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Herring Gull gobbling a ?Sculpin at Pittenweem Harbour

This one was sitting on the harbour wall at Pittenweem. All traces of the winter flecking are gone. This adult is ready to breed.

Herring Gulls keeping an eye on things in Pittenweem Harbour, Fife

This chilled Grey Seal was loafing in Pittenweem Harbour

Gyles House built in 1626 it was a sea-captain's house

Fishing boats tied up at Pittenweem harbour.

Pittenween harbour, Fife, Scotland

Fishing boats at Pittenweem harbour

Some fishing boats brighten up a rather dull day

taken in a street by the harbour in Pittenweem, Fife

A day of sunshine and passing clouds at Pittenweem.

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Pittenweem is now the most active of the fishing ports in the East Neuk coast of Fife. Fishing boats jostle for position in its busy harbour and this is a lively vibrant place at any time of day. To add to the atmosphere, visitors can watch the fish market conducted in the sheds on the harbour each morning.

 

The harbour is a magnet for visitors. Photographers can take their pick between the brightly-hulled fishing boats or the jumble of red pantiled or grey slated houses. Pittenweem simply oozes charm. Along the harbourside are the local inns, which have served fishermen for generations and no doubt continue to do so. Many of the small houses in the village bear plaques showing that they have been restored by the National Trust for Scotland.

Undiscovered Scotland

 

Safe in the Harbour - Eric Bogle

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Pittenweem - Flight Glenrothes to Crail 12 May 2018

 

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Pittenweem Harbour, coast of Fife, Scotland

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Scottish Creel Fishing

Creel fishing is a profitable, species-selective and environmentally sustainable form of fishing with very little by-catch. Target species are brought to the surface alive and undamaged, meaning that egg bearing ‘berried’ females or undersized animals can be returned to the sea. The carbon footprint (in particular fuel consumption) is minimal compared to other methods of fishing as the majority of boats are small and fish relatively close to shore.

 

Creel fishing takes place around Scotland’s coast. Creeling, and the many shore based services that rely on it, are often the main source of employment in fragile rural communities. The boats that make up the inshore creel fishery are small - usually under 10 metres long- which means that engine size and weather dictate how far from shore, and how often they can fish. One or two people normally crew a creel boat, one of whom is usually the owner. There were 1042 active creel fishing boats in Scotland in 2011. The main markets for the shellfish caught are on the European continent.

SCFF

 

Luke Kelly - (The Bonny) Shoals Of Herring

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Pittenweem Beach:

 

A walk along part of the Fife Coastal Path from Upper Largo to Anstruther approximately 14 miles.

 

....one of Pittenweem series...

Pittenweem is a charming old Scottish village.

 

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Water pouring from the breakwater in Pittenweem after a good storm battering from the Beast from the East. I tried in vain to get a good picture of the waves smashing the wall but the weather was horrendous and my equipment and I took a pounding.

Curving harbour wall and lighthouse at Pittenweem.

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Quite a crowd of these in Pittenweem Harbour today. Nice male.

New Year's Eve in Pittenweem and the fishing fleet is still working. This fisherman was hauling in the pots from his companion's boat below.

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The village name means place of the cave, referring to St Fillan's cave in Cove Wynd, which was used as a chapel by St Fillan in the 700s. The saint reputedly had miraculous powers. He is said to have written his sermons in the complete darkness of the cave, guided only by a glow emitted by his arm. Over the intervening centuries the cave has been largely respected as a shrine, though it was once used to store fishing nets. In the 1930s the cave was re-dedicated and services are still held there. The key is available locally.

 

Enigma - The Rivers Of Belief

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Lovely wee village of Pittenweem,

  

The Pittenweem Parish church can be seen from the harbour.

Parts of the Parish Church date back to the 1300s and originally formed part of the priory church of Pittenweem Priory. This grew out of a community founded by Augustinian monks who came here from the Isle of May in the 1200s. The rest of the priory was eventually incorporated into the fabric of the village of Pittenweem as it developed, and the site of the refectory was used in 1821 for the town hall, since converted to a house.

 

Vivaldi 'Four seasons' - Presto from summer

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It was nice to get several ages of common Eiders at Pittenweem Harbour earlier in the week. Adult male.

Pittenweem

 

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Common Eider male in Pittenweem harbour swimming through the reflections of a red trawler

Pittenweem Harbour was first recorded as a port in the year 1228 and the heyday of the fishing industry was during the latter half of the 19th and the beginning of the last century.

Pittenweem is now the most active of the fishing ports in the East Neuk coast of Fife. Fishing boats jostle for position in its busy harbour and this is a lively vibrant place at any time of day. To add to the atmosphere, visitors can watch the fish market conducted in the sheds on the harbour each morning.

The harbour is a magnet for visitors. Photographers can take their pick between the brightly-hulled fishing boats or the jumble of red pantiled or grey slated houses. Pittenweem simply oozes charm. Along the harbourside are the local inns, which have served fishermen for generations and no doubt continue to do so. Many of the small houses in the village bear plaques showing that they have been restored by the National Trust for Scotland.

As in other villages in the East Neuk of Fife many houses echo the Dutch style with crow-stepped gables. Viewed from above, the roofs seem to tumble down the hillside to the harbour below.

Pittenweem

 

Please see my other Photographs at: www.jamespdeans.co.uk

Pittenweem Harbour was first recorded as a port in the year 1228 and the heyday of the fishing industry was during the latter half of the 19th and the beginning of the last century.

Pittenweem is now the most active of the fishing ports in the East Neuk coast of Fife. Fishing boats jostle for position in its busy harbour and this is a lively vibrant place at any time of day. To add to the atmosphere, visitors can watch the fish market conducted in the sheds on the harbour each morning.

The harbour is a magnet for visitors. Photographers can take their pick between the brightly-hulled fishing boats or the jumble of red pantiled or grey slated houses. Pittenweem simply oozes charm. Along the harbourside are the local inns, which have served fishermen for generations and no doubt continue to do so. Many of the small houses in the village bear plaques showing that they have been restored by the National Trust for Scotland.

As in other villages in the East Neuk of Fife many houses echo the Dutch style with crow-stepped gables. Viewed from above, the roofs seem to tumble down the hillside to the harbour below.

Pittenweem

 

Please see my other Photographs at: www.jamespdeans.co.uk

Pittenweem:

 

A walk along part of the Fife Coastal Path from Upper Largo to Anstruther approximately 14 miles.

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