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The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

Temple of Athena Alea.

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas..

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

Temple of Athena Alea.

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas..

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

 

"The modern temple is far superior to all other temples in the Peloponnesus on many grounds, especially for its size. Its first row of pillars is Doric, and the next to it Corinthian; also, outside the temple, stand pillars of the Ionic order. I discovered that its architect was Scopas the Parian, who made images in many places of ancient Greece, and some besides in Ionia and Caria.

On the front gable is the hunting of the Calydonian boar. The boar stands right in the center. On one side are Atalanta, Meleager, Theseus, Telamon, Peleus, Polydeuces, Iolaus, the partner in most of the labours of Hercules, and also the sons of Thestius, the brothers of Althaea, Prothous and Cometes.

On the other side of the boar is Epochus supporting Ancaeus who is now wounded and has dropped his axe; by his side is Castor, with Amphiaraus, the son of Oicles, next to whom is Hippothous, the son of Cercyon, son of Agamedes, son of Stymphalus. The last figure is Peirithous. On the gable at the back is a representation of Telephus fighting Achilles on the plain of the Caicus" (Pausanias 8.45.5-7).

Marble fountain just north of the Temple of Athena Alea.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

 

"To the north of the temple is a fountain, and at this fountain they say that Auge was outraged by Hercules" (Pausanias 8.47.4).

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

Temple of Athena Alea.

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas..

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

Temple of Athena Alea.

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas..

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

Temple of Athena Alea.

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

Temple of Athena Alea.

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas..

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

Temple of Athena Alea.

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas..

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

 

"The modern temple is far superior to all other temples in the Peloponnesus on many grounds, especially for its size. Its first row of pillars is Doric, and the next to it Corinthian; also, outside the temple, stand pillars of the Ionic order. I discovered that its architect was Scopas the Parian, who made images in many places of ancient Greece, and some besides in Ionia and Caria.

On the front gable is the hunting of the Calydonian boar. The boar stands right in the center. On one side are Atalanta, Meleager, Theseus, Telamon, Peleus, Polydeuces, Iolaus, the partner in most of the labours of Hercules, and also the sons of Thestius, the brothers of Althaea, Prothous and Cometes.

On the other side of the boar is Epochus supporting Ancaeus who is now wounded and has dropped his axe; by his side is Castor, with Amphiaraus, the son of Oicles, next to whom is Hippothous, the son of Cercyon, son of Agamedes, son of Stymphalus. The last figure is Peirithous. On the gable at the back is a representation of Telephus fighting Achilles on the plain of the Caicus" (Pausanias 8.45.5-7).

The visible foundations belong to a 4th c. BCE temple designed by the architect Scopas.

Tegea, Arkadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier, 7th c. BCE temple burned down in 394, and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier, 7th c. BCE temple burned down in 394, and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier, 7th c. BCE temple burned down in 394, and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier, 7th c. BCE temple burned down in 394, and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier, 7th c. BCE temple burned down in 394, and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier temple burned down in 394 and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier, 7th c. BCE temple burned down in 394, and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier, 7th c. BCE temple burned down in 394, and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier, 7th c. BCE temple burned down in 394, and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier, 7th c. BCE temple burned down in 394, and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

The cult here dates back at least to the Early Iron Age if not before. An earlier, 7th c. BCE temple burned down in 394, and it was replaced by a marble Doric temple designed by the architect Scopas.

 

Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

Spolia

Modern house near the Temple of Athena Alea at Tegea, Arcadia, Greece

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