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Some awesome convection around the place as a very moist atmosphere combines with the hot autumn days...

 

This big cumulonimbus cloud with that sweet pileus cap eventually turned into a great storm, but was unfortunately way into no-mans-land by the time the light show began...

This HDR image was created in PaintShop Pro X6 by separating a single RAW file into 3 images (±2.0ev).

 

This is a crop of an older picture, as recommended by no body atoll Thanks for the tip!

A magical vision that I share with you. I felt very lucky to have seen this. It's a very rare sight.

 

Iridescent clouds are a beautiful phenomenon-but they're rarely seen and even less frequently photographed.

 

Iridescent clouds, known as "fire rainbows" or "rainbow clouds," occur when sunlight diffracts off water droplets in the atmosphere. And the recipe for these heavenly sights is actually pretty simple.

 

What happens is that the cumulus cloud, boiling upwards, pushes the air layers above it higher and higher. As the air gets pushed upwards, it expands and cools. And sometimes moisture in that air suddenly condenses into tiny droplets to form a cap cloud.

 

This "cap"—which scientists call a "pileus"—is the source of the brilliant spectacle.

 

The droplets in the cap cloud scatter sunlight to form the gorgeous colors.

 

California.

“Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky.” (Tagore).

  

Iridescent clouds are a beautiful phenomenon-but they're rarely seen and even less frequently photographed.

 

Iridescent clouds, known as "fire rainbows" or "rainbow clouds," occur when sunlight diffracts off water droplets in the atmosphere. And the recipe for these heavenly sights is actually pretty simple.

 

What happens is that the cumulus cloud, boiling upwards, pushes the air layers above it higher and higher. As the air gets pushed upwards, it expands and cools. And sometimes moisture in that air suddenly condenses into tiny droplets to form a cap cloud.

 

This "cap"—which scientists call a "pileus"—is the source of the brilliant spectacle.

 

The droplets in the cap cloud scatter sunlight to form the gorgeous colors.

 

I felt very lucky to have seen this. It's a very rare sight. California.

 

A magical vision that I share with you. I felt very lucky to have seen this. It's a very rare sight.

 

Iridescent clouds are a beautiful phenomenon-but they're rarely seen and even less frequently photographed.

 

Iridescent clouds, known as "fire rainbows" or "rainbow clouds," occur when sunlight diffracts off water droplets in the atmosphere. And the recipe for these heavenly sights is actually pretty simple.

 

What happens is that the cumulus cloud, boiling upwards, pushes the air layers above it higher and higher. As the air gets pushed upwards, it expands and cools. And sometimes moisture in that air suddenly condenses into tiny droplets to form a cap cloud.

 

No Photoshop.

 

This "cap"—which scientists call a "pileus"—is the source of the brilliant spectacle.

 

The droplets in the cap cloud scatter sunlight to form the gorgeous colors.

 

California.

The King Bolete is a very popular, delicious, meaty mushroom that grows all over the world. It has many names such as king, cep, porcini, steinpilz, penny bun and many others. It is apparently a complex of closely related species with similar looks, habitat, and flavor wherever it is found. It is highly variable in coloration. More study of this group will be required to sort out the variants more accurately. The king is a favorite and familiar mushroom drawn, painted or sculpted by artists. The king is often very large and stately with a thick club shaped stem, thick cap and an impressive kingly appearance.

 

Cap (pileus) 2-10 inches broad or larger, smooth, and quite thick and a bit sticky in damp weather. Convex becoming flat at maturity. The color is quite variable from light brown to reddish brown. It is dense when young becoming a spongy with age. The aroma is pleasant.

 

Pores (hymenophore) Closely spaced small pores are white. The pore layer is quite hard when young and white changing to yellowish then to pea soup green to greenish brown becoming fairly soft at maturity.

 

Stem (stipe) Very thick and club shaped. When young it is often almost as thick at the bottom as the cap is wide. The stem is usually finely reticulated meaning it has a net shaped raised pattern on the surface. The reticulation is most pronounced near the top. The color can vary from whitish cream to reddish brown. It can become cylindrical at maturity.

 

Flesh The flesh is white and dense in younger specimens becoming softer at maturity. It is generally non-staining and has a pleasant flavor when raw.

“Finding someone you love and who loves you back is a wonderful, wonderful feeling. But finding a true soul mate is an even better feeling. A soul mate is someone who understands you like no other, loves you like no other, will be there for you for ever, but I am a firm believer in the fact that for some, love lives on even after they're gone.”

Cecelia Ahern.

 

A magical vision that I share with you. I felt very lucky to have seen this. It's a very rare sight.

 

Iridescent clouds are a beautiful phenomenon-but they're rarely seen and even less frequently photographed.

 

Iridescent clouds, known as "fire rainbows" or "rainbow clouds," occur when sunlight diffracts off water droplets in the atmosphere. And the recipe for these heavenly sights is actually pretty simple.

 

What happens is that the cumulus cloud, boiling upwards, pushes the air layers above it higher and higher. As the air gets pushed upwards, it expands and cools. And sometimes moisture in that air suddenly condenses into tiny droplets to form a cap cloud.

 

This "cap"—which scientists call a "pileus"—is the source of the brilliant spectacle.

 

The droplets in the cap cloud scatter sunlight to form the gorgeous colors.

 

California.

from the Vista Bridge, Portland Oregon. Zoom in even closer in the full size view. N57529

April 10th SE corner of Iowa. These photos got posted sort of out of order and I was also using two cameras. This shot is near the end of the series. What you're looking at is a giant cumulus tower (cloud) that is rising very fast from below other layers of humid air in the atmosphere. Those layers are invisible but get compressed by the rising air and cause a disk of a new condensed cloud or "cap" above the storm tower. The tower blasts through and continues up destroying the cap. Below in the comments is one of the early shots when the caps were first appearing. There was a whole chain of these storms developing and a several of these caps or Pileus clouds were along the storm tops.

 

We were set to head out on the chase way earlier in the day, and probably would have wound up in central Wisconsin. The computer was having problems in Chris' truck and he replaced the power supply, that worked in the house, but it didn't work once the computer was back in the truck. He replaced the power inverter and still no luck (and blew the new power supply). We had to switch to a laptop and next thing you know, were weren't headed out until 5pm. Wisconsin wound up being a bust for the chasers that made it. We lucked out and caught these great formations in the very SE corner of Iowa and then we headed home. I was home by 3am. Nothing against Wisconsin, but I'd rather not be that far from home. Oh yeah, we hit a deer and smashed the front of the truck just a few miles from home.

A nice fall day in Zeist, the Netherlands.

Mushroom (or toadstool) is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source. The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word "mushroom" is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) or pores on the underside of the cap.

 

Please see here more Autumn and Mushroom pictures.

© www.tomjutte.tk

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A mushroom is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source.

 

The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word "mushroom" is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap. These gills produce microscopic spores that help the fungus spread across the ground or its occupant surface.

 

Mushroom describes a variety of gilled fungi, with or without stems, and the term is used even more generally, to describe both the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota and the woody or leathery fruiting bodies of some Basidiomycota, depending upon the context of the word.

 

Many mushroom species produce secondary metabolites that can be toxic, mind-altering, antibiotic, antiviral, or bioluminescent. Although there are only a small number of deadly species, several others can cause particularly severe and unpleasant symptoms.

 

Toxicity likely plays a role in protecting the function of the basidiocarp: the mycelium has expended considerable energy and protoplasmic material to develop a structure to efficiently distribute its spores. One defense against consumption and premature destruction is the evolution of chemicals that render the mushroom inedible, either causing the consumer to vomit the meal, or to learn to avoid consumption altogether.

 

(Wikipedia)

 

Crepidotus versutus, commonly known as the evasive agaric, is a species of fungi in the family Crepidotaceae. It is saprobic on wood, like other Crepidotus species, but it can also decompose herbaceous forest litter. The species is characterized by large, punctate, spores, and the white, hairy pileus.

A developing Supercell across far Northeast Wisconsin on July 1 2017. Only isolated storms were expected, but this beast began to develop along an old outflow boundary from a storm early in the afternoon. Aiding in the development was a lake breeze boundary. The updraft was so explosive.

Dans l'imminence de l'orage, le vendredi 6 avril 2012, Pentax K-5, Sigma 70-200 EX.

 

Just before the storm, April 6, 2012.

 

Portsmouth, New Hampshire

 

On Tuesday an intense but brief thunderstorm rolled through New Hampshire and other parts of New England. It left behind some amazing clouds and we were treated to an amazing display at sunset. I wasn't in a place to get a good foreground for the sunset so I did something I rarely ever do, zoom way in and photograph just the clouds. It worked because the different colors and shadows on the clouds were really incredible. If you look closely you'll notice a pileus cloud rolling over the tall cumulus cloud on the right side of the image. Mountains in the sky!

 

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(Explore #413: Jun 17, 2009)

 

View On Black

 

Closeup of the underside of a mushroom with the slough (marshy wetlands) as a backdrop. Bluebird Estates, Alberta, Canada

 

A mushroom is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source. The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, hence the word mushroom is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap, just as do store-bought white mushrooms.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushroom

  

A magical vision that I share with you. I felt very lucky to have seen this. It's a very rare sight.

 

Iridescent clouds are a beautiful phenomenon-but they're rarely seen and even less frequently photographed.

 

Iridescent clouds, known as "fire rainbows" or "rainbow clouds," occur when sunlight diffracts off water droplets in the atmosphere. And the recipe for these heavenly sights is actually pretty simple.

 

What happens is that the cumulus cloud, boiling upwards, pushes the air layers above it higher and higher. As the air gets pushed upwards, it expands and cools. And sometimes moisture in that air suddenly condenses into tiny droplets to form a cap cloud.

 

This "cap"—which scientists call a "pileus"—is the source of the brilliant spectacle.

 

The droplets in the cap cloud scatter sunlight to form the gorgeous colors.

 

California.

 

Stunning Supercell exploded across far Northeast Wisconsin on July 1 2017. This was not expected as conditions weren't favorable for Supercells, but due to an outflow boundary from an early storm and a lake breeze boundary, this Supercell Developed. What structure. Still in awe..

@ふもとっぱら

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Meteorology-wise, it's a Cumulonimbus with a Pileus (which is Latin for "cap, get it?) :D

"

 

Timber Creek, Northern Territory

Thunderstorms developed across Northeast Wisconsin which were borderline Severe. This storm was quite strong with some nice looking structure. Marinette and Oconto Counties WI. June 20 2017

A pileus veil formed over this rapidly expanding cumulus congestus cloud for about 3 minutes this afternoon creating the fibrous looking "cap" (pileus). As quickly as it appeared, it vanished, which is characteristic of this phenomenon. Sometimes it only lasts a few seconds.

A developing Supercell across far Northeast Wisconsin on July 1 2017. Only isolated storms were expected, but this beast began to develop along an old outflow boundary from a storm early in the afternoon. Aiding in the development was a lake breeze boundary. The updraft was so explosive.

The rising anvil has incorporated existing cloud above. More a Tam o' Shanter than a pileus (skull cap) cloud.

After a bit of searching I have found a small gallery of like formations with the following explanation:

 

Pileus or "mushroom cap" clouds are formed above cumulus. During the day warm moist air in cumulus rises and the clouds tower upwards. Sometimes their vertical growth pushes up a layer of moist air above them. The air layer expands as it is forced up into lower pressure surroundings and adiabatically cools. The water vapour in it suddenly condenses forming a misty veil-like layer of droplets above the cumulus - pileus cloud. Any cloud formed suddenly has all its droplets of similar size - ideal for iridescence or a corona. Source

 

This was shot very close to sunset with my point and shoot camera on the highway near Ipoh, Malaysia. I had black and white film in my camera at the time - bummer hey?!

Thunderstorms developed across Northeast Wisconsin which were borderline Severe. This storm was quite strong with some nice looking structure. Marinette and Oconto Counties WI. June 20 2017

A mushroom or toadstool is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source. The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word "mushroom" is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) or pores on the underside of the cap.

 

Please see here more Autumn and Mushroom pictures.

© www.tomjutte.tk

.

 

Current Name:

Gliophorus lilacipes E. Horak, Beih. Nova Hedwigia 43: 178 (1973)

Synonymy:

Hygrocybe lilacipes (E. Horak) Boertm., Biblthca Mycol. 192: 43 (2002)

Synonymy Contributor(s):

Kew Mycology (2013)

Article: Horak, E. (1990). Monograph of the New Zealand Hygrophoraceae (Agaricales). New Zealand Journal of Botany 28(3): 255-306 (www.rsnz.org/publish/abstracts.php).

Description: Pileus -45 mm, hemispherical becoming planoconvex, broadly umbilicate in aged specimens brilliant green-blue, fading to blue-brown or greenish blue, darker at centre; glutinous, margin striate, hygrophanous, glabrous. - Lamellae 8-14 (1 -3) distant, broadly adnate to decurrent; lilac-blue or pale green-blue, fading with age, edges concolorous with gelatinised, grey thread. - Stipe 20-60 x 25 mm, cylindrical, equal to attenuated towards apex; lilac to pale blue above, yellowish or ochraceous at base; glutinous, hollow, single. - Context brilliant lilac in upper portion of stipe, yellow-orange in base, reddish on drying. - Odour and taste not distinctive. - Chemical reactions on pileus: KOH - orange to pink; HCI, NH3 - negative. Spores 5-7 x 3-4um, ovoid. - Basidia 25-45 x 5-6 um, 4-spored. - Cheilocystidia forming sterile edge, composed of cylindrical, densely interwoven hyphae (2-6 um diam.), occasionally branched at tips, membrane strongly gelatinised. -Pileipellis an ixocutis of repent to suberect, cylindrical hyphae (27 um diam.), sometimes with branched tips, membranes strongly gelatinised, with plasmatic pigment; clamp connections present (P1. 1, Fig. 6).

Habitat: ECOLOGY: Common; saprobic on soil among litter in broadleaved-conifer forests Nothofagus Leptospermum, Weinmannia, Dacrydium, Agathis), occasionally also on rotten wood or on debris of tree fems. January-June.

Distribution: DISTRIBUTION: NZ (NA, G, WL, SL).

 

Article: Horak, E. (1973). Fungi Agaricini Novazelandiae I-V. Beihefte zur Nova Hedwigia 43: 200 p.

Description: Pileus 15-45 mm diam., hemispherical when young later becoming plano-convex, aged specimen broadly umbilicate, deep green-blue fading to blue-brown or greenish-blue, darker at the centre, glutinous, margin striated, hygrophanous, glabrous. Lamellae broadly adnate to decurrent, lilac-blue or greenish-bluish, fading, distant; gill edge with gelatinized, grey coloured thread. Stipe 20-60 x 2-5 mm, cylindric, equal to attenuated towards the lilac apex, yellowish or ochraceous at the base, glutinous, hollow, single. Context: deep lilac at the upper portions of the stipe, reddish on drying. Taste and odor not distinctive. Chemical reactions on pileus: KOH - orange to pink; NH3 and HCl- negative. Spores 4.5-6 x 3-4.5 µm, ovoid, smooth, inamyloid. basidia 25-35 x 5 µm, 4-spored. Cheilocystidia forming a sterile gill edge, consisting of cylindric cells densely interwoven and branched at the tips, strongly gelatinized and forming the glutinous thread, 2-6 µm diam. Epicutis of repent or suberect, cylindric gelatinized hyphae (2-7 µm diam.), occasionally branched at the free ends, forming an ixocutis. Clamp connections present.

Habitat: On soil in Nothofagus forest with Dacrydium, Weinmannia, etc. New Zealand.

Notes: Aging and drying change the colours of this beautiful polychromous species and one is puzzled to see many different shades and combinations of its typical colours. However, the lilac-blue tints at the upper part of the stipe and the relatively small spores are distinctive characters for its identification.

Thunderstorms developed across Northeast Wisconsin which were borderline Severe. This storm was quite strong with some nice looking structure. Marinette and Oconto Counties WI. June 20 2017

14:00 hs. Sensación Térmica 42º

Structured Storms developed across central Wisconsin during the afternoon and evening hours of July 12 2017. The active year of 2017 continues on. What a day!!!

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