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The light was good so I thought, why the heck shouldn't these books be shot anyway?

 

Bit of a shelf at home.

 

March 20, 2012.

Best friend

It would be simply lovely to climb the Harbour Bridge but it's also extremely expensive.

 

new video up on youtube ll please like my facebook ll if you want to ask anything

The following is a passage from Paul Theroux's book, THE LAST TRAIN TO ZONA VERDE.

 

In the clearing a twig fence was hung with trinkets, bead necklaces and bracelets, clusters of feathers, leather pouches, wooded pipes, and the pierced and polished fragments of ostrich shells. No one was hawking them: the artifacts were hanging like wind chimes or Christmas ornaments, with prices inked on paper tags. It was the honor system, appropriate to people in whose culture theft was unknown. “Stealing without being discovered is practically impossible in !Kung life, because the !Kung know everybody’s footprints and every object. Respect for ownership is strong, but apart from that , ‘Stealing would cause nothing but trouble. It might cause fighting” (Lorna Marshall, The !kung of Nyae Nyae). You chose the trinkets you wanted and left your money in a box.”

 

This little girl was standing by the fence that the author described. You can see her little necklace made from the broken shells of ostrich eggs.

 

In comparison to this way of life, the headlines for our local news involved a young man in an upscale vehicle stealing a donation jar from Girl Scouts selling cookies outside of a super market here in San Diego. He ran past the table where they were selling their cookies and grabbed the container, and then sped off. Luckily, the mother of one of the girls was able to document his license plates.

 

A reminder that all of my images are copyrighted and are not for your use in any way unless you contact me.

 

I want to thank everyone who has viewed this and other pictures! A big THANK YOU for looking at what I saw along the way while on safari.

   

During the visit with the San-Bushmen, I watched the men make bows and arrows and the women make jewelry. They laughed and joked among themselves and the guide. I was at peace with the world.

 

Out of the corner of my eye, I saw a figure floating out from the tall whispering bush that surrounded the clearing where I was. She seemed taller than the other tribe members and was wearing a wrap made from nature. A tiny child was perched on her shoulder.

 

It was a mystical experience. For a fleeting moment, I was seeing how life used to be.

 

I will repeat again the words of Paul Theroux who wrote of his meeting with the tribe. There is also more information on the tribe on my previous posts.

 

"I beheld their unusually friendly faces with a kind of rapture, as though gazing upon mythical ancestors. It is said that the features of these people are a combination of all of the racial characteristics of the world-Asian eyes, African faces, European skin tones –and if there was a human synthesis of all of the world’s ethnic groups, the resulting example would be a Ju/’hoansi person."

 

"I knew I was in the presence of our oldest living ancestors, and they radiated a kind of innocence and kindliness. It was no illusion. Everyone who has studied these people remarked on their gentleness, that they don’t fight, don’t raise their voices, don’t steal, never scold their children.”

 

A reminder that all of my images are copyrighted and are not for your use in any way unless you contact me.

  

The men and women of the San Bushman tribe have a distinctive appearance. Their features are mixture of what we now call the races of the world.

 

Paul Thoreux, the author who I have quoted before and a frequent traveller through Africa, described the tribe members in this way.

 

"I had glimpsed them in fascination, the way you see a bird of passage flashing onto a nearby branch. The look of these people was unmistakable.

 

Now and then on a busy Cape Town street I would see that light-hued, faintly Asian face, the narrow eyes, the delicate hands, the small stature, a distinct upright way of standing and a swift almost skipping way of walking."

 

For more quotes from Paul Thoreux and more information on the San-Bushmen please go to my set of Namibian pictures and see the other pictures of the tribe members.

 

A reminder that all of my images are copyrighted and are not for your use in any way unless you contact me.

 

A member of the San Bushmen tribe also known as "the real people" stood for me so I could take his picture. All of the tribe members were so accommodating as I clicked away.

 

As Paul Theroux wrote in "The Last Train to Zona Verde", " I beheld their unusual, friendly faces with a kind of a rapture, as though gazing upon mythical ancestors."

 

Please see my previous pictures of the tribe to read other quotes from this world traveller's book.

 

A reminder that all of my images are copyrighted and are not for your use in any way unless you contact me.

One of the first things I pack for a trip are books to read about my destination. One author who has travelled Africa is Paul Theroux who happens to be an American who travels and writes beautifully about the people he has met along the way. (We Americans are not known as avid travellers so he is even more of a rarity)

 

Mr. Theroux served in the Peace Corps in Africa in the 1960s and fell in love with the continent, returning numerous times to complete long and often difficult journeys. His last book, "The Last Train to Zona Verde" includes a trip trough Namibia where he finally meets members of the remaining Bushmen which had been a life long dream of his.

 

His dream became mine after reading of his memorable experience. These are his first impressions.

 

"I beheld their unusually friendly faces with a kind of rapture, as though gazing upon mythical ancestors. It is said that the features of these people are a combination of all of the racial characteristics of the world-Asian eyes, African faces, European skin tones –and if there was a human synthesis of all of the world’s ethnic groups, the resulting example would be a Ju/’hoansi person."

"I knew I was in the presence of our oldest living ancestors, and they radiated a kind of innocence and kindliness. It was no illusion. Everyone who has studied these people remarked on their gentleness, that they don’t fight, don’t raise their voices, don’t steal, never scold their children.”

   

"I will live in my soul."

"Death is an Endless night so awful to contemplate that it make us love life and value it with suco passion that it may be the ultimate cause of joy and all art." Paul Theroux

 

www.behance.net/tofuverde

www.instagram.com/tofuverde

There was one dim light burning in the foyer, but the rest of the apartment was dark. The darkness reminded me that he was blind.

Novel | Movie | Making of the movie

Making of the movie | Novel | Movie

And wisdom is a butterfly/ And not a gloomy bird of prey.

The visit with the San Bushman lasted for several hours and I could have stayed longer even though the mid day sun was beating down on the area where they lived in huts built on sandy soil. The tribe graciously allowed photos to be taken while they went about their daily lives and a few engaged in showing me what they did every day. This little girl was just so curious and wanted to see who the stranger from the outside world was.

 

I will repeat information on the San-Bushman that I posted before written by Paul Theroux.

 

His dream of seeing the tribe became mine after reading of his memorable experience. These are his first impressions.

 

"I beheld their unusually friendly faces with a kind of rapture, as though gazing upon mythical ancestors. It is said that the features of these people are a combination of all of the racial characteristics of the world-Asian eyes, African faces, European skin tones –and if there was a human synthesis of all of the world’s ethnic groups, the resulting example would be a Ju/’hoansi person."

"I knew I was in the presence of our oldest living ancestors, and they radiated a kind of innocence and kindliness. It was no illusion. Everyone who has studied these people remarked on their gentleness, that they don’t fight, don’t raise their voices, don’t steal, never scold their children.”

 

A reminder that all of my images are copyrighted and are not for your use in any way unless you contact me.

  

I have shown you images of the San-Bushman in their setting filled with frilly and lacy trees and bush. They are walking in the sand, creating jewelry and bows and arrows, laughing and telling jokes. Please see these pictures in the set of Namibia pictures.

 

It was a wonderfully romantic day for me. I enjoyed seeing how we might have lived and the warm reception that was given by the tribe was inspiring. I loved how my guide, who was tall and slender western looking chap, related to them in a respectful and warm way. They ended my visit with a farewell speech, thanking me for coming such a distance to see them. This touched me a great deal.

 

The reality is, however, that they have been relegated to government land much like the Native Indians of America. They have been treated in a disrespectful way by the South African government and the Namibian government. They live in poverty and are not able to hunt any longer. “Civilization” has destroyed them and their way of life. The visits with folks like me from the outside world seem to be charades, thus shattering all romantic ideas that one can still find the old ways, somewhere in the world.

 

Did I feel deceived? No not at all. Really, NOT at all! In some ways I believe they liked being taken back in time to revisit the way their ancestors lived and perhaps knowing that they allowed a romantic, such as I, to live in that world, if only for a few fleeting moments.

 

The following is a passage by Paul Theroux, a romantic traveler too:

“The image of the Ju/’hoansi we cling to-I did anyway- is that of a wild-dwelling, self-sufficient people. We seem to need them to be that way, not merely different from us, and purer, but more different than they really are- tenacious, resourceful, generous, peaceful, as if inhabiting Eden. They are reminders of who we once were, our ancient better selves. At one time, long ago, all of us were foragers on earth. What a relief it is in a world yearning for authenticity to know that though we have blighted our habitat, there is an unspoiled place on the planet, and a people who have defied modernity by clinging to their old ways. The past recaptured. Isn’t it pretty to think so?”

 

A reminder that all of my images are copyrighted and are not for your use in any way unless you contact me.

 

I want to thank everyone who has viewed this and other pictures! A big THANK YOU for looking at what I saw along the way while on safari.

 

Sometime ago beccafromchatham mentioned there was an article about geese in the December 2006 Smithsonian magazine. I'm happy to say this is a wonderful article and is available online Living with Geese by Paul Theroux.

I have some pens and pencils.

 

A moleskine.

 

And a head full of quotes, lyrics and the like.

 

Come and see them at quoteskine.tumblr.com

My favorite author and me! Wow, met the guy at a lecture here in Portland. I even asked a question, "How many languages do you speak and what methods do you use to learn new languages?" Answer: Italian, an African language he learned for the Peace Corps, Swahili-- a couple minutes of his meeting with Obama (he is a big supporter)-- and immersion is the way to learn.

 

A true hero of mine, for many years. Very proud to have met him and shook his hand. He signed a picture of him rowing "Golden Eye" for me.

Orange, the signature colour of Penguin paperbacks. Interesting to see how the spine design has changed through the years.

  

Chicago, IL, 2013

 

I stopped by Cafe Mustache in Logan Square to try the coffee from South Side of Chicago roaster Bridgeport Coffee.

 

Panasonic LX3

Dynamic BW mode

Rodolfo Alonso Editor (Buenos Aires, 1970).

I love paperback books from this era (1967 in this case). They take a work of literary fiction and try to make it seem, from the cover, like it is some sort of dirty book. Why not just sell real dirty books if that's what people want?

 

The people on the cover of this book don't seem like they have very much to do with the characters in the book - that's certain.

 

++++++++++++++++++

 

Book Description

 

This novel, set in the green chaos of East Africa, concerns the ambitions of three women, teachers at a remote girls’ school. They are the only white women in this region, and each is in her way doomed.

 

Miss Poole, the Headmistress, was born in Africa and cannot live anywhere else. A colonial, she wants desperately to order the society along Christian principles. But she has little support in this. Her most intimate friend is Rose, an African albino girl. Bettyjean Lebow -- B.J. to her friends -- an American Peace Corps volunteer from San Diego, has other ideas; she has come to help and can’t understand why the others “have this thing about black people.” And yet she has difficulty reconciling her Hollywood fantasies of Africa with her liberal outlook.

 

Heather Monkhouse, about whom much is rumored, left a dull job in outer London to come to Africa, where she hoped the loveless routine of her life would end. After being fired from a teaching job in Nairobi, she arrives at Miss Poole’s and creates a threatening mood of suspense, made worse by the hysteria all the women feel in their loneliness. Trapped at the school, each struggles to realize her own vision of Africa, and to survive.

 

During one school term, in an isolation where the only willing men are two black cousins, Wangi and Wilbur, the vision of each woman alters against her will, then is destroyed. And the sardonic humor that characterizes the earlier chapters explodes into a denouement of ferocious violence.

 

from www.paultheroux.com/books/book-204.html

~ Paul Theroux

 

With my Jeep on my way down on Mouna Kea.

 

Mouna Kea Observatory Access Road with its twists and turns passing through the rugged terrain made up of solidified lava. I spotted atleast 15 small and big cinder cones around here. Its just fascinating to imagine how it would have looked when there was lava exploding thru all those cinder cones at the same time some 4000 to 6000 years ago.

 

Some Facts about the Mouna Kea volcano:

Most Recent Eruption: At least 7 separate vents erupted between about 6,000 and 4,000 years ago

Number of Historical Eruptions: none

Oldest Dated Rocks: 237,000 ± 31,000 years before present

Estimated Age of Mauna Kea: About 1 million years

 

January 3 2010, Big Island, Hawaii. This is amazing. See the number of cinder cones around here >> just tremdous views from here.

Caught a shot of Paul Theroux looking up in delight to the avid reader who has requested for an autograph.

Pocket Penguin 13

Paul Theroux

Two Stars

 

Published by the Penguin Group

Published as a Pocket Penguin 2005

13 cover artwork: Mat Maitland at Big Active

 

From the back cover:

Every book tells a story... And the 70 titles in the Pocket Penguin series are emblematic of the renowned breadth and quality that formed part of the original Penguin vision in 1935 and that continue to define our publishing today. Together, they tell one version of the unique story of Penguin Books.

 

Paul Theroux is one of the world's most prolific and versatile authors. A writer of acclaimed and award-winning fiction, Theroux is perhaps better known as a traveller with the rare ability to bring the world home to his millions of readers. Penguin has happily been Theroux's companion both in his fictional and in his non-fictional forays, and in Two Stars he explores the world of celebrity surrounding two icons: Elizabeth Taylor and Marilyn Monroe.

Luz en el alma, luz en la cocina,

De noche luz y de mañana luz

y luz entre las sábanas del sueño.

Las redes que temblaban en la luz

siguen saliendo claras del océano.

 

Pablo Neruda, Aquella luz

Road travel in western Nepal. A good book helps during the inevitable delays.

We went back to the parlor library. He had forgotten to show me his edition of Poe. I said that I recently read The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym.

 

"The ending of that book is so strange--the dark and the light."

 

"And the ship with the corpses on it."

 

"Yes," said Borges a bit uncertainly. "I read it so long ago, before I lost my sight. It is Poe's greatest book."

Verde que te quiero verde.

Verde viento. Verdes ramas.

El barco sobre la mar

y el caballo en la montaña.

Con la sombra en la cintura

ella sueña en su baranda,

verde carne, pelo verde,

con ojos de fría plata.

Verde que te quiero verde.

Bajo la luna gitana,

las cosas la están mirando

y ella no puede mirarlas.

 

Federico García Lorca, fragmento de 'Romance sonámbulo'

Falling from the western selves

To find yourself alone again

Wonderin' where you have been

Your lonely voice

Calls across the star lit coast

Reaching out to be seen

 

She cries your name

Three times again

She cries your name

How long can this love remain?

 

Scratch beneath the surface screen

Of what we say and what we seem

Is there truth to be seen?

She's cryin' out your name

But her scream sounds the same

How fickle fate can be

 

- Beth Orton, from 'She cries your name'

 

Popularised by both Bruce Chatwin and Paul Theroux, La Trochita runs on a narrow gauge between Esquel and El Maiten

Green is the jungle and adventure

Green is hope and peace

Green smells like a fresh cut gras

Green looks like mountains, valleys and trees

Green sounds like etnic music

Green is clean energie

Green is ecology

Green is freshness

Green is the future

  

Beginng to think that, in fact, this might make a great setting for the film adaptation of Paul Theroux's novel Hotel Honolulu.

Famous hotel....Paul Theroux slept here....In two different books! ;-)

"The train smelt of yesterday's picnics" [Bruce Chatwin - In Patagonia]

Weddell seals have the most southerly distribution of any mammal, with a habitat that extends as far south as McMurdo Sound (at 77°S). It is the only species in the genus Leptonychotes and the only member of the Antarctic tribe of lobodontine seals to prefer in-shore habitats on shore-fast ice over free-floating pack ice.

 

“Travel is only glamorous in retrospect” – Paul Theroux

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