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The so-called "heroon" of Lefkandi, dated to ca. 950 BCE; it is the largest building by far yet known from the Greek Early Iron Age.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The so-called "heroon" of Lefkandi, dated to ca. 950 BCE; it is the largest building by far yet known from the Greek Early Iron Age. (It's under the shed.)

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.

The ancient settlement site of Lefkandi-Xeropolis sits on a promontory above the South Euboean Gulf. Excavations have turned up a flourishing Late Mycenaean (LH IIIC) settlement as well as Iron Age habitation. The site seems to have been abandoned ca. 700 BCE, when the inhabitants may have moved to Eretria to the south.