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The Swing

 

How do you like to go up in a swing,

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!

 

Up in the air and over the wall,

Till I can see so wide,

River and trees and cattle and all

Over the countryside--

 

Till I look down on the garden green,

Down on the roof so brown--

Up in the air I go flying again,

Up in the air and down!

~ Stevenson ~

 

Get the details on Threads & Tuneage

King's Mere, Putney Heath

 

Putney is a district in south-west London, England, located in the London Borough of Wandsworth. It is situated 5.1 miles (8.2 km) south-west of Charing Cross. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. And thus we take leave of Putney, one of the pleasantest of the London suburbs, as well as the most accessible.

Manorbier village lies in the beautiful county of Pembrokeshire in South West Wales. Lying west of Tenby and south east of Pembroke, Manorbier was once famously described as "the pleasantest place in Wales” by Giraldus Cambrensis, The archdeacon of Brecon and historian of his time.

 

Source: www.manorbier.org.uk/

Manorbier is a village in the county of Pembrokeshire south west Wales. Located west of the town of Tenby and south east of Pembroke, Manorbier was once famously described as "the pleasantest place in Wales.” Having a picturesque beach and a beautiful medieval castle it would be difficult to argue with Giraldus Cambrensis, archdeacon of Brecon and the renowned chronicler of his times, more especially as "Gerald" was born in Manorbier (in 1146) and was the most famous Welsh travel writer for a thousand years!

LARGER

This 12th Century Norman church, dedicated to St. James the Greater, stands opposite Manorbier Castle in a dramatic position overlooking Manorbier Bay. The foundation of the church is ancient and unknown. Gerald of Wales worshipped at the church and as a boy (in 1153) he asked to be taken to the church for refuge during an attack on the nearby town of Tenby by Welsh Princes. The chancel, built on much older foundations, is called the ‘weeping chancel’ as a feature of the wall is said to show the inclination of Christ’s head upon the cross.

To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world.

The cruise through the canal was an amazing experience. There were so many people at the top deck. We were close to docking at the pier.

 

Best viewed in large "L"

 

Venice, Italy

 

Travel Blog

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"To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world." - Freya Stark

King's Mere, Putney Heath

 

Putney is a district in south-west London, England, located in the London Borough of Wandsworth. It is situated 5.1 miles (8.2 km) south-west of Charing Cross. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. And thus we take leave of Putney, one of the pleasantest of the London suburbs, as well as the most accessible.

"How do you like to go up in a swing,

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!

 

Up in the air and over the wall,

Till I can see so wide,

Rivers and trees and cattle and all

Over the countryside—

 

Till I look down on the garden green,

Down on the roof so brown—

Up in the air I go flying again,

Up in the air and down!"

 

~ Robert Louis Stevenson

 

Many thanks ~ fellow photographers and Flickr friends ~ for your visits, likes and notes.

 

j van cise photos (SmugMug)

flickriver photos

Fluidr

 

110617

King's Mere, Putney Heath

 

Putney is a district in south-west London, England, located in the London Borough of Wandsworth. It is situated 5.1 miles (8.2 km) south-west of Charing Cross. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. And thus we take leave of Putney, one of the pleasantest of the London suburbs, as well as the most accessible.

King's Mere, Putney Heath

 

Putney is a district in south-west London, England, located in the London Borough of Wandsworth. It is situated 5.1 miles (8.2 km) south-west of Charing Cross. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. And thus we take leave of Putney, one of the pleasantest of the London suburbs, as well as the most accessible.

Putney Heath Woods

 

Putney is a district in south-west London, England, located in the London Borough of Wandsworth. It is situated 5.1 miles (8.2 km) south-west of Charing Cross. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. And thus we take leave of Putney, one of the pleasantest of the London suburbs, as well as the most accessible.

King's Mere, Putney Heath

 

Putney is a district in south-west London, England, located in the London Borough of Wandsworth. It is situated 5.1 miles (8.2 km) south-west of Charing Cross. The area is identified in the London Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. And thus we take leave of Putney, one of the pleasantest of the London suburbs, as well as the most accessible.

“To awaken alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world.” – Freya Stark

HOW do you like to go up in a swing,

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it's the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!

 

Up in the air and over the wall,

Till I can see so wide,

Rivers and trees and cattle and all

Over the countryside—

 

Till I look down on the garden green,

Down on the roof so brown

Up in the air I go flying again,

Up in the air and down!

 

Robert Louis Stevenson

 

bwdreams.blogspot.com/

The Library, like the Banqueting Hall, occupies the site of the old medieval hall. With its rich, warm tones, it is perhaps the pleasantest room in the entire castle. As usual with work designed by the Architect William Burges, the library contains some whimsical touches. Burges has a sly laugh at Darwin in the design around a doorway: while one monkey steals an apple from the Tree of Knowledge, another two have grabbed the Book Of Truth, and one of these is looking into it with great perplexity.

 

I spent a Saturday morning at the superb North Carolina Museum of Art. I hope to return several times, and to keep adding to a set that will show the range of the collections, the beautifully designed new building, and the outdoor sculpture park and greenway that connect it to North Carolina's capitol city.

 

www.ncartmuseum.org/

 

www.briandavidjoyner.com/photography/2010/the-new-north-c...

 

______________________________________________________________________ _

"Though he chafed at being called an impressionist, Childe Hassam was the most accomplished of the American painters influenced by Monet. Many of his most engaging paintings were executed during summer weeks spent on the Isles of Shoals, a group of rocky islands off the coasts of Maine and New Hampshire. This painting conveys Hassam's quietly rapturous experience of nature. One imagines the artist rising at dawn to carry his canvas, easel and paint box out to the eastern headlands of Appledore Island, there to bear witness to a radient dawn." (From the museum label)

 

"Frederick Childe Hassam (October 17, 1859 – August 27, 1935) was a prolific American Impressionist painter, noted for his urban and coastal scenes. Along with Mary Cassatt and John Henry Twachtman, Hassam was instrumental in promulgating Impressionism to American collectors, dealers, and museums. He produced over 3,000 paintings, watercolors, etchings, and lithographs over the course of his career, and was an influential American artist of the early 20th century..........................................

 

During the summers, he would work in a more typical Impressionist location, such as Appledore Island, the largest of the Isles of Shoals off New Hampshire, then famous for its artist's colony. Social life on the island revolved around the salon of poetess Celia Thaxter who hosted artists and literary figures. The group was a "jolly, refined, interesting and artistic set of people...like one large family." There Hassam recalled, "I spent some of my pleasantest summers...(and) where I met the best people in the country." Hassam's subjects for his paintings included Thaxter's flower garden, the rocky landscape, and some interior scenes rendered with his most impressionistic brush strokes to date. In Impressionist fashion, he applied his colors "perfectly clear out of the tube" to unprimed canvas without pre-mixing.[29] Artists displayed their work in Thaxter's salon and were exposed to wealthy buyers staying on the island. Thaxter died in 1894, and in tribute Hassam painted her parlor in The Room of Flowers."

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Childe_Hassam

 

"How do you like to go up in a swing,

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!

 

Up in the air and over the wall,

Till I can see so wide,

River and trees and cattle and all

Over the countryside--

 

Till I look down on the garden green,

Down on the roof so brown--

Up in the air I go flying again,

Up in the air and down!"

- Robert Louis Stevenson The Swing

“One of the pleasantest things in the world is going on a journey; but I like to go by myself”

The Swing

  

How do you like to go up in a swing,

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!

 

Up in the air and over the wall,

Till I can see so wide,

River and trees and cattle and all

Over the countryside--

 

Till I look down on the garden green,

Down on the roof so brown--

Up in the air I go flying again,

Up in the air and down!

 

Robert Louis Stevenson

   

Identifier: essaysofleighhun00hunt

Title: The essays of Leigh Hunt

Year: 1903 (1900s)

Authors: Hunt, Leigh, 1784-1859 Symons, Arthur, 1865-1945, ed Brock, H. M. (Henry Matthew), 1875-1960 illus

Subjects:

Publisher: New York, E.P. Dutton and Company

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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hem as we may: and observe—Thomsonhimself does not say how cruel they are ; or what a setof rascals to dance and be merry in spite of their betterknowledge. He says, Ah little think the gay, licentious proud — and so they do. And so they will, till the diffusion ofthought, among all classes, flows, of necessity, into theirgay rooms and startled elevations ; and forces them to lookout upon the world, that they may not be lost by beingunder the level. We had intended a very merry paper this week, to be-speak the favour of our new readers :— A very merry, dancing, drinking, Laughing, quaffing, and unthinking paper— as Dryden has it. But the Christmas holidays are past;and it is their termination, we suppose, that has made us 144 BAD WEATHER serious. Sitting up at night also is a great inducer of yourmoral remark ; and if we are not so pleasant as we intendedto be, it is because some friends of ours, the other night,were the pleasantest people in the world till five in themorning.

 

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RAINYD^VY POETRY . Dicessit ab astrisHumor, et ima petit.—Lucan. Humour sets the welkin free, And condescends with you and me. Critics lament over a number of idle rhymes in the worksof Swift, that may come under the above title ; and wish, atleast, that they had never been published. They designatethem as the sweepings of his study, his private weaknesses,unworthy of so great a genius, and exclaim against hisfriends for collecting them. I really cannot see thehumiliation. If he had written nothing else, there might besome colour of accusation against him ; though I do not seewhy a dean is bound to be a dull private gentleman. Butif he had written nothing else, I think it may be pretty 146 RAINY-DAY POETRY safely pronounced that he would not have written thesetrifles. They bear the mark of a great hand, trifling asthey are. Their extravagance is that of power, not ofweakness; and the wilder Irish waggery of Dr Sheridan,slatternly and muddled, stands rebuked before them. Whatshould w

  

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“To awaken alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world.”

 

– Freya Stark

Identifier: crofuttsnewoverl1879crof

Title: Crofutt's new overland tourist and Pacific coast guide : containing a condensed and authentic description of over one thousand two hundred cities, towns, villages, stations, government fort and camps, mountains, lakes, rivers, sulphur, soda and hot springs, scenery, watering places, and summer resorts : where to look for and hunt the buffalo, antelope, deer and other game; trout fishing, etc., etc. In fact, to tell you what is worth seeing--where to see it--where to go--how to go--and whom to stop with while passing over the Union, Central and Southern Pacific Railroads, their branches and connections, by rail, water and stage, from sunrise to sunset, and part the way back, through Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Montana, Idaho, Nevada, California and Arizona

Year: 1879 (1870s)

Authors: Crofutt, George A

Subjects:

Publisher: Chicago, Ill., The Overland Pub. Co.

Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

  

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B p • p H^ ►Hj l-tJ H-t5 t-4s f r- 1 • g • » w . f ^ 8: ^ ca^h^ > Q I M. M-COOOO H^COO >*i- *°: 8 :^gfe^ Ci 1^ JnD 05 O OOhfc-O g^g 5 ^ j|s>, (_i M-g to H*- Ol « i> i 2 CD O . . •^ !::t* bO *■ ^ • • H-S? n !x p^pS ^ ■Sj^CO • • o^oo o w O H-»- ) 5 tO-:50!! • OdO 00 « o Ol Oi • ^D tOQOtO* • O O :&: $5 C003 ^c;i S Or o: o ? NOH^O-^O^H^og CO d CO. 00 c 5ibTQoo^b?b- CO • -CI c ozooi K-ooo >;*. f^ I -i -CI P i-» .0 ; CO I >0-3H-»>Oii(-iC0OTg Ol ooboisocobio- *-- • Hf^ ? • 00 « a I—( t?j P s g g ^ o t-i p- W p Q £5 > a ^ P ^ i s! c1 These springs are highly recommendedfor their medicinal qualities. The earlyemigrants of 1859-60 often used the watersof the Navajoe Spring for making bread;by the addition of a little acid it makes avery fine article. Manitou—in the summer, is a busytown, of 1,000 or more people—all bent on

 

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FIRSr STEAM RAILROAD TRAIN IN AMERICA ScC AnnCX No. 7. AXD PACIFIC COAST GUIDE. *71 enjoyment. Fountain Creek ripplesthrough the place, along the banks ofwhich are many trees—cottonwgod, pine,cedar and willow. Cosey little cottagespeep out here and there from among thetrees, rocks, and gulches, as though afraidtheir secluded retreat would be discovered. There are three large hotels at Manitou—besides several small ones. The Beebecan accommodate 200 guests; the Cliff,100; while the Manitou House—open sum-mer and winter, and the pleasantest inpoint of location—has ample accommo-dations for full 250 guests. From Manitou, the distance to the fol-lowing places are: Garden of the Gods,3 1-2 miles; Glen Eyrie, Queens Canyon,to Devils Punch-Bowl, 5 1-2 miles; toCheyenne Canyon and Seven Falls, tenmiles; Summit of Pikes Peak, nearesttrail, ten miles; Monument Park, withMammoth Anvil, Dutch Wedding, Vul-cans Workshop and Dunces Parliament,ten miles; Buxtons Glen, Iron Springand Ute Pass

  

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He said the pleasantest manner of spending a hot July day was lying from morning till evening on a bank of heath in the middle of the moors, with the bees humming dreamily about among the bloom, and the larks singing high up overhead, and the blue sky and bright sun shining steadily and cloudlessly."

Emily Bronte

 

tones: Bärbel's PS/PSE actions

texture: flypaper

  

wish you a wonderful weekend :)

 

NEW: "i love your work 76"

How do you like to go up in a swing?

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!

 

Stumbled upon this at the end of our morning walk.. quickly took some shots..

Sorry, I've never made one of these before, and notice one came out blank. I hope it was okay to create one of these. Please let me know if there is a certain protocol with making these mosaics. I never meant to offend if I have used a picture where I shouldn't have. I always see mosaics on flickr members pages and think how wonderful they look.

 

1. Petal Floor, 2. bokeh, 3. :) Happy Mothers Day :) Explore # 14, 4. Poofy, 5. colorful intentions, 6. {celebrate}, 7. through the fence..., 8. yellow in purple, 9. Untitled, 10. Untitled, 11. {happy bench monday} :: stone stairs edition, 12. Take a Bow, 13. sit {here} with me..., 14. Climb this rope to paradise, 15. plum tree, 16. Pink Forest - trees, 17. Иви, 18. purple , 19. Untitled, 20. ahh., 21. Your imagination is your preview to life's coming attractions. Albert Einstein, 22. a piece of my holiday, 23. whimsy, 24. Untitled, 25. The pleasantest things in the world are pleasant thoughts: and the great art of life is to have as many of them as possible. Montaigne

How do you like to go up in a swing,

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!

 

Up in the air and over the wall,

Till I can see so wide,

Rivers and trees and cattle and all

Over the countryside—

 

Till I look down on the garden green,

Down on the roof so brown—

Up in the air I go flying again,

Up in the air and down!

 

- Robert Louis Stevenson

 

This was one of my favorite poems as a child, and it still brings me back.

 

I love how you can't tell she's moving except for her hair.

 

Swinging is a summer cliche and blowing hair is an all around cliche and so is a title based on a poem or quote. Happy Cliche Saturday! Entering this into the seasonal category of the scavenger hunt.

"How do you like to go up in a swing,

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!"

 

“A Child’s Garden of Verses” by Robert Louis Stevenson and illustrated by Dorothy E. Russell. Introduction and notes by Blanche E. Weekes. Copyrighted in 1928 by The John C. Winston Co.

Identifier: punch08lemo

Title: Punch

Year: 1841 (1840s)

Authors: Lemon, Mark, 1809-1870 Mayhew, Henry, 1812-1887 Taylor, Tom, 1817-1880 Brooks, Shirley, 1815-1874 Burnand, F. C. (Francis Cowley), 1836-1917 Seaman, Owen

Subjects:

Publisher: [London : Punch Publications, etc.]

Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

  

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I have tried tumbling in both ways, and recommend the latter as by farthe pleasantest and safest. I chose the Mosaic Arab then—one for thedragoman, one for the requisites of refreshment, and two for myself—notthat I proposed to ride two at once, but a person of a certain dimensionhad best have a couple of animals in case of accident. I left Cairo on the afternoon of October 18, never hinting to a singleperson the mighty purpose of my journey. The waters were out, and wehad to cross them thrice—twice in track-boats, once on the shoulders ofabominable Arabs,

 

Text Appearing After Image:

who take a pleasure in slipping and in making believe to plunge you inthe stream. When in the midst of it, the brutes stop and demand moneyof you—you are alarmed, the savages may drop you if you do not give—you promise that you will do so. The half-naked ruffians who conductyou up the Pyramid, when they have got you panting to the most steep,dangerous, and lonely stone, make the same demand, pointing downwardswhile they beg, as if they would fling you in that direction on refusal.As soon as you have breath, you promise more money—it is the best way—you are a fool if you give it when you come down. The journey I find briefly set down in my pocket-book as thus :—Cairo-Gardens— Mosquitoes—Women dressed in blue—Children dressed innothing—Old Cairo—Nile, dirty water, ferry-boat—Town—Palm-trees,ferry-boat, canal, palm-trees, town—Rice-fields—Maize-fields—Fellows ondromedaries—Donkey down—Over his head—Pick up pieces—Morepalm-trees—More rice-fields—W

  

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Identifier: deportmentaldit00grah

Title: Deportmental ditties : and other verses

Year: 1900 (1900s)

Authors: Graham, Harry, 1874-1936

Subjects:

Publisher: London : Mills & Boon

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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If you, finally, would rather seek to emulate your father, And become, like him, a self-made millionaire,There are difficulties here, too, since the plutocrats career, too, Is an intricate and troublesome affair;For you have to wrench their money (like a bee extracting honey) From such persons as it happens to belong to,And the growth of public feeling against any form of stealing Is both prevalent and strong, too. 21 B* Deportmental Ditties Then a simple life of pleasure, as a gentleman of leisure,Is the proper kind for evry one to lead, With a dash of dissipation, just by way of relaxation, And a brainstorm to account for each misdeed ; And the youth of one-and-twenty who has luxuries in plenty,And whose balance at the bank continues healthy, Will confirm my own impression that the pleasantest profession Is professing to be wealthy !

 

Text Appearing After Image:

22 No. IV. THE PROPOSAL In distant pre-Victorian days, When sentiment was still the fashion, And lovers chose becoming waysTo advertise their passion, The etiquette prescribed by Cupid Was not considered dull or stupid. The ardent suitor of that date, Who sought a maidens hand in marriage,Would drive in state to her front-gate, In his ancestral carriage ;And thence, with mien correct and knightly,Proceed to pay his court politely. When Strephon doffed his beaver hat,And humbly knelt before his goddess,Poor Chloes heart went pit-a-pat In her brocaded bodice ;And while he cut these courtly capers,She shrieked and swooned and had the vapours.

  

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The pleasantest things in the world are pleasant thoughts: and the great art of life is to have as many of them as possible. --Montaigne

I love this photo--it looks very much like the Christopher Robin illustrations by A.A. Milne

 

thank you Pianocats16 for reminding me this poem is by RL Stevenson! xox jean :)

 

The Swing

   

How do you like to go up in a swing,

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!

 

Up in the air and over the wall,

Till I can see so wide,

River and trees and cattle and all

Over the countryside--

 

Till I look down on the garden green,

Down on the roof so brown--

Up in the air I go flying again,

Up in the air and down!

  

Robert Louis Stevenson

Identifier: adventuresofpete00bear

Title: The adventures of Peter Peterkin

Year: 1916 (1910s)

Authors: Bear, Gilly Gabriel, Gilbert W

Subjects: Children's stories Whales

Publisher: New York : Sam'l Gabriel Sons & Co.

Contributing Library: New York Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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ries of adventure, inspiring, entertaining and amusingand full of life, action and interest just before the Sandman comes. The Green Tulip—A splendid fairy tale, describing the exciting adventures of twolittle Dutch children in search of a fairy tulip. Fun in the Forest—A charming story of absorbing interest, which tells an amusingtale of animals and their doings in field and forest. The illustrations and general make-up of the books are very attractive.—HeraW-re/e-graph, Montreal. The Green Tulip and Fun in the Forest, from the press of Saml. Gabriel Sons &Company, New York, are two delightful childrens books illustrated by Frances Brundage.The illustrations are in black and white and in color, the color pages being beautifully done.The stories are printed in large type and are nicely hound.—The Journal, Milwaukee. The Green Tulip By Gilly Bear Contains 64 Pages, Profusely Illustrated in Color and Black and White.Bound in Cloth, with Colored Insert on Cover Price 75 Cents

 

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Katrina and Jan are two quaint Dutca children living in Holland, described in The GreenTulip as the loveliest, strangest, pleasantest land on earth. They first meet a green fairywho is crying for a green tulip. So Katrina and Jan start out to find the green tulip for thegrieving fairy. In their search, the pair have some funny adventures. The illustrations areasdelightfully Dutch as a windmill or one of Franz Halss pictures.—Post Express, Rochester, N.Y. The Green Tulip—A fairy tale of Holland by Gilly Bear and published by Saml. GabrielSons & Company. Another clever and attractive bit of reading for the quite young juvenile.The illustrations done by Frances Brundage are in themselves ample conunendation for thischarming book for the Christmas list. The world of fairyland is put under tribute to furnishthe theme. Holland is made the setting and the talented co-workers in author and artist offerone of the most pleasing numbers in the Gilly Bear series, as a result of their deft

  

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Title: "Unprotected Females in Norway; or, the pleasantest way of travelling there, passing through Denmark and Sweden. With Scandinavian sketches from nature. [By Miss E. Lowe.]", "Appendix"

Author: Norway

Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10281.b.43."

Page: 79

Place of Publishing: London

Date of Publishing: 1857

Issuance: monographic

Identifier: 002676251

 

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Find this item in the British Library catalogue, 'Explore'.

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Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

 

Order a higher quality version from here.

  

Identifier: tombrownsschoold00hugh4

Title: Tom Browns school-days

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: Hughes, Thomas, 1822-1896

Subjects:

Publisher: New York, London, Harper & Brothers

Contributing Library: New York Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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ed to propound Arthurs theory about not beingsorry for his friends deaths, which he had hitherto kept in thebackground, and by which he was much exercised; for he didntfeel it honest to take what pleased him and throw over the rest,and was trying vigorously to persuade himself that he should likeall his best friends to die offhand. But Easts powers of remaining serious were exhausted, and infive minutes he was saying the most ridiculous things he couldthink of, till Tom was almost getting angry again. Despite of himself, however, he couldnt help laughing andgiving it up, when East appealed to him with, Well, Tom, youaint going to punch my head, I hope, because I insist upon beingsorry when you get to earth ? And so their talk finished for that time, and they tried to learnfirst lesson; with very poor success, as appeared next morning,when they were called up and narrowly escaped being floored,which ill-luck, however, did not sit heavily on either of their souls. SCHOOL DAYS CHAPTER VI

 

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TOM BROWN S LAST MATCH Heaven grant the manlier heart, that timely, ereYouth fly, with lifes real tempest would be coping;The fruit of dreamy hopingIs, waking, blank despair. —CLOUGH, Amlarualia. HE curtain now rises upon the last act of ourlittle drama—for hard-hearted publishers warnme that a single volume must of necessity havean end. Well, well! the pleasantest thingsmust come to an end. I little thought lastlong vacation, when I began these pages tohelp while away some spare time at a watering-place, how vividly many an old scene, which had lain hid awayfor years in some dusty old corner of my brain, would come backagain and stand before me as clear and bright as if it had hap-pened yesterday. The book has been a most grateful task to me,and I only hope that all you, my dear young friends who read it 1339]

  

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How do you like to go up in a swing,

Up in the air so blue?

Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing

Ever a child can do!

 

Up in the air and over the wall,

Till I can see so wide,

River and trees and cattle and all

Over the countryside—

 

Till I look down on the garden green,

Down on the roof so brown—

Up in the air I go flying again,

Up in the air and down!

 

RL Stevenson

 

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Hair Argrace Tsumugi $250L

 

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Background Zen Garden Complete Garden in a box $20L on the marketplace.

 

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Title: "Unprotected Females in Norway; or, the pleasantest way of travelling there, passing through Denmark and Sweden. With Scandinavian sketches from nature. [By Miss E. Lowe.]", "Appendix"

Author: Norway

Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10281.b.43."

Page: 10

Place of Publishing: London

Date of Publishing: 1857

Issuance: monographic

Identifier: 002676251

 

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The pleasantest things in the world are pleasant thoughts: and the great art of life is to have as many of them as possible.

Montaigne

To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world. -freya stark

 

Identifier: riversofgreatbr00lond

Title: The rivers of Great Britain, descriptive, historical, pictorical; rivers of the south and west coasts

Year: 1897 (1890s)

Authors:

Subjects: Rivers

Publisher: London [etc.] Cassell

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

entmere Reservoir,111 Boll offei-s thetemj)tation of anascent of 2,476 feet,and Troutbeck valleyis preferred as onthe Avhole the easiestand pleasantest route.Esthwaite Water,one of tlic smallerlakes, and a satelliteof ^^iu(l(l■lllere, isalso narrow in ]no-])ortion to length,and a matter offour miles removedto the west. Xoone is heard to raveabout its honulvshores and indifferentsetting, but it comesunder friujuent noticefrom its nearness to Ilawkshead, a quaint little nunkct-town with a notal)l( chinch,unil u grannnar school, one of whose forms is preserved with Wordsworths initialscut in it. Ksthwaite Water, however, is bound to receive its due in these j)ages,as the helpmeet of Windermere through the medium of the slioit and business-likeHtreaui (.rxsr.v Hkck. At the point where this feedei- is lost in the lake, thoughit iM not itH deepest ])art, the angler mav reckon upon the miscellaneous sportwhich is yielded by the lakes generally. In tlie dee]»er waters (and the plinnli line

 

Text Appearing After Image:

THE OllETA IIETWKKN TI1111.1.K.1.1.1J .V.MJ hL>rtICK (/I. 298). The Lkven.] THE LEVEN. 293 makes the bottom 240 foot at the maximum depth) the char, only to he fomid iua few locaHties in the thioe kingdoms, occurs. Its capture with rod and line issport of a kind, but it is inferior in this respect to the trout. At a time when theavailable rivers for the angler who cannot afford to be his own riparian owner arebecoming fewer and fewer, it is a little remarkable that these countless becks, tarns, full-sizedstreams and lakesare not morehighly prized bythe fisherman-tourist. It is truethat Windermere,from one cause., _ .3%, >-_>*- ^^^ -■■ ^^^-- ^ nxmmKMj^^ and another, ha.-

  

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Pelham Bay Park, Bronx, New York City, New York

 

This large dignified country house of local stone with cast iron balconies is one of the finest Greek Revival Period houses in this region. This excellently proportioned mansion with its handsome interiors and fine garden, with a small family burial ground, is one of the pleasantest country seats in New York City. The house is owned by the City and is under the jurisdiction of the Parks Department. It is leased to the International Garden Club which has restored it and now maintains it. In 1946 it was opened to the public as a house museum.

 

The importance of this building lies in its expression of great Classical dignity. Spaciousness, simplicity of line, symmetrically balanced elements and good construction typical of the Greek Revival Style are but a few of the details which make the Bartow-Pell Mansion one of the best examples of this architecture in the City.

 

- From the 1966 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

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Title: "Unprotected Females in Norway; or, the pleasantest way of travelling there, passing through Denmark and Sweden. With Scandinavian sketches from nature. [By Miss E. Lowe.]", "Appendix"

Author: Norway

Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10281.b.43."

Page: 220

Place of Publishing: London

Date of Publishing: 1857

Issuance: monographic

Identifier: 002676251

 

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