new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged phrynocephalus

Sharjah, UAE

 

One of my favourite species from the deserts of the UAE, these tiny little lizards were full of attitude and were a joy to observe, with behaviour such as burying themselves then popping their head above the sand, or curling their black-tipped tails high in the air as if to mimic a scorpion.

الاسم العربي : السحلية ضفدعية الرأس

• الاسم الإنجليزي :Arabian toad-headed agama

•الاسم العلمي :Phrynocephalus arabicus

• سميت كذلك بسبب شكل الرأس

 

Lens: Olympus ED 60mm f/2.8 Macro

Camera : Olympus OM-D

الاسم العربي : السحلية ضفدعية الرأس

• الاسم الإنجليزي :Arabian toad-headed agama

•الاسم العلمي :Phrynocephalus arabicus

•وصف الحيوان : سميت كذلك بسبب شكل الرأس

 

Prowling the desert with the grace of WWI British tank I was very lucky to find yet another (young and stupid) agamid lizard from genus Phrynocephalus, toad-headed agamas.

 

Kyzyl Kum desert, Nurata area, Uzbekistan.

Camera Model Name: Canon EOS 5D

Lens: EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM

Tv (Shutter Speed): 1/125

Av (Aperture Value): 16.0

Metering Modes: Partial Metering

ISO Speed: 100

Focal Length: 400.0 mm

Flash: Off

  

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DAY 09: Destination – KORZOK

 

Distance & Time: Shey – Korzok by car - 220 km / 7 hrs.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Three hours have passed; the struggle to get the car back on the main track is on. Trying to help by handing out the necessary tools and fetching stone slabs to construct a temporary pathway. Few chipped nails are of no concern but the bleeding fingertip needs attention; dig out a medicated strip from the first aid kit.

 

The car had swirled and jerked off the road; wheels sunk deeply in the treacherous sand. If our attempts are in vain, Tashi will walk back several kilometers to the shack (where we had tea earlier) to seek help. Adequate stock of drinking water and some food prepares us for the night in the desert if necessary. Strangely there is no sense of panic or impatience, an effect of the vast serenity that surrounds us.

 

Humidity is supposedly nil, but sweat trickles down the spine while fetching yet another slab. Look up at the sky and get in conversation with god, “Had your fun, now let’s get going!”

 

Little more effort and the car is on the road! Both of us are exhausted, Tashi more so. Get out a couple of energy bars along with my lunch box and hand them over to him.

 

On the other side of the road there is a Toad agama (Phrynocephalus laungwalansis), must get the camera.

 

This species of reptile have flat head and blunt mouth resembling a toad, thus the name. The agamids are perfectly suited for extreme desert conditions, with physical adaptations intended to withstand cold, dry climate. The small eye-openings, encircled by protective scaly eyelids form an effective barrier against sand particles. They can be found at elevation of 3, 100 – 4, 700 m / 10, 171 – 15, 420 ft. but sometimes even as high as 5, 500m / 18, 045 ft.

 

Often seen basking in the sun in warm open plains, will make a break for safety of the burrows if disturbed. Balance their two diagonally opposite feet when ground temperatures rise. Apart from natural predators like some birds are at the risk of being run over while darting across the road by cars. The number of which has been sharply rising with the in-flow of tourist.

from ift.tt/1eC6AR8

 

llbwwb:

 

(via 500px / Phrynocephalus Mystaceus by Milan Zygmunt)

 

Phrynocephalus versicolor, è un agamide molto diffuso nell'area in cui operiamo durante i nostri campi di eco-volontariato. Generalmente occupa le zone nelle quali la copertura vegetale è molto scarsa. L'esemplare nella foto è stato fotografato su un'area di dune che periodicamente visitiamo.

EF100mm f/2.8 Macro USM with 12mm, 20mm and 36 mm Extension tubes stacked. I couldn't get any closer. He was very docile. Maybe the 100 degree plus heat had something to do with it.

Like to see the pictures as LARGE as your screen? Just click on this Slideshow : www.flickr.com/photos/reurinkjan/sets/72157607926302446/s...

 

Physical description

Tibetan name Wha or Wamo,ཝ། .

The Tibetan Sand Fox is one of the smaller fox species. It has thick, soft fur that protects it from the winds of the high mountains, with a dense undercoat that is brown to rusty yellow in color. The fur on the upper flanks is rusty, whereas the lower flanks and rump is colored gray, sometimes producing the illusion of a line along the animal's flank. The lower part of its ruff, as well as its throat, chest, and abdominal region is white. Small black patches on the shoulders set off the white chest.The tip of the tail is white. Adult Tibetan foxes are 60 to 70 centimetres (24 to 28 in) from head to body (juveniles are somewhat smaller) and a tail length of 29 to 40 centimetres (11 to 16 in). Weights of adults are usually 4 to 5.5 kilograms (8.8 to 12 lb).

 

The Tibetan Sand Fox has a unique face that appears square; this is an illusion created by its large ruff. As seen in the Planet Earth episode "Great Plains", the fox keeps its body stiff and its head level when stalking.

 

The Tibetan Sand Fox's karyotype is made up of 36 chromosomes.

 

Behavior

Mated pairs remain together and may also hunt together. Mating evidently occurs in December, with whelping in February.

 

After a gestation period of about 50 to 60 days, two to four young are born in a den, and stay with the parents until they are eight to ten months old. Shortly after leaving they will search for mates and territory of their own.

 

In contrast to other fox species, the Tibetan Fox is not highly territorial, so it may be found near other foxes.

 

Diet

The Tibetan Sand Fox primarily preys on the Plateau Pika (Ochotona curzoniae); it also feeds on rodents, ground birds, and carrion.

 

A 1998 dropping analysis of 113 fox droppings to determine the Tibetan Sand Fox diet showed a content of 95 percent Plateau Pika (Ochotona curzoniae) and 2.7 percent Tibetan Antelope (Pantholops hodgsonii), most likely scavenged. The remainder consisted of insects, bird feathers, and plants, including Ephedra berries. A previous study in 1986 showed Woolly Hare (Lepus oiostolus) and a lizard of the Phrynocephalus genus, while a separate study the previous year of 158 droppings in the Qinghai Province of China noted additional content, including Himalayan Marmot (Marmota himalayana), Bharal (Pseudois nayaur), Himalayan Musk Deer (Moschus chrysogaster), and livestock. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tibetan_Sand_Fox

•الاسم العربي : السحلية ضفدعية الرأس

• الاسم الإنجليزي :Arabian toad-headed agama

•الاسم العلمي :Phrynocephalus arabicus

•وصف الحيوان : سميت كذلك بسبب شكل الرأس المثلث المبطط

 

شكرا أخي بدر على المعلومة *

 

.•. All rights are reserved .•

.

الاسم العربي : السحلية ضفدعية الرأس

• الاسم الإنجليزي :Arabian toad-headed agama

•الاسم العلمي :Phrynocephalus arabicus

• سميت كذلك بسبب شكل الرأس

大耳沙蜥(學名:Phrynocephalus mystaceus)

 

在中國新疆西部和中亞的沙漠中生活著一種沙蜥,它的嘴角有一囊狀的皮褶,看起來有點像耳廓,所以科學家們給它取了個很有意思的名字:大耳沙蜥。大耳沙蜥的這種皮褶和真正的外耳廓完全沒有關係,因它並沒有外耳。但耳狀皮皺具有輔助攻擊、捕食的功能,當它憤怒、攻擊或準備逃避的時候皮褶張開,露出肉紅色的“大耳”,並不停地扇動,發出“呼呼”的響聲來恐嚇對方。

Phrynocephalus axillaris from Ruoqiang, Xinjiang Province.

A male Yarkand toad-headed agama (Phrynocephalus axillaris) is sending signal by it's curving tail. Tail curve, tail lash and tail wave are main form of the lizards' communication. Our research group have been working on this lizards for more than five years. Now we believe the tail signal has correlation with courtship and territorial defence.

Like to see the pictures as LARGE as your screen? Just click on this Slideshow : www.flickr.com/photos/reurinkjan/sets/72157607926302446/s...

  

Tibetan name Wha or Wamo,ཝ། .

The Tibetan Sand Fox is one of the smaller fox species. It has thick, soft fur that protects it from the winds of the high mountains, with a dense undercoat that is brown to rusty yellow in color. The fur on the upper flanks is rusty, whereas the lower flanks and rump is colored gray, sometimes producing the illusion of a line along the animal's flank. The lower part of its ruff, as well as its throat, chest, and abdominal region is white. Small black patches on the shoulders set off the white chest.The tip of the tail is white. Adult Tibetan foxes are 60 to 70 centimetres (24 to 28 in) from head to body (juveniles are somewhat smaller) and a tail length of 29 to 40 centimetres (11 to 16 in). Weights of adults are usually 4 to 5.5 kilograms (8.8 to 12 lb).

 

The Tibetan Sand Fox has a unique face that appears square; this is an illusion created by its large ruff. As seen in the Planet Earth episode "Great Plains", the fox keeps its body stiff and its head level when stalking.

 

The Tibetan Sand Fox's karyotype is made up of 36 chromosomes.

 

Behavior

Mated pairs remain together and may also hunt together. Mating evidently occurs in December, with whelping in February.

 

After a gestation period of about 50 to 60 days, two to four young are born in a den, and stay with the parents until they are eight to ten months old. Shortly after leaving they will search for mates and territory of their own.

 

In contrast to other fox species, the Tibetan Fox is not highly territorial, so it may be found near other foxes.

 

Diet

The Tibetan Sand Fox primarily preys on the Plateau Pika (Ochotona curzoniae); it also feeds on rodents, ground birds, and carrion.

 

A 1998 dropping analysis of 113 fox droppings to determine the Tibetan Sand Fox diet showed a content of 95 percent Plateau Pika (Ochotona curzoniae) and 2.7 percent Tibetan Antelope (Pantholops hodgsonii), most likely scavenged. The remainder consisted of insects, bird feathers, and plants, including Ephedra berries. A previous study in 1986 showed Woolly Hare (Lepus oiostolus) and a lizard of the Phrynocephalus genus, while a separate study the previous year of 158 droppings in the Qinghai (Amdo) Province of Tibet noted additional content, including Himalayan Marmot (Marmota himalayana), Bharal (Pseudois nayaur), Himalayan Musk Deer (Moschus chrysogaster), and livestock. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tibetan_Sand_Fox

Tibetan name Wha or Wamo,ཝ། .

The Tibetan Sand Fox is one of the smaller fox species. It has thick, soft fur that protects it from the winds of the high mountains, with a dense undercoat that is brown to rusty yellow in color. The fur on the upper flanks is rusty, whereas the lower flanks and rump is colored gray, sometimes producing the illusion of a line along the animal's flank. The lower part of its ruff, as well as its throat, chest, and abdominal region is white. Small black patches on the shoulders set off the white chest.The tip of the tail is white. Adult Tibetan foxes are 60 to 70 centimetres (24 to 28 in) from head to body (juveniles are somewhat smaller) and a tail length of 29 to 40 centimetres (11 to 16 in). Weights of adults are usually 4 to 5.5 kilograms (8.8 to 12 lb).

 

The Tibetan Sand Fox has a unique face that appears square; this is an illusion created by its large ruff. As seen in the Planet Earth episode "Great Plains", the fox keeps its body stiff and its head level when stalking.

 

The Tibetan Sand Fox's karyotype is made up of 36 chromosomes.

 

Behavior

Mated pairs remain together and may also hunt together. Mating evidently occurs in December, with whelping in February.

 

After a gestation period of about 50 to 60 days, two to four young are born in a den, and stay with the parents until they are eight to ten months old. Shortly after leaving they will search for mates and territory of their own.

 

In contrast to other fox species, the Tibetan Fox is not highly territorial, so it may be found near other foxes.

 

Diet

The Tibetan Sand Fox primarily preys on the Plateau Pika (Ochotona curzoniae); it also feeds on rodents, ground birds, and carrion.

 

A 1998 dropping analysis of 113 fox droppings to determine the Tibetan Sand Fox diet showed a content of 95 percent Plateau Pika (Ochotona curzoniae) and 2.7 percent Tibetan Antelope (Pantholops hodgsonii), most likely scavenged. The remainder consisted of insects, bird feathers, and plants, including Ephedra berries. A previous study in 1986 showed Woolly Hare (Lepus oiostolus) and a lizard of the Phrynocephalus genus, while a separate study the previous year of 158 droppings in the Qinghai (Amdo) Province of Tibet noted additional content, including Himalayan Marmot (Marmota himalayana), Bharal (Pseudois nayaur), Himalayan Musk Deer (Moschus chrysogaster), and livestock. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tibetan_Sand_Fox

Agamidae/agamid lizard family........Qinghai/Tibetan Plateau, China

These lizards venture out in the middle of the summer day when the air temperature at 'lizard level' can be well over 50 C! They minimize contact with the hot sand and try and keep their bodies as far off the sand as possible.

DSC03383 just about everywhere in the drier and stonier parts of the Gobi (Mongolia) were these small agamid lizards (Phrynocephalus sp). Most seemed to be juvenile less than 10 cm long and only really only detectable when they move. I have included many colour variants and locations in this set - they all seem to be Phrynocephalus versicolor (AKA the many coloured toad-headed Agama)

...or Persian Sun-watcher. Showing why it is also known as the Toad-headed agama. Look no nose!

They are not easy to spot unless they move. Near Mount Ararat, Turkey 2012.

 

I had this down as Phrynocephalus persicus but the Turkish herp site says Phrynocephalus horvathi.

It was 46 C and this guy was getting as far from the hot sand as he could and keping his body orientated to minimise insolation!

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 12 13