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An agaric is a type of fungal fruiting body characterized by the presence of a pileus (cap) that is clearly differentiated from the stipe (stalk), with lamellae (gills) on the underside of the pileus. "Agaric" can also refer to a basidiomycete species characterized by an agaric-type fruiting body. An archaic usage of the word agaric meant 'tree-fungus' (after Latin agaricum); however, that meaning was superseded by the Linnaean interpretation in 1753 when Linnaeus used the generic name Agaricus for gilled mushrooms.

 

Most species of agarics are classified in the Agaricales, however, this type of fruiting body is thought to have evolved several times independently, hence the Russulales, Boletales, Hymenochaetales, and several other groups of basidiomycetes also contain agaric species. Older systems of classification place all agarics in the Agaricales, and some (mostly older) sources still use "agarics" as a common name for the Agaricales.

 

Contemporary sources now tend to use the term euagarics when referring only to members of the Agaricales. "Agaric" is also sometimes used as a common name for members of the genus Agaricus, as well as for members of other genera, for example, Amanita muscaria is sometimes called "fly agaric".

 

Amanita muscaria poisoning occurs in either young children or people ingesting it to have a hallucinogenic experience. Occasionally, immature button forms have been mistaken for puffballs. Additionally, the white spots can be washed away during heavy rain and it then may seem as the edible A. caesarea.

 

Amanita muscaria contains a number of biologically active agents, at least one of which, muscimol, is known to be psychoactive. Ibotenic acid, a neurotoxin, serves as a prodrug to muscimol, with approximately 10-20% converting to muscimol upon ingestion. A toxic dose in adults is approximately 6 mg muscimol or 30 to 60 mg ibotenic acid; this is typically about the amount found in one cap of Amanita muscaria. However, the amount and ratio of chemical compounds per mushroom varies widely from region to region and season to season, which further confuses the issue. Spring and summer mushrooms have been reported to contain up to 10 times as much ibotenic acid and muscimol compared to autumn fruitings.

 

A fatal dose has been calculated at an amount of 15 caps. Deaths from this fungus A. muscaria has been reported in historical journal articles and newspaper reports; however, with modern medical treatment a fatal outcome because of the poison of this mushroom would be extremely rare. Many older books list it as "deadly" but this is a mistake that gives the impression it is far more toxic than it actually is. The North American Mycological Association has stated there are absolutely no reliably documented fatalities in the past century. The vast majority (90% or more) of mushroom poisoning deaths are from having eaten either the greenish to yellowish death cap (A. phalloides) or perhaps even one of the several white Amanita species which are known as destroying angels.

 

The active constituents of this species are water soluble, and boiling and then discarding the cooking water will at least partly detoxify A. muscaria. However, drying may increase potency as the process facilitates the conversion of ibotenic acid to the more potent muscimol. According to some sources, once detoxified, the mushroom becomes edible.

 

File under: Grappenhall heys grappenhallheys walled garden Warrington Cheshire England UK tony smith tonysmith hotpix tonysmithhotpix mushroom red fungi big large agaric fly flyagaric mature white dots autumn October Fall wet weather nature natural history world

 

(c) Hotpix / HotpixUK Tony Smith - tone@Hotpix.freeserve.co.uk WDCC

A mushroom is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source.

 

The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word "mushroom" is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap. These gills produce microscopic spores that help the fungus spread across the ground or its occupant surface.

 

Mushroom describes a variety of gilled fungi, with or without stems, and the term is used even more generally, to describe both the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota and the woody or leathery fruiting bodies of some Basidiomycota, depending upon the context of the word.

 

Many mushroom species produce secondary metabolites that can be toxic, mind-altering, antibiotic, antiviral, or bioluminescent. Although there are only a small number of deadly species, several others can cause particularly severe and unpleasant symptoms.

 

Toxicity likely plays a role in protecting the function of the basidiocarp: the mycelium has expended considerable energy and protoplasmic material to develop a structure to efficiently distribute its spores. One defense against consumption and premature destruction is the evolution of chemicals that render the mushroom inedible, either causing the consumer to vomit the meal, or to learn to avoid consumption altogether.

 

(Wikipedia)

A punishing cloud builds up in the afternoon heat and humidity!

 

This is one of the better build ups to the storm season just passed in the Kurrajong/Hawkesbury area.

  

Some awesome convection around the place as a very moist atmosphere combines with the hot autumn days...

 

This big cumulonimbus cloud with that sweet pileus cap eventually turned into a great storm, but was unfortunately way into no-mans-land by the time the light show began...

Pileus Iridescent Cloud and Lava flowing from Pacaya Volcano - Guatemala - October 2009

 

Agua Volcano on the background.

 

Ya! My 400th picture posted on flickr :)

...Thanks to all my friends and visitors, who contribute to push me more in my work every single day.

This HDR image was created in PaintShop Pro X6 by separating a single RAW file into 3 images (±2.0ev).

 

This is a crop of an older picture, as recommended by no body atoll Thanks for the tip!

A magical vision that I share with you. I felt very lucky to have seen this. It's a very rare sight.

 

Iridescent clouds are a beautiful phenomenon-but they're rarely seen and even less frequently photographed.

 

Iridescent clouds, known as "fire rainbows" or "rainbow clouds," occur when sunlight diffracts off water droplets in the atmosphere. And the recipe for these heavenly sights is actually pretty simple.

 

What happens is that the cumulus cloud, boiling upwards, pushes the air layers above it higher and higher. As the air gets pushed upwards, it expands and cools. And sometimes moisture in that air suddenly condenses into tiny droplets to form a cap cloud.

 

This "cap"—which scientists call a "pileus"—is the source of the brilliant spectacle.

 

The droplets in the cap cloud scatter sunlight to form the gorgeous colors.

 

California.

14:00 hs. Sensación Térmica 42º

The King Bolete is a very popular, delicious, meaty mushroom that grows all over the world. It has many names such as king, cep, porcini, steinpilz, penny bun and many others. It is apparently a complex of closely related species with similar looks, habitat, and flavor wherever it is found. It is highly variable in coloration. More study of this group will be required to sort out the variants more accurately. The king is a favorite and familiar mushroom drawn, painted or sculpted by artists. The king is often very large and stately with a thick club shaped stem, thick cap and an impressive kingly appearance.

 

Cap (pileus) 2-10 inches broad or larger, smooth, and quite thick and a bit sticky in damp weather. Convex becoming flat at maturity. The color is quite variable from light brown to reddish brown. It is dense when young becoming a spongy with age. The aroma is pleasant.

 

Pores (hymenophore) Closely spaced small pores are white. The pore layer is quite hard when young and white changing to yellowish then to pea soup green to greenish brown becoming fairly soft at maturity.

 

Stem (stipe) Very thick and club shaped. When young it is often almost as thick at the bottom as the cap is wide. The stem is usually finely reticulated meaning it has a net shaped raised pattern on the surface. The reticulation is most pronounced near the top. The color can vary from whitish cream to reddish brown. It can become cylindrical at maturity.

 

Flesh The flesh is white and dense in younger specimens becoming softer at maturity. It is generally non-staining and has a pleasant flavor when raw.

“Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky.” (Tagore).

  

Iridescent clouds are a beautiful phenomenon-but they're rarely seen and even less frequently photographed.

 

Iridescent clouds, known as "fire rainbows" or "rainbow clouds," occur when sunlight diffracts off water droplets in the atmosphere. And the recipe for these heavenly sights is actually pretty simple.

 

What happens is that the cumulus cloud, boiling upwards, pushes the air layers above it higher and higher. As the air gets pushed upwards, it expands and cools. And sometimes moisture in that air suddenly condenses into tiny droplets to form a cap cloud.

 

This "cap"—which scientists call a "pileus"—is the source of the brilliant spectacle.

 

The droplets in the cap cloud scatter sunlight to form the gorgeous colors.

 

I felt very lucky to have seen this. It's a very rare sight. California.

 

EXPLORE August 27, 2008 #450 - Thank you everyone very much!!!!!

 

Fat mushroom in our back yard ~

 

Please view on the LARGE size~

 

Wekipedia

 

Mushroom vs. toadstool

 

The relative sizes of the cap (pileus) and stalk (stipe) vary widely. The terms "mushroom" and "toadstool" go back centuries and were never precisely defined, nor was there consensus on application. The term "toadstool" was often but not exclusively applied to poisonous mushrooms or to those that have the classic umbrella-like cap-and-stem form. Between 1400 and 1600 A.D., the terms tadstoles, frogstooles, frogge stoles, tadstooles, tode stoles, toodys hatte, paddockstool, puddockstool, paddocstol, toadstoole, and paddockstooles sometimes were used synonymously with mushrom, mushrum, muscheron, mousheroms, mussheron, or musserouns. The term "mushroom" and its variations may have been derived from the French word mousseron in reference to moss (mousse). There may have been a direct connection to toads (in reference to poisonous properties) for toadstools. However, there is no clear-cut delineation between edible and poisonous fungi, so that a "mushroom" may be edible, poisonous, or unpalatable. The term "toadstool" is nowadays used in storytelling when referring to poisonous or suspect mushrooms. The classic example of a toadstool is Amanita muscaria.

   

A magical vision that I share with you. I felt very lucky to have seen this. It's a very rare sight.

 

Iridescent clouds are a beautiful phenomenon-but they're rarely seen and even less frequently photographed.

 

Iridescent clouds, known as "fire rainbows" or "rainbow clouds," occur when sunlight diffracts off water droplets in the atmosphere. And the recipe for these heavenly sights is actually pretty simple.

 

What happens is that the cumulus cloud, boiling upwards, pushes the air layers above it higher and higher. As the air gets pushed upwards, it expands and cools. And sometimes moisture in that air suddenly condenses into tiny droplets to form a cap cloud.

 

No Photoshop.

 

This "cap"—which scientists call a "pileus"—is the source of the brilliant spectacle.

 

The droplets in the cap cloud scatter sunlight to form the gorgeous colors.

 

California.

© Ray Skwire

 

Update - The US NWS of Philadelphia/Mt. Holly has confirmed these are lenticular clouds.

 

Update - Thank you EVERYONE for your views, favs, and comments. I never really expected this to go to Explore so you can imagine I'm pretty stoked about this right now!

 

I've never seen clouds quite like this.

 

Most of the day, it was tons of these little clouds with lots of layers, and possibly pileus over top. Like...LOTS of little clouds with pileus all over them.

 

But I always thought pileus were generally seen on clouds with strong updrafts, potentially indicating a chance of storm development but these were definitely not the case.

 

I honestly thought they were some form of lenticular clouds.

 

Update - Apparently, I named these jellyfish clouds not knowing that there is a phenomena where warm, moist air gets trapped between a surface layer and a higher layer of dry air. What you end up with are Altocumulus clouds. Whether or not this is what they are, I do not know.

A magical vision that I share with you. I felt very lucky to have seen this. It's a very rare sight.

 

Iridescent clouds are a beautiful phenomenon-but they're rarely seen and even less frequently photographed.

 

Iridescent clouds, known as "fire rainbows" or "rainbow clouds," occur when sunlight diffracts off water droplets in the atmosphere. And the recipe for these heavenly sights is actually pretty simple.

 

What happens is that the cumulus cloud, boiling upwards, pushes the air layers above it higher and higher. As the air gets pushed upwards, it expands and cools. And sometimes moisture in that air suddenly condenses into tiny droplets to form a cap cloud.

 

This "cap"—which scientists call a "pileus"—is the source of the brilliant spectacle.

 

The droplets in the cap cloud scatter sunlight to form the gorgeous colors.

 

California.

I sat on my butt in the grass in my back yard for 40 minutes watching this storm grow and change... I was completely transfixed.

A mushroom, or toadstool, is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source.

 

The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word "mushroom" is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap. "Mushroom" also describes a variety of other gilled fungi, with or without stems, therefore the term is used to describe the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota. These gills produce microscopic spores that help the fungus spread across the ground or its occupant surface.

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“Finding someone you love and who loves you back is a wonderful, wonderful feeling. But finding a true soul mate is an even better feeling. A soul mate is someone who understands you like no other, loves you like no other, will be there for you for ever, but I am a firm believer in the fact that for some, love lives on even after they're gone.”

Cecelia Ahern.

 

A magical vision that I share with you. I felt very lucky to have seen this. It's a very rare sight.

 

Iridescent clouds are a beautiful phenomenon-but they're rarely seen and even less frequently photographed.

 

Iridescent clouds, known as "fire rainbows" or "rainbow clouds," occur when sunlight diffracts off water droplets in the atmosphere. And the recipe for these heavenly sights is actually pretty simple.

 

What happens is that the cumulus cloud, boiling upwards, pushes the air layers above it higher and higher. As the air gets pushed upwards, it expands and cools. And sometimes moisture in that air suddenly condenses into tiny droplets to form a cap cloud.

 

This "cap"—which scientists call a "pileus"—is the source of the brilliant spectacle.

 

The droplets in the cap cloud scatter sunlight to form the gorgeous colors.

 

California.

An agaric is a type of fungal fruiting body characterized by the presence of a pileus (cap) that is clearly differentiated from the stipe (stalk), with lamellae (gills) on the underside of the pileus. "Agaric" can also refer to a basidiomycete species characterized by an agaric-type fruiting body. An archaic usage of the word agaric meant 'tree-fungus' (after Latin agaricum); however, that meaning was superseded by the Linnaean interpretation in 1753 when Linnaeus used the generic name Agaricus for gilled mushrooms.

© by photography by jrb. DO NOT USE this or any of my images without my permission. Check out my website www.imagesbyjrb.co.uk.

from the Vista Bridge, Portland Oregon. Zoom in even closer in the full size view. N57529

Thunderstorms developed across Northeast Wisconsin which were borderline Severe. This storm was quite strong with some nice looking structure. Marinette and Oconto Counties WI. June 20 2017

View On Black

 

I was rather indecisive this evening regarding what to post. Does that happen to you? In the end I thought I'd share this very handsome devil caught over the weekend with you ... isn't he rather impressive!! (((-;

It's late as I write this sorry!

 

Happy Thursday folks!

 

Just one more sleep (((-;

xoxo

  

Cumulonimbus calvus is a moderately tall cumulonimbus cloud which is capable of precipitation, but has not yet reached the height where it forms into a cumulonimbus capillatus (fibrous-top) or cumulonimbus incus (anvil-top). Cumulonimbus calvus develops from cumulus congestus, and its further development under auspicious conditions will result in cumulonimbus capillatus.

 

This cloud consists mainly of water droplets. By definition of cumulonimbus cloud, at its top water droplets are transformed into ice crystals, but for cumulonimbus calvus content of ice crystals is small and freezing is in early stage, so cloud top still looks round and puffy.

 

Cumulonimbus calvus is characterized by distinctive (between other types of cumulonimbus cloud) rounded shape and relatively sharp edges of its top area, unlike cumulonimbus incus or cumulonimbus capillatus, which have cirriform tops. Developing cumulonimbus calvus loses sharp outlines of the top as more water droplets transform into ice crystals. Strong updrafts may form pileus or thin vertical stripes protruding upwards out of the cloud. When upper part of the cloud freezes to greater extent and clearly visible cirriforms appears, cumulonimbus calvus turns into another species of cumulonimbus.

 

Cumulonimbus calvus arcus is a sub-type of cumulonimbus calvus, which has arcus cloud ahead of cloud's front.

wiki

Thanks Inez!

April 10th SE corner of Iowa. These photos got posted sort of out of order and I was also using two cameras. This shot is near the end of the series. What you're looking at is a giant cumulus tower (cloud) that is rising very fast from below other layers of humid air in the atmosphere. Those layers are invisible but get compressed by the rising air and cause a disk of a new condensed cloud or "cap" above the storm tower. The tower blasts through and continues up destroying the cap. Below in the comments is one of the early shots when the caps were first appearing. There was a whole chain of these storms developing and a several of these caps or Pileus clouds were along the storm tops.

 

We were set to head out on the chase way earlier in the day, and probably would have wound up in central Wisconsin. The computer was having problems in Chris' truck and he replaced the power supply, that worked in the house, but it didn't work once the computer was back in the truck. He replaced the power inverter and still no luck (and blew the new power supply). We had to switch to a laptop and next thing you know, were weren't headed out until 5pm. Wisconsin wound up being a bust for the chasers that made it. We lucked out and caught these great formations in the very SE corner of Iowa and then we headed home. I was home by 3am. Nothing against Wisconsin, but I'd rather not be that far from home. Oh yeah, we hit a deer and smashed the front of the truck just a few miles from home.

You can also find me here / Il est aussi possible de me retrouver ici : Facebook Page

 

FR : Sortie dans le département de l'Eure avec Igor, bien que trop à l'Ouest nous avions tout de même eu la chance d'assister à un peu de spectacle. Notamment ce brouillement convectif à l'arrière d'une Supercellule dans le secteur de Beauvais (Oise). Elle connaîtra une alimentation très active grâce à toute l'énergie mise à sa disposition. Les sommets percent facilement et les Pileus sont légions. Bien que éloigné, nous avons tout de même eu la chance d'observer sa période de genèse juste sous nous yeux puis celle de sa maturité.

 

ENG : Outing in the Eure departement with Igor, we were a bit too far at the West but we had the chance to see something. Especially with the back of this Supercell over the Oise departement. Shad had a powerful feeding thanks to all the energy in the area. The tops of cloud pierce easily, and the Pileus are legion. We also assist to her gensis, just in front of us, and her maturity period.

 

2015 - Eure / Normandie / France.

Thunderstorms developed across Northeast Wisconsin which were borderline Severe. This storm was quite strong with some nice looking structure. Marinette and Oconto Counties WI. June 20 2017

A nice fall day in Zeist, the Netherlands.

Mushroom (or toadstool) is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source. The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word "mushroom" is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) or pores on the underside of the cap.

 

Please see here more Autumn and Mushroom pictures.

:copyright: www.tomjutte.tk

.

 

Stunning Supercell exploded across far Northeast Wisconsin on July 1 2017. This was not expected as conditions weren't favorable for Supercells, but due to an outflow boundary from an early storm and a lake breeze boundary, this Supercell Developed. What structure. Still in awe..

Thunderstorms developed across Northeast Wisconsin which were borderline Severe. This storm was quite strong with some nice looking structure. Marinette and Oconto Counties WI. June 20 2017

Mushrooms on the woods visible during rainy season…

A mushroom is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source. The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, hence the word mushroom is most often applied to fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap just as do store-bought white mushrooms. However, "mushroom" can also refer to a wide variety of gilled fungi, with or without stems, and the term is used even more generally to describe both the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota and the woody or leathery fruiting bodies of some Basidiomycota, depending upon the context of the word. Forms deviating from the standard form usually have more specific names, such as "puffball", "stinkhorn", and "morel", and gilled mushrooms themselves are often called "agarics" in reference to their similarity to Agaricus or their placement in the order Agaricales. By extension, "mushroom" can also designate the entire fungus when in culture or the thallus (called a mycelium) of species forming the fruiting bodies called mushrooms.(wikipedia)

 

Thunderstorms developed across Northeast Wisconsin which were borderline Severe. This storm was quite strong with some nice looking structure. Marinette and Oconto Counties WI. June 20 2017

Thunderstorms developed across Northeast Wisconsin which were borderline Severe. This storm was quite strong with some nice looking structure. Marinette and Oconto Counties WI. June 20 2017

♪♫ Sueña♪♫

(aconsejo ver en tamaño grande)

  

Aun entre algodones las contemplo desde mi ventana. Hidrometeoros que la ciencia llama cirros, pileus, cúmulos, estratos y nimbostratos; pero que para mí, desde niño, no fueron otra cosa sino caprichosas figuras de semejanza humana o animal, curiosos objetos, acaso algún mapa en movimiento, todas formas viajeras en la ruta antojadiza dirigida por el viento.

 

(Del blog. 5cancionessobre.blogspot.com/2009/01/nubes.html )

A rapidly rising pyrocumulus from the nearby Tetlin Junction wildfire (2013) briefly produced a pileus veil, before being consumed by the heat and power of this wildfire.

 

At this moment, a firestorm 'firenado' was erupting on the ground, and firefighters and gear were rapidly evacuating as whole trees were ripped up and sucked skyward by violent forces.

 

Below link is a youtube video shot by pilot radioing information to ground and incident command.

Music is 'Barton Hollow' by The Civil Wars... aka Dead Man Walking....

 

Tetlin Junction Wildfire Firenado, August 2013

  

...that pretty much explains it...this week has produced some awesome skies. But with that comes weather warnings. I'm so proud of this because it's my first decent lightning strike but LOL it was so tiny~

Thunderstorms developed across Northeast Wisconsin which were borderline Severe. This storm was quite strong with some nice looking structure. Marinette and Oconto Counties WI. June 20 2017

 

Crepidotus versutus, commonly known as the evasive agaric, is a species of fungi in the family Crepidotaceae. It is saprobic on wood, like other Crepidotus species, but it can also decompose herbaceous forest litter. The species is characterized by large, punctate, spores, and the white, hairy pileus.

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