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In the very heart of Berlin - nearby of our home you'll find these rapeseeds fields. A pilot project of the Free University of Berlin.

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Direkt im Herzen von Berlin - bei uns in der Nähe -

findet man diese Rapsfelder.

Sie sind ein Pilotprojekt der Freien Universität Berlin.

  

Harvesting of sea buckthorn as a pioneer project in Styria.

For exchange of experiences were the regions of Northern Germany contacted, were these berries grow.

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Ernte von Sanddorn als ein PionierProjekt in der Steiermark.

Die Regionen von Norddeutschland, wo diese Beeren angesiedelt sind, wurden zum Erfahrungsaustausch kontaktiert.

This is in the park Adkins Arboretum. I like this picture a lot because is one of my first pictures I took when I decide to start learning photography. I have not be able to take more pictures for some time now (health problems) and I decide to post this modified version of my real picture that you can see in my photostream.

 

Please, give me your opinion and all criticism are welcome.

 

Thank you very much!

 

Adkins Arboretum (400 acres) is a native garden and arboretum located within Tuckahoe State Park at 12610 Eveland Road, Ridgely, Maryland. The facility was developed as a pilot project for the Sustainable Sites Initiative, an interdisciplinary program of the United States Botanic Garden, the American Society of Landscape Architects, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, and the University of Texas. Its gardens contain a "living collection" of over 600 native plant species, used to promote land stewardship practices in the Chesapeake Bay region.

 

About 18,000 people visit the arboretum each year; 5,000 are children. It offers classes to the public in horticulture, ecology and natural history throughout the year and is open daily.

Nelson’s 1909 built courthouse is one of the most photographed building in town. It stands on the corner of Vernon and Ward Streets - kinda hidden behind the ivy,

 

The building was designed by F.M. Rattenbury, famous for the British Columbia Parliament Buildings and the Empress Hotel in Victoria.

 

Rattenbury used a composite of Romanesque and Chateau styles to create a structure of stately beauty combined with an imposing strength appropriate to its judiciary nature.

 

Contractor W.C. Gillett, who was mayor of Nelson from 1906 to 1907, used Kootenay Marble quarried from his own Kaslo site for the construction.

 

Gillet employed British Columbia Douglas fir for the interior woodwork and the roof was constructed of slate taken from the west coast.

 

A building long admired for its fine design, the Nelson Court House stands as a testament to beauty and strength in a community that takes pride in its own living history.

 

ABOUT NELSON:

With 206 identified heritage sites, the city of Nelson has the highest number of heritage structures of any BC community outside of Vancouver and Victoria.

 

Nelson was one of the first communities in the pilot project for the Main Street Canada Program, with 70 heritage buildings in the downtown core restored between 1980 and 1985.

 

69 of the sites are on the Canadian Register of Historic Places - sites with a Statement of Significance that identifies the important heritage elements of the site.

Excerpt from urbantoronto.ca:

 

A new street mural has been installed in Kensington Market by local community members as the first instalment in the City of Toronto's StART Road Mural Pilot Project. Despite prohibiting the installation of street murals in 2015, City Council subsequently voted to allow select community organizations to install street murals as part of a pilot project.

 

Located on Baldwin Street, the mural features graphics that represent the neighbourhood. The vivid assortment of vegetables and fruits signifies Kensington Market's identity as a neighbourhood known for its eclectic variety of grocery stores and restaurants. The mural is the first stage of a four-stage pilot project that will see street murals installed on Condor Avenue (west of Greenwood subway yard), Lauder Avenue (near Dufferin and St. Clair), Hiawatha Road (Little India), and in North York (where a specific location is yet to be disclosed), by October 31st, 2016.

 

The StART Road Mural Pilot Project allows community organizations to install murals on low-traffic streets during scheduled events that permit road closures. The initiative emerged through a concerted effort by urban advocates—including some City Councillors—who advocate in favour of road murals as a place-making and community-building exercise. Prompted by the community-led installation of a street mural in the Regal Heights neighbourhood in 2015—which moved the City to disallow street murals citing traffic, safety, and maintenance concerns—the pilot project was established in order to determine the feasibility, durability, and safety concerns associated with this type of public art.

 

Four murals will be installed as part of the pilot project, which culminates in October. As part of this initiative, community organizations must hold local consultations to ensure support for each project, in addition to covering the cost of the murals, as well as recruiting local residents in their installation and maintenance. Once the projects have been installed, the City of Toronto's Transportation Services division will analyze the feasibility of these installations in order to consider establishing a permanent framework for street murals.

 

About a week ago I had the opportunity to look again at the building from the outside. Meanwhile, the demolition work is well advanced. The old approach zone for the garbage trucks is already destroyed (see the photos Nr. 32 & Nr. 15-17 of the series). On some sides, the walls are already completely torn and you can already see the inside of the building. A building disappears and I guess it's kind of sad ....

 

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

Via the ladder on the left side we went to the next area of the complex.

 

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

  

Goodbye garbage-incineration-plant, we had a f*ck*ng great time! And: thanks a lot for all the views, favs and comments! I am very happy about such a positive response! Yesterday I happened to be there again and the demolition is already very advanced. Maybe I'll post the days an additional photo of the current state;)

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

As you can see in the backround (like on Photo No. 16): The walls of this hall were already demolished. On older photos from the Internet you can still see the former facade (here for example: gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...).

 

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

O Train - Line 2

 

Ottawa’s “Trillium line” crossing the Rideau River and entering Carleton University. The Trillium Line of Ottawa’s Light Rail Transit (LRT) is also known as “Line 2”. The LRT currently only has 2 lines, the north-south line featured here and the east-west line, known as Confederation Line.

 

“The Trillium Line was introduced on October 15, 2001, as a pilot project to provide an alternative to the Transitway bus rapid transit on which Ottawa had long depended exclusively for its high-grade transit service. The single-track line operated with five stations and a single passing loop at Carleton station. (1).

 

It is legally considered a federally-regulated mainline railway despite being used for local public transport purposes, and the service it provides is, in terms of its route and service frequency, more like that of an urban railway than a metro or tramway. (1).

 

The Trillium Line initially used three Bombardier Talent diesel multiple unit (DMU) trains for service. After being retired in 2015, the units were put up for auction multiple times before eventually being sold for C$25,200 on December 14, 2018. In September 2011, Alstom announced that it would deliver six new two-car Coradia LINT train sets in 2013; the trains were handed over to OC Transpo in June 2013. These trains were put into service on March 2, 2015, and the Bombardier Talent units were subsequently retired.” (1).

 

Much to the disappointment - and frustration - of Carleton University students, many of whom use the O-Train’s Trillium line to travel to and from campus, the Trillium line will be out of service from May 2020 through to September 2022 while a significant expansion of the line is completed.(2).

 

Sources: (1) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trillium_Line

(2) www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/frustrated-students-carleto...

 

The light was pretty perfect. The sun was low, we didn’t need a flashlight and we benefited from strong contrasts.

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

  

Tower of D. Pedro Pitões

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The Tower of D. Pedro Pitões (Portuguese: Torre de D. Pedro Pitões/Torre da Cidade) is a former-medieval fortification situated in the civil parish of Cedofeita, Santo Ildefonso, Sé, Miragaia, São Nicolau e Vitória, that protected the northern Portuguese city of Porto.

The tower was "rediscovered" in 1940 in the Largo do Açougue during the course of the demolition of various buildings circling the Sé Cathedral of Porto, and was reconstructed near its original site.

 

In 1974, the building became the seat of the Centro Cultural e Social da Sé (Sé Social and Cultural Centre).

Architect Manuel Magalhães directed the rehabilitation of the tower in 1997, as part of the urban pilot project for the Bairro da Sé. Following this, in 1998, a tourist post under the concession of Porto Tours was opened onsite, based on a protocol between the Associação de Turismo do Porto (Porto Tourism Association) and the Câmara Municipal do Porto.

 

...I have to admit, I was pretty excited too :D

 

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

  

This part of the complex was already half open and...

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

  

Remains of technology were found on the wall, a carpet of pigeon shit and a large number of dead birds on the floor.

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

Merchants, Kirkpatrick, Wilson and Clements (K.W.C.), paid $10,500 for the lots for this Nelson gem.

 

Designed and built in one year (1901), it long remained the largest mercantile block in Nelson.

 

At street level, one of the City’s finest grocery stores offered delicacies from afar. The turret, once typical of many corner buildings, is the only one remaining on Baker Street.

 

Arches over the windows on the third storey, decorative brick work and pilasters tie the structural elements together.

 

With 206 identified heritage sites, the city of Nelson has the highest number of heritage structures of any BC community outside of Vancouver and Victoria.

 

Nelson was one of the first communities in the pilot project for the Main Street Canada Program, with 70 heritage buildings in the downtown core restored between 1980 and 1985.

 

69 of the sites are on the Canadian Register of Historic Places - these sites have a Statement of Significance that identifies the important heritage elements of the site

...last photos of the outer facade were shot.

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

Partially a kind of end-time mood arose (my friend was reminded of his ps-4 game "last of us" ;)

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

  

Outside, the progress of clean-up work could already be seen.

 

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

The Fierens blocks were built during 1938 and 1939 and are based on the idea of the "Subsistence dwelling ". It was a rational approach to social housing. They were modern for their time and possessed waste chutes, central heating, a kitchen and even a bathroom. In 2015 the City Council wanted to demolish them. After heavy protests from the neighbourhood and by recognition of the high architectural value, these plans were drained. On the facades of this social housing blocks the work of young artists was put up under the name 'Public Museum'. The artist translated the title into Greek and wanted to make a link between the Greek crisis and the discussion about this building.

The city will now turn them into 125 'affordable rental flats' for people who are not eligible for social housing. With the pilot project she hopes to stop the urban exodus and attract and keep promising young people to the city.

 

De Fierensblokken werden gebouwd gedurende 1938 en 1939 en zijn gebaseerd op het idee van de "Existenzminimumwoning".

Het was een rationale benadering van sociale huisvesting. Ze waren modern voor hun tijd en bezaten afvalkokers, centrale verwarming, een keuken en zelfs elk een badkamer.

In 2015 wilde het stadsbestuur ze slopen. Na zware protesten uit de buurt en door erkenning van de hoge architecturale waarde, werden deze plannen afgevoerd. Op de gevels van deze sociale woonblokken werd werk van jonge kunstenaars aangebracht onder de noemer ‘Openbaar Museum’.

De kunstenaar vertaalde de titel naar het Grieks en wilde hiermee een link leggen tussen de Griekse crisis en de discussie die er over dit gebouw gevoerd werd.

De stad zal van de Fierensblokken 125 ‘betaalbare huurwoningen’ maken voor mensen die net niet in aanmerking komen bij sociale woningen. Ze hoopt met het proefproject de stadsvlucht tegen te gaan en kansrijke jonge mensen naar de stad te trekken en te houden.

  

A Shadow of a broken window. Inside, the building was very well preserved and at no time we had to expect any collapse or such dangers.

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

We suspected that these big tubes could be the old turbines for power generation.

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

  

Everywhere were old instruments, tubes and other machines to discover. Some things were demolished and...

 

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

  

I found the overturned lantern pretty cool. At home I came to ponder: how the hell could that happen at this exposed location?

 

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

...thanks to the many well-preserved scaffolding, you could explore the building from countless angles.

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

  

Reminiscent of childhood Sci-fi programs such as Space 1999, you can find these Floating Pavilions just beyond Wilhelminapier. I arrived just in time before the sun set on my last evening in Rotterdam.

 

Click here to see more of my Rotterdam shots : www.flickr.com/photos/darrellg/albums/72157700872931264

 

From the Inhabitat website : "In an effort to address the challenges of climate change and sea level rise, the City of Rotterdam has started to build some intriguing floating structures. The first pilot project is a catalyst for climate change-proof architecture called the Floating Pavilion that consists of three connected hemispheres that look like bubbles anchored within the Dutch city’s old harbor. An initiative of Rotterdam Climate Proof (part of the Rotterdam Climate Initiative), the mixed-use pavilion was designed by Deltasync and PublicDomain Architects, and it sets an unprecedented example for innovative, sustainable and climate-proof architecture......

 

The shelter’s heating and air conditioning systems rely on solar energy and surface water and the systems are only used in areas of the structure where they are specifically required. The pavilion also purifies its own water to use in the toilets and whatever is left can be discharged back into the water with no negative impact."

 

My Website : Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : Photocrowd

 

© D.Godliman

Maybe someone wanted to get rid of his crap or the fire department used the wrecks for exercises?

 

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

Mike Makatron’s mural in Meyers Place

 

Spend a night down one of Melbourne's oldest laneways and see why Meyers Place is a popular spot for both traditionalists and new-school scenesters. Originally known as Nicholas Lane, Meyers Place connects Little Collins and Bourke up at the top end of town. Recently selected as one of the pilot projects for the city's new Green Your Laneways campaign, the laneway's grey walls will be brought to life by creepers, vertical gardens, window boxes and green galleries.

 

Join the arty types and suits that still flock to the eponymous bar that started the laneway drinking scene way back in 1990s. Climb the stairs and order your favourite at Italian home-style eatery The Waiters Club, which has been a pit stop for countless theatre fans and revellers over the years. Enjoy a drink in the Loop rooftop garden and look out across the city, tuck into Argentinian cuisine in the old-world atmosphere of San Telmo, or get adventurous with tailor made cocktails at Lily Blacks.

 

Content: Visit Victoria

 

IMG_1176-2

Finally the time has come and i can proudly present the first photo of my new series “An old Garbage-Incineration-Plant. Impressions of an abandoned Place”. For me it was one of the most exciting "Lost Places" ever. As you can see from the first photos, we (a super-cool friend was with me) were rewarded right at the beginning of our tour with broken windows and a first view at a "heart" of the complex...

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

Reminiscent of childhood Sci-fi programs such as Space 1999, you can find these Floating Pavilions just beyond Wilhelminapier. I arrived just in time before the sun set on my last evening in Rotterdam.

 

Click here to see more of my Rotterdam shots : www.flickr.com/photos/darrellg/albums/72157700872931264

 

From the Inhabitat website : "In an effort to address the challenges of climate change and sea level rise, the City of Rotterdam has started to build some intriguing floating structures. The first pilot project is a catalyst for climate change-proof architecture called the Floating Pavilion that consists of three connected hemispheres that look like bubbles anchored within the Dutch city’s old harbor. An initiative of Rotterdam Climate Proof (part of the Rotterdam Climate Initiative), the mixed-use pavilion was designed by Deltasync and PublicDomain Architects, and it sets an unprecedented example for innovative, sustainable and climate-proof architecture......

 

The shelter’s heating and air conditioning systems rely on solar energy and surface water and the systems are only used in areas of the structure where they are specifically required. The pavilion also purifies its own water to use in the toilets and whatever is left can be discharged back into the water with no negative impact."

 

My Website : Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : Photocrowd

 

© D.Godliman

Gas cartridges and fire extinguishers were scattered all over the site. To get to the next building, we first had to get out again.

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

  

No shit, we found a wreck of an old fire truck and...

 

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

  

Here you can see the slightly exposed staircase over which we came to the roof of the plant.

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

Architects: Lesson and Kuhne

Year of Completion: 1915 / Conversion and restoration: 1997

International competition: 1st Prize, 1994

Award: Saxon State Prize for Architecture, 1999

 

At 83,460 square metres (898,400 sq ft), it is the world's largest railway station measured by floor area. It has 19 overground platforms housed in six iron train sheds, a multi-level concourse with towering stone arches, and a 298 metres (978 ft) long facade.The plans for the historical Leipzig main railroad station by the architects of

the firm of Lossow und Kühne were submitted in the 1906 competition for a “Passenger Railway Station with Terminal.” At the time of its inauguration in 1915, it was the largest terminal in Europe. Beyond its function as a transportation hub, it rapidly developed into an architectural showcase. After being destroyed in World War II it was rebuilt in 1965, but it lost some of its significance as a result of the increase in automobile travel.

The uses of the railroad as well as the requirements of railway stations have changed over the years. In addition to providing functionality, flexibility, comfort, and design, today’s railway station architecture must measure up to the standards of upscale urban pedestrian areas. This was the idea behind reestablishing the main Leipzig railroad station as the focus of urban life in the city.

HPP received the first prize in the architectural competition for the station’s reconfiguration in 1994 and was contracted immediately thereafter to follow through with the realisation of their proposal.

As a result, the conversion of the largest railway terminal in Europe became a pilot project with the mission of incorporating a retail and services centre in the reception building. In doing so, HPP had to guarantee that while the structure

of the landmark-protected station building would not be altered, the new design would meet the project’s functional, constructive, and economic needs while maintaining the fascinating impact of the 270-meter-long concourse hall. In its conversion of the station the design allowed for one major alteration to the existing structure: the addition of a lens-shaped opening in the concourse hall which respected the historical nature of the structure while creating a formal

and functional element of spatial connection.

Via the staircase one could reach the big hall over every floor! Relatively high up it looked like this and...

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

We could even go to the roof of the complex, which was about 10 stories high. The view was fantastic!

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

Roundabout Remembered:

21 years ago tonight, RH1 "Kestrel" turned the "wheels of Roundabout" for the last time, setting off on route R3 from Petts Wood to OB (the garage), that was the last journey.

It is with this sentiment today that I dressed Kestrel as running number 1 and set the blinds accordingly to "R""3" just like it did back in 1995 on the last journey. RH1 enjoyed a pleasant run today in welcomed sunshine. Here's a couple of photos, look closely and my little white dog is looking out of the door windows.

Whilst it was a very sad day back in 1995 when Roundabout closed its doors, the legacy it gave is continued to this day, as the R network in Orpington is in its 30th year. I'd like to pay respects to those whom have helped make it a success, especially those older more venerable staff whom are no longer with us. The pilot project of London's 1st Midibus network all started off with this little bus, RH1 "Kestrel".

 

Photo (c) TomG.2016.

This still is part of a backup for a virtual reality 360 I took at this location. We're experimenting with ways to bring VR into online courses, and I played with some of the technology while at a conference in Jackson.

 

We're doing a serious pilot project at Indiana Dunes National Park this spring. We want to know what things students do (not) learn effectively in a VR setting.

 

Whatever the answer to that question, I spent a lovely morning snowshoeing off-trail through Grand Teton National Park, taking both VR and conventional images.

ⓒ2017 Youngjin Ko

 

King Street Pilot project.

These are pictures from the Venice Pavillion Graffiti wall......

 

The Venice Art Walls, the last remnant of the Venice Beach Graffiti Pit, were created as a haven for street artists when the Venice Pavilion was demolished as part of the Venice Beach Renovation of 1999-2001. The area was governed by a permit system until 2003. Since that time, use of the walls has skyrocketed due to a high demand for legal places for street art.

 

As part of a pilot project, painting will be restricted to those holding permits granted by ICU Art, and will be limited to daylight hours on weekends and city holidays in clearly defined areas. The goal of the program is to preserve the important cultural resource that the Venice Art Walls represent for the artists that paint there.

 

“It’s all about getting your name out there. If there is a way to do that without vandalism, it would be heaven - More Walls!” - Permitted artist Bryant Allen, aka RCADE

 

Take a look at my other Venice Beach photos...........

 

TTC King street pilot project

As a farewell, once again the ground floor was visited and...

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

street art walk. Pilot Project, Chicago is well worth a visit. Link below

www.pilotprojectbrewing.com/

DSC01568_DxO

The Coit Tower murals in the American Social Realism style formed the pilot project of the Public Works of Art Project, the first of the New Deal federal employment programs for artists. Ralph Stackpole and Bernard Zakheim successfully sought the commission in 1933, and supervised the muralists, who were mainly faculty and students of the California School of Fine Arts (CSFA), including Maxine Albro, Victor Arnautoff, Ray Bertrand, Rinaldo Cuneo, Mallette Harold Dean, Gordon Langdon, Clifford Wight, Edith Hamlin, George Albert Harris, Otis Oldfield, Suzanne Scheuer, Hebe Daum, Jane Berlandina, Frederick E. Olmsted Jr., Jose Moya del Pino and Frede Vidar.

Wikipedia

San Francisco, California

ⓒ2017 Youngjin Ko

 

King Street Pilot project.

Originally known as Nicholas Lane, Meyers Place connects Little Collins and Bourke Streets up at the top end of town. Recently selected as one of the pilot projects for the city's Green Your Laneways campaign, the laneway's grey walls have been brought to life by creepers, vertical gardens, window boxes and green galleries.

Even a few objects of everyday life were - 20 years after the shutdown of the plant - still preserved!

  

About the series (to which the Photo above belongs)

 

All photos of the series were shot at an abandoned garbage-incineration-plant. The plant is located near the city of Fürth (Germany) and was, according to information from the Internet, a pilot project of a famous German technology group. The stated goal was: via the smoldering of garbage, the city should be supplied with electricity.

But: the whole project became a big catastrophe. First, the costs exploded. In 1990, the cost was estimated at € 16 million, by 1995, the used sum had doubled and ultimately the total cost amounted to € 125 million! In addition, there was more trouble. A protest was formed among the citizens of Fürth, the plant was privatized, the hope for profit did not materialize and numerous incidents occurred right from the start. Already shortly after the commissioning in the year 1997 the operators had to fight with numerous complications (on a website of the city of Fürth are listed: material accumulation, software failure and release of smoldering gas). Already in 1998, after four weeks running time, the incineration plant came to a bitter end. With the occurrence of a material jam an important drum seal was destroyed and a cloud of toxic smoldering gas could escape. 73 people were injured and the plant was shut down forever.

In June 2018, 20 years after the shutdown, the owner announced the demolition of the complex. Some of the facade has already been torn open (at the beginning of July 2018), the view of the steel skeleton on one side is generously exposed.

 

Sources (in German):

www.fuerthwiki.de/wiki/index.php/M%C3%BCll-Schwelbrennanlage

www.nordbayern.de/region/fuerth/der-tag-an-dem-die-giftwo...

 

Highly recommended (including old sketches and already demolished parts of the building):

gesichterderstadt.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/die-mull-schwe...

  

About the post-processing

 

For editing I've used the Lightromm plug-in "Silver Efex Pro". More precisely: Preset Nr. 28 (in German: "kühle töne"), but partly with adjustments: I didn’t use the artificial grain nor the frame of the preset and sometimes I omitted the blue color filter. The selected sequence of photos should give the viewer the impression of a walk through the complex and it corresponds mostly to the actually gone way.

   

On June 27, 2011, the Micronutrient Initiative and Teck Resources announced a new partnership, the Zinc Alliance for Child Health (ZACH), which will support countries to scale-up zinc supplementation programs for the treatment of diarrhoea. Endorsed by the Government of Canada, ZACH’s first project will be in Senegal, where some zinc programming has been piloted and is poised for scale-up. These photos from Joal, Mbodiène & Fadiouth in Senegal were taken during one of the pilot projects.

 

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