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In the foreground "Composition of Joy" by Mercedes & Franziska Welte (Austria) and in the background "Politics of Dialogue" by Nadim Karam (Lebanon).

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This year again, the Personal Structures art exhibition takes place in the Giardini della Marinaressa in the heart of Venice and gathers sculptures carried out by international artists.

sculpture-network.org/en/magazine/Personal-Structures-201...

 

How open is the so called “Open culture” in Europe? The visualization shows what kind of Creative Commons licenses are applied to the artworks uploaded on the online platform “Europeana”. These licenses are classified by usage openness and the artworks are distributed among the top 10 contributing countries.

 

Team: Nicolò Fabio Banfi, Erika Inzitari, Ludovico Pincini, Andrey Vinogradov

Content in Motion: Curating Europe’s Audiovisual Heritage.

During the 2015 international EUscreen conference in Warsaw, the benefits and challenges were discussed of memory institutions in making available online their AV collections.

CC image by Catherine Cronin, building on original Networked Teacher image by Alec Couros www.flickr.com/photos/courosa/2922421696/

Later versions changed 'Classroom' to 'Physical Spaces'. See www.slideshare.net/cicronin/open-culture-open-education-o...

liverpool easter egg hunt

Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw44amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

1104 The American Florist, June ij Fancy Fernsp -$2.00 per 1000 New Crop Galax, Bronze or Green 11.25 per 1000; 10,000 $7.60 Sphagnum Moss, large bales $1 26; 6bales, $7.00. Extra Fine T,euC0tll0e Sprays, Green and BroMze $1.00 per 100; $7.60 per 1000 Boxwood, per bunch, 36c; 60-lb. case, $8.60 Magnolias, Brown and Green, Imported stock per basket, $2.60; 6 baskets, $2.00 each Discount on orders of 10,000 or more. Florists in the Middle and Western States can save money by placing their orders with us. A trial order solicited. MICHIGAN CUT FLOWFR EXCHANGE, Inc. Wholesale Commission Florists and Florists' Supplies, 38-40 Broadway, All Phone Connections. DETROIT, MICH. Massachusetts Horticultural SoDiety. At the rhododendron exhibition held June 10 the following were the awards: Orchids—Display of 25 plants, arranged for effect with foliage plants. J. T. Butterworth. first; Mrs. J. Gardner, second; J. T. Butterworth. third. Gra- tuities—Mrs. J. L. Gardner, display of rhododendrons; T. C. Thurlow & Sons Co peonies; Wm. W^hitman. collection of peonies; Mrs. J. L. Gardner, collec- tion of peonies; Harvard Botanic Gar- den, display of water lilies; J. T. But- terworth, display of orchids; ^ m. Whitman, display of palms and Can- terbury bells; Mrs. E. M. Gill, display of cut flowers. Gold medal—E. J. Shaylor, collection of peonies. Silver medals—R. and J. Farquhar & Co., dis- play of peonies, iris and other plants; Walter Hunnewell, Cattleya Welleslei- ana Bronze medal—J. T. Butterworth. specimen Miltonia vexillaria. First- class certificate of merit—F. J. Rea, new aster Amellus, Beaute Parfait; Langwater Gardens, seedling orchids, Cattleva Loddigesii X Laella purpurata alba. Cultural certificate—J. T. Butter- worth, specimen Cattleya Mendel i Morganiana. Honorable mention—Mil- ton Lockwood, new hybrid peony, L'Esperance; R. and J. Farquhar, dis- play of tree peonies; R. and J. l-ar- quhar. Iris pallida. Vote of thanks- Walter Hunnewell, display of rhodo- dendrons; Mrs. D. S. Greenough col- lection of hybrid columbines. Vege- tables : Theodore Lyman fund. Aspar- agus—Four bunches, twelve stalks each G. P. Wheeler, first; Oliver Ames, second; Frederick Mason, third. Beets- Twelve specimens, open culture, Oliver Ames, first. Lettuce—Four heads, Frederick Mason, Big Boston, first; same exhibitor, Wayahead, second; same exhibitor, Tenderheart, third. Spinach—peck, Frederick Mason, first, Victoria. Rhubarb-Twelve stalks, open culture, Frederick Mason, first: Oliver Ames, second. Gratuity—Oliver Ames, tomatoes. Achillea Argentea. Some confusion has existed with re- gard to this plant, which has been sometimes referred to Tanacetum ar- genteum. The latter, however, is quite distinct, being of shrubby habit, with large golden yellow flowers. Achillea argenta was sent out by Mr. Thonip- son, of Ipswich, about the year 1888, but its origin is somewhat obscure, states a writer in the Gardeners' Maga- zine. At the same time it is a very dec- orative rock plant, with silvery-white foliage in rosettes of closely set pinnate leaves. Like many other dwarf-grow- ing achilleas it forms a spreading car- pet that makes it a very attractive plant even when not in flower. During May and June the flowers are pro- duced on stems from four to five inches Loretta or Huckleberry, $K5U per case A fine substitute for Southern Willi Smilax. Extensively used for June decorations. Order direct from onr Southern Branch. DENRY M. ROBINSON & CO., McWilliams, Ala. high, usually about six on a stem. The individual flower heads are about three-quarters of an inch in diameter, with pure white rays, and a pale yel- low disc. In choosing a position for this plant it must be borne in mind that damp or heavy soil is fatal to it in winter, therefore a sunny, somewhat sloping ledge should be selected. The soil should be deep, but of a strong na- ture. A. Argentea is readily propa- gated by means of division in early spring, or by cuttings in summer. The latter strike readily in a close frame, and soon make good flowering plants. As a pot plant for the cold house it is very useful and decorative, coming into flower in the 'Cold frame a little earlier than in the rock garden. In a selection of six of the best dwarf achilleas for the rock garden this would be one of the first chosen, others being A. ageratifolia, A. moschata, A. rupestris, A. tomentosa and A. umbel- lata. Greenhouse Building; Tacoma, Wash.—H. W. Walker, two greenhouses, 20xI0S feet. Hollywood, Calif.—Cocos & Kentla Co., one greenhouse, 30x00 feet. Northport, L. I., N. Y.—J. D. Cock- croft, one greenhouse 55x400 feet, two greenhouses 25x150 feet. Waynesboro, Pa.—Henry Eichholz, two greenhouses 35il50 feet. Westboro, Mass.—Leonard C. Midg- ley, two greenhouses 50x300 feet. Elmwood, Conn.—Louis L. Barton, several greenhouses. Bangor, Me.—Adam Sekinger, one greenhouse 35x300 feet. Chicago, 111.—Otto Kuehnel, one greenhouse 18x100 feet. Park Ridge, 111.—E. H. Meuret, one greenhouse 27x219 feet. Stroudsburg, Pa.—J. Howard Stone, one greenhouse 28x150 feet and three, 25x150 feet. Lafayette. Ind.—H. Roth, two green- houses 26x114 feet. Bangor, Me.—A. J. Loder, two green- houses. Athol, Mass.—Geo. W. Sutherland, one greenhouse. Wheaton, 111.—E. T. Wanzer, one greenhouse 20.xl00 feet. Kalamazoo, Mich.—G. Van Bochove & Bro., two greenhouses.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Mention the American Florist when writing (Jeurge Cotsnnas <£• Co. Wholesaleand Retail Dealers in all Itinds of Evergreens Fancy and DaKt;er| Feros, Bronze and Green Galax, Holly Leucotboe Sprays. Princess Pine. Etc. Jelivered to all parts ol United Stales and Canada 127 W. 28tll St, bet 6tb & 7tb Aves.. Uoiii Vnrb Telepbone 1202 Madison Square ''"" '«"■ Mention the American Florist when writing # Huckleberry Foliage A Very Pleasing New Decorative Green. Perpetuated and li/ir^CGCC Natural Sheet iVl%^aac.9 Quality and service unequalled. E A. BEAVEN, Evergreen, Ala. Ueniion the American Florist when writing SEND US YOUR ORDERS FOR HUCKLEBERRY FOLIAGE A pleasing substitute for Wild Smilax. Same size cases ai Wild Smilax. $2 50. Caldwell the Woodsman Co. EVERRGEEN, ALA. Chicago, 111—W. E. Lynch, three greenhouses 28x285 feet. Libertyville. 111.—Meredith Floral Co., five greenhouses, one 20x82 feet, one 35x90 feet and three 27i'!.x200 feet

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

~~ OPEN GARDEN Interaction ~~

 

Museo del Metaverso (MdM)

 

slurl : Uqbar

via WordPress ift.tt/2Tx6mqB

 

It has been a season of mourning for literature: first the death of Mary Oliver and now W.S. Merwin, two writers who left a considerable imprint on over half a century of American poetry. Considering the fact that founding father of the Beats and proprietor of world-renowned City Lights Bookstore, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, turns 100 on March 24th, maybe a few more people have glanced over to check on him. How’s he doing?

 

He's grown "frail and nearly blind," writes Chloe Veltman at The Guardian in an interview with the poet this month, "but his mind is still on fire." Ferlinghetti “has not mellowed,” says Washington Post book critic Ron Charles, "at all." If you’re looking for him at any of the events planned in his honor, City Lights announces, he will not be in attendance, but he has been busy promoting his latest book, a thinly-veiled autobiographical novel about his early life called Little Boy.

 

In the book Ferlinghetti describes his childhood in images right out of Edward Gorey. He was a “Little Lord Fauntleroy” in a Bronxville mansion 20 miles outside New York, an orphan taken in and raised by descendants of the founders of Sarah Lawrence. “His new guardians spoke to one another in courtly tones and dressed in Victorian garb,” notes Charles. “They sent him to private school, and, more important, they possessed a fine library, which he was encouraged to use.”

 

The poet would later write he was a “social climber climbing downward,” an ironic reference to how some people might have seen the trajectory of his career. After serving in the Navy during World War II, earning a master’s at Columbia, and a Ph.D. at the Sorbonne, Ferlinghetti decamped to San Francisco, and founded the small magazine City Lights with Peter D. Martin. Then he opened a bookstore on the edge of Chinatown to fund the publishing venture.

 

The shop became a haunt for writers and poets. Ferlinghetti started publishing them, starting with himself in 1955. The following year he gained international infamy for publishing Allen Ginsberg’s Howl (hear Ginsberg read the poem at City Lights in '56). The book was banned, and Ferlinghetti put on trial for obscenity. If anyone thought this would be the end of Lawrence Ferlinghetti, they were mistaken.

 

He has published somewhere around forty books of poetry and criticism, novels and plays, been a prolific painter for sixty years, as well as a publisher, bookseller, and activist. He does not consider himself a Beat poet, but from his influential first two books—Pictures of the Gone World and 1958’s A Coney Island of the Mind—onward, Ferlinghetti’s philosophical outlook has more or less breathed the same air as Ginsberg et al.’s.

 

Quoting from Coney Island, Andrew Shapiro writes, “he counseled us to ‘confound the system,’ ‘to empty out our pockets… missing our appointments’ and to leave ‘our neckties behind’ and ‘take up the full beard of walking anarchy.’” He is still doing this, every way that he can, in public readings, media appearances, and a canny use of YouTube. His is not a call to flower power but to full immersion in the chaos of life, or, as he writes in “Coney Island of the Mind 1” in the “veritable rage / of adversity / Heaped up / groaning with babies and bayonets / under cement skies / in an abstract landscape of blasted trees.”

 

Ferlinghetti urged poets and writers to “create works capable of answering the challenge of apocalyptic times, even if this meaning sounds apocalyptic… you can conquer the conquerors with words.” Despite this stridency, he has never taken himself too seriously. Ferlinghetti is as relaxed as they come—he hasn’t mellowed, but he also hasn’t needed to. He’s a loose, natural storyteller and comedian and he’s still delivering sober, prophetic pronouncements with gravitas.

 

See and hear Ferlinghetti take on conquerors, bullies, and xenophobes, underwear, and other subjects in the readings here from his throughout his career, including a full, 40-minute reading in 2005 at UC Berkeley, below, an album of Ferlinghetti and Kenneth Rexroth, above, and at the top, a video made last year of the 99-year-old poet, in Lady Liberty mask, reading “Trump’s Trojan Horse” under a grinning, gray-bearded self-portrait of his younger self. Happy 100th to him. "I figure that with another 100 birthdays," he says, "that'll be about enough!"

 

Related Content:

 

Bill Murray Reads the Poetry of Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Wallace Stevens, Emily Dickinson, Billy Collins, Lorine Niedecker, Lucille Clifton & More

 

Allen Ginsberg’s Howl Manuscripts Now Digitized & Put Online, Revealing the Beat Poet’s Creative Process

 

The First Recording of Allen Ginsberg Reading “Howl” (1956)

 

Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC. Follow him at @jdmagness

 

Lawrence Ferlinghetti Turns 100: Hear the Great San Francisco Poet Read “Trump’s Trojan Horse,” “Pity the Nation” & Many Other Poems is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

 

The post Lawrence Ferlinghetti Turns 100: Hear the Great San Francisco Poet Read “Trump’s Trojan Horse,” “Pity the Nation” & Many Other Poems appeared first on .

 

The post Lawrence Ferlinghetti Turns 100: Hear the Great San Francisco Poet Read “Trump’s Trojan Horse,” “Pity the Nation” & Many Other Poems appeared first on .

 

Khajuraho, in central India, is famous for temples with erotic sculptures.

Biog:

 

Paula Le Dieu: Creative Director & Co-founder SimpleMotion.com

 

Paula has worked with many media and cultural organisations such as the England Arts Council, British Film Institute, BBC, Guardian, Fairfax and Ofcom as well as interactive arts, activism and film making communities such as The Space, Mozilla and Doc/Fest. Her experience spans making and curating interactive experiences, shaping the future of public service media, leading the digital transformation of arts and cultural heritage organisations and working with international communities of artists and open culture practitioners.

 

Paula is channeling her experience into her own endeavour - SimpleMotion.com - a company that makes things that move - as well as her own arts practice and ongoing interest in public arts and web policy.

 

Paula has been a proud board member for Doc/Fest, the Open Knowledge Foundation and Lighthouse Arts.

 

You can follow her @archiville

Hello Brooks Family,

First of all let me says thanks for all the warm wishes in the past few weeks they have been much appreciated. Also a big thank you from my family and myself for cash gift it will go to good use most likely pay for lodging close to the hospital so Heather is not driving back and forth each day . As most all you know I am headed in Monday for 2 life changing but most importantly life saving surgeries.

 

Back in 2006 I had a small tumor removed from the right side of my face (pituitary glade) below my cheek bone. After the surgery I did 6 and a half weeks of radiation to kill all or most of the tissue left around the muscles, bone and nerves vs. surgically removing them all. This left a fully functional side of my face. Unfortunately the radiation did not kill everything and in the course of the past 8 years a new very aggressive tumor has formed. This tumor is above my cheek bone in between my eye and ear a PET scan found it roughly 2 months ago. After 2 months of seeing many eye, ear and brain specialist the best but yet most aggressive course of action for a long term cure will be to surgically remove all muscle ,bone and nerves including my right eye and ear(REALLY SUCKS!). Then surgically affixing a free flap (a large pcs. of skin from my thigh) to cover it all. This free flap will have a heart beat blood source ect. Then I will radiate the free flap to ensure all cancer has a very small chance of returning.

 

I will have the first surgery this coming Monday 11-25-13 everything will be removed then I will be in ICU will the bone and tissue sample are sent out to ensure all cancer has been removed and there are negative margins in both. Then the following Monday 12-2-13 the free flap will be attached. All of this is happening at Porter Hospital here in Denver.

 

The recovery will be mostly mental. I will have physical therapy to get my balance where it needs to be and dealing with the loss of my depth perception and probably a little speech therapy as well. The largest hurdle will be me mentally dealing with how I look as it will be a dramatic in your face change to my appearance and the way others deal with this as well. Once I have conquered all of that I will back to my old self and the doctors say I should be able to everything I do today.

 

Take care and if all goes well I should be back in the office within the next 6-8 weeks.

   

Upcoming Surgery 11/25/13

— Nov 19, 2013

As many of you know Jim is scheduled for surgery on the Monday November 25th at Porter Hospital. The doctors will remove the tumor, this more than likely will result in losing his right eye and ear. December 2nd another surgery will be performed to place a free flap over the area where the tumor was removed. We do not have any details regarding his hospital stay. We believe he will be in ICU after the first surgery possibly staying there until the second. Once Jim is out of surgery I will let every know and post information regarding visiting hours etc.

 

One surgery down

— Nov 25, 2013

Jim was out of surgery around 5:30ish. Everything went well they were able to remove all the cancerous mass. They had to remove his right eye and ear in the process. Right now he is in ICU with guauze packed in the area wear everything was removed. This is to ensure all the cancer is removed before placing the skin flap. We finally got too see him around 6:15, he just got pain meds and was pretty groggy. I did not stay long just a quick kiss & a I love You! Tonight he really needs to rest, after all he was in surgery for almost 9 hours. Sometimes doing what the doctors ask is very hard and I did not want to leave him! I will post again Tuesday maybe a picture or two (I want to get his ok before I do that) Thanks to everyone for the text and well wishes! I really want to give a Big shout out to the AWESOME group of employees at Brooks!!! As always Jim looks out for his girls and wanted to get me a hotel room close to the Hospital and thanks to your overwhelming generosity I did!

 

Day two at Porter

— Nov 26, 2013

Jim is doing GREAT! He's still in ICU but he's talking, has gotten out if bed and sat in a chair a couple if times, even completed a lap around the unit in record time. He using percaset to manage the pain and he has gotten a lot of sleep. But the most exciting news is that he got a longer hospital bed!

 

Day 3

— Nov 27

Jim's doctor is thrilled w/his progress! It was a busy day: he got a sponge bath, some more tubes removed, he made it 2 laps around the unit, got to have a few sips of Apple juice. But the best news is that we got down graded and moved to different room(in the hospital world this is a good thing)!! This busy day did take a toll on him, he went to sleep immediately after getting his percasit at 8:30. Normally he giggles like a school girl for 30 mins. Thanks to everyone who has posted messages & sent text to us! I was reading them to Jim this morning and he really enjoyed hearing from you! I apologize for any mis-spellings/typos I'm using my phone to update.

 

Day 4

--Nov 28

Jim's still doing very well. They are watching his blood sugar (it's high) and giving him insulin. But they are not too worried about it. The doc says it most likely due to the surgery and the shock to his body. He was really tired and has slept most the day. He did take a walk and sit up to watch some football;)

 

Day 5

--Nov 29

Jim had a lot of visitors today, he loved it. He has been running a temp off & on since last night. He was awake most the day but could not get comfortable enough to go to sleep until about 10 mins ago.

  

Day 6 @ Porter

— Nov 30

 

Jim had a great day! He was up walking, spent quite a bit of time sitting in a chair, sent some texts & even took a few naps. Seeing Erika, Matt & Scarlett made his afternoon! When they left he stood up & gave everyone hugs! He starting running a low grade fever around 8pm, so he took some meds and was asleep within an hour. I got the standard answer "all his blood work came back normal; this due to the stress of surgery." It amazes me what medical professionals consider "normal'

 

--Dec 2

Sorry no post last night. I usually stay w/Jim until he falls asleep. But last night was just like a night at home if Jim doesn't sleep no one sleeps:) Sunday was a very long day. He went in for the 2nd surgery this morning. I went to the hotel for some much needed zzzzssss after seeing him of to surgery. His Doc just called and he said the surgery was text book. They took skin & tissue of his thigh to create the free flap on his face. He will be in recovery then back to the ICU for a day or so. I am going to the let the skilled nursing staff at Porter due their jobs this afternoon & tonight & I will see "my love" tomm morning. Thanks everyone for your support Jim reads this site every morning, we are blessed to have such a great support team!!!

 

Day after Second surgery

— Dec 3

Jim has had a rough couple nights, apparently sleep is hard to come by in the hospital. When Darian & I got there this morning his was in good spirits. A little frustration as the breathing tube was still in & he was hungry! It took a few hours to get both taken care of. He has quite a bit of pain in his right thigh, this where the skin was taken from. He finally got a few naps in this afternoon. Thanks to all that visited today, it really means a lot to both of us! As expected his is still doing very very well;)

 

Time to get Moving!!!!

— Dec 4

Today really kicked his a@s! They got him up & walking for the 1st time in 2 days. When asked how his walk went his response was "it sucked!" His right thigh is really sore But his pain level on scale 1-10 was a 10 in his thigh this morning by 8pm it was a 4. So he decided the walk was worth it!! He has the feeding tube still (not real happy about it) & he can have sips of Apple juice & water. Overall a pretty good day!

 

Thursday getting closer

— Dec 5

Well everything is pretty much the same-Jim argued w/the Doc that the feed tube should be taken out - he lost hopefully tomm!! He should be moving out if ICU tomm as well to a regular room. Maybe some of the tubes, wires, & drains will taken out. He did go for a pretty long walk today and is getting up & down a little easier. Thanks to "Team Brooks" for visiting tonight

  

Friday

— Dec 6

Well looks like Jim is not moving to a reg room this weekend. The Doc just wants to make sure everything keeps moving forward & he feels more comfortable w/Jim staying put. He did not get the feeding tube out - they say he needs ALOT of calories to heal & it would take a whole lot of jello to do that! He took all this news very well. He had a good balance to his day: he took 2 long walks, took several naps, & had two nice visits. We have decided that everything staying the same is a pretty good day!

  

Sleepy day

— Dec 7

 

Jim must have been making up for the last week and half -- cuz he slept a lot today. We did get him up for 2 long walks! Everything is still the same; he did get the oxygen monitor removed from his free flap & tonight he got some beef broth. Before it left he said "today was a pretty good day!" Excellent sign in professional opinion!

  

Go Broncos!!

— Dec 8

 

Jim moved to the first floor this afternoon - Whoot Whoot

  

Happy Monday!

— Dec 9

 

Feeding tube out!!!!! The leg vac is off as well. Home tomm!!!!

 

Yes!!!

— Dec 10

Super busy day, who knew it takes 7 hours to discharge someone from the hospital! We are home so excited

 

Good to be Home

— Dec 12

Wow 2 days home. Jim is getting sleep without being woke up every few hours. He is still in a liquid diet & his right thigh is still really sore. Other than that everything is going pretty well. We go back to the Doc on Weds - the 2 remaining drains & some of the staples should come out then.

 

Our Weekend

— Dec 15

Saturday Jim felt like he was run over by a truck & had no energy. Sunday was much better his legs were still really sore & weak - but he got up & walked & sat in the chair several times today. I am so proud if how he is handling recovery - he's a little frustrated w/his progress. I told him everything has taken twice as long recovery won't be any different, but he will get better every day!

 

Dec 17 - I texted Jim and he wrote back: "Hey CC good to hear from you. Just trying to get the skin graphs on my thighs healed up

  

1st Post-Op visit today

— Dec 18

 

Thanks to Corky & A for coming over and helping get Jim in and out of the house to the car!!!!! Visited the surgeon (Dr.Campana) this morning. Jim got his neck and leg drains removed. He also got all his staples taken out, there were a bunch! The Doc gave him the ok to eat regular food again, he's going to start out with soft foods to get use to chewing again. We have an appointment next week to get going on the radiation treatments. This was a pretty busy day but everything is progressing like it should, it was a good day.

 

Lookin' Good

— Dec 20

 

a picture was sent and it's amazing what the medical profession can do - Jim looks great with all that he has been through.

  

Happy Holidays

— Dec 26

 

Thanks to everyone for the visits & dinners we appreciate very much!!! We went to see the Doc this morning Jim was having a lot if drainage from his flap & some it had separated from the normal skin. Campana cleaned him up, added 2 small drains, & prescribed antibiotics for an infection in his neck. The separation is not a big deal the flap is still attached but is not attaching to the previously radiated skin, we are just watching this for now. So all in he is still doing great!

  

Boys will be Boys

— Dec 26

 

Thanks to Juice, Corky, Big Mac, Riley & the rest if the Fantasy Football league. Jim really enjoyed your visit plus he is really excited to have bragging rights for winning. Also a huge thanks to A for assisting us again to & from the car, you are the best!!!!

 

--Dec 27

I went and saw Jim today, he looks good and his healing is moving in the right direction. It was really good to see him :) Jim is really tall - he's 6'6" - I was thinking he was 7 feet.

  

Monday, Monday

— Dec 30

 

Thanks to the "Lunch Club" for visiting today! Jim has been upstairs twice today plus he put pants on (anyone who has visited knows that's pretty awesome & our visiting nurse was really surprised. Now we are sitting on the couch watching Oregon beat the Longhorns, just a normal night at home...soooo nice.

  

Happy New Year

— Dec 31

 

Went to the doc today...the infection is looking better. We have an appt with the wound care unit at Porter Friday they will probably put a wound vac to help the separation on his head heal quicker. So we are still moving forward.

  

Another Monday

— Jan 6, 2014

 

Jim has been doing excellent! He's getting up and down the stairs a lot better, sleeping & chewing is still a challenge but getting easier. He got the wound vac on today on the part that separated (we were there 2.5 hours) we get home and the stupid machine quit working WTF! We call the company & a rep is suppose to call us first thing in the morning (I would not want to be that rep, Jim is not exactly happy.) Good news the infection in his neck seems to have cleared up;)

  

Where does the week go?

— Jan 9

 

Good news Jim now has a wound vac that is working!!! Now let's all pray the wound on his head heals quickly! The graphs in his legs are healing really well.

  

Starting week 8 of recovery

— Jan 13

 

Had a good weekend, lots of visitors, plus the wound vac worked perfectly!We are visiting the wound care clinic at Porter Hospital Mon,Wed, & Fri to make sure the area where the flap has separated is healing properly. The nurses say the wound is looking really good & everythingis filling in nicely. Jim has been using a wheel chair to get to his appointments But today he walked from the lobby to the 3rd floor, huge accomplishment! Plus yesterday he made us queso dip & washed the dishes;)

  

It's Hump Day, whoo whoo!

— Jan 15

 

Jim got great news today. We had an appt w/the Doc & the gap is 60-70 percent healed & he has gained 3lbs. He also got a release to work 10 hours a week from home! Which is awesome he is getting bored!

  

What a great day!!!

— Jan 17

 

Jim had an appt at the wound care clinic this morning, everything is still healing well. We only have to go twice next week instead of three times. After lunch we went on a walk around Siena lake. He did really well made it .87 miles according to our run keeper app. This was good for Jim in so many ways: he got to see the beautiful mountains, enjoyed some fresh air & it was a good workout for his balance & depth perception.

 

--Jan 22

Jim came to work today for awhile to meet with his co-works and boss. I gave him a big hug!!! He looks really good and it was great to see him. Can't wait until he's back full time.

  

Done with week 9

— Jan 24

 

Pretty good week! The gap and Jim's right leg continue to heal. Jim has hit the boredom point-he is working from home 2 hours a day & we finished half the trim on our stairs (the rest we will finish next week). We have ventured out to several public places this week. We went to Home Depot & Jim had his first little kid stare, but Jim waved & said "hi" & the little guy smile & said "hi" back. Jim went into his office on Wednesday everyone was thrilled to see him. This afternoon Jim went w/me to Walmart to pickup a few groceries, this outing was successful as well. We are hoping to get the doc to release him for 4 hours a day working when we go Wednesday. Not sure how many more easy projects we have so the doc better come through!!!

  

Heading the right direction

 

— Feb 1

 

Good news everything is still healing wonderfully! The wound vac should be gone in a couple of weeks, everyone keep your fingers crossed! Jim is taking less medications and getting stronger both mentally & physically. He shoveled snow this morning & is back to his "clean freak self";) Plus he got released to work 4 hours a day starting Monday! He is very excited to have the girls over for the Super Bowl tomm. Go Broncos!!!

 

Feb 5

Jim came in the office today - talked to his co-workers about stuff and other people. I didn't want to distrub him. Before he left, he wanted to say hi to me and he gave me a big hug :). He looks good considering what he has been through. God bless you Jim!!! Can't wait to see you back at work.

  

Wow!!! Our12th week

— Feb 10

 

Had some concerns w/how the tunnel was healing on Thursday of last week. We went to wound care today and the measurements were better-so everything is still moving forward just not as quickly as we would like. Jim is still working 4hours a day and it seams to be going well. I am sending out a warning to everyone driving the streets of Westminster---Jim is going to try driving tomm. So consider yourselves warned;)

  

1st Time Driving in 3 months

— Feb 11

 

Whew!!!! Jim drove around for about 1/2 hour this afternoon. He went It around the neighborhood & on Wadsworth. He did really well, tomm we plan to do a little longer drive. So I guess the warning for tomm will be for those of you that live North (ie Broomfield, Longmont, Boulder)

 

--Feb 13

I was copied on an email from Jim - it was good to see one from him. I wrote back saying, "It’s so nice to see an email from you. How is the driving coming along?"

 

he wrote back: "It has been going pretty good just have to turn my entire body to the right vs. just my head. I may drive in next week and work my 4 hours from the office. Heather goes back to work next week so I may be a little bored."

  

When will Jim get a break?

— Feb 19

Went to wound care yesterday and it looks like he has the beginning of a staph infection. They prescribed 2 really strong antibiotics and we are going to Porter daily to get the bandages changed. Hopefully we see some improvement by Monday.

 

--Feb 20

Jim worked 4 hours today at the office. It was so good to hear his voice and laugh. What an amazing guy he is - with all he has been through and still going through, he has a great attitude and he is the same happy person.

 

Week 17 of Recovery

— March 14

 

I know I have not update everyone in while. The last three weeks have been super busy. I went back to work, Jim is still working 4 hours aday but he is driving into the office three or four days a week. They found an infection in the tunnel about three weeks and we were going to Porter for wound every day for two weeks. The strong antibiotics he was on cleared the infection up and he had a CT scan on Tuesday 3/11. We met w/the surgeon yesterday to go over the results. Everything was all clear on the scan and we were going to continue with treatment from Wound Care to finish this up. Jim did get a bit a teaser; the surgeon was not going to put the wound vac back on, but the great nurses at wound care convinced him this would speed up the healing process. So as of Monday Jim will have to carry around the wound vac again, but still a better option than surgery!!!!

 

All in all Jim is doing fantastic, he really enjoys going into work! I want to give a big shoutout to the Brooks Peeps, THANK YOU all for making Jim feel comfortable about returning to work!!!!

  

Hangin' in There

— April 14

 

Looks like the staph infection has crept back into Jim's wound. The new game plan is to put the wound vac on for two days. The remainder of the week keep packing it w/the Dakion solution; this medicine has been around since 1950, smells like bleach, but Jim has responded very well to it. Plus they might keep him on antibiotics until the wound heals completely. Jim is driving into work Mon-Fri for about 6 hours a day. All things considered things are going pretty well.

  

We Need a New Action Plan

— May 2

 

The tunnel has not gotten any worse in the last month but it has not gotten better either. We met with both surgeons today and yesterday. They both had different approaches to this problem. They are going to brain storm and come up with the master plan to put an end to this crazy hole. However, it does look like Jim is in for another surgery, but nothing near as complicated as the first two. We will let everyone know our next step.

  

1st Step

— May 9, 2014

 

Today Jim went in for a short surgery. The surgeon took several biopsy samples to ensure there is not more tumor in the area that is not healing. We will know the results Weds. On a good note this is the first procedure that actually took the amount of time he thought it would take only 1 hour.

  

Step 2

— May 14, 2014

 

We met w/the surgeon this morning & all the biopsies were negative. Good news no cancer left! Jim will be in for another surgery that will add another free flap over the wound area & tissue to fill in the tunnel. It will be taken from his left fore arm this time. We are expecting him to stay in the hospital for five days or so after surgery to monitor the oxygen level of the new flap. The surgery will take about six hours, but he will not have a feeding tube or ventilator so this will be much easier on him than the previous two surgeries.

  

We have a date

— May 14

 

It must be easier to schedule 2 surgeons vs 5, Jim next surgery will be June 6th

 

--June 5

Fellow Granville Phillips/MKS Family,

 

I had hoped I would not have to send out another email such as I did back in November but unfortunately the staph infection as well as the size/weight of the free flap have caused a pretty large defect( defect medical term it truly is a hole in the side of my head) right above were the free flap is attached to my skull. The doctors have tried everything they know to heal the wound other than surgery. Nothing has worked so far thus the world's largest Band Aid I have be wearing the past few months. I will be going back in for surgery this Friday June 6 to have a skin graph added to cover the defect kind.

 

The graph will be taken from the underside of my left wrist (left radial forearm free flap) as well as a section of vein from my left calf (jump graphs done a lot in open heart surgery's) to get the blood source all the down my face to the neck area roughly 21 inches. I will be I ICU for 3 days just to monitor the blood flow and oxygen to the new skin graph to ensure my body does not reject it. Then back home shortly after I am hoping for a short recovery since the graph is small and not very deep plus I will be on both thighs like last time. I should be pretty mobile. Even though this surgery is not as large in scoop as the past 3 it is still very detailed and will take a little over 6 hours.

 

My family and myself would like to thank you for the heartfelt prayers and kind words dealing with this the past three surgeries, Hopefully I will be back in the office within 2 to 4 weeks. My wife will continue to update the Caring bridge site.

  

Quick update

— June 6

 

Jim is out of surgery and everything went well. They watching to make sure the skin above the flap doesn't breakdown.will update later

  

24 hours after surgery

— June 7

 

Wow---Jim looked amazing today! They took the breathing tube out first thing this morning. He also go several other tubes removed. His color is good, he ate some food, sat up in the chair for almost 5 hours, and took a lap around the floor. He is now only taking OxyContin for pain management instead fentanyl. He left arm & neck are pretty sore but not near as painful as his right leg was last time. He was a little disappointed that the put the oxygen mister on him tonight but when he relaxes & goes to sleep his oxygen leave drops just below where its suppose to be. All things considered he is doing great

  

Big Move

— June 10

 

Jim was moved down to the first floor this morning. He had a great day and will be coming home Tuesday or Wednesday

 

June 10 - received a text from Jim and he's going home today - this is great news!!!

 

--June 14

I texted Jim today asking how he is feeling and hoping the surgery sent well so he can get this healed. He wrote back saying he's not too bad, arm is pretty sore but other than that pretty good. All signs look good so far and the staples get out Tuesday afternoon.

 

--June 17

Rec'd a text from Jim - said appt was good and all the staples are out and both graphs look real good. He just needs to get his arm healed so he can use it.

 

--June 27

Text from Jim - the arm where they took the graph from is getting better so now he can tie his shoes. There is a separation between the 2 graphs so they cut it open to culture it to make sure no infection. It's been three week - healing slow.

 

--July 2

Text from Jim...

Finally good news. Everything is healing fine, no infection. Hopefully, I can start radiation in a few weeks. even my arm has nothing on it - open air to help heal it. Should be back to work Monday, July 7th :)

  

Making Progress

— July 20

 

We were up early today, the whole family heading to Hennesse Trail above Eldora. Erika, Matt, Scarlett, Heather & I had a great time. First time I have been out since my first surgery in November.

 

---Aug 4, 2014

Jim starts radiation and chemo Thursday, August 7th. Radiation is every day for 30 sessions, and the chemo treatments are once a week. He should be done by September 18th.

  

A small step backwards

— Aug 14

 

Sorry I have not posted anything in a while, but we had a lot going on. First off we met with the radiologist and he suggested Jim do 33 treatments of radiation & chemo once a week. This took us by surprise because we were always told chemo had no effect on Jim's form of cancer. But there have been new studies that show this "one, two punch" have been successful. He was suppose to start the regime last Thursday, but he found a small opening (about the width of pencil) right above his chin. We saw the surgeon they took cultures and suggested he go back to wound care and meet the infectious disease doctor. Good new the opening was not caused by an infection, they think it may have been an abscess that opened up. So he is going to wound care once a week & we are packing it daily with a medicated strip. Hopefully it heals quickly and he can move on to the next step.

 

October 20, 2014

Jim still has a very small opening on his chin. There is no infection which is good news. This needs to heal completely before the radiation and chemo can start. Last year he was in the hospital during the holidays so this year he can enjoy them. The treatments will start next year.

 

December 2, 2014

Please continue to pray for Jim. He wants to get this done and has decided to do the radiation and chemo. He was in ER Nov 26 and 27 due to dehydration.

 

December 29, 2014

Jim is back to work and looks good - it's so good to see him again!!!

 

April 16, 2016

Jim will be having another surgery since a small area is not healing and keeps getting infected.

 

April 22, 2016

Surgery scheduled for May 9. Praying that all goes well and this section will heal.

 

May 10, 2016

Jim had surgery yesterday around 2 p.m. he got out of surgery around 6:45, didn't get to his room until 9 p.m. Everything went well - took out the infected area of his jaw and a tooth. Hospital stay will be 3-4 days. He is joking with the nurses.

 

He had a skin graft from his right shoulder and a vein re-positioned to help bring blood to the area that would not heal.

 

May 16, 2016

Jim got home from the hospital Friday afternoon. The feeding tube comes out Wednesday. He is not ready for visitors since his jaw is pretty sore to talk.

 

May 20, 2016

Jim texted me today saying "they removed all my drains and feeding tubes this week - real food YES!! Only have 30 plus staples and stitches to get removed then I may feel human. Miss you guys. Talk to you next week."

 

June 1, 2016

Received a text saying due to some complications he is having another surgery June 14th.

 

June 14, 2016

Surgery went well. Jim will be in the hospital for a few days for IV antibiotics to kill small infection in his neck, not flap related.

 

June 17, 2016

Going home today - just in time for the weekend!!!

 

July 20, 2016

The good news is, Jim is coming back to work Monday!!! The healing is going good. Says he's ready to get out of the house.

 

July 25, 2016

Jim was back to work today. So good to see him. He has been through hell and back and he has a great attitude. Gotta love him!!!

 

August 6, 2016

The last surgery was suppose to be the last one. But Jim will need another surgery. He is meeting with the doctors tomorrow and another one for a 2nd opinion. The talk is removing the first flap and do another skin graft from his chest. This poor guy has the best attitude with all these surgeries and skin grafts. Please pray that whatever the doctors decide, this surgery will work.

 

January 12, 2020

Jim is still struggling. I'm told his cancer is back and is going through chemo again.

 

May 7, 2020 - Jim lost his battle - passed away - so sad

liverpool easter egg hunt

Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw48amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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'9'3- The American Florist. 1257 OBITUARY. Frederick William Brookes. With the death of Frederick William Brookes, Sunday, June 22, the man most intimately connected with the early flower trade of Chicago, passed away. Mr. Brookes died at his home in .Morton Grove at the ripe age m si; years. He had been a resilient of Chi- cago and vicinity since is."-".. He was born in England In 1827 and came to New Y"i'k in is:;ij. \ year later, when he was seven, he made the trip to Chi- sago with his parents by ox team, the trip consuming a period of 35 days. For a time in his early manhood he worked as a printer and was also in the cattle business, later entering the teed and flour trade. His father was the late Samuel Brookes, who had been an old-time English gardener, and who owned an extensive place in London before com- ing to America. The elder Mr. Brookes expected to settle in Canada, but soon after landing came to the United states^ About 1S45 Samuel Brookes built ^Chicago's first commercial greenhouse, a lean-to structure. 14x 50 feet, located at 100 Adams street. It had an outside door but was also entered through a window from the house with which it was connected. It was considered a big house at the time and was used principally for the growing of azaleas, camellias and other pot plants. Later the elder Mr. Brookes moved to Thirty-ninth street and Lake avenue. Frederick W. Brookes was as- sociated with his father in this venture after 1858 and after 1S75. when the parent died, he managed the business himself until 1893, when he retired. Mr. Brookes remembered the early days of Chicago and liked to recall the past. He knew Edgar Sanders, John Goode. J. T. Anthony. W. G. Newill, Geo. Wittbold. Dr. John Kennicott and other pioneer florists. In 1S60 he mov- ed to 4525 Lake avenue into "Old Tib- bits orchard." where he remained until his retirement. After giving up busi- ness he moved to Morton Grove, where he took a horticulturist's keen delight in his private garden. Mr. Brookes is survived by three sons. The fu- neral was held Monday afternoon, June 23. from the residence, interment at Oakwoods cemetery. John H. Newhall. John Howard Newhall, head of the Aurora Greenhouse Co., of Aurora. 111., died June 14 as a result of heart trou- ble. He had been ill for a long time. Mr. Xewhall was born in Sturgis. Mieh.. in 1S50, but had been a resident of Aurora since 1887. He established the company of which he was the head about 10 years ago. He was a promi- nent Knight Templar, and highly re- spected by all who knew him. He is survived by his wife and two grown children, a son and daughter. John Mine. John Sline. a retired nurseryman of Geneva. X. Y.. died June 13 after a ten days' illness of pneumonia. He had been a resident of Geneva for nearly half a century but had not en- gaged actively in the nursery business for almost IS years. He leaves three sons and two daughters. Massachusetts Horticultural Society. Prizes ami gratuities awarded al the rose and strawberrj exhibition of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, June 2] and 22. 1913, were as follows : AWARDS FOB FLOWERS. Theodore Lyman fund, No. 2. hardy roses, collection, named, not less thin 2n varieties. W. .1. Clemson, first; H, E. Converse, second; Thos. N. Cook. third. John C. Chaffin fund (for ante teurs only), best three blooms of any white hybrid perpetual rose. Boston Consumptives hospital, first; Robert Seaver, second. Best three blooms of any pink hybrid perpetual rose.—Rob- ert Seaver, first; Robert Seaver, sec- ond; Mrs. R. Goodnough, third. Best three blooms any red hybrid perpetual rose.—Boston Consumptives' hospital, first; Robert Seaver, second; Robert

 

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The Late F. W. Brookes. MADrsON, Wis.—Mallory & Brown have disposed of their business here to L. L. May & Co. (Inc.), of St. Paul. Minn. Mr. Mallory will leave shortly tor Western Canada. Seaver, third. Basket of hybrid per- petual roses, artistically arranged.— Robert Seaver, first. Hybrid perpetual roses. 12 named varieties, three blooms of each.—W. J. Clemson, first; Col. Frederick Mason, second. Six named varieties, three of each.—Robert Seaver, first; Robert Seaver, second; Thos. N. Cook, third. Twelve varieties, one of each.—Duncan Finlayson, first. Six named varieties, one of each.—Boston Consumptives' Hospital, first; Duncan Finlayson, sec- ond; Thos. N. Cook, third. Hybrid tea roses, collection of 12 varieties, three blooms of each.—James Werner, gar- dener to Albert Geiger. Jr., first; H. E. Converse, second. Best three blooms of a hybrid tea variety introduced since 1908— Thos. N. Cook, first; Thos. X. Cook, second; Robert Seaver, third. Six blooms, any white variety.—A. W. Preston, first. Six blooms, any yellow variety.—A. W. Preston, first. Six blooms, any pink variety.—A. W. Pres- ton, first; Mrs. J. L. Gardner, second; A. W. Preston, third. Six blooms, any red variety.—Robert Seaver. first; A. W. Preston, second; Thos. X. Cook, third. Basket, artistically arranged.— Robert Seaver. first; Robert Seaver, second. General display. 100 bottles of hardy roses, named.—W. J. Clemson. first: Mrs. Frederick Ayer. secnml Frederick Mason, third. For the most artistic decoration of roses with foliage, to till span nol ■ ■■•tint: 50 square feet Duncan Finlayson, Best decoration of roses for table of eight covers. Mrs. Gustai Peterson, first. Sweet Williams, 18 vases of three trusses each, nol less than six varieties. -Mrs. J. L. Gardner, first, A W. Preston, second. flowers, 25 vases, distinct species and varieties, for innate growers only.— Duncan Finlayson, first; Walter Hun- newell, second. Best display.—M. P. Handler, first, silver medal; Eastern Xurseries, second, bronze medal, cam- panula medium, collection filling 1U vases, one color in a vase.—Mrs. Fred- erick Ayer, first; Mrs. Frederick Ayer. <nd. GRATUITIES. Mrs. Frederick Ayer, display of roses; Mrs. E. M. Gill, display of hardy roses; Duncan Finlayson. display of roses; K. J. Shaylor, collection of peonies; Mrs. c G. Weld, two vases of peonies; Breck, Robinson Co., display of peonies; A. W. Page, display of seedling peonies; T. C. Thurlow's Sons Co., display of named peonies; Harvard Botanic Gar- den, display of aquatics; Mrs. X. B. Cutter, sweet Williams; Harvard Bot- anic Garden, display of fuchsias in pots; E. B. Dane, display of cut or- chids; F. J. Dolansky, display of or- chids in pots; J. T. Butterworth. dis- play of orchids in pots; E. B. D display of Gladiolus Colvillei hybrids; Wm. Sim. display of sweet peas; Mt. Desert Xurseries, display of hardy herbaceous flowers and flowering shrubs. SILVER MEDALS. Bayard Thayer, display of new Phil- adelphia hybrids and seedlings. FIBST CLASS CERTIFICATE OF MERIT. E. B. Dane, Dendrobium Sanderae: Walter Hunnewell, Laelio-Cattleya Rex. HONORABLE MENTION. Mrs. James Farquhar, display of hy- brid tea roses; Eastern Nurseries, dis- play of seedling hybrid, climbing, and other roses; Mrs. H. E. Dolbeare. col- lection of rambler roses; R. «fc J. Far- quhar & Co., display of foxgloves; R. & J. Farquhar & Co., display of seed- ling roses. Vote of thanks awarded W'alter Hun- newell for marguerite Mrs. Sander. AWARDS FOR VEGETABLES. Theodore Lyman fund Xo. 2; Beets. 12. open culture—Col. Frederick Ma- son, first. W. J. Clemson. second. Cab- bages, four specimens, W. Heustis & Son, first; W. Heustis & Son. second. Cucumbers, four specimens—W. J. Clemson, first; J. C. Collidge. second. Lettuce, four heads—Walter Hunne- well, first; Oliver Ames, second. Peas. Cradus or Thomas Laxton. 5il pods— F. W. Sargent, first; Walter Hunne- well, second. Sutton's Excelsior, 50 pods—Col. Frederick Mason, first: Wal- ter Hunnewell, second. Any other va- riety. 50 pods—Walter Hunnewell. first; Col. Frederick Mason, second: i .lltction, not less than three varieties. 50 pods each—Walter Hunnewell. tirst; Mrs. A. A. Warburton, second etion of vegetables, not less than six varieties, tastefully arrange. 1 W. J. Clemson, first; Oliver Anns, second: W. Heustis & Son, third. GRATUITIES. Edward Lynch, rhubarb; W. J. Clemson. tomatoes; A. W. l'reston, tomatoes: Mrs. A A W rburton, col- ;.n of vegetables.

  

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liverpool easter egg hunt

Copyright: © 2013 Jeremy Villasis. All Rights Reserved.

 

Project 365/344. Jaipur, with its distinctly colored buildings, is often called the "Pink City" to imitate the red sandstone architecture of Mughal cities.

 

Jaipur, Rajasthan

India

Steg auf dem Dach des Offenen Kulturhauses in LInz

Footbridge on the roof of the Open Culture House in Linz

 

www.ok-centrum.at/

Un regalito para todos los docentes con motivo de la festividad de Santo Tomás de Aquino.

 

Gracias a mi hermano universitario, por hacer de modelo con la camiseta “Open Education” de cosecha propia ;-)

Title: 1911 annual catalogue : seeds machinery, etc

Identifier: 1911annualcatalo1911cmwo

Year: 1911 (1910s)

Authors: C. M. Woolf & Co. Inc; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Seeds Catalogs; Nurseries (Horticulture) Catalogs; Vegetables Catalogs; Fruit Catalogs; Gardening Equipment and supplies Catalogs

Publisher: Washington, D. C. : C. M. Woolf & Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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IO PUMPKIN German, Kurbis French, Potiro?i Spanish, Calabaza One pound will plant from 200 to 300 hills Culture.—The common practice is lo drop two or three seeds in every third or fourth hill in the cornfield, but if cultivated on a large scale the seed may be sown In hills 8 feet apart each way, four plants to each hill, and otherwise treated in the same manner as recommended for melons or cucumbers. Connecticut Field. This variety is most extensively used throughout New England and New York for Held culture; is gen- erally planted with corn. Pkt., 5c. ; oz., 10c. ; V4 'b., 15c ; lb.. 25c. Cushaw, or Crookneck. Grows to a very large size, sometimes attaining a weight of TO pounds, and resembling in shape the Winter Crookneck squash ; of light cream-color, sometimes slightly striped with green. Pkt, 5c; oz.. 10c; % lb.. 25c; lb., 75c. Large Cheese, or Kentucky Field. Flat and round like a cheese; color of skin deep orange. Ilesh somewhat lighter; one or the best for table use. Pkt., 5c: oz.. 10c; % lb., 15c; lb., 25c. Sweet, or Sugar, This Is a small, round, and very prolific variety; skin and Mesh deep orange-yellow ; very fine-grained, sweet and tine for pies. The pie 1'umpkln of New England. Pkt., 5c ; oz.. 10c: Vt lb-, 20c; lb., 65c. King of the Mammoths. This Is truly a giant among Pumpkins; specimens have been grown to weigh 250 pounds. In shape It Is round, flat and slightly ribbed; color of skin and flesh bright golden yellow and of good quality, ranking excelleut pies, but grown principally for stock; keeps well. Pkt.. 5c; oz., 10c; V4 lb., 25c; lb., 75c RADISH German, Hottig, Kabies Spanish, Rabano French, Radis, Rave, Pelite Rave One ounce will sow 100 feet of drill Culture.—The soil for Radishes should be very rich, light and mellow, well broken by digging, as their tender and ralld qualities

 

Text Appearing After Image:

depend much upon their rapid growth. For very early use, sow in gentle hotbeds in February, and in the open air as soon as the ground can be worked, at intervals of ten or twelve days for a succession as long as they may be wanted. The winter varieties should be sown in August, lifted before severe frost, mid stored In the cellar. Long Cincinnati Market. An Improved strain of the well-known Long Scarlet Short-Top. An excellent variety. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; •4 lb., 15c; lb., 50c Turnip, Philadelphia White Box. One of the best varieties for growing under glass, as well as for outdoor culture; it is a rapid grower, with a short top; a beautiful round white variety; grows to a good size, and is always crisp, fine-grained and tender. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 15c; lb., 50c C. M. Woolf & Co., Inc. Olive-Shaped. French Breakfast. Pink color, olive shape, white- lipped, anil the favorite variety in the markets of Paris; popular everywhere. Pkt.. 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 15c; lb., 50c. Vick's Scarlet Globe. One of the very earliest Radishes In cul- tivation; equally good for forcing or open culture in spring and early summer; color a beautiful scarlet: crisp, juicv and tender. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; >4 lb., 20c; lb., 50c. Long Icicle. The finest white variety; very early. Pkt., 5c; oz.. 10c: Vi lb., 20c; lb., 65c White Strasburg. One of the best of the long summer sorts; roots are long, handsome and tapering, and both skin and flesh pure white; flesh firm, brittle, tender retaining these qualities when routs have become old ami large. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c: V4 lb., 15c. ; lb., 50c FALL, or WINTER RADISHES Half-Long Black Spanish. Intermediate between Long and Round Iflack Spanish. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 15c; lb., 50c. Turnip. Crimson Giant. Extremely large, but never pithy; suit- able for forcing or open culture; very tender and crisp. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; V4 lb., 15c; lb., 50c SPINACH German, Spinal French, Espinard Spanish, Espinaca One ounce for 100 feet of drill; 10 to 12 pounds in drills for an acre Culture.—This Is a very Important crop In our market-gardens, and Is one of the most easily managed of all vegetables, requir- ing but little culture, and may be had fit for use the entire season. The main crop Is sown in September. It Is sometimes covered up in exposed places with straw or salt hay during winter, which prevents It from being cut by frost; but In sheltered fields there Is no necesslity for covering. For summer use It may be sown at Intervals of two or three weeks from April to August. Spinach Is best developed and most tender and succulent when grown In rich soil. Bloomsdale Savoy-leaved. A heavy cropper, of fine qualify and very hardy; succulent leaves, curled and crinkled like a Savoy cabbage; hardier and most productive sort. Oz., 5c; % lb., 10c; lb.. 15c. Five to 10 lbs., 12c per lb.; over 10 lbs.. 10c. per lb. Long-standing Thick-leaved. Stands the longest before running to seed: durk green. Grown especially for us In Holland. Same prices as Savoy. SALSIFY, or OYSTER PLANT German, Bocfsbart French, Sa/si/is Spanish, Oslra vegetal One ounce will sow 50 feet of drill Culture.—Sow the seed in light, deep soil, early in spring, In drills 12 inches apart and 1 Inch deep, thinning out the young plants to 4 or 5 Inches. The roots will be ready for use in

  

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Tonight's brainstorming session

Read the article on opensource.com

Copyrights vs. human rights

 

Created by Libby Levi for opensource.com

Title: Coast watch

Identifier: coastwatch00uncs_19

Year: 1979 (1970s)

Authors: UNC Sea Grant College Program

Subjects: Marine resources; Oceanography; Coastal zone management; Coastal ecology

Publisher: [Raleigh, N. C. : UNC Sea Grant College Program]

Contributing Library: State Library of North Carolina

Digitizing Sponsor: North Carolina Digital Heritage Center

  

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"These people bring vital cultural traditions to our state that many employers, community leaders and others have already recognized/5 —David Griffith

 

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A50VE: Las Carolinas in Snallotte caters to immigrants looki ng for long-distance "calling cards so they may keep in touch with relatives in Mexico and other countries. Hispanic Mig-ation Large numbers of Spanish-speaking immigrants began moving to North Carolina in 1986 after the passage of the Immigration Reform & Control Act, which gave immigrants legalized status if they lived and worked in the United States for five years. "Farm workers from Mexico first went to Texas and California when sugar beets and cotton were mechanized," Griffith explains. "Then they began migrating to Florida. Once the immigrants were in Florida, they began coming up the East Coast." From 1990 to 2000, the number of foreign-bom immigrants increased by more than 200 percent in North Carolina, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. "However, the actual numbers of foreign-bom immigrants are higher because officials overlook many undocumented immigrants and do not include those doing seasonal work such as seafood processing," says Johnson, an ECU sociologist. In recent years, Hispanics also have migrated to rural parts of southeastern North Carolina, particularly in Duplin, Sampson, Pender, Bladen and Brunswick counties — where they have been integrated into the poultry, pork and pickle industries. Others have found work in landscaping and related industries. They also have settled in North Carolina's metropolitan areas, including Wilmington. Most move to North Carolina to improve their standard of living. "I left Mexico when I was 19," says Munoz, who has lived in the United States for 20 years. "I had a dream of buying a truck and selling cattle. But it didn't work out." Instead, Munoz took a job on a dredge and later went to work at the Crow Creek Golf Club. Immigrants like Munoz's wife, Carolina Ramirez, have used their native language to help with research projects, including the immigrant study funded by Sea Grant. While working on the project, she had to return to Mexico at least once a year to meet U.S. visa requirements. "Sometimes, I feel like I am in jail here because I have to go back and forth to Mexico to keep my visa," says Ramirez. "At the same time, I feel a lot has been done here for me and my husband." One of the most difficult adjustments for Hispanic women is dealing with the open culture. "Many women in Mexico are from families who do not allow them to speak out openly about sex and other issues," she says. Ramirez lives in a large, comfortably furnished trailer with her husband and stepdaughter. However, not all immigrants have adequate housing, she says. Some Hispanics share a room with up to seven people in housing provided for workers, Ramirez says. "Many Hispanic workers are afraid to speak up about living conditions because they think they will get fired from the job." Others live on their own, yet crowd into housing in order to send more money home to families. In coastal North Carolina, many immigrants work in the seafood industry. In crab processing plants, Hispanic workers have H-2B visas that allow them to work as seasonal employees. From March to November or December, they spend their days picking, sorting and boxing crabs. "We have about 40 Mexican workers who work seasonally along with 12 local ladies," says Don Cross, co-owner of Pamlico Packing Company. "The Mexican women have been our saviour." Without the H-2B workers, he says his processing facility and others would be out of business as far as production goes. "The Mexican workers are the backbone of our workforce," he adds. Continued Coastwatch I Holiday 2006 I www.ncseagrant.org 15

  

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Title: Annual catalogue : 1915 machinery fertilizers seeds etc

Identifier: annualcatalogue11915cmwo

Year: 1915 (1910s)

Authors: C. M. Woolf & Co. Inc; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Seeds Catalogs; Nurseries (Horticulture) Catalogs; Vegetables Catalogs; Fruit Catalogs; Gardening Equipment and supplies Catalogs

Publisher: Washington, D. C. : C. M. Woolf & Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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14 C. M. WOOLF & CO., Inc., 1005 B Street, N. W.( Washington, D. C. RADISH German, Rettig, Radies Spanish, Rabano French, Radis, Rave, Pelite Rave One ounce will s0w 100 feet of drill. CULTURE.—The soil for Radishes should be very rich light and mellow, well broken by digging, as their tender and mild qualities depend much upon their rapid growth For very early use. sow in gentle hotbeds in Februarv. and in the open air as soon as the ground can be worked,* at intervals of ten or twelve days for a succession as long as thev mav be wanted. The winter varieties should be sown in August, lifted before severe frost, and stored in the cellar

 

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Vick's Scarlet Globe Radish. LONG CINCINNATI MARKET.—An improved strain of the well-known Long Scarlet Short-Top. An excellent variety. Pkt., 5c; oz.. 10c; 14 lb., 15c; 1 lb.. 40c CRIMSON GIANT.-Extremely large, but never pithy; suit- able for- forcing or open culture; very tender and crisp. Pkt.. 5c; oz., 10c; lb., 15c; 1 lb., 40c. PHILADELPHIA WHITE BOX.-One of the best varieties for growing under glass, as well as for outdoor culture- it is a rapid grower, with a short top; a beautiful round white va- riety; grows lo a good size, and is always crisp, fine grained and tender. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; i , lb., 15c; 1 lb 40c OLIVE-SHAPED. FRENCH BREAKFAST.—Pink color, olive shape white-tipped, and the favorite variety in the mar- yf"b.,?5cM^D:,5EPUlar everywhere- Pkt- 5c; °2-. iJJ°K'Q 1CARLET GLOBE. One of the very earliest Rad- shes in cultivation; equally good for forcing or open culture in spring and early summer; color a beautiful scarlet- cri«n juicy and tender. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; 1 lb 50c LONG ICICLE.—The finest white variety; very early Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; 14 lb., 20c; 1 lb., 50c. WHITE STRASBURG.-One of the best of the long summer sorts; roots are long, handsome and tapering, and both skin and flesh pure white; flesh firm, brittle, tender, retaining these oz.ffocf; fbn, ^T^b^oTm& old and larse- Pkt-5c; Fall or Winter Radish HALF-LONG BLACK SPANISH.—Intermediate between Long and Round Black Spanish. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 15c' 1 lb., 40c. ROSE CHINA WINTER.—Bright rose-colored skin; flesh white and quality excellent; one of the best for fall and win- ter use; a favorite with marketmen. Pkt., 5c; oz 10c1 % lb., 15c; 1 lb., 50c. WHITE CHINESE, or NEW CELESTIAL.—It is ready for use when 2y2 or 3 inches long, and continues until nearly 6 inches long, making it almost an all-season Radish 1 flesh is firm, solid, and pure white, and is very attractive appearance. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; & lb, 15c; 1 lb, 50c. SPINACH German, Spinat French. Espinard Spanish Espina One ounce for 100 feet of drill; 10 to 12 pounds in dri lor an acre. CULTURE.—This is a very important crop in our mart gardens, and is one of the most easily managed of all veg tables, requiring but little culture, and mav be had fit for u the entire season. The main crop is sown in September. It

  

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This illustration was made in the year 2000 for Mute Magazine, before the whole Creative Commons idea and the open culture concept were popular.

... acclaimed international photographer, author, musician, (as well as being one of the three photo contest judges) and of course, Sir Paul's brother - with (left) Cultural & Community Champion, Donna Williamson, another judge. The third judge was the renowed Liverpudlian photographer and film maker, Mark McNulty.

 

Little did I realise as I "clicked" that a cheque with my name on was in the envelope he's holding, and that I had won.

 

What a wonderful night it was as the contest results were announced. And, what a wonderful bunch of people I found myself among, including not just the famous, but also some of Flickr's finest Flickr-friends - both old and new.

   

This is the shot that won me my award/prize. See following 2 pics on stream for more info ... and also link below :

 

www.flickr.com/photos/the_old_brit/5405772198/

Title: 1913 annual catalog : machinery, seeds, fertilizers, etc

Identifier: 1913annualcatalo1913cmwo

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: C. M. Woolf & Co. Inc; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Seeds Catalogs; Nurseries (Horticulture) Catalogs; Vegetables Catalogs; Fruit Catalogs; Gardening Equipment and supplies Catalogs

Publisher: Washington, D. C. : C. M. Woolf & Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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C. M. Woolf & Co., Inc. PUMPKIN German, Kurbis French, Potiron Spanish, Calabaza One pound will plant from 200 to 300 hills Culture.—The common practice is to drop two or three seeds in every third or fourth hill in the cornfield, but if cultivated on a large scale the seed may be sown in hills 8 feet apart each way, four plants to each hill, and otherwise treated in the same manner as recommended for melons or cucumbers. Connecticut Field. This variety is most extensively used througliout New England and New York for field culture; is generally planted with corn. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; % lb., 15c; lb., 25c. Cushaw, or Crookneck. Grows to a very large size, some- times attaining a weight of 70 pounds, and resembling in shape the Winter Crookneck squash; of light cream-color, sometimes slightly striped with green. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; !i lb., 25c; lb., 75c. Large Cheese, or Kentucky Field. Flat and round like a cheese; color of skin deep orange, flesh somewhat lighter; one of the best for table use. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; % lb., 150; lb., 40c. Sweet, or Sugar. This is a small, round, and very prolific variety; skin and flesh deep orange-yellow; very fine- trained, sweet and fine for pics. The pie Pumpkin of New Ingland. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; '/i lb., 20c; lb., 65c. King of the Mammoths. This is truly a giant among Pump- kins; specimens have been grown to weigh 250 pounds. In shape it is round, flat and slightly ribbed; color of skin and flesh bright golden yellow and of good quality, making excel- lent pies, but grown principally for stock; keeps well. Pkt., Sc; oz., 15c; 'A lb., 35c; lb., $1.00. RADISH German, Rettig. Radies Spanish, Rabano French, Radis, Rave, Pelite Rave One ounce will sow 100 feet of drill Culture.—The soil for Radishes should be very r ch, light and mellow, well broken by digg ng. as their tender and mild t|ual-

 

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ities dejjend much ujion their rapid growth. For very early use, sow in gentle hotbeds in February, and in the open air as soon as the ground can be worked, at intervals of ten or twelve days for a succession as long as they may be wanted. The winter varieties should be sown in August, lifted before severe frost, and stored in the cellar. Long Cincinnati Market. .\n improved strain of the well- known Long Scarlet Short-Top. .'\n excellent variety. Pkt., sc; oz., loc; 'A lb., 15c; lb., 40c. Olive-Shaped, French Breakfast. Pink color, olive shape, white-tipped, and the favorite variety in the markets of Pans; popular everywhere. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc ; 14 lb., 15c; lb., 50c. Vick's Scarlet Gloge. l)ne of the very earliest Ra<lishes in cultivation ; equally good for forcing or open culture in spring and early summer; color a beautiful scarlet; crisp, juicy ana tender. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; % lb., 25c; lb., 6oc. Long Icicle. The finest white variety; very early. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; '/4 lb., 20c; lb., 60c. White Strasburg. One of the best of the long summer sorts; roots are long, handsome and tapering, and both skin and flesh pure white; flesh firm, brittle, tender retaining these qualities when roots have become old and large. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; '/i lb., 15c; lb., 40c. FALL, or WINTER RADISH Half-Long Black Spanish. Intermediate between Long and Round Black Spanish. Pkt.. 5c; oz., loc; % lb., 15c; lb., 40C. Turnip, Crimson Giant. Extremely large, but never pithy; suitable for forcing or open culture; very tender and crisp. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; % lb., 15c; lb., 50c. SPINACH German, Spinat Frencli, Kspinard Spanish, Espinaca One ounce for ico feet of drill; 10 to 12 pounds in drills for an acre Culture.—This is a very important crop in our market gar- dens, and is one of the most easily managed of all vegetables, requiring but little culture, and may be had fit for use the entire season. The main crop is sown in .Seiitimber. It is sometimes covered up in exposed places with straw or salt hay during winter, which prevents it from being cut by frost; but in sheltered fields there is no necessity for covering. For sum- mer use it may be sown at intervals of two or three weeks from .April to .\ugust. Spinach is best developed and most teniler and succulent when grown in rich soil. Bloomsdale Savoy-leaved. .\ heavy cropper, of fine quality and very hardy: succulent leaves, curled and crinkled .like a Savoy cabl age; hardier and most productive sort. Oz., 5c; lb., luc; lb., 15c. Five to 10 lbs., 12c per lb. Long-standing Thick-leaved. Stands the longest before run- n'ng to seed; dark green, (irown especially for us in Holland. Same jirices as Savoy. SALSIFY, or OYSTER PLANT German, Bodsbart French, Salsifis Spanish. Ostra vegetal One ounce will sow 50 feet of drill Culture.-—Sow the seed in light, deep soil, early in spring, in drills 12 inches apart and i inch deep, thinning out the yourig plants to 4 or 5 • inches. The roots will be ready for use in October, when a supply should be taken up and stored like car- rots. Those remaining will suffer no injury by being left in the ground till spring, but should be dug up before commencing their growth. Mammoth San'Iwich Island. We consider this the largest and most prol'itable .Sals'fy in cultivation: roots are two to three times the size of the ordinary Salsify, and of more agreeable flavor. It s pure white in color, and invaluable to market gerdcners. Pkt., 5c; 02., loc; ^ lb., 35c; lb., $1.00. SUNFLOWER Persons wishing to purchase in quantity will please write for special prices Mammoth Russian. The standard large-growing variety, which is used largely for feeding poultry. loc per lb.

  

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Title: B.K. Bliss and Son's illustrated spring catalogue and amateur's guide to the flower and kitchen garden

Identifier: bkblisssonsillus1873henr

Year: 1873 (1870s)

Authors: Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection; B. K. Bliss & Sons

Subjects: Flowers Catalogs; Plants Catalogs; Vegetables Seeds Catalogs; Gardening Catalogs; B. K. Bliss (Firm); Flowers; Plants; Vegetables; Gardening

Publisher: New York, N. Y. : B. K. Bliss & Sons

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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1 $0 10 $0 30 $1 00 §3 00 10 10 25 25 2 00 75 2 00 10 30 1 00 3 00 10 40 1 25 4 00 10 40 1 25 4 00 ONIONâ(Continued.) Fid. 0~. >4 Lb. Lb. â \Vliite Portugal.âA mild, pleasant Onion, wliicb grows to fair size and liandsonie shape, but is very bard to keep, being liable to gather mois- ture unless spread very thin. It is called "' Silver Skin " in the Middle States, wliere it requires two seasons to grow to full size, - - _ Danvei's Yellow.âThis line variety originated in Danvers, Mass. It is a thick, heavy, straw-colored Onion, niild-tiavored, and yields most abundantly; ripens early and keeps equal to the best. It is taking the place of tire Common Yellow wherever it becomes known, - - - Yellow Dutch.âThe Common YeUow variety is rather flat-shaped, and excellent-flavored. This is the " Strasburg " of the English catalogues, and the " Silver Skin " of the Eastern States. Good to keep. Large Ked Oval, or Globe.âSimilar to the Large Red in color and flavor, but (juite distinct in forui, being nearly globular; it produces a good crop, and is much prized by many as a market variety, - - - - White Glohe.âForm nearly ovoid, very regular and synnnetrical, skin white, mild an^l pleasant liavor; keei)S well; is an e.xcellent variety, - Yellow Globe.âThe same shape as the preceding, with a yellow skin; an excellent market variety, NEAV ITALIAN ONIONS. These varieties grow to a veiy large size in strong soil, and are particularly adapted for culture in the Southern States. They are of a very mild flavor, and much liked by all who have tried them. Ptt. Oz. y^Lh. Lb. Marzagole.âThe latest novelty in this class. They grow to a large size, and are said to be the earliest of all. If sown in Autumn in warm climates, they will be ready for use in March, - - _ _ . Large Italian Ked Tripoli.âBulbs of this variety were exliibited in England, weighing two and one-half pounds, flavor is exceedingly mild and pleasant, - -- -- -- -- -- New Giant Kocca of Naples.âBulbs exhibited as above, weigliing three and one-half pounds. This variety has a light brown skin, of delicate flavor ami a globular form, -------- Giant White Tripoli.âSpecimens of this variety were exhiliited at the Royal Agricultural Show at Oxford, four roots weighing nine pounds. Early White Nai>les.âA distinct variety of quick, gentle and mild flavor, of large size, weighing about a pound each, earlier than the preceding, and beautiful silver skin, NEW QUEEN ONION. A very nice silver skinned Tripoli Onion, as remarkable for its keeping rapidity of its growth. SO 20 SO 50 SI 75 SC 00 50 40 50 50 6 00 4 00 6 00 6 00 qualities as for the If sown in ^M.arch it wall produce Onions from one to two inches in diameter early in the Sum- mer wliich will keep sound until the Summer or the following year; and if sown in July, it will be ready to pull late in the same year. a)ul be sound and fit for use until the following Autumn. Rich or strong soil is not necessary for its cultivation, any medium or poor gaiden mould will suit it. It is of an excellent mild flavor, aiul can lie highly recommended. 25 cents per packet. The prices ainiexed for the following varieties, are when forwarded by express at purchaser's expense: \2 ounce pacl'aqes, by mail,prepaid, iO cents. Qt. Bn. Top, or Button Onions, - - - - - - SO 25 S6 00 Potato Onions, - -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 25 6 00 Onion Sets, yellow, ."in 8 00 Onion Sets, white, - 40 10 00 OKACHE, or MOUNTAIN SPINACH. lAtriplex Jiorfensis, LiN. Aroche, Fr. Garten meltte, Ger. Armuelle. Sp.] CuLTTTRE.âThis plant flourishes best in a rich, moist soil, in open ground. The seed may lie sown about the end of September, and again in the Spring for succession, in drills six inches apart. When the .seedlings are about an inch high thin them to six inches asunder; and those removed may be planted out at the same distance in a similar situation, and watered occasionally, if needed, until established. The leaves must be gathered for use while young, otherwise they will be worth- less and stringy. One ounce will sow one hundred feet of row. The leaves of the Orache are cooked and eaten in the same manner as Spinach, to which it is prefeiTed by many persons. PI't. Oz. }4 Lb. Lb. White, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - SO 10 $0 20 SO 50 SI 50 PAKSLEY. [Apium petroselimim, Lin. Persil, Fr. Petersilie, Ger. Perejil, Sp.] This well-known and agreeable savorj' herb is used as a garnish and for seasoning soups, meats, etc. Chltitre.âParsley loves a rich soil, .and tolerably deep. Soot is a manure very congenial, and may be added to the compost. Soak the seeds a few hours in tepid water, and sow early in the Spring in one foot drills; thin out the plants to three or four inches apart; a single row forms a very good edging for beds or walks. The seed germinates very slowly, and sometimes two or three weeks will elapse before the plants mnke their appearance. It often fails entirely in diy weather. One ounce of seed will sow .about two hundred feet of row. To have Parsley green during Winter remove some plants into a light cellar, and treat tliem as in open culture in Autumn. Pkt. Oz. }iLb. Plain Parsley.âTliis is the liardiest and strongest growing sort in culti- vation. Leaves dark green, plain, longer than the Curled, and better flavored for seasoning. A covering of straw or evergreen boughs will ordinarily protect it through the Winter. Curled, or Double.â^lore dw.-irfy .and tender; leaves yellowi.sh green and very beautitully crimpeil and curled; used principally as a ganiish tor tlie tnble. -" - - - - - - - -"- Dunnett's Triple Curled.âLeaves beautifully curled, extra fine for garnishing. ------------- Hamburg, or Kooted.âThe roots are used for flavoring soups, etc..

  

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Title: Annual catalogue : 1915 machinery fertilizers seeds etc

Identifier: annualcatalogue11915cmwo

Year: 1915 (1910s)

Authors: C. M. Woolf & Co. Inc; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Seeds Catalogs; Nurseries (Horticulture) Catalogs; Vegetables Catalogs; Fruit Catalogs; Gardening Equipment and supplies Catalogs

Publisher: Washington, D. C. : C. M. Woolf & Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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Vick's Scarlet Globe Radish. LONG CINCINNATI MARKET.—An improved strain of the well-known Long Scarlet Short-Top. An excellent variety. Pkt., 5c; oz.. 10c; 14 lb., 15c; 1 lb.. 40c CRIMSON GIANT.-Extremely large, but never pithy; suit- able for- forcing or open culture; very tender and crisp. Pkt.. 5c; oz., 10c; lb., 15c; 1 lb., 40c. PHILADELPHIA WHITE BOX.-One of the best varieties for growing under glass, as well as for outdoor culture- it is a rapid grower, with a short top; a beautiful round white va- riety; grows lo a good size, and is always crisp, fine grained and tender. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; i , lb., 15c; 1 lb 40c OLIVE-SHAPED. FRENCH BREAKFAST.—Pink color, olive shape white-tipped, and the favorite variety in the mar- yf"b.,?5cM^D:,5EPUlar everywhere- Pkt- 5c; °2-. iJJ°K'Q 1CARLET GLOBE. One of the very earliest Rad- shes in cultivation; equally good for forcing or open culture in spring and early summer; color a beautiful scarlet- cri«n juicy and tender. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 20c; 1 lb 50c LONG ICICLE.—The finest white variety; very early Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; 14 lb., 20c; 1 lb., 50c. WHITE STRASBURG.-One of the best of the long summer sorts; roots are long, handsome and tapering, and both skin and flesh pure white; flesh firm, brittle, tender, retaining these oz.ffocf; fbn, ^T^b^oTm& old and larse- Pkt-5c; Fall or Winter Radish HALF-LONG BLACK SPANISH.—Intermediate between Long and Round Black Spanish. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; % lb., 15c' 1 lb., 40c. ROSE CHINA WINTER.—Bright rose-colored skin; flesh white and quality excellent; one of the best for fall and win- ter use; a favorite with marketmen. Pkt., 5c; oz 10c1 % lb., 15c; 1 lb., 50c. WHITE CHINESE, or NEW CELESTIAL.—It is ready for use when 2y2 or 3 inches long, and continues until nearly 6 inches long, making it almost an all-season Radish 1 flesh is firm, solid, and pure white, and is very attractive appearance. Pkt., 5c; oz., 10c; & lb, 15c; 1 lb, 50c. SPINACH German, Spinat French. Espinard Spanish Espina One ounce for 100 feet of drill; 10 to 12 pounds in dri lor an acre. CULTURE.—This is a very important crop in our mart gardens, and is one of the most easily managed of all veg tables, requiring but little culture, and mav be had fit for u the entire season. The main crop is sown in September. It

 

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like a Savoy Cabbage; Oz., 5c; J/, lb, 10c; 1 lb Mammoth Sandwich Island. PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. Bloomsdale Savoy. sometimes covered up in exposed places with straw or sa hay during winter, which prevents it from being cut by frosl but in sheltered fields there is no necessity for covering F< summer use it may be sown at intervals of two or three week troni April to August. Spinach is best developed and mos tender and succulent when grown in rich soil BLOOMSDALE SAVOY-LEAVED.—A heavy cropper, of fiD § rer£ , ,ar^y: succulent leaves, curled and crinkle hardier and most productive sor , 15c. Five to 10 lbs, 12c per lb. ..LONG-STANDING THICH LEAVED.—Stands the longest be fore running to seed; dark greei Grown especially for us in Hollam Same prices as Savoy. SALSIFY, or OYSTER PLANT German. Hodsbart French, Salsifi: One ounce will sow 50 feet on drill. C U L T U R E.—Sow the seed ii light, deep soil, early in spring, ii drills 12 inches apart and 1 inct deep, thinning out the young plant! to 4 or 5 inches. The roots will b< ready for use in October, when £ supply should be taken up anc stored like carrots. Those remain ing will suffer no injury by being left in the ground till spring, but should be dug up before commenc- ing their growth. MAMMOTH SANDWICH ISLAND.—We consider this the largest and most profitable Salsify in cultivation; roots are two to three times the size of the ordinary Salsify, and of more agreeable flavor. It is pure white in color, and invaluable to market garden- ers. Pkt, 5c; oz, 10c; ]4 lb, 35c; 1 lb, $1.00.

  

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Intellectual Property Rights Give Zuckerberg His Fake Size

by TDB

Feb 21, 2017

 

Facebook Plans to Rewire Your Life. Be Afraid ... Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg's manifesto, penned clearly in response to accusations leveled at the social network in the wake of the bitter U.S. election campaign, is a scary, dystopian document. It shows that Facebook -- launched, in Zuckerberg's own words five years ago, to "extend people’s capacity to build and maintain relationships" -- is turning into something of an extraterritorial state run by a small, unelected government that relies extensively on privately held algorithms for social engineering. -Bloomberg

 

Mark Zuckerberg is one of the richest young men in the world with a company that spans the globe. And now he is putting that company to work defining what fake news is and is not. To help him in this task he has recruited other like Snopes.

 

Snopes is run by a man who just divorced the co-founder to marry someone else. They seem to publish way too many articles for their small staff. Some have speculated the CIA is helping them. But no one is saying, exactly. So it's speculation.

 

Zuckerberg says he's done the best he can to build an unimpeachable references organization to help him decide what is fake and what isn't. Presumably he will change it as necessary.

More:

 

In 2012, Zuckerberg addressed future Facebook investors in a letter attached to the company's initial public offering prospectus. Here's how he described the company's purpose:

 

People sharing more — even if just with their close friends or families — creates a more open culture and leads to a better understanding of the lives and perspectives of others. We believe that this creates a greater number of stronger relationships between people, and that it helps people get exposed to a greater number of diverse perspectives. By helping people form these connections, we hope to rewire the way people spread and consume information. We think the world’s information infrastructure should resemble the social graph — a network built from the bottom up or peer-to-peer, rather than the monolithic, top-down structure that has existed to date. We also believe that giving people control over what they share is a fundamental principle of this rewiring.

 

The article points that whatever Zuckerberg has intended to do, it has largely failed. That includes his upcoming effort to differentiate between real and fake news.

 

And it points out that Zuckerberg has actually made anxieties worse for a number of people. That's because Facebook is ultimately a competitive situation with everyone trying to create a perfect online life. This caused people overall to have less life satisfaction when using Facebook, not more.

 

The same thing happens when new mothers get on Facebook to share the joys of newfound parenting. "Failing to get enough ... validation causes depressive symptoms." In other words the exposure to others who seem to be doing better than you, once again turns Facebook into software that is damaging to individuals rather than life-affirming.

 

But from our point of view, Zuckerberg shouldn't be where he is anyway. The CIA apparently built up his operation and its size and scale is dependent on various post Civil War decisions. The CIA wants the real-time data that Facebook is collecting from over a billion people (or so we are told).

 

Chief among the court decisions are elaborations of corporate personhood and intellectual property rights. Also fiat, central-bank money and various kinds of regulation that only very large companies can fully fulfill.

 

For Zuckerberg, it is probably intellectual property rights that are among the most important parts of his empire. An article entitled From Zero to Zuckerberg tells the tale of just how critical IP is.

 

Firstly, protecting your IP enables your company to differentiate itself from other businesses and can act as its unique selling point, often helping it to secure future investment.

 

In fact, many VCs may not back a business at all if its IP isn’t protected. It can be seen as vulnerable to competitors — especially larger, cash-heavy companies who can swoop in and replicate it — and therefore too risky to scale. Put it another way, IP effectively ensures that the ‘new’ Zuckerberg can exist.

 

IP has virtually lifted Zuckerberg into the position he is in today. The idea that software telling people about the lives of other similar people can be worth billions and even trillions is based on what society has decided to protect

 

There is no reason why society should protect IP. If Zuckerberg wants protection, he should pay for it himself. Right now you and I pay.

 

Zuckerberg is worth tens of billions based on post Civil-War decisions that back up IP ideas that shouldn't have been debated in the first place. The only people IP helps these days, for the most part, are those with the very largest companies like Zuckerberg's.

 

IP helped Zuckerberg build what is essentially a false company. Now he is compounding the problem. Because of his size, he is becoming an arbiter of what is and is not Fake News.

 

Conclusion: Zuckerberg will push forward on this track, perhaps oblivious to the ridiculousness of his position. He shouldn't be where he is, and his current size has as much to do with the CIA as it does with IP determinations. Put together the two influences to build a behemoth. It shouldn't exist but it does.

Title: 1913 annual catalog : machinery, seeds, fertilizers, etc

Identifier: 1913annualcatalo1913cmwo

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: C. M. Woolf & Co. Inc; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Seeds Catalogs; Nurseries (Horticulture) Catalogs; Vegetables Catalogs; Fruit Catalogs; Gardening Equipment and supplies Catalogs

Publisher: Washington, D. C. : C. M. Woolf & Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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ities dejjend much ujion their rapid growth. For very early use, sow in gentle hotbeds in February, and in the open air as soon as the ground can be worked, at intervals of ten or twelve days for a succession as long as they may be wanted. The winter varieties should be sown in August, lifted before severe frost, and stored in the cellar. Long Cincinnati Market. .\n improved strain of the well- known Long Scarlet Short-Top. .'\n excellent variety. Pkt., sc; oz., loc; 'A lb., 15c; lb., 40c. Olive-Shaped, French Breakfast. Pink color, olive shape, white-tipped, and the favorite variety in the markets of Pans; popular everywhere. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc ; 14 lb., 15c; lb., 50c. Vick's Scarlet Gloge. l)ne of the very earliest Ra<lishes in cultivation ; equally good for forcing or open culture in spring and early summer; color a beautiful scarlet; crisp, juicy ana tender. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; % lb., 25c; lb., 6oc. Long Icicle. The finest white variety; very early. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; '/4 lb., 20c; lb., 60c. White Strasburg. One of the best of the long summer sorts; roots are long, handsome and tapering, and both skin and flesh pure white; flesh firm, brittle, tender retaining these qualities when roots have become old and large. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; '/i lb., 15c; lb., 40c. FALL, or WINTER RADISH Half-Long Black Spanish. Intermediate between Long and Round Black Spanish. Pkt.. 5c; oz., loc; % lb., 15c; lb., 40C. Turnip, Crimson Giant. Extremely large, but never pithy; suitable for forcing or open culture; very tender and crisp. Pkt., 5c; oz., loc; % lb., 15c; lb., 50c. SPINACH German, Spinat Frencli, Kspinard Spanish, Espinaca One ounce for ico feet of drill; 10 to 12 pounds in drills for an acre Culture.—This is a very important crop in our market gar- dens, and is one of the most easily managed of all vegetables, requiring but little culture, and may be had fit for use the entire season. The main crop is sown in .Seiitimber. It is sometimes covered up in exposed places with straw or salt hay during winter, which prevents it from being cut by frost; but in sheltered fields there is no necessity for covering. For sum- mer use it may be sown at intervals of two or three weeks from .April to .\ugust. Spinach is best developed and most teniler and succulent when grown in rich soil. Bloomsdale Savoy-leaved. .\ heavy cropper, of fine quality and very hardy: succulent leaves, curled and crinkled .like a Savoy cabl age; hardier and most productive sort. Oz., 5c; lb., luc; lb., 15c. Five to 10 lbs., 12c per lb. Long-standing Thick-leaved. Stands the longest before run- n'ng to seed; dark green, (irown especially for us in Holland. Same jirices as Savoy. SALSIFY, or OYSTER PLANT German, Bodsbart French, Salsifis Spanish. Ostra vegetal One ounce will sow 50 feet of drill Culture.-—Sow the seed in light, deep soil, early in spring, in drills 12 inches apart and i inch deep, thinning out the yourig plants to 4 or 5 • inches. The roots will be ready for use in October, when a supply should be taken up and stored like car- rots. Those remaining will suffer no injury by being left in the ground till spring, but should be dug up before commencing their growth. Mammoth San'Iwich Island. We consider this the largest and most prol'itable .Sals'fy in cultivation: roots are two to three times the size of the ordinary Salsify, and of more agreeable flavor. It s pure white in color, and invaluable to market gerdcners. Pkt., 5c; 02., loc; ^ lb., 35c; lb., $1.00. SUNFLOWER Persons wishing to purchase in quantity will please write for special prices Mammoth Russian. The standard large-growing variety, which is used largely for feeding poultry. loc per lb.

 

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4 '.^giiHSI^ '''' - PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

  

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... self promotion.

 

Here, @ Thomas Steers Way, Liverpool One Flickr (real life) friend Ray Wood points to my prize winning pic in Open Culture's "Show Your Beautiful Face competition and ensuing outdoor, public exhibition. My award was presented by chief judge, Mike McCarney ; world famous photographer and brother of Sir Paul McCartney of Beatles fame.

 

Btw, my friend (pictured above) Ray also had a great pic of his own shortlisted and exhibited for a fortnight here @ Liverpool One - as did other Liverpool Flickr friends, Anthony Beyga and Jim Malone (2).

Identifier: wwrawsoncoseedsm1899wwra

Title: W.W. Rawson & Co. seedsmen / W.W. Rawson & Co.

Year: 1899 (1890s)

Authors: W.W. Rawson & Co W.W. Rawson & Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Nurseries (Horticulture) Massachusetts Boston Catalogs Nursery stock Massachusetts Boston Catalogs Vegetables Seeds Massachusetts Boston Catalogs Flowers Seeds Massachusetts Boston Catalogs Grasses Seeds Massachusetts Boston Catalogs Bulbs (Plants) Seeds Massachusetts Boston W.W. Rawson & Co Nurseries (Horticulture) Nursery stock Vegetables Flowers Grasses Bulbs (Plants) Perennials Trees Shrubs Fruit trees Fruit Gardening Seed industry and trade

Publisher: Boston, Mass. : W.W. Rawson & Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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ISO feet of drill. CULTURE.—Parsley succeeds best in a rich, mellow soil,and, as the seeds germinate very slowly, should be sownas early in the spring as the ground can be worked. Sow indrills fourteen inches apart, and thin to six or eight inches.Cover one-half of an inch deep. To have parsley green duringwinter, remove some plants into a light cellar, and treat themas in open culture in autumn. Bxtra Fine Curled (see cut).—Dwarf and tender, leavescrimped beautifully and curled. Used principally as a gar-nish for the table. Per pkt., 5 cts.; oz., 10 cts.; %-lb., 30 cts. Eixtra Cbampion Moss Curled.—Leaves beautifully curled,extra fine for garnishing. Per pkt., 5 cts.; oz., 10 cts.; i/4-lb.,30 cts. New Fern-Leaved.—Exquisite in form, and admirably suitedfor table decoration. Per pkt., 5 cts.; oz., 10 cts.; i/i-lb.,25 ots. Plain Parsley.—Hardier, and the leaves are longer and of adarker green than the Curled. Better for seasoning. Perykt., 5 cts.; oz., 10 cts.; U-lb., 25 cts.

 

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Extra Fine Cnrled Parsley. PARSNIP. (Panaia, Fr. Pastinake, Ger. Chirivia, Sp.)One ounce will sow iiOO feet of drill. Five poundsrequired for one acre. CULTURE.—Sow as early in the spring as theweather will permit, in drills fifteen inches apart, cov-ering the seed one-half of an inch deep. When well up,thin out to five or six inches apart in the rows. Pars-nips are improved by frost; and it is a usual custom totake up in the fall a certain quantity for winter use,leaying the rest in the ground until spring, to be dug asrequired. Short Round Frencli.—The earliest variety. Per pkt.,5 cts.; oz., 10 cts.; %-lb., 20 cts. Arlington Long Smooth (see cut, page —).—Verysmooth and true, unsurpassed for market or exhibi-tion purposes, and the best for general crop. Per pkt.,5 cts.; oz.; 10 cts.; %-lb., 30 cts.; lb., $1.00. Improved Guernsey (Improved Half-Long).—Agreatly improved and wonderfully fine strain ofGuernsey Parsnip, of which ourcustomers are unanimous inpraising the fine qu

  

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Title: 1895 catalogue of the Ki-ote Seed and Nursery Co

Identifier: 1895catalogueofk1895kiot

Year: 1895 (1890s)

Authors: Ki-ote Seed and Nursery Co; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Nursery stock South Dakota Sioux Falls Catalogs; Vegetables Seeds Catalogs; Flowers Seeds Catalogs; Fruit Catalogs

Publisher: Sioux Falls, South Dakota : Ki-ote Seed and Nursery Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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MIMULUS. (Monkey Flower.) These Bowers m re- markable for their rich and beautiful marking and spots; well adapted for vases, pots and baskets. andal-o I'm- open culture in the garden. Height I foot. The seed Is very dell cute, and should lie sown indoors, in boxes : 11 a n-plant. Pkt. 5c. WALL FLOWER. A very desirous class of yrlutei bloomers; ore deliclously fragrant, and many -hades of color. Pkt. 10c. TORKMA. Charming plants for pot culture, vases or hanging baskets. They are very attractive In beds or masses; the flowers are of great beauty, produced In abundance and are of long duration. ur ser.f'i vi. mixtiuk. pkt. Km. WILD ROSE. THE BEULAH WEAVER. Thi wed of i hi - jhajimoth v vniKTVW.is gathered PERSON M.l.V by our manager from » bush iiVKH mm. m:T in height, and we have Utile doubt of its being the vkhv i.akokst and most BEAOTHPtJL Wild Rose to lx' found anywhere. Don't fail to order it. Pkt. of about 20 seeds, only .V. THE SUCCESSFUL FARMER OFFER should be taken advantage of by every person who is fortunate enough to secure a copy of this catalogue. Besides get- ting the value of your money in erood seeds you (ret a valuable paper free.

  

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Set: www.flickr.com/photos/connectirmeli/sets/72157631630221202/

[click slideshow]

 

Thursday @ #OKfest: okfestival.org/onlineschedule/#thu

 

This set of pics taken during:

* Morning Plenary - Inspirational Keynotes: Anneli Jäätteenmäki & James Cameron & Tiago Peixoto + Introduction to Thursday's Programme

* Open Research and Education:

Peeragogy Handbook Workshop

* Open Education Fishbowl Conversations: Designing MOOCs & Future of Textbooks

* Open Culture and the Commons: Michael Edson (Simthsonian Institute) "Lego Beowulf and the Web of Hands" followed by a Special Europeana Announcement from Harry Verwayen

* Open Cities: Life in the Urban Panopticon Discussion

 

- I compress the messages of Thursday in the following quote (slide 118):

 

Public spaces have many purposes in social life - they allow people to make sense of the social norms that regulate society, they let people learn to express themselves and learn from the reactions of others, and they let people make certain acts or expressions 'real' by having witnesses acknowledge them.

- Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition -

General Overview:

 

Claw Islands:

The most isolated set of islands are called The Claw Islands primarily inhabited by Water worshiping amphibious humanoids. A group of a half dozen main islands, the largest of which is shaped vaguely like a C or claw hand. In the center of the largest main Claw island, there is an underwater nexus. A land based city sits on the inside of C. These people have a Neutral Avatar that protects and guides them. The people have opened themselves to the various planes and have an open culture of study, any plane may be pursued. They have raised an Army as well. These people have theorized that heated water and steam may be used to power devices, but have not developed steam yet.

 

Main Continent:

In the upper left starts with a large island and peninsula formation. The island is the largest island. It's northern coast is mountainous and it's southern coast is deciduous forest. It is currently unpopulated.

 

The peninsula is mainly dense forest with a pattern of rivers. On the peninsula a volcano is surrounded by a ring of mountains. The peninsula is connected to the main continent by a narrow forested track. The mainland consists of a mountainous region. The peninsula is home to the Trin-ja, a race of 4ft tall sentient squirrel like people who live arboreal and are masters of martial combat. They have two cities, each with a standing army of warriors. T'co is located in the south near the narrow tract and a large river. Bauhb is located further north nearer to the Mountain Ring. The Trin-ja are primarily an earth based culture and have rejected the offer of the Air emissaries to teach them their knowledge.

 

A very large bay separates the peninsula from the mainland. This bay is called the Dead Sea, and holds the Blight of Life. The blight prevents life from flourishing and so this area of the sea is named. The northern inside of the main V continent has mountains, pine forests, and lakes, along with coastal fertile ground. A human avatar and race of farming humans have just been manifest in this area, but are still young and undetermined in their nature.

 

The left V coast is low mountains, lakes and some fertile plains. In the central left inland area rests the source of the Blight of Life, The Pit of Doom. The Doom pit is a great chasm and deep sinkhole. Lake Willowbee rests to the south and a large river feeds into the Doomed chasms, eventually draining into the many canyons and caverns. The area smells of deep stagnant earth. Here in the Doomed chasms lives the fire daemon. The Fire Daemon is the avatar and birth father of the Black Demons. These black demons stand 8 ft tool and are experts at fire magic. They have a city located in the northern reaches of the chasms, which has a standing army of black fire demons .

 

The North Central inland consists of the ice tundra. The ice tundra is separated from the Northwest forests by a large inlet of very rough seas. Essentially a huge bay, the Rough Sea is cold and harsh. The ice tundra has no population yet.

 

To the south of the Rough sea starts the Barrier Peaks. This long stretch of mountain runs down the center of the V. The Northern Barrier peaks is populated by a young race of Dwarves who have no Avatar. The western areas of the Barrier peaks is a lake region. The waters are clear and mountain fed, but the land is blighted. Once the most fertile grounds, now this region is home to the Thals. Thals are orc-like in stature and have embraced order (light). They are experts in warfare, have the secrets of steel, and have taken on the Clockwork Avatar Tic He as their god and leader. Tic He came down from the mountain and taught them the structure and order of society. The Thals have embraced the Light magic and are a lawful society. They have two cities. Tik and Chaka. Each city has a standing Army. Tik is walled, but Chaka is not. The Thals actively seek guidance and trade with the Veeza (See below).

 

The central Barrier peaks are ice capped and snowy. Here in the central peaks is the lost city of the shapers. This is a race of shape changing alchemists. They worship the avatar they call The First and have scattered spies across the world. They all posess some telepathic power and are strongly involved with the Veeza. The Southern Barrier Peaks end in farmland and the southern tip of the main V continent.

 

South of the V has a string of long thin islands that despite being at the pole have a tropical warm environment. This area is home to a race of nature spirits, primarily earth worshipers and have rejected the offer of Air to teach them. These Beach Nymphs worship a nature goddess avatar and have a city located next to a magical nexus named Epheria.

 

The eastern regions of the Barrier peaks are primarily desert and plains.

 

The upper right of the V is rolling plains and the home of the Minotaur. The minotaurs have embraced Chaos and despite their agrarian pursuits, have mastered chaos magic. The dark order is a group of chaos magic scholars who have been researching and writing the Scrolls of the 5. The minotaurs were the first race of the planet and have three cities. Kervak in the north was founded first, then Lake hollow in the southwest and Thredge a bit further west and closer inland to the V where the lakes, pine forest, and plains come together.

 

Pine forests transition into fertile ground along the left central V. This area is home to the Elat, an angelic earth avatar of the Anashim people. There are two distinct races, a group of 4' tall dark haired and 750 year old humanoids and a race of giants. These races are broken into two cultures. The northern Nephalim live centered around the city of BehShaar and the Raphalim to the south in the city of Beth Hacham. Both groups have earth and healing magic. The Raphalim have embraced the order of Air and welcomed them to teach and found a school of Air magic. The region is coastal and grows figs, olives, and nuts, to the western inland lies a long thin strand of mountains and on the other side is the devouring desert. The desert is full of sinkholes and quicksand.

 

The south right V is the place of Fang Mountain. An immense singular mountain that is home to the Avatar Lady Evonna. The lady founded the order of Veeza to study the magic of discovery. Clairvoyance, illusion, future knowledge, telepathy, and fortunes. The order is gypsy like, but has it's home at Mount Fang. The veeza are oracles and sages, they accept any race or people as long as they are true to the craft of unlocking the present and future. The Veeza have studied all the worlds cultures to date and are experts in Anthropology of the material world.

 

Off the south right V coast is the Sea of Storms, and on the other side of that sea is a set of islands, called the Isles of Dashar. The isles are populated by a group of Elves who have accepted the presence of the Air Embassy and are experts in Air Magic (weather) and are expert seamanship.

  

CC-BY Coding da Vinci - Der-Kultur-Hackathon, Foto: Heiko Marquardt

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