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Off with your head

Dance 'til you're dead

Heads will roll

On the floor

 

Alternate Version: grabilla.com/0350a-a5860a7d-f790-4842-9b8f-d99751e8b5d4.png

Full: grabilla.com/0350a-50c33258-034b-4ef8-b60e-d41ca7d8059c.png

Original: www.flickr.com/photos/toxicrayne/8487681600/

 

Did a quick one for a couple hours, or since whenever i posted the last pic, I love the expression of this one and of course i had to use a song with an attitude to go with.

 

PS I'm really comfortable working with PF skins, They're easy to work with for me =)

For Sabrina Palmira :)

( now she kinda reminds me of shakira )

before

 

Second Life.

For Fightingvio Inaka :)

  

before

 

Second Life.

  

After some absence I come back to Flickr with my version of a picture of Harley Quinn, inspired by a screenshot ofthe upcoming movie 'Suicide Squad' with Margot Robbie (nypdecider.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/suicide-squad-marg...)

 

Highrez snapshot with Firestorm 4.7.7

Done @ *Everwinter* Post Apocalyptic Theme Park

Pose: Custom pose 'Harley' done by me in DAZ3D

Maitreya Lara mesh body with CATWA Gwen Mesh Premium Head

Skin: DeeTalez Yasmin Nordic

Eyes: IKON Triumph Moor

Ears: MANDALA Steking Ears Season5

Make-up: SlackGirl Room02 Shadow - JESSICA HEAD :: Catwa

Bubblegum: Pink Fuel Yum Bubblegum!

Hair: little bones. Harley - Harley Quinn RARE (Gacha)

Tattoo: TAOX Bitchy

Necklace: CELTIC MYST Warrioress Angel - Female Edition

My Harley Quinn outfit consists of: Blueberry & Grixdale GACHA Madcap Jacket - Lara - Jester RARE; top - Lara - Red

Gloves: RealEvil Industries Bad-Kitty Gloves Pack 2 - RARE (Gacha)

Baseball Bat: MadPea Why So Mad? - Barbie (Common - Gacha) @ The Arcade

 

Thank you to all my followers for your support.

Lyrics: Out Tonight by RENT

Re-done because she deserves more attitude. *Z-snap* Lol.

She's really inspired by the character of Mimi <3 Love that movie..

 

So watcha think guys? Which one do you prefer? I wanna know!!!

*Ooooouuuuuut toooonight...*

*edit*

i39.tinypic.com/25f652b.png

An attitude rarely shown me by any of my T's, I was just reaching in to rearrange the furnishings prior to a photoshoot, turned out that she was about to molt later same evening. Glad she held it long enough for me to grab the camera and set up a strobe!

 

Open the 1920px Original in a new tab.

  

update 10/15/2014 - Please go Look! The Digital BCA Quilt group project with 20 people is now finished and posted here: www.flickr.com/photos/mimitalks/15492035056/

 

I took the photo. The attitude is all hers... In this world we have lots of ills, one of them being that people I don't know on Flickr (and may have zero in common with) tend to favorite pics of my daughter. She's lovely, I admit, but I have begun posting her images as private to friends and family contacts - who have seen her grow up in images here on Flickr. The exceptions are artsy images or (see links in comments) the Breast Cancer Awareness images posted just because and those that promote our now-yearly group Digital Breast Cancer Awareness Quilt projects (6 Quilts on Flickr so far) and our 2 Pink Ribbon Trees. She was 8 years old, when I started using her image (with her willingly adorned in pink - that doesn't happen any more!) to promote the awareness of this devastating and life-changing, sometimes fatal disease. She and I do this together in honor of my mom, a Breast Cancer survivor until her death of unrelated causes in 2009. Mama found her cancer through a mammogram. I'm about to schedule mine. If it applies, have you had yours yet?

Pressure can make or break you. The only difference between a piece of black coal and a priceless diamond is the amount of pressure it has endured.

 

- Joel Osteen (more Joel Osteen love quotes and sayings)

 

This is also featured at OM | Rekindling the Light Within

 

Original photo credit: Ray Sadler

Poecilotheria ornata 1-inch sling

 

When I fed it last night, this tiny sling went wild and snagged four roaches in its fangs within seconds. I had planned on this being just another focus stack, but considering the sling's attitude I thought maybe I'd take the image in an opposite direction than usual ... I left off the upper layers of the stack, leaving the sling's eyes in a sort of mindless, zombied blur and letting the sharp focus of the eerily infant-like roach eyes become the image's rather morbid point of attention.

 

Open the 1920px Original in a new tab.

Isaac is the man. He really is. His determined can-do, trouble-solving attitude may be exemplary for the systems engineer's mind-set, but the stuff he copes with: it boggles the mind.

 

FXAA-injection with custom shader configuration, tonemapping and pre- and post-sharpening, 4xMSAA + transparency multisampling, lucky fingers. Download wallpaper (1080p).

 

Featured here.

It's been a while since I did another piece with this series, but here's the third picture. I have a few more I actually will attempt to execute, so I'm not done yet.

_________________________

 

Definition of Anger:

an·ger

noun

1. A strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire.

2. Chiefly British Dialect . pain or smart, as of a sore.

3. Obsolete . grief; trouble.

 

As my sexual abuse as an adolescent became a daily routine, I held in a lot of anger. I became a bitter person, I carried a bad attitude as most would see it. I hated myself, the person who would abuse me, before I knew it I hated everyone & everything.

There have been many times where I had contemplated suicide & murder, over & over in my mind. I self-mutilated myself to make my abuser less interested in what he was doing to me & it work, but only for a little while. The abuse continued & as always I was threatened to keep quiet. I went through many manic episodes where I would trash my room, break perfectly good things that I owned & cared for.

Screaming into pillow & inflicting some kind of pain was a temporary relief from everything going on. I felt like there was no escaping him, no way of ever becoming “Normal.” His verbal abuse got to me really bad, sometimes even more than the physical abuse. The words & hurt forever imprinted into my memory.

 

I've been able to make more steps forward with my current therapy, the memories of my past don't creep up as much as they used to. My anger got the best of me before, but now I'm learning to let go. I've learned a lot about myself & I still am learning as I go along with things.

 

Before (Unedited)

 

_________________________

 

*The Prelude of the 'Within Me' mini series.*

 

Part 2: Within Me (Paranoia)

For Pure Restful :)

 

Second Life.

 

before

     

Rugby, Stade Numa-Daly, Nouméa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Noumea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

 

Médaille d'or : Samoa

Médaille d'argent : Iles Fidji

Médaille de bronze : Papouasie - Nouvelle-Guinée

Merthyr Tydfil (Merthy Tudful) from the A465 road.

  

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Merthyr Tydfil county borough Image:WalesMerthyrTydfil.png

Geography

Area

- Total

- % Water Ranked 21st

111 km²

? %

Admin HQ Merthyr Tydfil

ISO 3166-2 GB-MTY

ONS code 00PH

Demographics

Population:

- Total (2005 est.)

- Density

Ranked 22nd

54,900

Ranked 9th

496 / km²

Ethnicity 99.0% White

Welsh language

- Any skills Ranked 15th

17.7%

Politics

Arms of Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council

Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council

www.merthyr.gov.uk/

Control Labour

MP

 

* Dai Havard

 

Merthyr Tydfil (Welsh: Merthyr Tudful) is a town and county borough in Wales, with a population of about 55,000. It lies within the historic county of Glamorgan.

Contents

[hide]

 

* 1 Pre-history

* 2 The Roman invasion

* 3 The coming of Christianity

* 4 Local legends

* 5 The Normans arrive

* 6 Early Modern Merthyr

* 7 The Industrial Revolution

o 7.1 Influence and growth of iron industry

o 7.2 The Merthyr Riots

* 8 The decline of coal and iron

* 9 Post-world war II

* 10 Local government

* 11 Schools and Colleges

o 11.1 Colleges

o 11.2 Vocational Training Providers

o 11.3 Secondary Schools

o 11.4 Primary Schools/Nurseries

* 12 Natives of Merthyr Tydfil

* 13 See also

* 14 External links

* 15 References

 

[edit] Pre-history

 

Various peoples, migrants from Europe, had lived in the area for more than three thousand years, dating back to the Bronze Age. The were followed from about 1000BCE by the Celts, and from their language, the Welsh language developed. Hillforts were built during the Iron Age and the tribes who lived in them were called Silures by the Roman invaders.

 

[edit] The Roman invasion

 

The Romans had arrived in Wales by about 47-53CE and established a network of forts, with roads to link them. They had to fight hard to consolidate their conquests, and in 74 CE they built an auxiliary fortress at Penydarren, overlooking the River Taff (Taf). It covered an area of about 3 hectares, and formed part of the network of roads and fortifications. Remains of this fortress were found underneath the football ground where Merthyr Tydfil FC play. A road ran north-south through the area, linking the southern coast with mid-Wales via Brecon. Parts of this and other roads, including one known as Sarn Helen, can still be traced and walked on.

 

The local tribe, known as the Silures, resisted this invasion fiercely from their mountain strongholds, but the Roman armies eventually prevailed. In time, relative peace was established.

 

The Roman empire eventually disintegrated, and the Penydarren fortress was abandoned by about 120CE. By 402 CE, the army in Britain comprised mostly Germanic troops and local recruits, and the cream of the army had been withdrawn across to the continent of Europe. By about 408CE, the armies of the Saxons were landing and the locals were left to their own devices to fight off the new invaders.

 

[edit] The coming of Christianity

 

The Latin language and some Roman customs and culture became established before the withdrawal of the Roman army. The Christian religion was introduced throughout much of Wales by the Romans, but locally, it may have been introduced later by monks from Ireland and France who made their way into the region following rivers and valleys.

 

[edit] Local legends

 

After the departure of the Romans, minor kingdoms slowly developed in the area. Welsh legend describes a Romano-British leader who repelled Saxon invaders, and through conquest and diplomacy, united several small kingdoms to create a sizable kingdom that included South Wales and much of western Britain. This grew into the legend of King Arthur. More legend than fact is known about this man. Some scholars suggest that he may have been Ambrosius Aurelianus. If so, he would have spoken Latin and maintained some aspects of Roman culture, possibly including at least nominal devotion to Christianity, the official religion of the Romans at the time. Aurelianus may have been of Roman birth, and there are some implications that he may have been related to a Roman Emperor.

 

Another local tradition holds that a girl called Tydfil, daughter of a local chieftain named Brychan, was an early local convert to Christianity, and was pursued and murdered by a band of marauding Picts and Saxons while traveling to Hafod Tanglwys in Aberfan, a local farm that is still occupied to this day. The girl was considered a martyr after her death in approximately 480CE. “Merthyr” translates to “Martyr” in English, and tradition holds that when the town was founded, the name was chosen in her honor. a church was eventually built on the traditional site of her burial.

 

[edit] The Normans arrive

 

The valley through which the River Taff flowed was heavily wooded, with a few scattered farms on the mountain slopes, and this situation persisted for several hundred years. The Norman Barons moved in, after conquering England, but by 1093, they only occupied the lowlands and the uplands remained in the hands of the Welsh rulers. The effect on the locals was probably minimal. There were conflicts between the Barons and the families descended from the Welsh princes, and control of the land see-sawed to and fro.

 

[edit] Early Modern Merthyr

 

No permanent settlement was formed until well into the Middle Ages. People continued to be self-sufficient, living by farming and later by trading. Merthyr Tydfil was little more than a village. An ironworks existed in the parish in the Elizabethan period, but it did not survive beyond the early 1640s at the latest. In 1754, it was recorded that the valley was almost entirely populated by shepherds, and the markets and fairs at which farm produce were traded were many, bringing prosperity to some, and starvation to others.

 

[edit] The Industrial Revolution

 

[edit] Influence and growth of iron industry

 

Merthyr was situated close to reserves of iron ore, coal, limestone and water, making it an ideal site for ironworks. Small-scale iron working and coal mining had been carried out at some places in South Wales since the Tudor period, but in the wake of the Industrial revolution the demand for iron led to the rapid expansion of Merthyr's iron operations. The Dowlais Ironworks was founded by what would become the Dowlais Iron Company in 1759, making it the first major works in the area. It was followed in 1765 by the Cyfarthfa Ironworks. The Plymouth ironworks were initially in the same ownership as Cyfarthfa, but passed after the death of Anthony Bacon to Richard Hill in 1788. The fourth ironworks was Penydarren built by members of the Homfray family in 1784. As these works were established, along with their associated iron ore and coal mines, Merthyr grew from a village of some 700 inhabitants to an industrial town of 80,000 people.

The Cefn Coed Viaduct was built to carry the Merthyr to Brecon line.

The Cefn Coed Viaduct was built to carry the Merthyr to Brecon line.

 

The demand for iron was fuelled by the railways and by the Royal Navy, who needed cannons for their ships. In 1802, Admiral Lord Nelson visited Merthyr to witness cannon being made.

 

Several railway companies established routes that linked Merthyr with coastal ports or other parts of Britain. They included the Brecon and Merthyr Railway, Vale of Neath Railway, Taff Vale Railway and Great Western Railway. They often shared routes to enable access to coal mines and ironworks through rugged country, which presented great enegineering challenges. In 1804, the world’s first railway locomotive, "The Iron Horse", developed by the Cornish engineer Richard Trevithick, pulled 10 tons of iron from Merthyr on the newly constructed tramway from Penydarren to Abercynon. A replica of this now resides in the National Waterfront Museum in Swansea. The tramway passed through what is arguably the oldest railway tunnel in the world, part of which can still be seen along side Pentrebach Road at the lower end of the town.

 

During the first few decades of the 1800s, the ironworks at Dowlais and Cyfarthfa continued to expand and at their peak were the most productive ironworks in the world. 50,000 tons of rails left just one ironworks in 1844, to enable expansion of railways across Russia to Siberia. At its peak, the Dowlais Iron Company operated 18 blast furnaces and employed 7,300 people, and by 1857 had constructed the world's most powerful rolling mill. The companies were mainly owned by two dynasties, the Guest and Crawshay families. One of the famous members of the Guest family was Lady Charlotte Guest who translated the Mabinogion into English from its original Welsh. The families also supported the establishment of schools for their workers.

 

[edit] The Merthyr Riots

The Cyfarthfa Castle, commissioned in 1824 by the ironmaster William Crawshay II

The Cyfarthfa Castle, commissioned in 1824 by the ironmaster William Crawshay II

 

The riots of 1831 were precipitated by a combination of the ruthless collection of debts, frequent wage reductions when the value of iron periodically fell, and the imposition of truck shops. Instead of using normal coin of the realm, some ironmasters paid their workers in specially-minted coins or credit notes, known as "truck". These could only be exchanged at shops owned by the ironmasters. Many of the workers objected to both the price and quality of the goods sold in these company-owned shops.

 

There is still controversy over what actually happened and who was to blame. It was probably more of an armed rebellion than an isolated riot. The initiators of the unrest were most probably the skilled workers; men who were much prized by the owners and often on friendly social terms with them. They also valued their loyalty to the owners and looked aghast at the idea of forming trade unions to demand higher wages. But events overtook them, and the community was tipped into rebellion.

 

The owners took fright at the challenge to their authority, and called on the military for assistance. Soldiers were sent from the garrison at Brecon. They clashed with the rioters, and several on both sides were killed. Despite the hope that they could negotiate with the owners, the skilled workers lost control of the movement.

 

Some 7,000 to 10,000 workers marched under a red flag, which was later adopted internationally as the symbol of the working classes. For four days, they effectively controlled Merthyr.

 

Even with their numbers and captured weapons, they were unable to effectively oppose disciplined soldiers for very long, and several of the supposed leaders of the riots were arrested. Some were transported as convicts to the penal colonies of Australia. One of them, Richard Lewis, popularly known as Dic Penderyn, was hanged for the crime of stabbing soldier Donald Black in the leg, creating the first local working-class martyr. Alexander Cordell's novel The Fire People is set in this period. A serious political history of these events, The Merthyr Rising was written by the Merthyr-born Marxist and writer Professor Gwyn Alf Williams in 1978.

 

The first trade unions, which were illegal and savagely suppressed, were formed shortly after the riots. The rising also helped create the momentum that led to the Reform Act. The Chartism movement, which did not consider these reforms extensive enough, was subsequently active in Merthyr.

 

Many families had had enough of the strife, and they left Wales to utilise their skills elsewhere. Numerous people set out by ship to America, where the steelworks of Pittsburgh were booming. It only cost about five pounds to travel steerage.

 

[edit] The decline of coal and iron

The abandoned Cyfarthfa Ironworks blast furnaces

The abandoned Cyfarthfa Ironworks blast furnaces

 

The steel and coal industries began to decline after World War One, and by the 1930’s, they had all closed. In 1987, the iron foundry, all that remained of the former Dowlais ironworks, closed, marking the end of 228 years continuous production on one site.

 

The fortunes of Merthyr revived during World War Two, as war-related industry was established in the area. Many refugees from Europe settled in the town.

 

[edit] Post-world war II

 

Immediately following World War Two, several large companies set up in Merthyr. In October 1948, the American-owned Hoover company opened a large washing machine factory and depot in the village of Pentrebach, a few miles south of Merthyr Tydfil. The factory was purpose-built to manufacture the Hoover Electric Washing Machine, and at one point, Hoover was the largest employer in the borough. At the Hoover factory the Sinclair C5 was built.

 

Several other companies built factories, including an aviation components company, Teddington Aircraft Controls, which opened in 1946. The Teddington factory closed in the early 1970s.

 

The Gurnos housing estate was, at the time of its construction, the largest housing project in the world.

 

Cyfarthfa, the former home of the ironmaster Richard Crawshay, an opulent mock-castle, is now a museum. It houses a number of paintings of the town, a large collection of artefacts from the town's Industrial Revolution period, and a notable collection of Egyptian tomb artefacts, including several sarcophagi.

 

While testing a new angina treatment, researchers in Merthyr Tydfil disovered (purely by accident) that the new drug had erection-stimulating side effects. This discovery would go on to form the basis for viagra Wired. The inventor Howard Stapleton, based in Merthyr Tydfil, developed the technology that has given rise to the recent mosquitotone or Teen Buzz phenomenon.[1]

 

[edit] Local government

 

The current borough boundaries date back to 1974, when the former county borough of Merthyr Tydfil expanded slightly to cover Vaynor in Breconshire and Bedlinog in Glamorgan, it becoming a local government district in the administrative county of Mid Glamorgan at the time. The district became a county borough again on April 1, 1996. The area is governed by Merthyr Tydfil County Borough Council

  

'Bold text'Bold text== Sports and Leisure == The football club, Merthyr Tydfil F.C. or 'The Martyrs' play in the Southern Football League. The town was once home to a fully-professional Football League club, Merthyr Town F.C., but they folded in the 1930s.

 

The rugby club, Merthyr Tydfil RFC, is known as the Ironmen.

 

Merthyr Tydfil hosted the National Eisteddfod in 1881 and 1901. It is twinned with Clichy-la-Garenne, France.

 

Merthyr Tydfil's Central Library, which is in a prominent position in the centre of the town, is a Carnegie library.

 

Penydarren Country XI Cricket Club were founded in 1971 and currently play at the ICI Rifle Fields Ground.

 

Also famous for the hometown wrestling promotion of Celtic Wrestling

 

[edit] Schools and Colleges

 

[edit] Colleges

 

* Merthyr Tydfil College of Further Education

  

[edit] Vocational Training Providers

 

* Tydfil Training Consortium Limited

 

[edit] Secondary Schools

 

* Afon Taf High School

* Bishop Hedley High School

* Cyfarthfa High School

* Pen-y-dre High School

 

[edit] Primary Schools/Nurseries

 

* Ynysowen Primary School

* Gellifaelog Junior School

* Gwaunfarren Junior School

* Heolgerrig Junior School

* St. Illtyd's R.C. Primary School

* St. Mary's R.C. Primary School

* Edwardsville Primary School - a school keen to promote environmentally friendly attitudes and lifestyles

 

[edit] Natives of Merthyr Tydfil

 

Among those born in Merthyr Tydfil are:

 

* Laura Ashley - fashion designer and retailler

* William Berry, 1st Viscount Camrose - newspaper proprietor, and his brothers Seymour Berry (Lord Buckland) and James Gomer Berry, 1st Viscount Kemsley

* Richard Davies - actor

* Sir Samuel Griffith - Australian politician

* Craig Handley - film director

* Julien MacDonald - fashion designer

* Leslie Norris - poet

* Johnny Owen - boxer

* Joseph Parry - composer

* Robert Sidoli - Welsh rugby international

* Howard Winstone - boxer

 

Other notable residents included Esther Isaacs, mother of "Chariots of Fire" athlete Harold Abrahams; the grandfather of Rolf Harris also came from Merthyr. One of the first two Labour MPs to be elected to parliament, the Scot Keir Hardie, was elected by the Merthyr Tydfil constituency.

v1 (this pose IS possible with the hands like that if you're like, a ballerina).

v2

v3

 

You are going to dress up as a very eccentric lady with big fancy hats, an abundance of jewelry or other accessories with over the top makeup. The catch is that you will only be showing neck, head, forearms and hands. Nothing more! And you must also have over the top makeup - while your accessories are to be elegant (no bangles or casual jewelry) your makeup should be anything but. Do not get trashy on us now, there are many ways to go over the top while staying away from stripper makeup. The attitude of the shoot should be 'Oh wow, you want to take my little ole picture?' Give us coy, cute, and fun!

____

MINUET CHAPTER TWO READ & REVIEW

If you do, I'll totes like, give you my babies.

____

Fuck, this took me far too long to decide on my final pose. But I'm happy? Maybe.

 

I don't know why, but here she reminds me of Yvonne Strahvoski who was also my next door neighbour for 6 years or something. Weird shit.

 

Did a MAJOR assessment today in English, and I'm fucking anxious about it. I won't get the marks back for AGES but still.

Rte 103, Cuttingsville (Shrewsbury), Vermont USA • Laurel Glen Mausoleum (1880) and Laurel Hall (1882) … are excellent examples of high style architecture. Laurel Hall, designed by architect G.B. Croff of New York City, is a Queen Anne style mansion with Stick and Eastlake style influence, the detail and integrity of which has few equals in Vermont. Laurel Glen Mausoleum, a mix of the Classical and Egyptian Revivals also designed by Croff, is one of the most elaborate mausoleums in the state. The property has statewide significance … as an excellent example of a Victorian era country estate, comprised of landscaped grounds, a carriage barn, an icehouse, and a caretaker's cottage, erected by a native son who had made his fortune elsewhere. It also has significance … for representing Victorian era attitudes toward death and mourning. …

 

Laurel Hall (1882) is significant as one of the finest high style, Queen Anne residences in Rutland County. The Shrewsbury chapter of The Historic Architecture of Rutland County says, "Its marvelous display of jigsawn decoration and stickwork is nearly unrivaled in the Rutland area (p. 395)." Laurel Hall reflects the opulence of this period of American history. The large two story house with its three story central tower is a grand building that exudes a secure and gentle grandeur with the wide wrapping porch and conservative use of exterior decoration. Laurel Hall was built to be the summer residence of a man who had no family, yet commissioned a house to have four bedrooms in addition to two separate bedrooms for servants. The interior of the house truly reflects the wealth and social status of Bowman, with sixteen foot ceilings, large formal hallway with polychromatic painted archway, wide cherry Eastlake staircase, and large multi-hued windows in the stairwell. – From the quite extensive Statement of Significance and History, from the fine folks at the University of Vermont Historic Preservation Program.

 

In south-central Vermont, … we catch a glimpse of a stone man stepping up to the bronze door of a cemetery mausoleum.

 

The sad-looking man, top hat and coat on his arm, holds a large key over his heart while clutching a floral wreath in his other hand. In afternoon light, the sight is eerie (a night visit would be even more unnerving).

 

The slightly larger than life-size marble figure is of local tanning magnate John Porter Bowman. In 1880, Bowman's wife passed away; he had lost a daughter in 1879, and another years earlier. To remember them, he had a grandiose mausoleum constructed in Laurel Glen Cemetery, dwarfing surrounding grave markers. Bowman commissioned an architect, stoneworkers and a famous sculptor to create his vision of post-mortem devotion. The structure, comprised of 750 tons of granite and 50 tons of marble, cost $75,000 -- a heap o' money at the time.

 

The interior features sculpted busts of the deceased, and ornate stonework around the crypts. Mirrors are positioned to make the room seem larger than it really is.

 

When completed in 1881, the mausoleum became a local tourist attraction. Thousands converged on the cemetery to gawk. Bowman had a guest book placed inside the chamber, and hired an usher/guide to conduct short tours.

 

Then Bowman built an elaborate summer home -- Laurel Hall -- right across the road. While the house was under construction, he had the grieving version of himself created and installed on the tomb's steps. Eventually he moved into Laurel Hall permanently. From that vantage, he could gaze over at the Bowman sculpture ready to unlock the mausoleum. It must have been weird. …

 

Bowman himself died in 1891, and joined the rest of the family in this unique sanctuary. – From the Field Review by the team at Roadside America.

 

☞ On November 23, 1998, the National Park Service added the Mausoleum and Laurel Hall (also known as John P. Bowman Estate) to the National Register of Historic Places (#98001429).

 

More Info: [1] An c.1882 Albumen print with a stereoscopic view of the Mausoleum's interior; [2] An extensive summary from the Shrewsbury Historical Society; and [3] the GeoHack: 443°29′5″N 72°52′49″W.

 

Bougainville is an island to the east of Papua New Guinea.The people wanted to be free of New Guinea and declared independence, so a long civil war took place with a lot dead people. The peace has came back, the island has a special political status, but you still need secutity when you go in the bush.

Everybody is nice with foreigners (except when they are drunk, but it's a worldwide attitude!) and are amazed to see tourists coming in their island.

The youth who fought few years ago like to keep their soldier look...

Bougainville island, Autonomous Region of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

The shy attitude of this kid is funny, compared to the agressive make up of his tribe!

Papua New Guinea , Highlands, Mount Hagen festival singsing

4276

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

All designs from Art by January Birds With Attitude at Deviantscrap.

January's kit is comprised of birds and fall foliage extracted from her personal photographs...my concept was to see if I could take these PNGs and recreate a 'photographic' image. My process was to create successive layers in Photoshop and use varying degrees of Gausian blur to achieve depth of field.

Bougainville is an island to the east of Papua New Guinea.The people wanted to be free of New Guinea and declared independence, so a long civil war took place with a lot dead people. The peace has came back, the island has a special political status, but you still need secutity when you go in the bush.

Everybody is nice with foreigners (except when they are drunk, but it's a worldwide attitude!) and are amazed to see tourists coming in their island.

Bougainville island, Autonomous Region of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Combatting violence against women

Documentary tells the story of Dawn Crey, one of the 60 women who went missing from the Downtown Eastside

 

Kevin Griffin

Vancouver Sun

  

Thursday, March 08, 2007

  

Unlike most other documentaries, Finding Dawn wasn't created to be shown on TV. Director Christine Welsh knew that despite being a mass audience, TV is usually experienced individually. Welsh didn't want viewers to feel isolated and powerless after watching an emotional film about missing women in Western Canada.

 

Instead, Welsh intended for her film to be seen in small groups so that afterwards, people could talk and share their stories.

 

She saw Finding Dawn as a catalyst to help combat violence against women.

 

"We made it to be used -- to affect change," Welsh said. "I believe that the way to do that is to show it together with people."

 

On Monday, Welsh got another opportunity to show her film in a unique group setting. She was part of a screening in the Dag Hammarskjold Library in the United Nations in New York as part of the 51st Session of the Commission on the Status of Women. Welsh was at the screening along with Janice Acoose, a first nations professor in Saskatchewan, and Bev Jacobs, president of the Native Women's Association of Canada.

 

Finding Dawn takes its name from the search for Dawn Crey, number 23 among the 60 missing women from the Downtown Eastside. She was one of the People of the River, the Sto:lo from the upper Fraser Valley around Chilliwack. Welsh says Dawn's remains were found on Robert Pickton's farm but there wasn't enough DNA to include her as one of 26 women he's charged with killing.

 

Welsh takes Dawn's story as a starting point for a journey into the native women who have gone missing or been murdered in Western Canada in communities such as Saskatoon or along Highway 16, the Yellowhead in northern B.C. She interviews the relatives and friends who not only talk about never forgetting those who have been murdered, but of changing attitudes that treat native women as marginalized and disposable.

 

Finding Dawn is more about the living than the dead and how native women are organizing to combat violence against native women. Going way beyond media stereotypes of native women as victims, it presents the real stories of native women who are actively engaged in making changes on and off reserve.

 

Finding Dawn won the Amnesty International Film Festival Gold Audience Award at the 10th annual festival in November in Vancouver.

 

Welsh said from New York that she thought it was important to show the film at a UN event because it brings the issues of indigenous women in Canada to an international audience. She said the lack of any images of indigenous women in a photography exhibit in the lobby of the UN shows just how invisible they are.

 

"We looked and couldn't find any images of native indigenous women," said Welsh, a Metis filmmaker. "We raised that on the panel in the discussion afterwards. 'You don't see us here.'"

 

Like many other screenings she's been at, Welsh said the one at the UN was an emotional one for the 60 people who attended -- especially those who didn't know the story of the missing women or of Pickton's trial.

 

"A film like this is always a hard sell," she said.

 

"I think the screening will help underscore that this is a really important issue and help in the distribution of the film."

 

Welsh said in making Finding Dawn, she made a point of including images of men who are helping to make change.

 

"I have been very moved in a couple of screenings at the Carnegie Centre and in Powell River," she said. "There were these aboriginal men who stood up and said what they needed to do. These men, rather than feeling threatened, felt that they had to be part of the solution."

 

Finding Dawn is being shown again in Vancouver Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Vancity Theatre at the Vancouver International Film Centre, Seymour at Davie.

 

Afterwards, Welsh will be part of a discussion along with Fay Blaney, an aboriginal feminist featured in the film, Marlene George, community services programmer at the Carnegie Community Centre and an organizer of the Feb. 14 Women's Memorial March, and University of B.C. assistant professor and media analyst Mary Lynn Young, who is also a contributor to the Feminist Media Project, an attempt to intervene in mainstream media depictions of the Missing Women case in Vancouver.

 

The moderator will be Dara Culhane, co-editor of In Plain Sight: Reflections on Life in Downtown Eastside Vancouver.

 

kevingriffin@png.canwest.com

 

- - -

 

AT A GLANCE

 

Finding Dawn

 

Vancity Theatre at the Vancouver International Film Centre, Seymour at Davie

 

Sunday, 3 p.m.

 

Tickets, $10, available from www.ticketstonight.ca or 604-646-3200.

 

Ran with fact box "At a Glance", which has been appended tothe end of the story.

 

© The Vancouver Sun 2007

Rte 103, Cuttingsville (Shrewsbury), Vermont USA • In the Laurel Glen Cemetery. ∞ Laurel Glen Mausoleum (1880) and Laurel Hall (1882) …are excellent examples of high style architecture. Laurel Hall, designed by architect G.B. Croff of New York City, is a Queen Anne style mansion with Stick and Eastlake style influence, the detail and integrity of which has few equals in Vermont. Laurel Glen Mausoleum, a mix of the Classical and Egyptian Revivals also designed by Croff, is one of the most elaborate mausoleums in the state. The property has statewide significance … as an excellent example of a Victorian era country estate, comprised of landscaped grounds, a carriage barn, an icehouse, and a caretaker's cottage, erected by a native son who had made his fortune elsewhere. It also has significance … for representing Victorian era attitudes toward death and mourning. …

 

Laurel Hall (1882) is significant as one of the finest high style, Queen Anne residences in Rutland County. The Shrewsbury chapter of The Historic Architecture of Rutland County says, "Its marvelous display of jigsawn decoration and stickwork is nearly unrivaled in the Rutland area (p. 395)." Laurel Hall reflects the opulence of this period of American history. The large two story house with its three story central tower is a grand building that exudes a secure and gentle grandeur with the wide wrapping porch and conservative use of exterior decoration. Laurel Hall was built to be the summer residence of a man who had no family, yet commissioned a house to have four bedrooms in addition to two separate bedrooms for servants. The interior of the house truly reflects the wealth and social status of Bowman, with sixteen foot ceilings, large formal hallway with polychromatic painted archway, wide cherry Eastlake staircase, and large multi-hued windows in the stairwell. – From the quite extensive Statement of Significance and History, from the fine folks at the University of Vermont Historic Preservation Program.

 

In south-central Vermont, … we catch a glimpse of a stone man stepping up to the bronze door of a cemetery mausoleum.

 

The sad-looking man, top hat and coat on his arm, holds a large key over his heart while clutching a floral wreath in his other hand. In afternoon light, the sight is eerie (a night visit would be even more unnerving).

 

The slightly larger than life-size marble figure is of local tanning magnate John Porter Bowman. In 1880, Bowman's wife passed away; he had lost a daughter in 1879, and another years earlier. To remember them, he had a grandiose mausoleum constructed in Laurel Glen Cemetery, dwarfing surrounding grave markers. Bowman commissioned an architect, stoneworkers and a famous sculptor to create his vision of post-mortem devotion. The structure, comprised of 750 tons of granite and 50 tons of marble, cost $75,000 -- a heap o' money at the time.

 

The interior features sculpted busts of the deceased, and ornate stonework around the crypts. Mirrors are positioned to make the room seem larger than it really is.

 

When completed in 1881, the mausoleum became a local tourist attraction. Thousands converged on the cemetery to gawk. Bowman had a guest book placed inside the chamber, and hired an usher/guide to conduct short tours.

 

Then Bowman built an elaborate summer home -- Laurel Hall -- right across the road. While the house was under construction, he had the grieving version of himself created and installed on the tomb's steps. Eventually he moved into Laurel Hall permanently. From that vantage, he could gaze over at the Bowman sculpture ready to unlock the mausoleum. It must have been weird. …

 

Bowman himself died in 1891, and joined the rest of the family in this unique sanctuary. – From the Field Review by the team at Roadside America.

 

☞ On November 23, 1998, the National Park Service added the Mausoleum and Laurel Hall (also known as John P. Bowman Estate) to the National Register of Historic Places (#98001429).

 

More Info: [1] An c.1882 Albumen print with a stereoscopic view of the Mausoleum's interior; [2] An extensive summary from the Shrewsbury Historical Society; and [3] the GeoHack: 443°29′5″N 72°52′49″W.

 

Spiritual Lounge magazine, January 2011

 

spirituallounge.whitedrums.com/

 

Book Review - Gayatri Pagdi

 

As a Buddhist teacher and a community education tutor Ngakma Nor'dzin has been teaching meditation for long. The book Relaxing into Meditation has been the product of all the years of teaching. The book is a no-frills, 'How to' guide to meditation that looks at a typical group meditation scenario. Nor'dzin starts of with the techniques, which allow the students to arrive at a starting point to meditation. There are chapters on the best position for meditation, the technique of breathing with alternate nostril, the skill of just 'listening in', the essential breathing patterns and the actual posture while meditating etc. Nor'dzin also makes a special mention of singing that the students should undertake in a group. She says, “Our voices are an energetic aspect of who we are. The sounds we make are 'material' in that they affect our senses, but their 'materiality' is intangible. Our voice is the intangible and energetic link between our mind and our body – between our insubstantial being and our substantial being. Practices using the voice help us become keenly aware of the power of this energetic communication.” She would advise practitioners to look at singing as a tool to relaxation, to let go of their inhibitions that might hold some back.

 

The book also carries a gentle warning against sitting in a room with incense sticks burning when the students are engaging in breathing exercises. The resulting deeper breaths will mean smoke is inhaled deeply into the lungs and will lead to coughing. For today's several New Age enthusiasts who are more concerned about the props that accompany any such practice, this advice should come handy.

 

Nor'dzin's writing is practical and, as she takes you through the steps, all of it seems like the most natural thing to do. I particularly liked the chapter on 'Walking Meditation' which is not very commonly known and which uses the physical process of walking as the focus instead of the breath.

 

Another interesting concept is the meditation that involves analytical contemplation and visualisation. It involves dwelling on a subject and attempting to deeply penetrate the essence of that subject in order to discover our preconceptions, our prejudices and our habitual views. The meditation 'Friend, Enemy, Stranger' looks at our concepts and feelings around people we like, people we do not get along with, and people with whom we have no personal connection. Writes Nor'dzin, “Our view is the basis of all our expectations of life, our interpretations of circumstances, and our responses to the experiences we encounter in our lives. Our view governs how we are as people in the world and causes us to create an inter-penetrating network of reference points.” She claims offer us an opportunity to look at our entrenched viewpoints and can unlock our previously closely held points of view.

 

The book also explains how meditation helps us discover that there are qualities and aspects of our lives that are not as we would wish them to be. When we begin to meditate daily, they often seem to show up suddenly, but the fact of the matter is that they have always been there and it is now that we are becoming aware of them. Visualization techniques help us to cleanse ourselves of them and eventually get rid of them to embrace more enlightened attitudes and conduct.

 

Nor'dzin's approach is simple and direct. Along with a short glossary of terms explained, she gives illustrated tips on making sitting equipment for the practice. Her line drawings explaining the postures have more of a utilitarian rather than an aesthetic value. The book, on the whole, seems rather unadorned but it's friendly, down to earth and, most importantly, useful.

  

Russian Ridge Open Space Preserve. GPS tracks from mountain bike ride, Oct. 7, 2007. Satellite view in Google Maps, attitude angle.

Rte 103, Cuttingsville (Shrewsbury), Vermont USA • In the Laurel Glen Cemetery. ∞ Laurel Glen Mausoleum (1880) and Laurel Hall (1882) … are excellent examples of high style architecture. Laurel Hall, designed by architect G.B. Croff of New York City, is a Queen Anne style mansion with Stick and Eastlake style influence, the detail and integrity of which has few equals in Vermont. Laurel Glen Mausoleum, a mix of the Classical and Egyptian Revivals also designed by Croff, is one of the most elaborate mausoleums in the state. The property has statewide significance … as an excellent example of a Victorian era country estate, comprised of landscaped grounds, a carriage barn, an icehouse, and a caretaker's cottage, erected by a native son who had made his fortune elsewhere. It also has significance … for representing Victorian era attitudes toward death and mourning. …

 

Laurel Hall (1882) is significant as one of the finest high style, Queen Anne residences in Rutland County. The Shrewsbury chapter of The Historic Architecture of Rutland County says, "Its marvelous display of jigsawn decoration and stickwork is nearly unrivaled in the Rutland area (p. 395)." Laurel Hall reflects the opulence of this period of American history. The large two story house with its three story central tower is a grand building that exudes a secure and gentle grandeur with the wide wrapping porch and conservative use of exterior decoration. Laurel Hall was built to be the summer residence of a man who had no family, yet commissioned a house to have four bedrooms in addition to two separate bedrooms for servants. The interior of the house truly reflects the wealth and social status of Bowman, with sixteen foot ceilings, large formal hallway with polychromatic painted archway, wide cherry Eastlake staircase, and large multi-hued windows in the stairwell. – From the quite extensive Statement of Significance and History, from the fine folks at the University of Vermont Historic Preservation Program.

 

In south-central Vermont, … we catch a glimpse of a stone man stepping up to the bronze door of a cemetery mausoleum.

 

The sad-looking man, top hat and coat on his arm, holds a large key over his heart while clutching a floral wreath in his other hand. In afternoon light, the sight is eerie (a night visit would be even more unnerving).

 

The slightly larger than life-size marble figure is of local tanning magnate John Porter Bowman. In 1880, Bowman's wife passed away; he had lost a daughter in 1879, and another years earlier. To remember them, he had a grandiose mausoleum constructed in Laurel Glen Cemetery, dwarfing surrounding grave markers. Bowman commissioned an architect, stoneworkers and a famous sculptor to create his vision of post-mortem devotion. The structure, comprised of 750 tons of granite and 50 tons of marble, cost $75,000 -- a heap o' money at the time.

 

The interior features sculpted busts of the deceased, and ornate stonework around the crypts. Mirrors are positioned to make the room seem larger than it really is.

 

When completed in 1881, the mausoleum became a local tourist attraction. Thousands converged on the cemetery to gawk. Bowman had a guest book placed inside the chamber, and hired an usher/guide to conduct short tours.

 

Then Bowman built an elaborate summer home -- Laurel Hall -- right across the road. While the house was under construction, he had the grieving version of himself created and installed on the tomb's steps. Eventually he moved into Laurel Hall permanently. From that vantage, he could gaze over at the Bowman sculpture ready to unlock the mausoleum. It must have been weird. …

 

Bowman himself died in 1891, and joined the rest of the family in this unique sanctuary. – From the Field Review by the team at Roadside America.

 

☞ On November 23, 1998, the National Park Service added the Mausoleum and Laurel Hall (also known as John P. Bowman Estate) to the National Register of Historic Places (#98001429).

 

More Info: [1] An c.1882 Albumen print with a stereoscopic view of the Mausoleum's interior; [2] An extensive summary from the Shrewsbury Historical Society; and [3] the GeoHack: 443°29′5″N 72°52′49″W.

 

Rte 103, Cuttingsville (Shrewsbury), Vermont USA • Laurel Glen Mausoleum (1880) and Laurel Hall (1882) … are excellent examples of high style architecture. Laurel Hall, designed by architect G.B. Croff of New York City, is a Queen Anne style mansion with Stick and Eastlake style influence, the detail and integrity of which has few equals in Vermont. Laurel Glen Mausoleum, a mix of the Classical and Egyptian Revivals also designed by Croff, is one of the most elaborate mausoleums in the state. The property has statewide significance … as an excellent example of a Victorian era country estate, comprised of landscaped grounds, a carriage barn, an icehouse, and a caretaker's cottage, erected by a native son who had made his fortune elsewhere. It also has significance … for representing Victorian era attitudes toward death and mourning. …

 

Laurel Hall (1882) is significant as one of the finest high style, Queen Anne residences in Rutland County. The Shrewsbury chapter of The Historic Architecture of Rutland County says, "Its marvelous display of jigsawn decoration and stickwork is nearly unrivaled in the Rutland area (p. 395)." Laurel Hall reflects the opulence of this period of American history. The large two story house with its three story central tower is a grand building that exudes a secure and gentle grandeur with the wide wrapping porch and conservative use of exterior decoration. Laurel Hall was built to be the summer residence of a man who had no family, yet commissioned a house to have four bedrooms in addition to two separate bedrooms for servants. The interior of the house truly reflects the wealth and social status of Bowman, with sixteen foot ceilings, large formal hallway with polychromatic painted archway, wide cherry Eastlake staircase, and large multi-hued windows in the stairwell. – From the quite extensive Statement of Significance and History, from the fine folks at the University of Vermont Historic Preservation Program.

 

In south-central Vermont, … we catch a glimpse of a stone man stepping up to the bronze door of a cemetery mausoleum.

 

The sad-looking man, top hat and coat on his arm, holds a large key over his heart while clutching a floral wreath in his other hand. In afternoon light, the sight is eerie (a night visit would be even more unnerving).

 

The slightly larger than life-size marble figure is of local tanning magnate John Porter Bowman. In 1880, Bowman's wife passed away; he had lost a daughter in 1879, and another years earlier. To remember them, he had a grandiose mausoleum constructed in Laurel Glen Cemetery, dwarfing surrounding grave markers. Bowman commissioned an architect, stoneworkers and a famous sculptor to create his vision of post-mortem devotion. The structure, comprised of 750 tons of granite and 50 tons of marble, cost $75,000 -- a heap o' money at the time.

 

The interior features sculpted busts of the deceased, and ornate stonework around the crypts. Mirrors are positioned to make the room seem larger than it really is.

 

When completed in 1881, the mausoleum became a local tourist attraction. Thousands converged on the cemetery to gawk. Bowman had a guest book placed inside the chamber, and hired an usher/guide to conduct short tours.

 

Then Bowman built an elaborate summer home -- Laurel Hall -- right across the road. While the house was under construction, he had the grieving version of himself created and installed on the tomb's steps. Eventually he moved into Laurel Hall permanently. From that vantage, he could gaze over at the Bowman sculpture ready to unlock the mausoleum. It must have been weird. …

 

Bowman himself died in 1891, and joined the rest of the family in this unique sanctuary. – From the Field Review by the team at Roadside America.

 

☞ On November 23, 1998, the National Park Service added the Mausoleum and Laurel Hall (also known as John P. Bowman Estate) to the National Register of Historic Places (#98001429).

 

More Info: [1] An c.1882 Albumen print with a stereoscopic view of the Mausoleum's interior; [2] An extensive summary from the Shrewsbury Historical Society; and [3] the GeoHack: 443°29′5″N 72°52′49″W.

 

Match de basket.

Salle omnisports Vallée du Tir

Nouméa, Nouvelle-Calédonie

Noumea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

 

Papouasie - Nouvelle-Guinée : 42

Samoa : 71

Match de classement de beach-volley, Fayaoué, Ouvéa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Ouvea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

"If we do not change our violent attitudes and behaviors, how can we change our community?" asked PNG's Family Support Centre last week during an ending violence against women event. Over 700 people participated in the Eastern Highlands Family Voice event to celebrate #16days of Activism this year with the theme "Inspiring Change". Highlights included speeches from partners, skits and dramas, dances and songs from women and youth groups. Eastern Highlands Family Voice is a UN Women Pacific Pacific Fund Grantee.

 

Photo: UN Women PNG

 

www.panamacityliving.com/jimmy-buffets-margaritaville-pan...

NEW ITEMS BRING A FRESH ATTITUDE TO ITS COASTAL MENU

Jimmy Buffett’s® Margaritaville® Panama City Beach launched a refreshed menu featuring more than 15 new and enhanced dishes and drinks. The new recipes rely heavily upon the inherent flavor of fresh and house-made ingredients to enhance and define the personality of each dish, making it possible to ensure optimal flavor. The fresh new items to be experienced, from made-to-order appetizers, new entrees, and desserts for splurging and sharing to handcrafted margaritas. Fans of the brand will be pleased to know that their favorite signature items are still there and even elevated to a new level.

 

Margaritaville’s® iconic name brings to mind the desire in everyone to kick back and escape the everyday, if only for a few hours. Nostalgic island moments come to life with new appetizers like the “Drunken” Shrimp Skillet, shrimp sautéed in tequila key lime butter, roasted garlic and peppers with a mini baguette for dipping and Asiago Crab Dip, filled with lump crabmeat and served with grilled crostini.

 

 

The Bites section takes guests back to waterfront beach bars they love to visit with small plates to mix-and-match or share, ranging from the Maryland-Style Crab Cake Slider, topped with shredded lettuce and jalapeño tartar sauce, a Grilled Shrimp Skewer, seasoned with a jerk glaze and Beach Tacos, filled your way with Carne Asada, Pork Carnitas or Chicken Tinga.

 

 

The new LandShark Lager Fish and Chips takes this classic to a sublime level with its crispy crust, thanks to the thinnest and lightest of batters made with Margaritaville’s® signature beer. Chimichurri Flat Iron Steak is served with fries and chimichurri, the perfect sauce for grilled meats. Shrimp Trio is a combo of blackened, coconut crusted and island lime sautéed shrimp served with French fries, cilantro lime coleslaw, Key West cocktail and jalapeño tartar sauce.

 

 

New desserts for splurging and sharing include the Chocolate Hurricane, which is everything the name implies, and Chocolate Banana Bread Pudding made with chocolate chips and fresh bananas.

 

In true Margaritaville® spirit, the menu maintains and enhances its signatures ranging from the Cheeseburger in Paradise®, a handcrafted choice burger topped with American cheese, lettuce, sliced tomato, pickles and paradise island sauce to Crispy Coconut Shrimp, jumbo shrimp crusted with coconut and golden fried, served with horseradish-orange marmalade dipping sauce, French fries and cilantro lime coleslaw. Worthy of the name Margaritaville®, the new Margaritas and Boat Drinks menu offers too many new cocktails, tequilas, margaritas and boat drinks to list. A few highlights include: the Blueberry Pomegranate Margarita, Margaritaville Silver Tequila, Cointreau® Orange Liqueur, blueberry pomegranate purée; Planter’s Punch, Appleton Rum VX, Sailor Jerry’s Spiced Rum, freshly blended sweet and sour, pineapple juice, pomegranate and a dash of bitters; The Watermelon Agave Fresca with Margaritaville Silver Tequila, watermelon puree and the proprietary lime agave blend with a splash of soda; and an abundant collection of Tequilas served as shots with sangrita, the tomato based chaser made in house.

 

 

ABOUT JIMMY BUFFETT’S® MARGARITAVILLE® PANAMA CITY BEACH

 

The Panama City Beach restaurant located in Pier Park at 16230 Front Beach Road is open Monday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. For more information regarding the Panama City Beach location, please visit www.margaritavillepanamacitybeach.com or call 702.733.3302. For all existing and future locations, please visit www.margaritaville.com.

 

ABOUT JIMMY BUFFETT’S® MARGARITAVILLE®

 

Inspired by the lyrics and philosophy of Jimmy Buffett, the leading lifestyle brand is comprised of restaurants, retail shops, consumer products, casinos, resorts, vacation ownership and a national radio station on SiriusXM. Margaritaville® delivers an experience where guests can enjoy the sights, sounds and tastes of their favorite vacation destination, whatever their latitude. Margaritaville® is more than a restaurant, it’s a state of mind and that guests can get there from most anywhere.

 

Margaritaville® locations span the United States in destinations, such as Key West, New Orleans, Orlando, Las Vegas, Myrtle Beach, Panama City Beach, Nashville, Honolulu, Atlantic City and coming soon to Destin, FL and Pigeon Forge, TN.

 

International locations include the Caribbean, Mexico, Republic of Panama, Canada and Australia. Margaritaville® resorts are located in Pensacola Beach and Bossier City, with Hollywood Beach, Florida slated to open in 2015.

Rte 103, Cuttingsville (Shrewsbury), Vermont USA • In the Laurel Glen Cemetery. ∞ Laurel Glen Mausoleum (1880) and Laurel Hall (1882) … are excellent examples of high style architecture. Laurel Hall, designed by architect G.B. Croff of New York City, is a Queen Anne style mansion with Stick and Eastlake style influence, the detail and integrity of which has few equals in Vermont. Laurel Glen Mausoleum, a mix of the Classical and Egyptian Revivals also designed by Croff, is one of the most elaborate mausoleums in the state. The property has statewide significance … as an excellent example of a Victorian era country estate, comprised of landscaped grounds, a carriage barn, an icehouse, and a caretaker's cottage, erected by a native son who had made his fortune elsewhere. It also has significance … for representing Victorian era attitudes toward death and mourning. …

 

Laurel Hall (1882) is significant as one of the finest high style, Queen Anne residences in Rutland County. The Shrewsbury chapter of The Historic Architecture of Rutland County says, "Its marvelous display of jigsawn decoration and stickwork is nearly unrivaled in the Rutland area (p. 395)." Laurel Hall reflects the opulence of this period of American history. The large two story house with its three story central tower is a grand building that exudes a secure and gentle grandeur with the wide wrapping porch and conservative use of exterior decoration. Laurel Hall was built to be the summer residence of a man who had no family, yet commissioned a house to have four bedrooms in addition to two separate bedrooms for servants. The interior of the house truly reflects the wealth and social status of Bowman, with sixteen foot ceilings, large formal hallway with polychromatic painted archway, wide cherry Eastlake staircase, and large multi-hued windows in the stairwell. – From the quite extensive Statement of Significance and History, from the fine folks at the University of Vermont Historic Preservation Program.

 

In south-central Vermont, … we catch a glimpse of a stone man stepping up to the bronze door of a cemetery mausoleum.

 

The sad-looking man, top hat and coat on his arm, holds a large key over his heart while clutching a floral wreath in his other hand. In afternoon light, the sight is eerie (a night visit would be even more unnerving).

 

The slightly larger than life-size marble figure is of local tanning magnate John Porter Bowman. In 1880, Bowman's wife passed away; he had lost a daughter in 1879, and another years earlier. To remember them, he had a grandiose mausoleum constructed in Laurel Glen Cemetery, dwarfing surrounding grave markers. Bowman commissioned an architect, stoneworkers and a famous sculptor to create his vision of post-mortem devotion. The structure, comprised of 750 tons of granite and 50 tons of marble, cost $75,000 -- a heap o' money at the time.

 

The interior features sculpted busts of the deceased, and ornate stonework around the crypts. Mirrors are positioned to make the room seem larger than it really is.

 

When completed in 1881, the mausoleum became a local tourist attraction. Thousands converged on the cemetery to gawk. Bowman had a guest book placed inside the chamber, and hired an usher/guide to conduct short tours.

 

Then Bowman built an elaborate summer home -- Laurel Hall -- right across the road. While the house was under construction, he had the grieving version of himself created and installed on the tomb's steps. Eventually he moved into Laurel Hall permanently. From that vantage, he could gaze over at the Bowman sculpture ready to unlock the mausoleum. It must have been weird. …

 

Bowman himself died in 1891, and joined the rest of the family in this unique sanctuary. – From the Field Review by the team at Roadside America.

 

☞ On November 23, 1998, the National Park Service added the Mausoleum and Laurel Hall (also known as John P. Bowman Estate) to the National Register of Historic Places (#98001429).

 

More Info: [1] An c.1882 Albumen print with a stereoscopic view of the Mausoleum's interior; [2] An extensive summary from the Shrewsbury Historical Society; and [3] the GeoHack: 443°29′5″N 72°52′49″W.

 

When personal growth stops because of bumping against a "glass ceiling" it is time to change beliefs and attitude. Bumphead Parrotfish, PNG -the Ocean is Alive-

Rte 103, Cuttingsville (Shrewsbury), Vermont USA • In the Laurel Glen Cemetery. ∞ Laurel Glen Mausoleum (1880) and Laurel Hall (1882) … are excellent examples of high style architecture. Laurel Hall, designed by architect G.B. Croff of New York City, is a Queen Anne style mansion with Stick and Eastlake style influence, the detail and integrity of which has few equals in Vermont. Laurel Glen Mausoleum, a mix of the Classical and Egyptian Revivals also designed by Croff, is one of the most elaborate mausoleums in the state. The property has statewide significance … as an excellent example of a Victorian era country estate, comprised of landscaped grounds, a carriage barn, an icehouse, and a caretaker's cottage, erected by a native son who had made his fortune elsewhere. It also has significance … for representing Victorian era attitudes toward death and mourning. …

 

Laurel Hall (1882) is significant as one of the finest high style, Queen Anne residences in Rutland County. The Shrewsbury chapter of The Historic Architecture of Rutland County says, "Its marvelous display of jigsawn decoration and stickwork is nearly unrivaled in the Rutland area (p. 395)." Laurel Hall reflects the opulence of this period of American history. The large two story house with its three story central tower is a grand building that exudes a secure and gentle grandeur with the wide wrapping porch and conservative use of exterior decoration. Laurel Hall was built to be the summer residence of a man who had no family, yet commissioned a house to have four bedrooms in addition to two separate bedrooms for servants. The interior of the house truly reflects the wealth and social status of Bowman, with sixteen foot ceilings, large formal hallway with polychromatic painted archway, wide cherry Eastlake staircase, and large multi-hued windows in the stairwell. – From the quite extensive Statement of Significance and History, from the fine folks at the University of Vermont Historic Preservation Program.

 

In south-central Vermont, … we catch a glimpse of a stone man stepping up to the bronze door of a cemetery mausoleum.

 

The sad-looking man, top hat and coat on his arm, holds a large key over his heart while clutching a floral wreath in his other hand. In afternoon light, the sight is eerie (a night visit would be even more unnerving).

 

The slightly larger than life-size marble figure is of local tanning magnate John Porter Bowman. In 1880, Bowman's wife passed away; he had lost a daughter in 1879, and another years earlier. To remember them, he had a grandiose mausoleum constructed in Laurel Glen Cemetery, dwarfing surrounding grave markers. Bowman commissioned an architect, stoneworkers and a famous sculptor to create his vision of post-mortem devotion. The structure, comprised of 750 tons of granite and 50 tons of marble, cost $75,000 -- a heap o' money at the time.

 

The interior features sculpted busts of the deceased, and ornate stonework around the crypts. Mirrors are positioned to make the room seem larger than it really is.

 

When completed in 1881, the mausoleum became a local tourist attraction. Thousands converged on the cemetery to gawk. Bowman had a guest book placed inside the chamber, and hired an usher/guide to conduct short tours.

 

Then Bowman built an elaborate summer home -- Laurel Hall -- right across the road. While the house was under construction, he had the grieving version of himself created and installed on the tomb's steps. Eventually he moved into Laurel Hall permanently. From that vantage, he could gaze over at the Bowman sculpture ready to unlock the mausoleum. It must have been weird. …

 

Bowman himself died in 1891, and joined the rest of the family in this unique sanctuary. – From the Field Review by the team at Roadside America.

 

☞ On November 23, 1998, the National Park Service added the Mausoleum and Laurel Hall (also known as John P. Bowman Estate) to the National Register of Historic Places (#98001429).

 

More Info: [1] An c.1882 Albumen print with a stereoscopic view of the Mausoleum's interior; [2] An extensive summary from the Shrewsbury Historical Society; and [3] the GeoHack: 443°29′5″N 72°52′49″W.

 

Line 'em up! Move 'em out! Get your hot tent ticket items right here folks!

 

I saw at least a dozen boxes of the Breyer JAH Connoisseur model "Giselle" for sale on the table that day, but ended up purchasing "Gala" (so cool looking!) and the "Surprise" model (pinto) which I promptly traded for the palomino)

 

I never did get to see any of the guest horses (just a few glimpses here and there), as I was too preoccupied and too stupid waiting in a long lineup, sweating it out with hundreds of others in the heat, humidity and dust; waiting for the opportunity to pick up a few Breyerfest special run tent models (of which you were NOT guaranteed to get!). Alas, by the time the first 50 in the lineup (out of 250) went through, all the special run models were sold out!).

 

This is the part of Breyerfest that I find most annoying: the lineups, the crowds, the jostling, etc; and missing all the great horse shows - the opportunity to see REAL horses, the "Parade of Breeds" the Breyer guest horses, some great equine photo-taking opportunities, and everything that Kentucky Horse Park has to offer - all because of the mad rush to get a few plastic toy horses.

 

This was NOT my favorite thing to do. I truly dislike the relentless hype, the crowded stores, the ungracious "I-don't-care, will-that-be-cash-or-credit-card attitude" of the Breyer store representatives AND the unsympathetic Breyer employee who told me "Sorry, tough luck. It's the luck of the draw.." to all those who got stuck at the rear of the line, sweated and waited - only to find all the models were sold out as they went through the line.

 

Sorry Breyer - your unsympathetic, hard sell attitude didn't win any fans here.

 

I think this year will be my last year attending the Breyerfest events at Kentucky Horse Park. Next time when I go to Kentucky Horse Park - it will BE for Kentucky Horse Park! (not for Breyer plastic!)

  

Rio Lesines & Pierrick Lesines (Vanuatu team)

Match de classement de beach-volley, Fayaoué, Ouvéa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Ouvea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

Match de classement de beach-volley, Fayaoué, Ouvéa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Ouvea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

Athlétisme, Stade Numa-Daly, Nouméa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Noumea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

 

Médaille d'or : Théo Houdret (NC)

Médaille d'argent : Sapolai Yao (PNG)

Médaille de bronze : Skene Kiage (PNG)

Match de classement de beach-volley, Fayaoué, Ouvéa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Ouvea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

www.messersmith.name/wordpress/2010/11/16/making-pancakes/

I am amazed daily by how busy I am. This was not something which I expected - another indication which demonstrates that I was paying little attention to the mundane details of life. Eunie was so competent and took care of so many things so efficiently and transparently that she seldom seemed to be busy. Oh, what an illusion that was! As part of my self-reprogramming to appreciate once again the potential humour of life situations, I'm trying to understand how this highlights my basic lazy attitude when it comes to things which I perceive as "work" compared to things which I find more amusing, such as "play".

 

So, these days I wonder how she did it all, how she did it without seeming to be doing much of anything. I hope that I'll learn to manage my time better. I can't believe how much time I waste doing things which are not productive. In the meantime, while I'm absorbing this and readjusting my priorities, I'm making some moves in the direction of creating opportunities to combine work with play. My first target is cooking.

 

Last night, I came home from work an hour early because I had guests coming for dinner. I had been thinking about making pancakes, because it's safe. Some people think that it's strange to have pancakes for dinner, but I felt willing to take the risk. I'm making a concerted effort to have guests to dinner at least one night a week. It softens the loneliness and gives me opportunities for enjoyment instead of working all evening until I find that it's two o'clock in the morning and I haven't felt sleepy yet. Yes, there is something funny in that, when I stop to think about it. Funny-stupid. The work will be there in the morning, but the sleep can't be retrieved. It's better to lay down with a really bad book and allow myself to be bored into slumber.

 

The thing about making pancakes is that you can't use just any old recipe. Since I can't smell anything any more, I have to depend on recipes. I have to have something which tells me exactly what to add, because I can't judge seasoning, especially aromatic spices. Pancakes are dead easy if you have a good recipe. I have the finest on the planet.

 

This is Eunie's ancient, venerable Betty Crocker Cookbook. Of course, there never was a real Betty Crocker. She was a fictitious person made up by the marketing gurus at General Mills. Over the years Eunie had several editions of the Betty Crocker Cookbook on her cookbook shelf upon which rests, as I counted last night, eighteen volumes of cooking variety. It's too bad that I'm not very adventuresome. I couldn't appreciate most of it anyway:

 

I remember one Betty Crocker Cookbook which Eunie had years ago which was a giant three-ring binder with a similar cover to the one above. This book was widely known as "The Big Red."

 

On page thirty of the cookbook above you will find the best pancake recipe in the world:

 

I've reproduced it here with enough pixels that you can read it or print it out, if you want to try it.

 

Since there is a slim possibility that you are an even worse cook than I, here are some elementary instructions to help you along the road to pancake nirvana. First you have to gather your ingredients. I was making a double batch of batter. That explains the two eggs. I have already added the flour and milk to the mixing bowl. So far, the mess is minimal:

 

Very efficient, eh? Give it time. It will become progressively more messy.

 

Okay , now it starts to get serious. I've added the eggs, baking powder, oil, salt and sugar. The table is getting cluttered and blobs of egg white and puffs of flour are already attracting my herd of ants. My bare feet are sticking to the floor. Sheba is standing in the kitchen door whining. She knows there are tasty spots to be licked:

 

My dad taught me that one secret of making pancakes is to not over mix the batter. He always told me to leave a few lumps. So, that's the way I have always done it. I don't know if it really makes any difference. I do cheat a little also on the recipe. I put in twice as much sugar and twice as much salt. I use a whisk instead of an electric mixer because I'm far too lazy to get the thing out and plug it into the wall:

 

Okay, we're all mixed up now and it's time to cook up some pancakes. Here is my stove ready for a serious session of cooking:

 

I like Teflon skillets, because I don't have to wash them. I just put them under the spigot, rinse and wipe and then dry. As you can see, I'm also making scrambled eggs. I have onions, tomatoes and Colby cheese cubes ready to add. I'll fry the onions a little first, then add the eggs, milk, salt and pepper mixture. When the eggs are almost cooked, I'll put in the tomatoes and cheese and give it a final stir.

 

So, the pancakes and scrambled eggs are cooked now and it's time to sit down and (hopefully) enjoy the meal. I've even managed to enjoy the cooking experience, since I waited until my guests arrived and allowed my new friends from the highlands to help out as they wished. But, wait! Pancakes are not so fine without some sort of syrup, eh? Maple syrup is my favourite, but I can't abide an artificial taste - ugh! One can occasionally find Real Maple Syrup here in Madang, but it is far too pricey to fit into my new austerity budget, a necessary concession to my enormous, recently incurred debt load. Well, that will go away with time. I refuse to fret about it any longer. It's such a waste of valuable time. I tell myself twenty times a day, "Stop thinking about that. Money is not your security."

 

So, what to do about syrup? I pulled out another trick from my hazy memories of youth, most of which I'd rather not revisit. I cooked up a batch of home-made syrup before my guests arrived. One can make a very tasty caramel syrup so easily and inexpensively that I can't imagine why anyone buys the stuff. Here is an example:

 

I hope this doesn't bore anyone, but I'm forging on nevertheless. I have come this far. I may as well finish it.

 

Put a cup or two or three of plain sugar into a saucepan and turn up the heat. After a while, you will notice that it is melting. Amazing! Sugar melts all by itself. Now comes the tricky part. You have to stir and stir and stir while it's melting until the whole mess turns into a very hot amber liquid. This is the part when you want to be very careful. It will burn you until the tears flow if you get any on you, especially on your tummy if you cook as I do as bare as is appropriate considering the sensibilities of my guests. I find this necessary to tolerate the mini-hell of my kitchen in the tropical heat.

 

So, being careful, you allow the sugar to go all gooey until it's mostly melted, possibly allowing for a few stubborn lumps. Do not, please, allow it to become too dark. If you do it will quickly acquire a burnt taste which is not at all pleasant. You will have to feed it to the pigs. Once it is sufficiently melted and has the darkish amber colour which is desirable you add some water. How much is anybody's guess. Add enough to turn it all into a syrup. If you add too much you will have to boil it down, which takes too much time. Be very careful adding the water as it is going to boil up like crazy because the melted sugar is blazing hot. I recommend that you stand back.

 

Keep stirring until all of the hard-candy like sugar is melted into the water. You should end up with something like a thin syrup while it is still hot. You can test the viscosity of it by putting some in a spoon and then carefully holding the bottom of the spoon barely touching some cold water. The contents of the spoon will thicken and give you an idea of how syrupy the final concoction will be.

 

At this stage it is very sugary and has no flavour except the caramel. I usually like to add some flavouring after it cools. I happened to have some home-made vanilla extract. It worked a treat. It is a blessing that we are able to get vanilla beans here at a very modest price. Soaking them in vodka for a few weeks makes an excellent vanilla flavouring. We have another advantage here in PNG because the quality of our sugar is very poor. It's more like raw sugar - very strongly tasting of molasses. It actually makes a better syrup than completely refined sugar.

 

I didn't take a picture of the finished meal, because I was too busy enjoying it and the fine company. I was hungry, too.

 

Bon appétit.

Match de basket.

Salle omnisports Vallée du Tir

Nouméa, Nouvelle-Calédonie

Noumea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

 

Papouasie - Nouvelle-Guinée : 42

Samoa : 71

This goby has attitude. Help with the species name?

Match de classement de beach-volley, Fayaoué, Ouvéa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Ouvea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

Match de classement de beach-volley, Fayaoué, Ouvéa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Ouvea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

Mr Lesines (Vanuatu)

Match de classement de beach-volley, Fayaoué, Ouvéa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Ouvea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

Match de classement de beach-volley, Fayaoué, Ouvéa, Nouvelle-Calédonie.

Ouvea New Caledonia.

14ème jeux du pacifique.

14th Pacific Games.

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