 as part of Boston's First Night celebration

See also[edit]

Boston portal

Boston martyrs

Granary Burying Ground

King's Chapel burying ground

Boston Public Garden

List of National Historic Landmarks in Boston

National Register of Historic Places listings in northern Boston, Massachusetts

References[edit]

^ Jump up to: a b James H. Charleton (November 1985). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: Boston Common" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2009-06-22. and Accompanying photos: one aerial from 1972 and three from 1985 (1.43 MB)

Jump up ^ National Park Service (2007-01-23). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.

^ Jump up to: a b "Boston Common". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved 2008-04-16.

Jump up ^ "Boston Common". City of Boston. Retrieved 2011-11-09.

Jump up ^ "Place Names: Boston English". Adam Gaffin and by content posters. Retrieved 2011-11-09.

Jump up ^ "Boston Common". CelebrateBoston.com. 2006. Retrieved 2011-03-26.

Jump up ^ "Boston Street Scene (Boston Common)". The Walters Art Museum.

Jump up ^ Loewen, James (1999). Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong. New York: The New Press. p. 414. ISBN 0-9650031 -7-5.

Jump up ^ Boston Common & Public Gardens - Great Public Spaces | Project for Public Spaces. PPS. Retrieved on 2013-08-21.

Jump up ^ Lowen, James (1994) Planning the City Upon a Hill: Boston Since 1630University of Massachusetts Press (Boston) ISBN 0-87023-923-6, ISBN 978-0-87023-923-6, p. 53

Jump up ^ Rogers, Horatio, 2009. Mary Dyer of Rhode Island: The Quaker Martyr That Was Hanged on Boston pp.1–2. BiblioBazaar, LLC

Jump up ^ J. Besse, A Collection of the Sufferings of the People called Quakers, 1753, Vol. 2, pp. 203-05.

Jump up ^ ODNB article by John C. Shields, ‘Leddra, William (d. 1661)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, Sept 2004; online edn, May 2007 [1], accessed 16 Aug 2009

Jump up ^ Zinn, Howard. A People's History of the United States. New York: Perennial, 2003. p.51 ISBN 0-06-052837-0

Jump up ^ "A Brief History of the Union Club". The Union Club of Boston. Retrieved 4 October 2012.

Jump up ^ Most, Doug (2014). The Race Underground: Boston, New York, and the Incredible Rivalry that Built America's First Subway. St. Martin's Press. pp. 233–234. ISBN 978-1-250-06135-5.

Jump up ^ Zinn, Howard. p.486

Jump up ^ www.friendsofthepublicgarden.org

Jump up ^ "Life is good" site Archived March 9, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.

Jump up ^ Levenson, Michael; McCabe, Kathy (October 22, 2006). "A love in Common for pumpkins". The Boston Globe.

Jump up ^ Drake, John C. (August 28, 2007). "Shots on Common strike teens, State House". The Boston Globe.

Jump up ^ Abel, David (August 30, 2007). "Curfew targets crime on Common". The Boston Globe.

Jump up ^ "Homeless Protest Boston Common Curfew: Park Closed After 11 P.M.". TheBostonChannel.Com. 2007-08-30. Retrieved 2008-04-16.

Jump up ^ Research at Boston University. Bu.edu (2007-01-10). Retrieved on 2013-08-21.

Jump up ^ www.celebrateboston.com/sites/boston-common-great-elm.htm. Missing or empty |title= (help)

Jump up ^ Winthrop Saltonstall Scudder, An historical sketch of the Oneida football club of Boston, 1862-1865 (Boston, 1926)

 

Some Catholic girls taking a selfie in the Main Square, Krakow.

 

About a million people (no exaggeration.....) had descended on Krakow to celebrate World Youth Day with the Pope so it made it the perfect selfie opportunity. Not to mention the perfect opportunity for a photographer who likes to take photos of people taking selfies......

 

Click here to see my other Poland shots : www.flickr.com/photos/darrellg/albums/72157671110605611

 

From Wikipedia : "The main square (Polish: Rynek Główny) of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city. It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m2 (430,000 ft2) is one of the largest medieval town squares in Europe. The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life.

 

The main square is a square space surrounded by historic townhouses (kamienice) and churches. The center of the square is dominated by the Cloth Hall (Sukiennice), rebuilt in 1555 in the Renaissance style, topped by a beautiful attic or Polish parapet decorated with carved masks. On one side of the cloth hall is the Town Hall Tower (Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Adalbert and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument. Rising above the square are the Gothic towers of St. Mary's Basilica (Kościół Mariacki). Kraków Main Square does not have a town hall, because it has not survived to the present day."

 

My Website : Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : Photocrowd

 

© D.Godliman

Urbanists need to regain control. The traffic engineer and landscape architect have had their way with the civic realm of our cities and towns for too long. The public spaces of any master plan are in fact the most valuable aspect of the design. Care should be given toward their creation and they should not be turned over entirely to any one specialized discipline.

The conception of a great civic realm, anchored by wonderfully, local public spaces, should be the principle goal of any urban design. Beauty will last the ages. If we are to truly build resilient settlements their public spaces must endure for generations. We do not have the luxury to waste on failed endeavors. The founding, or renewal, of a public space is critical to the success of any urban place. The square gives a neighborhood its identity. With success in mind, Urbanists must utilize all the characteristics of a successful public space —particularly the required management and diverse funding that allow for them to endure. As the New Urbanists increasingly look to retrofit suburbia, a similar eye must be put upon the many lost, miss-used or forgotten spaces that exist within our built environment. All land must not be underutilized. Perhaps our society does not yet understand the benefits that non-traditional American public spaces provide? In other parts of the world, a “shared space” is a cultural foundation. They are the streets and plazas that allow city life to exist. Traffic engineers had no hand in the creation of Rome’s piazze. We must learn from these cultures, and as American’s understanding of public space evolves we should not be timid about introducing these ancient forms into our plans. Today no one is looking after the whole of the civic realm. Our professional culture has specialized out of existence the generalist. And it is the generalist that understands what is required to grow a beautiful public space. As Urbanists, we understand the whole system. As Urbanists, we can conduct the symphony required to produce authentic beauty throughout our civic realm.

“Today nobody is concerned with city planning as an art — only as a technical problem. When, as a result, the artistic effect in no way lives up to our expectations, we are left bewildered and helpless; nevertheless, in dealing with the next project it is again treated wholly from the technical point of view, as if it were the layout of a railroad in which artistic questions are not involved.” (Sitte, p.223) In 1889, Camillo Sitte published “City Planning According to Artistic Principles.” One hundred and twenty years later little has changed in the practice of city building. The value of artistically created space has still not found a voice in the modern world. Why?

Shaping the public spaces of our settlements to support an enduring way of life is essential to both the economic development of a place and its overall resiliency. For decades, the artistic expression of our public spaces has not been the driving force behind the projects that shape our built environments’ identities. Beauty, comfort and the higher ideals of a place must be resurrected as the organizing force for city builders. We are still trapped by the statistics of the engineer and dull line of the drafting ruler when it comes to how we create our built environment. A Living Urbanism requires a sophisticated civic realm.

Anatomy of our Civic Realm

The civic realm can actively be identified as our publicly celebrated structures. However, our libraries, churches and governmental building are only a small, but visible, piece of our civic realm. A mature civic realm can be conceived of as the entire system of public spaces both contained by these civic buildings and connecting them. Contrary to other classification systems, I would like to propose that the civic realm is made up of only two categories of public space. In the most complex of conditions Shared Space and Landscaped Space, supported by quality public and private buildings, can provide the full range of conditions required for a meaningful civic realm to exist.

 

A Shared Space can be characterized as a piazza, piazzetta, plaza and, most importantly, streets and thoroughfares. I find these spaces fall under the guideline that urbanism enjoys complexity. These are “mixed-use” spaces in true form. Surprising is that within the best urbanism these spaces make no special consideration for the car. Properly programmed, multi-modal and effectively scaled the street is the most abundant of all shared public spaces. Yet we dilute the street down to a traffic tool in all American conditions. Why? When there are so many precedents for how a street can support all modes of transport equally. Few, if any, engineers will stamp drawings for the construction of a true piazza, piazzetta or plaza effectively removing these timeless forms from the urbanist’s palette. Our struggles for reducing the width of streets has taken too long. The ability to develop a true piazza needs to be possible. We must resurrect Shared Space as a possible modern urban form.

Landscape Spaces exist to connect urban dwellers to nature and to support the emotional experience of the pedestrian. Landscape Spaces create the contemplative places within a village, town or city. They are formed by having a strong connection with nature. The quay running along the river Siene in Paris, the great lawn in New York’s Central Park and the tree lined promenades of Villa Borghese in Rome are all stunning examples of how a Landscape Space gives emotion and soul to a city. Care must be given toward balancing the scale, orientation and natural features of our greens, squares, gardens and parks to ensure they offer the urban dweller relief in any form they wish to find.

Physical Characteristics of Public Space

Is a boulevard really a successful public space if it does not provide a pleasing escape for the pedestrian? Is a small plaza really a successful public space if it does not allow for the cafe to swell in the evening filling ever available square foot with patrons? As we contort the forms of our civic realm to support the modern demands placed upon them by public process and the science of traffic “engineering” (Jacobs, p. 72) we lose the characteristic that allow these spaces to be the foundation for a vibrant and living urbanism.

“The design standards imposed by the highway engineering profession, for instance, are particularly damaging to community as they ensure the dominance of the motor vehicle over the pedestrian, even within the neighborhood. If I may say so, your profession [architects] could be of great help with this challenge of converting the planning and engineering professions, as surely you have noticed that the well-proportioned neighborhoods of the Georgian and Victorian era hold their value far better than the monocultural housing estates of the past 50 years.” (HRH Prince of Wales, 2009)

As Urbanists, we must take up the Prince’s challenge. By giving modern meaning to the characteristics of a quality public space we can allow a boulevard to be a boulevard and plaza to be a plaza. We should no longer support the hybrid, or false, forms being forced upon our citizens.

Balancing the form of a public space is essential. It is most successful when all three dimensions of the space, as well as the surface treatments and sculpture, are considered in concert. It is understood that the containment of a public space is critical. Establishing the constraints of the outdoor room is also linked to the width and length of a public space. As mentioned earlier, we struggle to create narrow streets. I would also like to propose that our squares, and if we could build them, plazas and piazze are much too large.

“In former times all the arrangements and building forms we have enumerated were joined naturally in a unified arrangement that enclosed that plaza. In contrast to this, one tries in modern times to lay the plaza open. What this implies should be clear form what has been said above. It is equivalent to destroying the old plazas. Wherever such a disastrous undertaking has been carried out, the spatial effect is lost forever.” (Sitte, p. 176)

Christopher Alexander has also developed several patterns which I find often over-looked in contemporary practice.

“Pattern 61 – Make a public square much smaller then you would at first imagine; usually no more than 45 to 60 feet across, never more than 70 feet across. This applies only to its width in the short direction. In the long direction it can certainly be longer.” (Alexander, p. 313)

“Pattern 123 – For public squares, courts, pedestrian streets, any place where crowds are drawn together, estimate the mean number of people in the place at any given moment (P), and make the area of the place between 150P and 300P square feet.” (Alexander, p. 598)

Do modern planners or landscape architects consider the population of a public space when considering its most effective size? It is time to reexamine the size and proportions of the public spaces we design and ensure that they are appropriate to the activities, surrounding architecture and number of users. Size does matter.

Layers exist within all great public spaces. Picture the Piazza del Campo. The image of Siene’s Palazzo Pubblico, with its great tower, might come to mind, or the comfortable slope of its fan shaped form. But, with further scrutiny one can begin to see the layers of this space more clearly. The cafés, with their deep sienna brown awnings, situated on the ground floors of the surrounding buildings establish the outside layer and give the piazza its essential active edge. Just as important as engaging uses at the ground level is the composition, slightly varying fenestration and harmonious cornice line of the surrounding buildings. The tower pierces the perceived ceiling of the piazza completing the required characteristic that a public space be engaging in all dimensions. The tower can quickly be established as this spaces center, but with more investigation one will find that the square in fact has many centers. The portico of the Palazzo, opposite the portico is the Fonte Gaia, typically the square as several vendors dotted along its inner edge, the ring road between the cafés for strolling the circumference of the space and the sloping red brick floor with its many groups of seated onlookers all provide a difference experience. The addition of each of these layers enriches the composition giving the public space more significance.

Significance for public space can mean many things. Great spaces possess significant gravity. Several blocks away one should be able to sense, as if it is pulling you in, the nearing public space. This energy emitted from a significant public space attracts more than just pedestrians. At times this can create a gradient of taller builds, more intense ground floor users and increase in the number of intersections and streets. This gravity can also give a neighborhood its identity. “I live just off Washington Square Park” not only uses the significance of the square to orient location, but demonstrates how the gravity of the public space imposes identity on the surrounding blocks as well. The gravity created between the constellations of public spaces present throughout a civic realm give additional vibrancy to the traffic that flows throughout the city. This pulse of mobility gives life to not only the centers of activity but the various arms connecting them.

There are additional spaces that surround and lead into the primary place. They are the foyers for publics space during large events, the quieter plaza filled with cafés just outside the busy market square or the commercial nodes just outside the gates of the public garden providing refreshments to the scene. A healthy civic realm has a constellation of iconic public spaces. Each of these individual spaces possesses a constellation of supporting space. They might provide relief during extreme conditions or give space for services to support the active edge of the square. A single public space is better when it is part of a series of spaces. This fractal relationship gives vibrancy and depth to a living urbanism.

 

Public spaces are living. They breathe, sleep, require maintenance and enjoy company. As urbanism ages it continues to grow, change and adapt to the conditions of the time. This is true of the public spaces within that urbanism as well. Over designed and ridged alignment to uses significantly hinder the successful aging of a public space. These spaces must possess a certain amount of flexibility. This is even true within the span of one year. The best public space can support its citizens throughout the year. There is no “session.” The life of the city should not halt in winter. Prague does not close its squares due to cold weather. The many groups, clubs and organizations that a loved public space establishes will further extend the life of these places. These groups will give guidance to the space and provide resources as it ages. Quality public spaces are living infrastructure.

 

Beauty is Essential

A timeless public space is beautiful. This perhaps is the essential characteristic. Beauty is of course in the eye of the beholder. However, on average the dull, rigid and sterile places that mid-century planners conceived of as beautiful public space have failed. Beauty to the masses, not to a small group of intellectual designers, is essential for a public space to be successful. This beauty ensures the long term enjoyment of a space is certain. Fashion changes too frequently. To let it guide the creation of public space is a mistake. Beautiful squares, plazas, parks and gardens are multigenerational investments. Their form must be timeless for the required investment to be worth its value to a society. Beauty is more likely to be loved, and loved public spaces are more likely to spawn the groups required to maintain and care for it as the life of urbanism surrounding it unfolds. A loved public space endures.

Cycle of Involvement

What does the civic realm really mean to the city? Inevitably cultures and societies evolve. The civic realm provides the platform for this evolution. The civic realm is both the glue that holds a society together and a mirror that allows it to see its failures. This question is not correct; the civic realm means different things to different people. The meanings are not important, but the fact that the civic realm is present in one’s life is. We are just now becoming aware of what the lack of a civic realm can do to a culture and a society.

The civic realm engages the memory. It provides a physical history of a place either through the preservation of its best historic structures or through the generational interaction and story telling that gives rise to the myths of a place. The public spaces of living urbanism should persist within one’s memory. The mind should hold on to their image long since created. The most literal representation of the civic realms memory is those monuments and memorials erected to celebrate our past and the people who made life possible. Either in the squares of Savannah or under Napoleon’s Arc de Triomphe the physical memory is real. It is these memories, provide in large part through the civic realm, that serve to give a place its soul.

One comes to respect both one’s place and oneself more in the presence of the past’s greatest accomplishments. This respect, carried by the citizens’ sense of a place, resists filth, counteracts vandalism and elevates the spirit of said place. Given respect, by way of the connections to previous accomplishments, a successful civic realm’s public spaces will be cherished.

The cycle of a person’s involvement with the public spaces of their civic realm will come to teach them how to care. It will give them pride for their locale and its continued success. Pride will lead to ownership. The city will become one’s own and in time this ownership brings one further comfort in its spaces – a comfort that makes the city a home. Through a populations life cycle of experience within a civic realm, many stories will be crafted which, over time, will enrich the memories of a living urbanism.

Stewardship

A market square is more then just the physical space of the market square. Public space is a platform for the life of a city to unfold. However, a play needs its actors, script and time of performance to bring an audience. Successful public spaces require users. The best of these places provide activities for their users. The smallest parking court can be elevated to a public space when planted with a fruit tree. The cycle of caring for the tree, picking its fruit, smelling its flowers and enjoying its shade can create public space out of the simplest of utility areas. The activities in larger public spaces are produced. There are stewards of the space that initiate the production of the activities required to seed the cycle of involvement that leads to the long term enjoyment of a vibrant civic realm.

 

Just as important as the physical characteristics of a space are the activities carried out within, surrounding or through it. We have discussed the importance of the edge activities. But, often these need to be support and enticed by the activities available in the space proper. Just as the civic realm is divided into shared and landscaped space, activities can be passive and active. There is a strong correlation between landscaped spaces and passive activities. However, a quiet piazzette, with several café tables can be the loveliest of places to rest. Fred Kent, president of Project for Public Spaces, states that the best of public spaces are programmed by “zealous nuts.” It is these groups of nuts that knit together a square or park to improve its gravity, give opportunity for the creation of memories, and fundamentally provide for the enjoyment of future generations in the space.

At the center of a large publics space’s groups must be a “Friends of Great Kennedy Plaza” or a “Central Park Conservancy.” These organizations manage, fund and govern the ongoing operations of the space. They ensure its characteristics remain in place or improve. It is unfortunate, but modern urbanism requires successful large public spaces to be run like businesses.

Did Rome require Friends of the Forum? What kept the “geomorphic” spaces of unplanned cities running? (Kostof, p.43) We currently have no living tradition for the stewardship of our public space. During the last century, Americans learned that the stewardship of our native landscapes was worth the effort. During this century, we will learn that the stewardship of our village, town and city public spaces will be worth the effort as well. We must learn from Olmsted’s dual understanding for both the natural importance of Yellowstone’s preservation for the country and the complex details that would lead to Central Park’s success for New York. Both are of equal importance. Both required stewardship.

Local Economy

It is yet to be seen what type of global economy will be left, but being the optimist it is likely that global markets will still exist. The interesting thing about being competitive in a global market has a lot to do with the strength of your local market. For cities to be competitive globally they will need to differentiate themselves locally. Leveraging the advantages of the local arts, culture, landscape and vernacular building tradition is the foundation for cultivating a unique place in a global market. And we learned that a beautiful civic realm supports all of these items.

A resilient civic realm sets up so many factors that encourage innovation. In time of recession, people take to the streets with market stalls and push carts. These local economies would not be possible without established public space. Random encounters can lead to innovative interaction. The streets, square, plazas and parks are the places for locals to interact and improve their craft or practice.

 

What significant arts movement has been cultivated and supported by a suburban location? Movements, the type that inspire generations, begin in the cafés and piazze of our cities. The physical space of a city should be painted. Its beauty should be sketched, photographed and act as a well spring of creativity for future movements. A resilient civic realm captures the creativity of the group. The arts are perhaps the most radical of economies, but their practice is essential to pollinating the garden of innovation required for local economies to be successful. Fundamentally, a movement, either business or cultural, needs to be inspired. A living urbanism’s civic realm must provide this inspiration.

Civic and cultural institutions further enhance a local economy. Good public space gives visibility to these institutions and provides the essential link between the “Res publica” and “res privata”. These institutions are not only captured in the physical form of a museum or cathedral. Conservation can begin with a discussion in the square. Romance can ignite with a stroll through the garden. Just as a public space can give identity to a neighborhood, a resilient civic realm can help establish an attractive local culture. The institution of a romantic city can be a powerful enabler of the local economy.

Local economies are even more fine grain. The arrangement of public space gives identity to a district. The power of a good space provides the name to a neighborhood. These names can endure long past the time of their original conception. The economic power of a great civic realm can be demonstrated in the suburban shopping center habit of adorning placeless destinations with names traditionally assigned to the best public spaces.

A healthy social interaction, one that supports local economies, takes place in the public spaces of a living urbanism — commerce, or trade, originated in public space. That tradition is still present. I witnessed a chance encounter between two businessmen aboard a San Francisco trolley. One man hopped on, struck up a conversation with the man seated next to him and the next thing I knew they were getting off at the next stop heading toward the coffee shop to discuss a possible new venture. This is just one example of how a comfortable civic realm, not to mention public transit surrounding such areas, can support economic innovation. And if you believe Jane Jacobs, it is this type of innovation that keeps places alive.

 

Foundation for a Resilient Place

As Urbanists, we are responsible for helping to craft the foundations for a resilient place. A living urbanism is the best example of such a place. As we’ve discussed the creation, stewardship and enjoyment of a beautiful civic realm can have a profound effect on the successful passing of time. Celebrations and ceremonies are conducted within their enclosure, demonstrations are held in times of unease and direction given in times of crisis. The public spaces of our settlements are critical to their long term sustainability. These spaces are the constant throughout the lives of the citizens. Great care must be given to their creation and renewal. A beautiful public space can offer both a joyful reminder of the past and inspiring insight to the future.

As urbanists, we must realize that complexity is resilient. Natural ecosystems enjoy complexity as an essential piece of their endurance. Can a complex collections of public space help a local economy support itself during recession? Will these same public spaces improve themselves during booms? Many options are always more enjoyable than fewer and it seems as if contemporary planners, and even new Urbanists, are limiting the complexity possible in our built environment. A city or town should have a diverse selection of public spaces, each giving different types of citizens enjoyment. The stimulation of an elegantly complex civic realm keeps a culture renewed.

A living urbanism begins with community and space. It is the act of shaping this space that gives life to a place. Pleasing public space is the insurance that greater things are possible in a place. The quality of the civic realm is completely related to the comfortable level of density that the private spaces of a village, town or city can support.

A sophisticated civic realm allows for a compact population to exist. This population in turn improves the entire civic realm. It is essential for our projects to push this correlation. Achieving greater density is a significant piece of the puzzle that allows for transit, cultural institutions, local economies and an active street life to exist. It is this interdependence that makes the understanding and implementation of great public spaces so essential to our mission. As urbanists, we possess the skills necessary to lead the coming age of urban stewardship. It is time Urbanists regained control of our civic realm.

Works Cited

 

“Camillo Sitte: The Birth of Modern City Planning: With a translation of the 1889 Austrian edition of his City Planning According to Artistic Principles”

“The City Shaped: Urban Patterns and Meanings Through History”

“Dark Age Ahead”

“A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction“

 

livingurbanism.wordpress.com/tag/camillo-sitte/

"The Country Club Plaza (often referred to as The Plaza) is an American upscale shopping district and residential neighborhood in Kansas City, Missouri.

 

It was the first shopping center in the world designed to accommodate shoppers arriving by automobile.[1] The 55-acre (223,000 m²) site is about four miles (6.44 km) south of downtown, between 45th and 51st streets to the north and south and between Broadway and Madison Street to the east and west. The Kansas state line is one mile (1.6 km) to the west. Established in 1922 by J. C. Nichols and designed architecturally after Seville, Spain, the Plaza comprises high-end retail establishments, restaurants, and entertainment venues, as well as offices.[2] The neighborhoods surrounding the Plaza consist of upscale apartment buildings and mansions, especially those of the Country Club District built along Ward Parkway on the Plaza's southern and southwestern side. The Country Club Plaza is named in the Project for Public Spaces' list 60 of the World's Great Places.

 

The basic design of the Country Club Plaza reflects classic European influences, especially those of Seville, Spain, yet it curiously does not include a traditional open plaza. There are more than 30 statues, murals, and tile mosaics on display in the area, as well as major architectural reproductions, such as a half-sized Giralda Tower of Seville (the tallest building in the Plaza). The Plaza also includes reproductions of San Francisco's Path of Gold streetlights. Other works of art celebrate the classics, nature, and historical American themes such as westward expansion, and a magnificent fountain featuring four horses rearing up on their hind legs, designed by Henri-Léon Gréber."

Wikipedia®

 

(I ALWAYS USE MY OWN PHOTOGRAPHS. I USE TEXTURES FROM MANY SOURCES).

Yes, a Tottenham bench that's been on my Flickr pages before. (Please scroll down.)

 

In the whole scheme of towns, cities and streets how important are benches and other places to sit? The late William H. Whyte (Holly to his colleagues) thought they were very important.

 

On 5 December 2017 the website of the Project for Public Spaces (in New York) had a blog headed: Still Waiting for a NIce Place to Sit.

Anyone interested in this and linked issues may like to read and follow this website. Below is a quotation from the blog.

 

The first step to evaluating the health and vibrancy of a space might be to sit down. That is, if you can.

   Today, more than forty-five years have passed since Holly Whyte issued a call for more and better seating in New York City in his essay, “Please, Just a Nice Place to Sit.”

   Written in 1972, the piece decried the failure of local designers and architects to provide comfortable and usable spaces. Noting features like sawtooth-edged rails which preclude comfortable sitting in public spaces throughout the city, Whyte’s call to action showed that the best and most well-loved spaces around the city were those that were the most “sit-able.”

   Whyte took readers on a journey around the benches and ledges of the city, examining places like the steps of the Metropolitan Museum of Art or the New York Public Library as powerful places for sitting and socializing. The places that were the most sitting-friendly were the most sociable; and the places that were the most sociable were the safest.

   Holly Whyte implored the city to change zoning rules to encourage the creation of more sitting space, calling for 'as many feet of sitting space as there are feet in the outer dimensions of the property.'

   By becoming a “front-row seat” to the city, with inviting and engaging spaces for people to meet or watch day-to-day life unfold, plazas and other spaces can take advantage of the activity that tends to cluster around their entrances and on street corners.

   A space can improve through the seemingly simple assurance that ledges can actually fit the behinds of the people that need to sit, and that there are amenities like food, trees, and water features nearby to both shelter and entertain.

   The way people sit determines the way they interact; the availability of seating draws people to a space, and it can be the force that brings strangers together to talk.".

 

§ The blog has some links to articles and video clips by Whyte and his colleagues. Here's one where Holly Whyte talks about:

"the wonderful invention of the moveable chair".

§ My album of photos and a few comments about benches.

§ Link to download: Benches for everyone. Solitude in public, sociability for free. Research by the Young Foundation

The Country Club Plaza (often referred to as The Plaza) is an upscale shopping district and residential neighborhood in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. It was the first shopping center in the world designed to accommodate shoppers arriving by automobile. The 55 acre (223,000 m²) site is about four miles (6.44 km) south of downtown, between 45th and 51st streets to the north and south and between Broadway and Madison Street to the east and west. The Kansas state line is one mile (1.6 km) to the west.

 

Established in 1923 by J. C. Nichols and designed architecturally after Seville, Spain, the Plaza comprises high-end retail establishments, restaurants, and entertainment venues, as well as offices. The neighborhoods surrounding the Plaza consist of apartment buildings and upscale houses, especially those of the Country Club District built along Ward Parkway on the Plaza's southern and southwestern side. The Country Club Plaza is named in the Project for Public Spaces' list 60 of the World's Great Places. (Wikipedia)

Slideshow of Greenacre Park Images:

www.flickr.com/photos/reston2020/sets/72157624435684895/s...

  

From Project for Public Spaces website:

One of New York City's famed "vest pocket-parks," providing an emerald-green sanctuary for east-side residents and workers.

 

Why It Works: Like its sister vest-pocket park, Paley Park, Greenacre Park has the basic ingredients of a good public space:

 

1. It is located directly on the street so that people are attracted to look and to go in.

2. There is good, reasonably priced food.

3. There are movable chairs and tables so people can be comfortable and can have some control over where they sit.

4. A waterfall provides a focal point and a dramatic reason to visit the park and its noise creates a sense of quiet and privacy.

5. There is shade in the summer from the trees yet their thin structure allows a beautiful dappled light to pass through.

6. Overhead heat lamps on the upper level heat the park in cool weather.

 

GreenAcre Park functions as a living room for the community and the "regulars: who use it make a significant contribution to the safety of the park.

 

History & Background

 

With a 25-foot-high waterfall cascading over the rear wall, skillfully landscaped trees and plantings, an outdoor cafe, and shady arbors, the park was designed to make the most of its small size. Built in 1971 by the Greenacre Foundation, (founded two years earlier by Mrs. Jean Mauze, the former Abby Rockefeller) the park was developed to provide New Yorkers with "some moments of serenity in this busy world." The park's award-winning designs were created by Hideo Sasaki, former chairman of Harvard's Landscape Architecture Department, and Harmon Goldstone, who served as consultant. Greenacre park is heavily used, but not enough to make it feel busy.

 

The Greenacre Foundation, which owns and masterfully maintains the park, also operates a reference center at 457 Madison Avenue (51st Street) in conjunction with The Municipal Arts Society.

 

Greenacre Park is on PPS's list of the best parks in the world.

www.pps.org/great_public_spaces/one?public_place_id=70

This was the Town Hall for the former Metropolitan borough of Finsbury. It became the Registry and Records Office of the London Borough of Islington. Since 2005 it has been owned and was refurbished by The Urdang Academy a performing arts school.

 

(Photo shows the rear of the building in Garnault Place, London ECI.)

 

══════════════════════════════════

 

Local Government reorganisation poses a problem. What happens to the many striking and sometimes lovely old buildings which are - or once were - Town Halls, and other landmarks of civic pride?

 

Problems multiply as maintenance costs rise - especially when original features are 'Listed' and must be retained and repaired to a high standard. The grand stairways, halls and corridors must be made fully accessible for disabled people. And now a priority is sustainability - which usually means retrofitting buildings with 'green' features.

 

Islington faced the same problem as local councils across the country.

 

Ironically, at the same time as these pressures lead to the sale of some civic landmarks, architects and planners are championing ideas of 'place-making'.

 

The same phrase is sometimes used by politicians and bureaucrats, though they often mouth the words without knowing the song; dumbing it down into a " fashionable brand ".

 

___________________________

 

Links

 

§ Click here for a photo by Mahlum, of the main entrance in Rosebery Avenue.

§ The Urdang Academy website.

§ On Urdang Academy's website (October 2012) a brief history of the former Town Hall with photos.

§ Project for Public Spaces (PPS) New York. "What is Placemaking?"

§ PPS website homepage

§ English Heritage website page about Listed buildings.

§ Detail of the main entrance - photo in 2008 by Nico Hogg.

§ Finsbury Town Hall photos by Fin Fahey.

§ Finsbury Town Hall photos by MisterPeter.

§ During World War II, a 'Reporting Control Centre' was excavated below Finsbury Town Hall.

Read more on the website Subterranea Britannica.

§ Website for the Clerkenwell and City Trail.

 

-§- Links checked and updated 22 August 2012.

+§+ Know of an interesting and useful new link?

― Please let me know.

   

We were thrilled when we discovered Greenacre Park was directly across the street from The Pod Hotel.

 

Photo: Terri Phillips, Reston

 

The park opens at 8am during the week, and 9am on weekends.

 

From Project for Public Spaces website:

One of New York City's famed "vest pocket-parks," providing an emerald-green sanctuary for east-side residents and workers.

 

Why It Works: Like its sister vest-pocket park, Paley Park, Greenacre Park has the basic ingredients of a good public space:

 

1. It is located directly on the street so that people are attracted to look and to go in.

2. There is good, reasonably priced food.

3. There are movable chairs and tables so people can be comfortable and can have some control over where they sit.

4. A waterfall provides a focal point and a dramatic reason to visit the park and its noise creates a sense of quiet and privacy.

5. There is shade in the summer from the trees yet their thin structure allows a beautiful dappled light to pass through.

6. Overhead heat lamps on the upper level heat the park in cool weather.

 

GreenAcre Park functions as a living room for the community and the "regulars: who use it make a significant contribution to the safety of the park.

 

History & Background

 

With a 25-foot-high waterfall cascading over the rear wall, skillfully landscaped trees and plantings, an outdoor cafe, and shady arbors, the park was designed to make the most of its small size. Built in 1971 by the Greenacre Foundation, (founded two years earlier by Mrs. Jean Mauze, the former Abby Rockefeller) the park was developed to provide New Yorkers with "some moments of serenity in this busy world." The park's award-winning designs were created by Hideo Sasaki, former chairman of Harvard's Landscape Architecture Department, and Harmon Goldstone, who served as consultant. Greenacre park is heavily used, but not enough to make it feel busy.

 

The Greenacre Foundation, which owns and masterfully maintains the park, also operates a reference center at 457 Madison Avenue (51st Street) in conjunction with The Municipal Arts Society.

 

Greenacre Park is on PPS's list of the best parks in the world.

www.pps.org/great_public_spaces/one?public_place_id=70

From Project for Public Spaces website:

One of New York City's famed "vest pocket-parks," providing an emerald-green sanctuary for east-side residents and workers.

 

Why It Works: Like its sister vest-pocket park, Paley Park, Greenacre Park has the basic ingredients of a good public space:

 

1. It is located directly on the street so that people are attracted to look and to go in.

2. There is good, reasonably priced food.

3. There are movable chairs and tables so people can be comfortable and can have some control over where they sit.

4. A waterfall provides a focal point and a dramatic reason to visit the park and its noise creates a sense of quiet and privacy.

5. There is shade in the summer from the trees yet their thin structure allows a beautiful dappled light to pass through.

6. Overhead heat lamps on the upper level heat the park in cool weather.

 

GreenAcre Park functions as a living room for the community and the "regulars: who use it make a significant contribution to the safety of the park.

 

History & Background

 

With a 25-foot-high waterfall cascading over the rear wall, skillfully landscaped trees and plantings, an outdoor cafe, and shady arbors, the park was designed to make the most of its small size. Built in 1971 by the Greenacre Foundation, (founded two years earlier by Mrs. Jean Mauze, the former Abby Rockefeller) the park was developed to provide New Yorkers with "some moments of serenity in this busy world." The park's award-winning designs were created by Hideo Sasaki, former chairman of Harvard's Landscape Architecture Department, and Harmon Goldstone, who served as consultant. Greenacre park is heavily used, but not enough to make it feel busy.

 

The Greenacre Foundation, which owns and masterfully maintains the park, also operates a reference center at 457 Madison Avenue (51st Street) in conjunction with The Municipal Arts Society.

 

Greenacre Park is on PPS's list of the best parks in the world.

www.pps.org/great_public_spaces/one?public_place_id=70

The Wild Boar statue at Country Club Plaza was created in 1922 by developer Jesse Clyde (J.C.) Nichols.

 

This is one of three early reproductions of the Wild Boar of Florence (sculptor Benelli in 1857), by the Marinelli Studios of Florence.

 

The Country Club Plaza (often referred to as The Plaza) is an upscale shopping district and residential neighborhood in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. It was the first shopping center in the world designed to accommodate shoppers arriving by automobile. The 55 acre (223,000 m²) site is about four miles (6.44 km) south of downtown, between 45th and 51st streets to the north and south and between Broadway and Madison Street to the east and west. The Kansas state line is one mile (1.6 km) to the west.

 

Established in 1923 by J. C. Nichols and designed architecturally after Seville, Spain, the Plaza comprises high-end retail establishments, restaurants, and entertainment venues, as well as offices. The neighborhoods surrounding the Plaza consist of apartment buildings and upscale houses, especially those of the Country Club District built along Ward Parkway on the Plaza's southern and southwestern side. The Country Club Plaza is named in the Project for Public Spaces' list 60 of the World's Great Places. (Wikipedia)

Slideshow of images of Greenacre Park + 1 short video of waterfall:

www.flickr.com/photos/reston2020/sets/72157624435684895/s...

 

ABOUT GREENACRE PARK

From Project for Public Spaces website:

One of New York City's famed "vest pocket-parks," providing an emerald-green sanctuary for east-side residents and workers.

 

Why It Works: Like its sister vest-pocket park, Paley Park, Greenacre Park has the basic ingredients of a good public space:

 

1. It is located directly on the street so that people are attracted to look and to go in.

2. There is good, reasonably priced food.

3. There are movable chairs and tables so people can be comfortable and can have some control over where they sit.

4. A waterfall provides a focal point and a dramatic reason to visit the park and its noise creates a sense of quiet and privacy.

5. There is shade in the summer from the trees yet their thin structure allows a beautiful dappled light to pass through.

6. Overhead heat lamps on the upper level heat the park in cool weather.

 

GreenAcre Park functions as a living room for the community and the "regulars: who use it make a significant contribution to the safety of the park.

 

History & Background

 

With a 25-foot-high waterfall cascading over the rear wall, skillfully landscaped trees and plantings, an outdoor cafe, and shady arbors, the park was designed to make the most of its small size. Built in 1971 by the Greenacre Foundation, (founded two years earlier by Mrs. Jean Mauze, the former Abby Rockefeller) the park was developed to provide New Yorkers with "some moments of serenity in this busy world." The park's award-winning designs were created by Hideo Sasaki, former chairman of Harvard's Landscape Architecture Department, and Harmon Goldstone, who served as consultant. Greenacre park is heavily used, but not enough to make it feel busy.

 

The Greenacre Foundation, which owns and masterfully maintains the park, also operates a reference center at 457 Madison Avenue (51st Street) in conjunction with The Municipal Arts Society.

 

Greenacre Park is on PPS's list of the best parks in the world.

www.pps.org/great_public_spaces/one?public_place_id=70

ABOUT GREENACRE PARK

From Project for Public Spaces website:

One of New York City's famed "vest pocket-parks," providing an emerald-green sanctuary for east-side residents and workers.

 

Why It Works: Like its sister vest-pocket park, Paley Park, Greenacre Park has the basic ingredients of a good public space:

 

1. It is located directly on the street so that people are attracted to look and to go in.

2. There is good, reasonably priced food.

3. There are movable chairs and tables so people can be comfortable and can have some control over where they sit.

4. A waterfall provides a focal point and a dramatic reason to visit the park and its noise creates a sense of quiet and privacy.

5. There is shade in the summer from the trees yet their thin structure allows a beautiful dappled light to pass through.

6. Overhead heat lamps on the upper level heat the park in cool weather.

 

GreenAcre Park functions as a living room for the community and the "regulars: who use it make a significant contribution to the safety of the park.

 

History & Background

 

With a 25-foot-high waterfall cascading over the rear wall, skillfully landscaped trees and plantings, an outdoor cafe, and shady arbors, the park was designed to make the most of its small size. Built in 1971 by the Greenacre Foundation, (founded two years earlier by Mrs. Jean Mauze, the former Abby Rockefeller) the park was developed to provide New Yorkers with "some moments of serenity in this busy world." The park's award-winning designs were created by Hideo Sasaki, former chairman of Harvard's Landscape Architecture Department, and Harmon Goldstone, who served as consultant. Greenacre park is heavily used, but not enough to make it feel busy.

 

The Greenacre Foundation, which owns and masterfully maintains the park, also operates a reference center at 457 Madison Avenue (51st Street) in conjunction with The Municipal Arts Society.

 

Greenacre Park is on PPS's list of the best parks in the world.

www.pps.org/great_public_spaces/one?public_place_id=70

 

Real Time Flight Tracking from FlightView

 

Virgin Atlantic VS045 - 15 Oct 2009 - London (LHR) to New York (JFK)

London, UK (Heathrow) (LHR) - 2:00 PM, Oct 15

New York, NY (JFK) - 4:40 PM, Oct 15

Boeing 747-400

540 mph . 38000 feet

New York weather 6°C, light rain

 

New York City Transit | System Maps | Do Stuff Early, Wander and Relax rest of day :-)

 

Circle Line - circumnavigate Manhattan Island - Go early in the day.

Pier 83, West 42nd Street (at 12th Avenue) New York, NY 10036.

 

Empire State Building - 86th/102nd Floor Observation Deck (2 prices)

350 Fifth Avenue, (between 33rd/34th Streets), New York, NY 10118

Opening Times: Monday - Sunday: 08:00am - 02:00 am. - Visit Early Morning!!

 

Walking New York City | Manhattan Sightseeing Map | I've used the Manhattan Bus Map (pdf) and the New York City Visitors Guide and Map mostly.

 

Rockefeller Centre - Fifth Avenue at 50th Street

 

Grand Central Terminal - Park Avenue at 42nd Street

 

The View (revolving) Restaurant - 1535 Broadway, New York, NY 10036 - Maybe try Wednesday - 4:00pm-12am | New York Marriott Marquis

 

Museums and Galleries (especially if it's raining).

I think most museums and galleries charge, around $18.

 

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue (82nd St) New York, NY 10028-0198

Fri, Sat 10:00–8:15 | Sun, Tues–Thurs 10:00–4:30 | CLOSED : Monday

The Met has sculptures on The Roof, and a view. Café okay.

 

Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue (89th St) New York, NY 10128-0173

Sun-Wed: 10:00–5:45pm | Fri: 10:00–5:45pm | Sat: 10:00–7:45pm | CLOSED : Thursday

Walk down from the top.

 

Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), 11 West 53rd Street (between 5th/6th Avenues), NY

Sat– Mon, Wed-Thur: 10:30 – 5:30pm | Fri: 10:30 – 8:00pm | CLOSED : Tuesday

 

Whitney Museum of American Art

945 Madison Avenue at 75th Street, New York, NY 10021

Wed–Thurs: 11–6 pm, Fri: 1–9 pm (6–9 pm pay-what-you-wish), Sat–Sun: 11–6 pm, CLOSED: Monday & Tuesday

 

Photo Stores

Adorama Store, 42 West 18th Street, New York City, NY 1001

 

B&H Photostore, 420 9th Ave, NY New York 10001 (near Penn Station).

 

Calumet., 22 W. 22nd Street, New York, NY 10010

 

J & R, 34 Park Row, New York, NY 10038 (across from City Hall Park)

 

Ken Rockwell about Canon S90

 

Bryant Park ['Needle Park'] (wiki), see Project for Public Spaces

 

ABOUT GREENACRE PARK

The Greenacre lot is 100 by 63.6 feet. It is divided into three levels, one level being a raised terrace on the west, a second sunken at the back, and the third, or main one, a few feet above the sidewalk. The walls are of granite with the east wall in blocks given a rockface ashlar. The trees are honey locust, Gleditsia triacanthus; the shrubs are chiefly rhododendron to be found on the lower terrace. In addition, shrubs and flowers are set out in tubs according to season.

 

The chief feature of the park is a 25-foot high waterfall at the rear. The splashing of water is very much part of the park. Not to be overlooked is the convenient snackbar.

 

Greenacre Park, opened in 1971, is the work of Hideo Sasaki of Sasaki, Dawson, De May Associates with Harmon Goldstone, consultant.

 

From Project for Public Spaces website:

One of New York City's famed "vest pocket-parks," providing an emerald-green sanctuary for east-side residents and workers.

 

Why It Works: Like its sister vest-pocket park, Paley Park, Greenacre Park has the basic ingredients of a good public space:

 

1. It is located directly on the street so that people are attracted to look and to go in.

2. There is good, reasonably priced food.

3. There are movable chairs and tables so people can be comfortable and can have some control over where they sit.

4. A waterfall provides a focal point and a dramatic reason to visit the park and its noise creates a sense of quiet and privacy.

5. There is shade in the summer from the trees yet their thin structure allows a beautiful dappled light to pass through.

6. Overhead heat lamps on the upper level heat the park in cool weather.

 

GreenAcre Park functions as a living room for the community and the "regulars: who use it make a significant contribution to the safety of the park.

 

History & Background

 

With a 25-foot-high waterfall cascading over the rear wall, skillfully landscaped trees and plantings, an outdoor cafe, and shady arbors, the park was designed to make the most of its small size. Built in 1971 by the Greenacre Foundation, (founded two years earlier by Mrs. Jean Mauze, the former Abby Rockefeller) the park was developed to provide New Yorkers with "some moments of serenity in this busy world." The park's award-winning designs were created by Hideo Sasaki, former chairman of Harvard's Landscape Architecture Department, and Harmon Goldstone, who served as consultant. Greenacre park is heavily used, but not enough to make it feel busy.

 

The Greenacre Foundation, which owns and masterfully maintains the park, also operates a reference center at 457 Madison Avenue (51st Street) in conjunction with The Municipal Arts Society.

 

Greenacre Park is on PPS's list of the best parks in the world.

www.pps.org/great_public_spaces/one?public_place_id=70

In anticipation of Governor Snyder’s Special Message on Transportation and Infrastructure in October, the Michigan Municipal League and Let's Save Michigan hosted Michigan’s Transportation Vision: A Twitter Talk (http://www.mml.org/newsroom/twitter-transit/index.html) Tuesday, Sept. 13 at the League's Lansing office. Read more (http://www.mml.org/resources/21c3/post/2011/09/13/Michigan-Transit-Twitter-Talk-Big-Success3b-Organizations-Come-Together-To-Discuss-Future-of-Michigan-Transportation.aspx). Five transportation experts participated in the event - Robert Puentes of the Brookings Institution, Dan Gilmartin, Executive Director & CEO of the Michigan Municipal League, Rich Studley, President & CEO of the Michigan Chamber of Commerce, Chris Kolb, Executive Director of the Michigan Environmental Council and Rory Neuner, Project Coordinator for Transportation for Michigan. Puentes kicked of the discussion by providing a national perspective on the challenges Michigan faces, and suggested some potential solutions. Puentes noted that over 20,000 Michigan residents live without a vehicle and without access to public transportation. He said it needs to be easier for low income residents to get to their jobs, and the challenge is to link these individuals up with transit and job opportunities. Also as part of his discussion, Puentes said that while the amount of money Michigan spends on transportation is significant, it is not enough. Puentes also called for smarter spending. Also attending were State Rep. Doug Geiss, D-Taylor; and State Rep. Rick Olson, R-Saline; and other state officials.People and organizations (http://www.mml.org/resources/21c3/post/2011/09/13/Transit-Twitter-Talk-Generates-Constant-Conversation.aspx) across the state participated in the event on Twitter via their computers and smartphones. Some of the organizations tweeting and retweeting about the event using the Twitter hashtag #mitransvision included the Project for Public Spaces (an international nonprofit); Transport 4 America, a nationwide coalition focused on creating a national transportation program for the 21st century; Rustwire; Friends of Transit; and League of Michigan Bicyclists. Learn more (http://www.mml.org/resources/21c3/post/2011/09/13/Twitter-Talk-on-Transportation-Helps-Define-Communicate-Vision-for-Michigans-Future.aspx) about the event. Read a Sustainable Cities Collective blog (http://sustainablecitiescollective.com/thecityfix/29171/tweeting-new-transportation-vision-michigan) about the event. Interesting discussion and comments came from all the panelists, on a variety of transit-related topics, such as making sure public transit actually connects people to their jobs, and how safety and efficiency must be cornerstones to any successful transportation system. Read more about the Michigan's Transportation Vision: A Twitter Talk on Twitter @letsavemich and @mmleague and the hashtag #mitransvision and here on this website (http://www.mml.org/newsroom/twitter-transit/index.html). For more about the League and what we do go to mml.org. For more about Let's Save Michigan go to letssavemichigan.com.

Slideshow of Greenacre Park Images:

www.flickr.com/photos/reston2020/sets/72157624435684895/s...

 

Photo: Terri Phillips, Reston

 

From Project for Public Spaces website:

One of New York City's famed "vest pocket-parks," providing an emerald-green sanctuary for east-side residents and workers.

 

Why It Works: Like its sister vest-pocket park, Paley Park, Greenacre Park has the basic ingredients of a good public space:

 

1. It is located directly on the street so that people are attracted to look and to go in.

2. There is good, reasonably priced food.

3. There are movable chairs and tables so people can be comfortable and can have some control over where they sit.

4. A waterfall provides a focal point and a dramatic reason to visit the park and its noise creates a sense of quiet and privacy.

5. There is shade in the summer from the trees yet their thin structure allows a beautiful dappled light to pass through.

6. Overhead heat lamps on the upper level heat the park in cool weather.

 

GreenAcre Park functions as a living room for the community and the "regulars: who use it make a significant contribution to the safety of the park.

 

History & Background

 

With a 25-foot-high waterfall cascading over the rear wall, skillfully landscaped trees and plantings, an outdoor cafe, and shady arbors, the park was designed to make the most of its small size. Built in 1971 by the Greenacre Foundation, (founded two years earlier by Mrs. Jean Mauze, the former Abby Rockefeller) the park was developed to provide New Yorkers with "some moments of serenity in this busy world." The park's award-winning designs were created by Hideo Sasaki, former chairman of Harvard's Landscape Architecture Department, and Harmon Goldstone, who served as consultant. Greenacre park is heavily used, but not enough to make it feel busy.

 

The Greenacre Foundation, which owns and masterfully maintains the park, also operates a reference center at 457 Madison Avenue (51st Street) in conjunction with The Municipal Arts Society.

 

Greenacre Park is on PPS's list of the best parks in the world.

www.pps.org/great_public_spaces/one?public_place_id=70

An elegant buildings of the Rynek Square in Krakow, Poland.

 

This is the last square format recently created when looking for photos to upload to my Instagram account. Having had my Instagram account for about two years now I'm running out of square format shots to upload.

 

I know they don't need to be square any longer but as a fan of that format I decided i would stick to their original limitation as it would at least mean it would be different to my other social media 'outlets'. Starting to wonder how long I keep that up or even whether it's advisable.......

 

You can find my Instagram account here : www.instagram.com/dgphotos.co.uk/

 

From Wikipedia : "The main square (Polish: Rynek Główny) of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city. It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m2 (430,000 ft2) is one of the largest medieval town squares in Europe. The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life."

 

Click here to see more of my photos from Poland : www.flickr.com/photos/darrellg/albums/72157671110605611

 

My Website : Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : Photocrowd

 

© D.Godliman

Granville Island

 

Vancouver, BC

2010.07.18

  

***

Granville Island is a peninsula and shopping district in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It is located in False Creek directly across from Downtown Vancouver's peninsula, under the south end of the Granville Street Bridge.

 

Granville Island was once an industrial manufacturing area, but is now a major tourist destination, providing amenities such as a public market, a large marina, a hotel, the Emily Carr University of Art and Design (named in honour of the artist), Arts Umbrella, False Creek Community Centre, various theatres including the Arts Club Theatre Company and Carousel Theatre, and variety of shopping areas. There are two industrial areas remaining from the Island's heyday: a machine shop and cement plant. The island is very popular with tourists and locals alike.

 

Since its redevelopment in the 1970s, Granville Island has maintained a healthy community of craft studios, including: a Glassblowing studio, two Co-op Printmaking studios, a Fine Art Print Studio, a Luthier, a master saké maker, various Jewellers, the B.C. Potter's Guild Gallery, The Crafthouse Gallery, The Circle Craft shop, art galleries, boatbuilders, a Wood Co-op Shop, Woodworkers studios and so on. A weekly Farmer's Market has been ongoing since the early 1990's - this was the first contemporary Farmer's Market in Vancouver.

 

Granville Island Brewing Co. is also the name of a beer company which originated on Granville Island in 1984, but whose main base of operations was moved to Kelowna, British Columbia some time later. In 2009 it was purchased by Molson's Brewery and continues to brew small batches of its varieties at the original site, and offers beer-tasting and tours of their brewing facilities.

 

In 2004, Project for Public Spaces named Granville Island "One of the World's Great Places".

 

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Granville_Island

The main square in Krakow presented as a stitch of 2 photos.

 

This tour to Cracow was sponsed by the Boutique Hotel: Cracowdays.com

 

From the net

The main square of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city.

 

It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m² (430,000 ft²) is the largest medieval town square in Europe.

 

The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life.

The main square is a rectangular space surrounded by historic townhouses (kamienice), palaces and churches.

 

The center of the square is dominated by the Cloth Hall (Sukiennice), rebuilt in 1555 in the Renaissance style, topped by a beautiful attic or Polish parapet decorated with carved masks.

 

On one side of the cloth hall is the Town Hall Tower (Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Adalbert and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument. Rising above the square are the Gothic towers of St. Mary's Basilica (Kościół Mariacki).

Stone Arch Footbridge near the entrance to Stanley Park, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Additional Bridge Photos and a Bridge Blog at www.Bridgepix.com.

 

Stanley Park is a 404.9 hectare (1,000 acre) urban park bordering downtown Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It is the largest city-owned park in Canada and the third largest in North America. The park attracts an estimated eight million visitors every year, including locals and tourists, who come for its recreational facilities and its natural attributes. An 8.8 kilometre (5.5 mile) seawall path circles the park, which is used by 2.5 million pedestrians, cyclists, and inline skaters every year. Much of the park remains forested with an estimated half million trees that can be as tall as 76 metres (250 feet) and hundreds of years old. There are approximately 200 km (125 miles) of trails and roads in the park, which are patrolled by the Vancouver Police Department's mounted squad. The Project for Public Spaces has ranked Stanley Park as the sixteenth best park in the world and sixth best in North America. (Wikipedia)

The Country Club Plaza (often called The Plaza) is a privately owned American shopping center in the Country Club District of Kansas City, Missouri.

 

The center consists of 18 separate buildings representing 804,000 square feet of retail space and 468,000 square feet of office space.[1] The standalone buildings are built in a distinctive Seville Spain theme and are on different blocks mostly west of Main Street and mostly north of Brush Creek and blends into the Country Club neighborhood around it and the area is often simply called the "Plaza."

 

It was the first shopping center in the world designed to accommodate shoppers arriving by automobile.[2] The 55-acre (223,000 m²) site is about four miles (6.44 km) south of downtown, between 45th and 51st streets to the north and south and between Broadway and Madison Street to the east and west. The Kansas state line is one mile (1.6 km) to the west. Established in 1922 by J. C. Nichols and designed architecturally after Seville, Spain, the Plaza comprises high-end retail establishments, restaurants, and entertainment venues, as well as offices.[3] The neighborhoods surrounding the Plaza consist of upscale apartment buildings and mansions, especially those of the Country Club District built along Ward Parkway on the Plaza's southern and southwestern side. The Country Club Plaza is named in the Project for Public Spaces' list 60 of the World's Great Places.

From Wikipedia

The Seattle Central Library was designed by Rem Koolhaas

 

“The opinion of architectural critics and the general public has been mixed; many like the new library but are less fond of its unusual design. Paul Goldberger, writing in The New Yorker, declared the Seattle Central Library "the most important new library to be built in a generation, and the most exhilarating." The American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) of Washington awarded the Library its Platinum Award for innovation and engineering in its "structural solutions".

 

“Recently Lawrence Cheek, the architecture critic for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, reconsidered his earlier praise. Cheek revisited the building in 2007 and found it "confusing, impersonal, uncomfortable, oppressive" on the whole, with various features "decidedly unpleasant," "relentlessly monotonous," "badly designed and cheesily detailed," "profoundly dreary and depressing," and "cheaply finished or dysfunctional," concluding that his earlier praise for the building was a "mistake."[4]

 

”The library was also roundly condemned by the Project for Public Spaces, which noted "if the library were a true 'community hub,' its most active areas would connect directly to the street, spinning off activity in every direction. That is where Koolhaas's library, sealed away from the sidewalks and streets around it, fails completely." It went on to note "critics have cast it as a masterpiece of public space design. As if blinded by the architect's knack for flash and publicity, they cannot locate, or perhaps refuse to acknowledge, the faults in his creation."

 

“On the other hand, usage of the building is more than double the predicted volume.[8] In the library's first year, 2.3 million individuals came to visit the library, roughly 30% were out-of-town. The library was also found to have generated $16 million in new economic activity for its surrounding area during this period.”

 

- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_Central_Library

 

I thought it was delightful!

okay, so i finally took some time and found out the name of this park....it's Paley Park!

 

Paley Park is located @ 53rd Street between Madison and Fifth Avenues. It's a private owned public park by the William S. Paley Foundation.

 

Stanley Park is a 404.9 hectare (1,001 acre) urban park bordering downtown Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It was opened in 1888 by David Oppenheimer in the name of Lord Stanley of Preston, the Governor-General of Canada.

It is more than 10% larger than New York City's Central Park and almost half the size of London's Richmond Park. The park attracts an estimated eight million visitors every year, including locals and tourists, who come for its recreational facilities and its natural attributes. An 8.8 kilometres (5.5 mi) seawall path circles the park, which is used by 2.5 million pedestrians, cyclists, and inline skaters every year.[4] Much of the park remains forested with an estimated half million trees that can be as tall as 76 metres (249 ft) and hundreds of years old. There are approximately 200 kilometres (120 mi) of trails and roads in the park, which are patrolled by the Vancouver Police Department's equine mounted squad. The Project for Public Spaces has ranked Stanley Park as the sixteenth best park in the world and sixth best in North America.

Granville Island is a peninsula and shopping district in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It is located in False Creek directly across from Downtown Vancouver's peninsula, under the south end of the Granville Street Bridge.

 

The peninsula was once an industrial manufacturing area, but today it is now a major tourist destination and working neighbourhood. In 2004, Project for Public Spaces named Granville Island "One of the World's Great Places"

 

View on Black

Stanley Park is a 404.9 hectare (1,001 acre) urban park bordering downtown Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It was opened in 1888 by David Oppenheimer in the name of Lord Stanley of Preston, the Governor-General of Canada.

 

It is more than 10% larger than New York City's Central Park and almost half the size of London's Richmond Park. The park attracts an estimated eight million visitors every year, including locals and tourists, who come for its recreational facilities and its natural attributes. A paved 8.8 kilometres (5.5 mi) seawall path circles the park, which is used by 2.5 million pedestrians, cyclists, and inline skaters every year. Much of the park remains forested with an estimated half million trees, some of which stand as tall as 76 metres (249 ft) and are up to hundreds of years old. There are approximately 200 kilometres (120 mi) of trails and roads in the park, which are patrolled by the Vancouver Police Department's equine mounted squad. The Project for Public Spaces has ranked Stanley Park as the sixteenth best park in the world and sixth best in North America.

 

The main square (Polish: Rynek Główny) of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city. It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m² (430,000 ft²) is the largest medieval town square in Europe.[1][2] The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life.[3]

 

The main square is a rectangular space surrounded by historic townhouses (kamienice), palaces and churches. The center of the square is dominated by the Cloth Hall (Sukiennice), rebuilt in 1555 in the Renaissance style, topped by a beautiful attic or Polish parapet decorated with carved masks. On one side of the cloth hall is the Town Hall Tower (Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Adalbert and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument. Rising above the square are the Gothic towers of St. Mary's Basilica (Kościół Mariacki). www.studiomde.nl

The Al-Azhar Park in Cairo( Egypt) is located on a hilly site and surrounded by historic districts of Islamic Cairo.This Park is Located in the heart of the city on 30 hectare (74 acre) land and offers panoramic view of the surrounding area. It was inaugurated in May 2005.

The park developed at a cost in excess of USD $30 million, was a gift to Cairo from His Highness the Aga Khan.It is interesting to note that the city of Cairo was founded in the year 969 by the Fatimid Imam-Caliphs who were ancestors of the Aga Khan.

There are 325 varieties of plants and most of them are native grown in the nursery. In the park there are three fresh water reservoirs for the city. Here there are shaded walkways, play area for the children, museum, hill top restaurant and café near the lake.

Among several honors, this park is listed as one of the world's sixty great public spaces by Project for Public Spaces.

City Museum is a museum, consisting largely of repurposed architectural and industrial objects, housed in the former International Shoe building in the Washington Avenue Loft District of St. Louis, Missouri.

Popular among residents and tourists, the museum bills itself as an "eclectic mixture of children's playground, funhouse, surrealistic pavilion, and architectural marvel." Visitors are encouraged to feel, touch, climb on, and play in the various exhibits. The museum attracted over 300,000 visitors in 1999 and over 600,000 in 2007. It has been named one of the "great public spaces" by the Project for Public Spaces, and has won other local and international awards as a must-see destination.

La plaza Navona (Piazza Navona en italiano) es uno de los espacios urbanos más destacados de Roma, que reúne esculturas, fuentes y edificios de gran valor artístico y supone un centro de la vida social, cultural y turística de la ciudad. Este espacio ha constiuido un emplazamiento de importancia desde la Antigua Roma, en la que se levantaba allí un estadio para competiciones deportivas y combates de gladiadores.

 

La piazza Navona (place Navone en français) est la plus grande place touristique de Rome en Italie. Située dans la partie nord du champ de Mars, à proximité du Panthéon, elle est construite sur les ruines du stade de Domitien du ier siècle, dont elle conserve la forme exacte. Elle est, avec son décor architectural monumental (fontaine des Quatre-Fleuves de Gian Lorenzo Bernini (dit Le Bernin), église Sainte-Agnès-en-Agone de Francesco Borromini… ), l'un des plus beaux ensembles d'architecture baroque de Rome. En décembre 2005, le Project for Public Spaces a choisi la Piazza Navona comme la troisième meilleure place du monde.

 

Piazza Navona è una delle più celebri piazze di Roma, fatta costruire dalla famiglia Pamphili. La sua forma è quella di un antico stadio: venne costruita in stile monumentale per volere di papa Innocenzo X (Giovanni Battista Pamphilj).

 

Piazza Navona (pronounced [ˈpjattsa naˈvoːna]) is a square in Rome, Italy. It is built on the site of the Stadium of Domitian, built in the 1st century AD, and follows the form of the open space of the stadium.[1] The ancient Romans went there to watch the agones ("games"), and hence it was known as "Circus Agonalis" ("competition arena"). It is believed that over time the name changed to in avone to navone and eventually to navona.

The main square (Polish: Rynek Główny) of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city. It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m2 (430,000 ft2) is the largest medieval town square in Europe.The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life.

 

The main square is a rectangular space surrounded by historic townhouses (kamienice), palaces and churches. The center of the square is dominated by the Cloth Hall (Sukiennice), rebuilt in 1555 in the Renaissance style, topped by a beautiful attic or Polish parapet decorated with carved masks. On one side of the cloth hall is the Town Hall Tower (Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Adalbert and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument. Rising above the square are the Gothic towers of St. Mary's Basilica (Kościół Mariacki). Kraków Main Square does not have a town hall, because it has not survived to the present day.

The Country Club Plaza (often called The Plaza) is a privately owned American shopping center in the Country Club District of Kansas City, Missouri.

 

The center consists of 18 separate buildings representing 804,000 square feet of retail space and 468,000 square feet of office space.[1] The standalone buildings are built in a distinctive Seville Spain theme and are on different blocks mostly west of Main Street and mostly north of Brush Creek and blends into the Country Club neighborhood around it and the area is often simply called the "Plaza."

 

It was the first shopping center in the world designed to accommodate shoppers arriving by automobile.[2] The 55-acre (223,000 m²) site is about four miles (6.44 km) south of downtown, between 45th and 51st streets to the north and south and between Broadway and Madison Street to the east and west. The Kansas state line is one mile (1.6 km) to the west. Established in 1922 by J. C. Nichols and designed architecturally after Seville, Spain, the Plaza comprises high-end retail establishments, restaurants, and entertainment venues, as well as offices.[3] The neighborhoods surrounding the Plaza consist of upscale apartment buildings and mansions, especially those of the Country Club District built along Ward Parkway on the Plaza's southern and southwestern side. The Country Club Plaza is named in the Project for Public Spaces' list 60 of the World's Great Places.

From Wikipedia

The main square (Polish: Rynek Główny) of the Old Town of Kraków, Lesser Poland, is the principal urban space located at the center of the city. It dates back to the 13th century, and at roughly 40,000 m² (430,000 ft²) is the largest medieval town square in Europe.[1][2] The Project for Public Spaces (PPS) lists the square as the best public space in Europe due to its lively street life.[3]

 

The main square is a rectangular space surrounded by historic townhouses (kamienice), palaces and churches. The center of the square is dominated by the Cloth Hall (Sukiennice), rebuilt in 1555 in the Renaissance style, topped by a beautiful attic or Polish parapet decorated with carved masks. On one side of the cloth hall is the Town Hall Tower (Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Adalbert and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument. Rising above the square are the Gothic towers of St. Mary's Basilica (Kościół Mariacki).

 

With Poland's regained independence came the major change in the fortunes of Kraków—now the second most important city of a sovereign nation. The state began to make new plans for the city development and commissioned a number of representative buildings. The predominant style for new projects was modernism with various interpretations of the art-deco style.[74] Important buildings constructed in the style of Polish modernism include the Feniks 'LOT' building on Basztowa Street, the Feniks department store on the Main Square and the Municipal Savings Bank on Szczepański Square.

 

Tis is a panorama of 25 shot taken with my 105 at 2.8 and d800. This results in a effective f of 0.99

www.studiomde.nl

Depois de um dia em Whistler, passamos o final da tarde no Stanley Park.

O Parque de Stanley ou, no inglês original, Stanley Park é um parque urbano de 404,9 hectares em Vancouver, Colúmbia Britânica, Canadá. É o maior parque urbano no Canadá e terceiro maior na América do Norte. O parque atrai cerca de oito milhões de visitantes cada ano, incluindo locais e turistas, que vem pelos seus atributos naturais entre outras coisas. Uma muralha marítima de 8.8 km rodeia o parque, que é usado 2.5 milhões de pedestres, ciclistas e patinadores-em-linha cada ano. Muito do parque permanece florestado com cerca de meio milhão de árvores que podem ter até 76 metros e centenas de anos de vida. Há cerca de 200 km de estradas e caminhos no parque, que são patrulhados pelo Departamento Policial de Vancouver. O Projeto para os Espaços Públicos declarou o Stanley Park como 16º melhor do mundo e o 6º melhor da América do Norte.

Wikipédia

 

After a day at Whistler, we spent the evening at Stanley Park.

Stanley Park is a 404.9 hectare (1,001 acre) urban park bordering downtown Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It was opened in 1888 by David Oppenheimer in the name of Lord Stanley of Preston, the Governor-General of Canada.

 

It is more than 10% larger than New York City's Central Park and almost half the size of London's Richmond Park. The park attracts an estimated eight million visitors every year, including locals and tourists, who come for its recreational facilities and its natural attributes. A paved 8.8 kilometres (5.5 mi) seawall path circles the park, which is used by 2.5 million pedestrians, cyclists, and inline skaters every year. Much of the park remains forested with an estimated half million trees, some of which stand as tall as 76 metres (249 ft) and are up to hundreds of years old. There are approximately 200 kilometres (120 mi) of trails and roads in the park, which are patrolled by the Vancouver Police Department's equine mounted squad. The Project for Public Spaces has ranked Stanley Park as the sixteenth best park in the world and sixth best in North America.

Wikipedia

In anticipation of Governor Snyder’s Special Message on Transportation and Infrastructure in October, the Michigan Municipal League and Let's Save Michigan hosted Michigan’s Transportation Vision: A Twitter Talk (http://www.mml.org/newsroom/twitter-transit/index.html) Tuesday, Sept. 13 at the League's Lansing office. Read more (http://www.mml.org/resources/21c3/post/2011/09/13/Michigan-Transit-Twitter-Talk-Big-Success3b-Organizations-Come-Together-To-Discuss-Future-of-Michigan-Transportation.aspx). Five transportation experts participated in the event - Robert Puentes of the Brookings Institution, Dan Gilmartin, Executive Director & CEO of the Michigan Municipal League, Rich Studley, President & CEO of the Michigan Chamber of Commerce, Chris Kolb, Executive Director of the Michigan Environmental Council and Rory Neuner, Project Coordinator for Transportation for Michigan. Puentes kicked of the discussion by providing a national perspective on the challenges Michigan faces, and suggested some potential solutions. Puentes noted that over 20,000 Michigan residents live without a vehicle and without access to public transportation. He said it needs to be easier for low income residents to get to their jobs, and the challenge is to link these individuals up with transit and job opportunities. Also as part of his discussion, Puentes said that while the amount of money Michigan spends on transportation is significant, it is not enough. Puentes also called for smarter spending. Also attending were State Rep. Doug Geiss, D-Taylor; and State Rep. Rick Olson, R-Saline; and other state officials.People and organizations (http://www.mml.org/resources/21c3/post/2011/09/13/Transit-Twitter-Talk-Generates-Constant-Conversation.aspx) across the state participated in the event on Twitter via their computers and smartphones. Some of the organizations tweeting and retweeting about the event using the Twitter hashtag #mitransvision included the Project for Public Spaces (an international nonprofit); Transport 4 America, a nationwide coalition focused on creating a national transportation program for the 21st century; Rustwire; Friends of Transit; and League of Michigan Bicyclists. Learn more (http://www.mml.org/resources/21c3/post/2011/09/13/Twitter-Talk-on-Transportation-Helps-Define-Communicate-Vision-for-Michigans-Future.aspx) about the event. Read a Sustainable Cities Collective blog (http://sustainablecitiescollective.com/thecityfix/29171/tweeting-new-transportation-vision-michigan) about the event. Interesting discussion and comments came from all the panelists, on a variety of transit-related topics, such as making sure public transit actually connects people to their jobs, and how safety and efficiency must be cornerstones to any successful transportation system. Read more about the Michigan's Transportation Vision: A Twitter Talk on Twitter @letsavemich and @mmleague and the hashtag #mitransvision and here on this website (http://www.mml.org/newsroom/twitter-transit/index.html). For more about the League and what we do go to mml.org. For more about Let's Save Michigan go to letssavemichigan.com.

Regular transportation, places to cross the street, and diverse options all contribute to a vibrant neighborhood according to Andres Ramirez.

In anticipation of Governor Snyder’s Special Message on Transportation and Infrastructure in October, the Michigan Municipal League and Let's Save Michigan hosted Michigan’s Transportation Vision: A Twitter Talk (http://www.mml.org/newsroom/twitter-transit/index.html) Tuesday, Sept. 13 at the League's Lansing office. Read more (http://www.mml.org/resources/21c3/post/2011/09/13/Michigan-Transit-Twitter-Talk-Big-Success3b-Organizations-Come-Together-To-Discuss-Future-of-Michigan-Transportation.aspx). Five transportation experts participated in the event - Robert Puentes of the Brookings Institution, Dan Gilmartin, Executive Director & CEO of the Michigan Municipal League, Rich Studley, President & CEO of the Michigan Chamber of Commerce, Chris Kolb, Executive Director of the Michigan Environmental Council and Rory Neuner, Project Coordinator for Transportation for Michigan. Puentes kicked of the discussion by providing a national perspective on the challenges Michigan faces, and suggested some potential solutions. Puentes noted that over 20,000 Michigan residents live without a vehicle and without access to public transportation. He said it needs to be easier for low income residents to get to their jobs, and the challenge is to link these individuals up with transit and job opportunities. Also as part of his discussion, Puentes said that while the amount of money Michigan spends on transportation is significant, it is not enough. Puentes also called for smarter spending. Also attending were State Rep. Doug Geiss, D-Taylor; and State Rep. Rick Olson, R-Saline; and other state officials.People and organizations (http://www.mml.org/resources/21c3/post/2011/09/13/Transit-Twitter-Talk-Generates-Constant-Conversation.aspx) across the state participated in the event on Twitter via their computers and smartphones. Some of the organizations tweeting and retweeting about the event using the Twitter hashtag #mitransvision included the Project for Public Spaces (an international nonprofit); Transport 4 America, a nationwide coalition focused on creating a national transportation program for the 21st century; Rustwire; Friends of Transit; and League of Michigan Bicyclists. Learn more (http://www.mml.org/resources/21c3/post/2011/09/13/Twitter-Talk-on-Transportation-Helps-Define-Communicate-Vision-for-Michigans-Future.aspx) about the event. Read a Sustainable Cities Collective blog (http://sustainablecitiescollective.com/thecityfix/29171/tweeting-new-transportation-vision-michigan) about the event. Interesting discussion and comments came from all the panelists, on a variety of transit-related topics, such as making sure public transit actually connects people to their jobs, and how safety and efficiency must be cornerstones to any successful transportation system. Read more about the Michigan's Transportation Vision: A Twitter Talk on Twitter @letsavemich and @mmleague and the hashtag #mitransvision and here on this website (http://www.mml.org/newsroom/twitter-transit/index.html). For more about the League and what we do go to mml.org. For more about Let's Save Michigan go to letssavemichigan.com.

A life size bronze statue of a woman in a wetsuit, with flippers on her feet and her mask pushed up on her forehead, sits on a large intertidal boulder just offshore of Stanley Park. In September of 1968, Douglas Brown, a Vancouver lawyer, talked to sculptor Elek Imredy about his desire to commission a sculpture inspired by the famous Copenhagen mermaid, which could be sited on the great granite boulder just off the northern shore of Stanley Park. Imredy proposed a life-size bronze sculpture of a scuba diver. On Brown's initiative, the Vancouver Harbour Improvement Society was formed with the intention of financing and facilitating a unique landmark for both Vancouverites and visitors to the city. They raised the money to produce the sculpture privately and Imredy was commissioned to craft the proposed work. The Vancouver Park Board gave permission to the society to place the sculpture on the rock. Because the boulder was often covered at high tide, a precast concrete ring was created and the rock was lifted by a floating crane and set on the ring about 100 feet from its original location. Imredy first took a mold of the top surface of the rock. In his studio, he made a replica of the rock and modeled the figure in clay. Imredy asked his young friend Debra Harrington to model, however the sculpture is not recognizably her image. "When I couldn't get the model to hold her hand the way I wanted it... I held my left hand in front of a mirror, showing its opposite, and I modeled right one. Of course, I made it a bit nicer, with longer fingers." A plaster of paris mold was made from the clay figure and the sculpture was cast in fibreglass. This fibreglass figure was flown to Rome where it was cast in bronze at Giovanni and Angelo Nicci's foundry. On June 9th, 1972, the sculpture was set in place by an electric crane reaching out from shore to the rock 8o feet away and fastened to the stone with stainless steel bolts. The next day the sculpture was ceremoniously unveiled. "Girl in Wetsuit" has become a landmark for visitors to Stanley Park and to boats that enter the harbour.

 

About Stanley Park

Stanley Park is a 404.9 hectare (1,001 acre) urban park bordering downtown Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. It was opened in 1888 by David Oppenheimer in the name of Lord Stanley of Preston, the Governor-General of Canada.

 

It is more than 10% larger than New York City's Central Park and almost half the size of London's Richmond Park. The park attracts an estimated eight million visitors every year, including locals and tourists, who come for its recreational facilities and its natural attributes. A paved 22 kilometres (14 mi) seawall path circles the park, which is used by 2.5 million pedestrians, cyclists, and inline skaters every year. Much of the park remains forested with an estimated half million trees, some of which stand as tall as 76 metres (249 ft) and are up to hundreds of years old. There are approximately 200 kilometres (120 mi) of trails and roads in the park, which are patrolled by the Vancouver Police Department's equine mounted squad. The Project for Public Spaces has ranked Stanley Park as the sixteenth best park in the world and sixth best in North America.

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