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Pororan island, Bougainville, Autonomous Region of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Blue Sea Star Schooling Baitfish Papua New Guinea Water

I'm really thinking about going back to Papua New Guinea and taking some photo-friends. If you're interested, get on our Newsletter. Note we'll have to have you sign wavers out the wazoo. It's not the safest place in the world... but the photography there is amazing. You can visit the Papua New Guinea category here on the site if you want to see more photos.

 

- Trey Ratcliff

 

Click here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

I saw all kinds of natives in various costumes, but none as hot as this. To me, they look like some kind of Rastafarian Chewbaccas. It's kind of like Chewie+Dreadlocks, eh? And it was absolutely sweltering outside. I was dressed in my Albert Schweitzer cargo shorts (not sure if he wore shorts, but if he did, he'd be wearing these) with a light t-shirt, and I was just dripping in sweat. I can't imagine what these guys felt like in these walking carpets.

 

- Trey Ratcliff

 

Click here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Papua New Guinea or Amsterdam?

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Every year at Mount Hagen, in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea, the biggest reunion of tribes in the world takes place. In a region where the first white man was seen in 1930, traditions are still strong, and the pride of the tribes takes precedence over modernity. Created in 1964 by Australian colonials to pacify the tribes, there's still a possibility of a confrontation, but these days take place in the shape of singing, colours and incredible garments...

“Armed carjackings, assaults, robbery, shootings and serious sexual offences, including rape, are common in Papua” warns the Foreign Office travel advice to travelers! But once you are in the place, you can meet the most incredible tribes in the world. The “Men bilong pait” (the Warriors) ,the” pipels” (the women), and the “pikinini” (the children) are all celebrating. Hundreds of papus are gathering themselves for the Singsing. It’s in open air, but you feel like being backstage in the latest fashion show in Milano or Paris as men paint their faces in red,yellow,white,black, women take grass to make skirts or kilts and cover their bodies with clay, mud, or even pigs fat! Old wise men are building the giant headdresses made of eagle, parrot and bird of paradise feathers. Each feather is packed in newspaper, to protect them from insects. It takes hours… Some warriors wear also marsupial jaws as necklaces! “If you do not have jaws, you can put dogs teeth, it works too” they told me!

Papua New Guinea , Highlands, Mount Hagen festival singsing

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

“Armed carjackings, assaults, robbery, shootings and serious sexual offences, including rape, are common in Papua” says the Foreign Office travel advice to travelers!

The papua tourism office has a hard work convincing more people like me to come to PNG!

Once a year takes place in Mount Hagen the biggest tribal meeting, called a singsing.

The “Men bilong pait” (the Warriors) ,the” pipels” (the women), and the “pikinini” (the children) are all here. Hundreds of papus are preparing themselves for the Singsing. It’s in open air, but you feel like being backstage in the latest fashion show in Milano or Paris as men paint their faces in red,yellow,white,black, women take grass to make skirts or kilts and cover their bodies with clay, mud, or even pigs fat!

Old wise men are building the giant headdresses made of eagle, parrot and bird of paradise feathers. Each feather is packed in newspaper, to protect them from insects. It will take hours…

Some warriors wear also marsupial jaws as necklaces! “If you do not have jaws, you can put dogs teeth, it works too” they tell me!

Bones, shells, pigs tusks, or twigs are put in the noses. I meet a Highlands warrior who has gave up the traditional shell that he used to put in his nose, and now uses an electrical meter!

Papu like to put a modern touch in their jewels or decorations, as we like to put some tribal stuff in our so called designed houses!

 

Now it’s time for parade. All the tribes are marching. It’s a mix of sounds and sights, not a love parade, rather a war parade!

The Mount Hagen festival was launched by the Australian colonial governor in 1964, to promote peace in the country.So…The warriors simulate fights! But the stone axes, the arrows, the shields, the spears, the bludgeons are real! There won’t be any violence during the festival, but everyday, tribal fights still take place, with guns instead of axes, and people die…

You can hear war songs, drums, and the tribes start to march in circle, in column, or in line .

The tribes keep on dancing until sundown, and have to listen to an endless speech from a local political while the few tourists go back to their hotels, stoned by the loudspeakers noise!

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

WW2 Japanese Donryu Bomber in Madang, Papua New Guinea

Eglu Narko, from Chimbu men tribe. With mud on his face to celebrate a death. - Papua New Guinea , Highlands, Mount Hagen festival singsing

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

        

New Guinea Fisherman, Milne Bay, Papua New Guinea, Dan Harding

Langania village, Tantanua dance (mask dance).

At dawn, masked warriors come out from the sea. They guard the bearer of a heavy, towering mask whose spirit purifies the graveyard and Malagan house for the public ceremony. The Malangan is a kind of wooden totem that belongs to the chief of the clan or the village.

The chief has to be beaten to blood with lime stones to show his bravery, and to deserve to have the Malangan.

New Ireland, Papua New Guinea

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

He wears only vegetal clothes. Langania village, New Ireland, Papua New Guinea

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

      

Lonely Planet Magazine commissioned me to create a set of maps for the current issue - this is an illustration for their Papua New Guinea feature.

 

© Zara Picken 2010 www.zaraillustrates.com

A little island in Papua New Guinea

Tari - Lodge Ambua

 

Tari Is the centre of Huli country in the Southern Highlands province of Papua New Guinea. It is the second largest settlement in the province, and accessible by road from Mendi.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tari,_Papua_New_Guinea

  

interesting to read:

www.townandcountrytravelmag.com/vacation-ideas/best-vacat...

We first met at Rondon Ridge, a new eco-lodge outside the town of Mount Hagen, the capital of the Western Highlands Province. The lodge's twelve rooms are immense and extremely comfortable; floor-to-ceiling glass doors open to the wide green Wahgi Valley, an amphitheater of rain forest–covered mountains draped in tendrils of cloud and mist. When I walked into my room, a sweet little wooden pig with a welcome note was waiting on my pillow. My first dinner started with delicious ginger-tinged watercress soup, which was followed by perfectly cooked venison, a salad of native greens and coffee-and-cream pavlova for dessert. Solar-powered electric blankets kept us warm during the cool nights, and piles of fluffy towels awaited us after every shower. But it's here, near the rain forest, in the clear mountain air full of the scent of woodsmoke and vibrating with a symphony of cicadas, birds and owls, that I realize I'm finally back in the magical land that has haunted me since my girlhood. Watching the fat equatorial sun turn pink, scarlet and then bloodred as it sets over the Wahgi Valley, I wonder if I could ever get enough of this place.

 

Exclusive at Getty Images

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Every year at Mount Hagen, in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea, the biggest reunion of tribes in the world takes place. In a region where the first white man was seen in 1930, traditions are still strong, and the pride of the tribes takes precedence over modernity. Created in 1964 by Australian colonials to pacify the tribes, there's still a possibility of a confrontation, but these days take place in the shape of singing, colours and incredible garments...

“Armed carjackings, assaults, robbery, shootings and serious sexual offences, including rape, are common in Papua” warns the Foreign Office travel advice to travelers! But once you are in the place, you can meet the most incredible tribes in the world. The “Men bilong pait” (the Warriors) ,the” pipels” (the women), and the “pikinini” (the children) are all celebrating. Hundreds of papus are gathering themselves for the Singsing. It’s in open air, but you feel like being backstage in the latest fashion show in Milano or Paris as men paint their faces in red,yellow,white,black, women take grass to make skirts or kilts and cover their bodies with clay, mud, or even pigs fat! Old wise men are building the giant headdresses made of eagle, parrot and bird of paradise feathers. Each feather is packed in newspaper, to protect them from insects. It takes hours… Some warriors wear also marsupial jaws as necklaces! “If you do not have jaws, you can put dogs teeth, it works too” they told me!

Papua New Guinea , Highlands, Mount Hagen festival singsing

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Komoa Beach, Papua New Guinea

 

Getty Images Collection | Stephen Walford Photography

 

:copyright: Stephen Walford 2015 All Rights Reserved

 

If you are interested in using an image please contact me for licensing details.

 

This work may not be copied, reproduced, republished, edited, downloaded, displayed, modified, transmitted, licensed, transferred, sold, distributed or uploaded in any way without my prior written permission.

A Royal Australian Air Force C-27J Spartan from No. 35 Squadron flies over Kokoda during Operation Hannah in Papua New Guinea.

The staging of the Goroka Show started back in 1957 at the Independence Park opposite the Goroka Main Market. It was first introduced and organized by Australian Kiaps. Kiaps from each district built round houses typical of thier districts. It is they proudly displayed cultures of their districts. The kiaps brought in singsing groups from their area and as we have some twenty nine languages and societies it was reflected in their culture.

 

These days the Goroka show is partly a tourist event, but it's a rare opportunity for travellers to experience the customs of over a hundred tribes that populate the Papua New Guinea highlands. During the course of the weekend the tribes gather for music, dancing, showing-off and extraordinary displays of tribal rituals.

 

The Goroka Show was held on 17th, 18th and 19th September 2010.

 

www.ingetjetadros.com/

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How can a country of 841 languages and 700 plus ethnc groups unite to form a country , impossible , but possible for PNG .

The men-with-wigs are the members of the Huli tribe. It is the most famous famous tribe of Papua New Guinea. They are called like that because they make wigs from their hair. They live close to Tari city in the center of the Papua New Guinea on the top of the Highlands. Most of the hulis are civilized but a part of them still lives a traditional life. For their singsings (the local names for the big events) the men come back to their indigenous customs. For these occasions, even the city of Tari is suddenly filled with aborigines dressed in short skirts and traditional wigs richly decorated with feathers. They paint their faces, usually with yellow, red, and white decorations like you can see on the picture.

Hulis are warriors.At the beginning of the year 2010, the tribal fights even start to bother the economical development. Police was deployed the Southern Highlands province to contain an ongoing tribal war which has troubled the ExxonMobil gas pipeline project. The operations of were badly affected by the fights which started in jaunary 2010. The fights caused 11 deaths and the destruction of more than 270 houses.

Papua New Guinea , Highlands, Mount Hagen festival singsing

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Boys from Kapleman village, near Kavieng in New Ireland island, Papua New Guinea

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Papua New Guinea (PNG; Tok Pisin: Papua Niugini), officially the Independent State of Papua New Guinea, is a country in Oceania, occupying the eastern half of the island of New Guinea and numerous offshore islands (the western portion of the island is a part of the Indonesian provinces of Papua and West Papua). It is located in the southwestern Pacific Ocean, in a region defined since the early 19th century as Melanesia. The capital is Port Moresby.

 

Papua New Guinea is one of the most culturally diverse countries on Earth. According to recent data, 841 different languages are listed for the country, although 11 of these have no known living speakers. . (A detailed series of language maps of Papua New Guinea may be found at Ethnologue) There may be at least as many traditional societies,out of a population of about 6.2 million. It is also one of the most rural, as only 18% of its people live in urban centres. The country is one of the world's least explored, culturally and geographically, and many undiscovered species of plants and animals are thought to exist in the interior of Papua New Guinea.

 

The majority of the population live in traditional societies and practise subsistence-based agriculture. These societies and clans have some explicit acknowledgement within the nation's constitutional framework. The PNG Constitution (Preamble 5(4)) expresses the wish for "traditional villages and communities to remain as viable units of Papua New Guinean society",and for active steps to be taken in their preservation.

 

After being ruled by three external powers since 1884, Papua New Guinea gained its independence from Australia in 1975. It remains a Commonwealth realm of Her Majesty Elizabeth II, Queen of Papua New Guinea. Many people live in extreme poverty, with about one third of the population living on less than US$1.25 per day

 

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