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Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

I do find the kids nowadays are great acrobats.

 

They can find good balance between study, extracurricular activities, tuition school, leisure, online social network and offline social gathering and many more ....

 

There are so many priorities for little kids compared to adults.

 

I admire their great balance.

 

This is candid shot of the dance performer in our local shopping mall for the Mid-Autumn Festival celebration last week. She was having a pose and practice for pictures by her family.

 

Have a great weekend!

 

Fuji X-T1 camera

Fuji XF 60mm F2.4 macro lens

 

台上一分鐘,台下十年功。

The generic avatar for all users of Facebook, the online social network launched in 2004. In early 2011, the number of active users exceeded 600 million.

 

www.zek.si

Selfie( I am not trying to beat Obama's record)

  

A selfie is a self-portrait photograph, typically taken with a hand-held digital camera or camera phone. Selfies are often shared on social networking services such as Instagram, Snapchat, and Tumblr. They are often casual, and are typically taken either with a camera held at arm's length or in a mirror.

  

The term "selfie" was discussed by photographer Jim Krause in 2005, although photos in the selfie genre predate the widespread use of the term. In the early 2000s, before Facebook became the dominant online social network, self-taken photographs were particularly common on MySpace. However, writer Kate Losse recounts that between 2006 and 2009 (when Facebook became more popular than MySpace), the "MySpace pic" (typically "an amateurish, flash-blinded self-portrait, often taken in front of a bathroom mirror") became an indication of bad taste for users of the newer Facebook social network. Early Facebook portraits, in contrast, were usually well-focused and more formal, taken by others from distance. In 2009 in the image hosting and video hosting website Flickr, Flickr users used 'selfies' to describe seemingly endless self-portraits posted by teenage girls. According to Losse, improvements in design—especially the front-facing camera copied by the iPhone 4 (2010) from Korean and Japanese mobile phones, mobile photo apps such as Instagram, and selfie sites such as ItisMee—led to the resurgence of selfies in the early 2010s.

  

Initially popular with young people, selfies gained wider popularity over time. By the end of 2012, Time magazine considered selfie one of the "top 10 buzzwords" of that year; although selfies had existed long before, it was in 2012 that the term "really hit the big time".According to a 2013 survey, two-thirds of Australian women age 18–35 take selfies—the most common purpose for which is posting on Facebook. A poll commissioned by smartphone and camera maker Samsung found that selfies make up 30% of the photos taken by people aged 18–24.

By 2013, the word "selfie" had become commonplace enough to be monitored for inclusion in the online version of the Oxford English Dictionary. In November 2013, the word "selfie" was announced as being the "word of the year" by the Oxford English Dictionary, which gave the word itself an Australian origin.

Selfies have also taken beyond the earth. A space selfie is a selfie that is taken in space. This include selfies taken by astronauts, machines and by an indirect method to have self-portrait photograph on earth retaken in space.

In January 2014, during the Sochi Winter Olympics, a "Selfie Olympics" meme was popular on Twitter, where users took self-portraits in unusual situations. The spread of the meme took place with the usage of the hashtags,#selfiegame, and #selfieolympics.

A selfie orchestrated by 86th Academy Awards host Ellen DeGeneres during the 2 March 2014 broadcast is the most retweeted image ever. DeGeneres said she wanted to homage Meryl Streep's record 18 Oscar nominations by setting a new record with her, and invited other Oscar celebrities to join them. The resulting photo of twelve celebrities broke the previous retweet record within forty minutes, and was retweeted over 1.8 million times in the first hour. By the end of the ceremony it had been retweeted over 2 million times, less than 24 hours later, it had been retweeted over 2.8 million times. As of 18 March 2014, it has been retweeted 3,400,395 times. It beat the previous record, 778,801, which was held by Barack Obama, following his victory in the 2012 presidential election.

In April 2014, the advertising agency iStrategyLabs produced a two-way mirror capable of automatically posting selfies to Twitter, using facial recognition software.

  

Please do note fave my photos without commenting ( what do people do with thousands of faves, look at them every morning ?)

  

More London here

www.flickr.com/photos/23502939@N02/sets/72157629381724431/

  

More candids here

  

www.flickr.com/photos/23502939@N02/sets/72157622769131641/

Maksymilian Rafailovych "Max" Levchyn is a Ukrainian-born American computer scientist and internet entrepreneur. He is the former chief technology officer of PayPal, which he co-founded in 1998. As CTO he was primarily known for his contributions to PayPal's anti-fraud efforts and is also the co-creator of the Gausebeck-Levchin test, one of the first commercial implementations of a CAPTCHA.

 

In 2002, he was named to the Technology Review TR100 as one of the top 100 innovators in the world under the age of 35, as well as Innovator of the Year. Levchin founded Slide in 2004 and was involved until 2011. In 2004, he helped start Yelp, an online social networking and review service, and is their largest shareholder as of 2012. He is on the board of directors for Yahoo!.

In the center of the roundabout doesn't lurk a tarantula, a minotaur or a www-bugspider but there are standing out - of a black π-perforation [r=1mm] - the anchoring grab-buckets of the AGP-slot residing upon the upper side. The PGA370-Socket motherboard {19.2_x_30.5 [cm]} is equipped with Integrated Circuits that were assembled in the 90ties.

 

SIZE (of the framing)

real /~thumbnail-area/ : ~ 18 x 13 [mm]

virtual /max. available for FC/ : 1273 x 927 [pixel]; 158.509 [cols]

 

STEADINESS was provided by a tripod, ILLUMINATION by the sun.

 

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TECHNOLOGIES: surface mount - through-hole

Surface mount technology (SMT) is a method for constructing electronic circuits in which the components (SMC, or Surface Mounted Components) are mounted directly onto the surface of printed circuit boards (PCBs). Electronic devices so made are called surface-mount devices or SMDs. In the industry it has largely replaced the through-hole technology construction method of fitting components with wire leads into holes in the circuit board.

An SMT component is usually smaller than its through-hole counterpart because it has either smaller leads or no leads at all. It may have short pins or leads of various styles, flat contacts, a matrix of solder balls (BGAs), or terminations on the body of the component.

PGA370-socket

This platform for Pentium III is not wholly obsolete, but its use is today limited to the above specialty applications, having been superseded by Socket 423/478/775 (for Pentium 4 and Core 2 processors). Via is at present still producing Socket 370 processors but committed to migrating their processor line to ball grid array packages.

Perplexing Circuit Board Lines

Despite what appears to be a perplexing mishmash of lines, there's an actual method to this madness. These lines conduct electricity to get the data to the on-chip processor with no interference, thusly unlike traditionally insulated wires, circuit board lines cannot cross each other. - The darkred circles of the photo allow the data signal to safely transfer from one side of the circuit board to the other, and get past any electronic obstacles in its way.

 

printed circuit board (PCB)

A printed circuit board (PCB) is a circuit board fabricated by densely mounting a plurality of parts on a plate made of phenol resin or epoxy resin and densely forming curtailed circuits on the surface of the plate to connect the respective parts to each other. A printed circuit board is typically produced by alternately stacking a plurality of substrates with conductive circuits formed thereon and prepreg sheets, bonding them under heat and pressure, forming holes to allow electrical parts to be mounted on the insulating plate, and plating them with copper or other metallic materials to provide an electrical connection between the surface and inner layers. Printed circuit boards have a variety of electric or electronic parts soldered to their circuit patterns which are formed by labyrinth-like copper foils, each having electric or electronic parts soldered to lands with their terminals inserted in the terminal holes, which are made in the lands. Printed circuit boards are classified into single-sided PCBs, double-sided PCBs and multi-layer PCBs depending the number of wiring circuit surfaces. A multi-layer PCB provides a plurality of electrically conductive layers separated by insulating dielectric layers. A typical multi-layer PCB includes many layers of copper, with each layer of copper separated by a dielectric material. Multi-layer printed circuit boards are commonly used in electronic devices to connect electronic components such as integrated circuits to one another. Printed circuit boards used in various types of data processing systems (especially in computers) are typically mounted within a plastic or sheet metal housing structure, and are conventionally referred to as motherboards ...

 

Make knotwork-like designs from old electronic circuit boards Another characteristic of Celtic/Anglo-Saxon art is 'knotwork'. Lines and ribbons are taken on never-ending journeys through complex repeats of flyovers and underpasses. © The British Library Board

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    Image of an older circuit board with mostly through hole technology fabricated: circuit board of greenish colour.

-------------------------------------

Along came the spiders

The busy creatures who will guide you through the Internet Forbes, October 23, 1995

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►► google-search results ◄◄

{(239/326/28,500/29,100/32,100/25,700/75,600 - July29/Aug14/Jan10/Sept10/20Oct10/09Mar11/15May2014)}

 

BLOGS:

Just lurking for now by Dave's Whiteboard, Dec 22nd, 2009

Jaron Lanier: technology humanist Los Angeles Times: Books, Authors and all things bookish by Carolyn Kellogg, Jan 10, 2010

Shack's Comings and Goings - A compilation of lessons, reviews, tips and advice that has helped my writing (w translations into 16 languages). Andy Shack on August 9th 2009

Computerworld Releases Special Report for IT Professionals Mindy on June 17th 2009

Multimodal imaging reveals consistent role for genes as mediators of circuit structure/function ... In his article, "Neural Connectivity as an Intermediate Phenotype: Brain Networks Under Genetic Control" [doi: 10.1002/hbm.20639] Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg examines the DARPP32, 5HTT and MAOA genes and asks whether their associations with aspects of brain structure/function are in any way consistent across different neuroimaging modalities. Amazingly, the answer seems to be, yes... - dendrite on July 31st 2009

Spiele ohne Grenzen Am Analystentag des Chipkonzerns verbreitert dieser sein Einzugsgebiet .... Intel Outside könnten Konkurrenten auf Handys und weitere Consumerelektronik-Geräte schreiben. May 27th 2009 by redaktion@handelszeitung.ch

Image has no backlink but has got the new description: "technology and creativity bring beauty and symmetry" by theabundantartist on Aug 14th 2009

Thinking Like a Computer library @ qut.edu.au, by Willans on 2010-02-04 Truncation: An asterisk * which asks the computer to look for a sequence of characters and any number of characters after that. Wildcard: A question mark ? which asks the computer to look for a sequence of characters and replace the wildcard with any one character. Phrasing: Asking the computer to regard a phrase as one sequence of characters by putting inverted commas " " around the phrase. Boolean Operators: Words used to combine searches in different ways OR asks the computer to find resources containing ANY of the given terms (used for similar terms) AND asks the computer to find resources containing ALL of the given terms (used for different terms) NOT asks the computer to eliminate any resources containing a given term.

Tek Talk Today Introduction by Lynn S on Sunday, 20th Sept 2009

Cool "socket 370″images A few nice socket 370 images I found

diggyblog October 15th, 2009

Search results for "system:lectures " @stowaway.net

Doug Clow's Imaginatively-Titled Blog - New Technology in Higher Education - Digital scholarship: Advanced technologies for research (1) posted on 10 March 2010

Science Hack Day and The Revolutionaries July 1, 2010 - by Premasagar

Download Ubuntu 10.04 LTS for Your Small Business Posted on June 8, 2010 by Windows Software Team

Israel's Cyber Weapons by Eric on September 28, 2010

A Bursting Market: Cisco Building APIs for Cloud Infrastructure Automation By Alex Williams / March 8, 2011 8:45 AM

Consistency is King Content, as king, is dead. Long live the new king, consistency. By Ian, March 18, 2011.

  

KEYWORDS

@ explore: interestingness April 2008

@ interesting: magnification, tarantula.

@ electronics cluster: circuit, led, diy

@ image: texture in the superimposition "346/365 _ incognito?" July 2009

@ hivemind: roundabout, spider,tarantula, scrap, bug, detail.

@ wordnik: labyrinthine, circuit, IC, circuit, technology, scrap, board, framing, mazy.

@ technorati: magnification, motherboard, thumbnail, bug.

@ igosso: labyrinthine, electronics, 3D pattern, writing materials, mazy, 2435823037 [backup], 9361468@N05 (タグをコピペすると、ブログなどにカンタン貼り付けできます。 (copy & paste the box-code to your blog easily.), 9 interesting CC-images of my flickr-account selected by igosso (Aug09).

@ m a h a l o: electric circuit, Electronic Data Systems, metallic bond.

@ netagura virtualbox Thinkpad T61でUbuntu再び その4 IntelVTを体感 , 10 月 5th, 2008

@ metal scrap: circuit-board

@ novovision.fr: tuyauterie

@ Free 3ds Textures: Small (240px / 175px), Medium (500px / 364px), Large (1273px / 927px) ['BACKUPs' of my flickr-image], patterns, detail, circuit,pattern, architecture, spider.

@ picturesandbox free figstockphotography: electronics, industry, process, spider, Free 3D Photos, free Data Center

@ articleslash: Virtual Or Real - How Many Different Faces Are There in Your Book?

@ yamaiko: superseded

IMAGE-HUNTERS

3ds Spider Textures Creative Commons project by Dustin Senos and is powered by Media Temple and phpFlickr

www.strassenkatalog.de/str/blumberger-damm-12683-berlin-b...

Random Nature Patterns FunSciEnt-Just another Science site, Oct 24th, 2009

News From US ... Provide The Latest News From All Over The Universe Jun.30, 2010 in Tech and Science

박영환의 '넥스트

free photos for business w license for commercial use with attribution

labyrinthine circuit board lines photohorde, June 2008

PALETTE: #595638 #B76413 #E1972B #FFD689 #325CC3 @ colorhunter

photos populaires @ B-Real - musicspot.fr

zephoria Danah Boyd@ friendfeed

IC photos les plus populaires labyrinthine circuit board lines @ djibouti-net

Мой интернет. Все об интернете 2003 Октябрь (My Internet {with Google Chrome only; IE blocks it out}. All of the Internet 2003 October) @ formyinet.ru

Embed Code for this Photo with Attribution License @everystockphoto

Intellectual property rights protect an individual or business against unfair encroachment and misappropriation of hard work and creativity by usurpers and infringers. Society (through its laws) generally seeks to promote competition and innovation in the marketplace of goods and services. By protecting intellectual property, society rewards the types of creative, industrious activities that provide new and better choices to all members of society. @svenlaw.com

Celtic Sculpture origins of Irish Art, Celtic Jewelry and Celtic Sculpture

Patent Transfer Ltd - Patent Monetization Services Posted by admin On June - 17 - 2010

365AffiliateMarketing.com | Effective Make Money Online Strategies (12th October 2010)

White Paper: Saving Your Servers from Disaster By Alex Williams / May 18, 2011

webdemexico.com.mx

 

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15th May 2014: 183,503 views

www.intersectionconsulting.comSocial media is intangible - how do you quantify the ROI of online social tools that are based on human networks and micro interactions?

 

This image is inspired by Shane Gibson's podcast about 26 ways to measure social media ROI - What resonates with me is the connection between online social networking and being social in your physical community.

 

Some people ignore or abandon social media because of its digital nature - they might not view the benefits of online social networking in the same way they see the ROI of being a member at their local Chamber of Commerce.

 

In my opinion, online social media and face-to-face networking need to be viewed through the same lens. Both involve social interaction, contributing to a community and getting out what you put in - The only difference being the medium.

Maksymilian Rafailovych "Max" Levchyn is a Ukrainian-born American computer scientist and internet entrepreneur. He is the former chief technology officer of PayPal, which he co-founded in 1998. As CTO he was primarily known for his contributions to PayPal's anti-fraud efforts and is also the co-creator of the Gausebeck-Levchin test, one of the first commercial implementations of a CAPTCHA.

 

In 2002, he was named to the Technology Review TR100 as one of the top 100 innovators in the world under the age of 35, as well as Innovator of the Year. Levchin founded Slide in 2004 and was involved until 2011. In 2004, he helped start Yelp, an online social networking and review service, and is their largest shareholder as of 2012. He is on the board of directors for Yahoo!.

Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

Maksymilian Rafailovych "Max" Levchyn is a Ukrainian-born American computer scientist and internet entrepreneur. He is the former chief technology officer of PayPal, which he co-founded in 1998. As CTO he was primarily known for his contributions to PayPal's anti-fraud efforts and is also the co-creator of the Gausebeck-Levchin test, one of the first commercial implementations of a CAPTCHA.

 

In 2002, he was named to the Technology Review TR100 as one of the top 100 innovators in the world under the age of 35, as well as Innovator of the Year. Levchin founded Slide in 2004 and was involved until 2011. In 2004, he helped start Yelp, an online social networking and review service, and is their largest shareholder as of 2012. He is on the board of directors for Yahoo!.

My social online presence.

By Frank Da Silva

 

A social network service uses software to build online social networks for communities of people who share interests and activities or who are interested in exploring the interests and activities of others.

 

Most services are primarily web based and provide a collection of various ways for users to interact, such as chat, messaging, email, video, voice chat, file sharing, blogging, discussion groups, and so on. Social networking has revolutionized the way we communicate and share information with one another in today's society. Various social networking websites are being used by millions of people everyday on a regular basis and it now seems that social networking is a part of everyday life.

 

The main types of social networking services are those which contain directories of some categories (such as former classmates), means to connect with friends (usually with self-description pages), and recommender systems linked to trust. Popular methods now combine many of these, with MySpace and Facebook being the most widely used in North America, Bebo, MySpace, Skyrock Blog , Facebook and Hi5 in parts of Europe, Orkut and Hi5 in South America and Central America, Friendster, Orkut and CyWorld in Asia and the Pacific Islands. Le Monde provided a detailed map of popularity, January 14, 2008.

 

More here personalizemedia.com - One slide of 80 from a presentation I gave at the Online Social Networking and Business Collaboration Conference on Nov 25 2008 in Sydney, Australia - this was primarily to show Second Life and Google Lively (RIP) are not the only non-games in town :)

Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

Sun May 29th 2016 - All images appearing on this site or any online social network are the exclusive property of Tyrone Mitchell of Tyrone islington Photography© 2016 All Rights Reserved

More here personalizemedia.com - Another slide from my Online Social Networking and Business Collaboration World presentation. This one looks at worlds created primarily for social interaction and game activity - the common element is they are naturally many to many interaction. Machinima here is a co-creative effort, augmented reality here as a social game element (which is inherent in Alternate Reality Games). The mobile tools area about mobile social network tools to enable worlds existing out on location etc etc

Today’s customers are more connected than ever. The rate of change in society is accelerating, as whole families – kids, parents and grandparents – join online social networks to keep up with each other and with friends, to share their interests and connect with new people. Social networks are where the people are going; that’s where the customers are. But most companies are slow to adopt these new, connected technologies.

 

Why? In some cases they don’t understand how social networks will impact the business. They can’t see a clear path or understand the implications. But in most companies there are a few people who do understand. But bureaucracy, corporate culture, blind spots, fear and risk-avoidant behaviors stand in the way.

 

Jack Welch once said “I’ve always believed that when the rate of change inside an institution becomes slower than the rate of change outside, the end is in sight. The only question is when.”

Can your company’s inside rate of change match the rate of change you see on the outside? If not, it’s time to take a good hard look at social technologies and start thinking about how they can help.

 

The Connected Company.

 

It's A-Pop 2015! (Saturday Only)

 

Instagram: @Tyroneislington

Facebook: Tyrone islington Photography

www.tyroneislington.com

  

All images appearing on any online social network are the exclusive property of Tyrone islington Photography© and Tyrone Mitchell and are protected under Canadian and International Copyright laws. The images may not be reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without the written permission of Tyrone Mitchell on behalf of Tyrone islington Photography©.

Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

It's A-Pop 2015! (Saturday Only)

 

Instagram: @Tyroneislington

Facebook: Tyrone islington Photography

www.tyroneislington.com

  

All images appearing on any online social network are the exclusive property of Tyrone islington Photography© and Tyrone Mitchell and are protected under Canadian and International Copyright laws. The images may not be reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without the written permission of Tyrone Mitchell on behalf of Tyrone islington Photography©.

It's Anime North in Toronto! The three-day event is Canada's premier fan-run anime convention! Fans, Cosplayers and more come from all around!

 

www.tyroneislington.com

 

All images appearing on any online social network are the exclusive property of Tyrone islington Photography© and Tyrone Mitchell and are protected under Canadian and International Copyright laws. The images may not be reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without the written permission of Tyrone Mitchell on behalf of Tyrone islington photography.

 

Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

Debate @ Media Art Café Berlijn, Enschede , NL

 

+ @ Media Art Café Berlijn, Second Enschede , SL

 

June 12 > 15:00 – 17:00 hrs CEST ( = SL 4 am- 6 am PDT)

 

Meta.Live.Nu

 

metalive.wordpress.com/2009/06/09/howmanylives

  

NEDERLANDS:

 

UTwente.nl/nieuws/pers/cont_09-065.doc

 

MACBerlijn.nl/agenda/details/157-PLANETART en UT.html

 

SecondEnschede.blogspot.com/2009/06/symposium-12-juni-200...

 

ENGLISH:

 

CreativeTechnology.eu/wordpress/?p=405

 

PLANETART.nl/now.htm

 

LIVE:

 

Streams.Live.nU

 

slurl.com/secondlife/Enschede/111/110/22

  

Our life and our relations are increasingly influenced by online social networks and virtual environments. In particular, multi-user virtual worlds like Second Life, World of Warcraft and Half Life are starting to occupy an increasingly dominant part of many people’s lives, but actually maintaining a second life parallel to their so-called real life is still reserved for the few.As a consequence, the media and public imagination harbor a number of misconceptions about how the use of virtual worlds might impact our lives as well as an often stereotypical portrayal of why someone might choose to live parts of their lives in a computer-mediated environment.

 

What is it really that makes some people spend hours daily in a virtual world? What are the conditions for finding virtual worlds rewarding and enjoyable? What kinds of experiences motivate people to live a second life? Is it about experimenting with that which is physically or ethically forbidden in their normal life, to play around, to meet others, to do business, or collaborative scientific or artistic work? What is the effect of a virtual life on the real, and the other way around? Will the popularity of virtual worlds increase further in the future?

 

We will explore such questions in the form of a panel, with 5 people around the table who have experience with Second Life as scientist, artist, philosopher, computer technologist or educator. The panelists will introduce themselves by showing different examples. Then the moderated discussion will start, with the opportunity for the audience to comment, ask questions or share (or even show) their own experiences.

 

The participants

  

Piet Hut is Professor of Astrophysics and Interdisciplinary Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, USA. His work in astrophysics is focused mainly on stellar dynamics. He founded a virtual institute, MICA, the Meta Institute for Computational Astrophysics, with a presence in the virtual worlds of Qwaq Forums, Second Life, and OpenSim. MICA is unique in being the first grass roots organization of professional scientists in Second Life. Current MICA activities include: professional journal club talks; popular astrophysics talks by professional astrophysicists for the general public; daily “coffee-time” gatherings where professional and amateur astronomers mingle; and lab-like experiments with OpenSim, where the physics engine is used to let stars fall to each other, rather than to the ground.

 

Anton Eliëns is coordinator of multimedia @ VU University Amsterdam and involved in setting up the Creative Technology curriculum where he leads the New Media track. His current activities focus on the application of game technology in serious applications and the development of serious games for education and business training.

 

Johnny Hartz Søraker is a PhD Research Fellow at the Department of Philosophy, University of Twente. Currently, he is doing research on the philosophy and ethics of virtual worlds as part of an International research group on “Evaluating the Cultural Quality of New Media”. He received his MA degree (Cand. Philol.) in Philosophy from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, then working on philosophy of mind and AI. Since then he has published and lectured extensively on philosophy of technology, philosophy and ethics of virtual worlds in particular.

 

Viola van Alphen is Multi Media Artist, Curator, Organiser, Business Consultant, Nerd and Managing director of the yearly festival GOGBOT (Art, Media, Technology, Music) and PLANETART, organization for the multi media art that organizes festivals and innovative cross media presentations. During Transmediale Berlin, international festival for Digital Culture, several international artists (i.e. the Australian bionic performance artists Stelarc) chose to participate choosing the medium of Second Life. Art is not only about showing beautiful pictures and crafts, but about philosophy, criticism, hacking and innovation. The past is a kind of future already happened…

 

Zsófia Ruttkay as a mathematician and computer scientist has been working in Artificial Intelligence, recently on creating engaging communicative behaviour for Virtual Humans. She has been fascinated by the new interaction, communication and expression forms the computer technology is offering – in her view giving rise to a new ideal of the Renaissance Man in the 21st century. She has been the driving person for the design and development of the new, interdisciplinary education Creative Technology at UT.

Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

Adam Shub

River City Ransom Street Fight

18" x 24" (457mm x 610mm)

 

Adam Shub (Facebook / SML Flickr) is an artist in New York. He is currently working on a series of paintings on arcade video games. You can check out his portfolio at www.artbreak.com/Squarepainter

 

Brooklyn Art Project (FriendFeed / Twitter) is a free online social network that connects 5500+ artists, collectors, and art enthusiasts from over 44 countries featuring over 44,000 artworks and 800+ short films and videos.

 

Members can participate in collaborative exhibits in Brooklyn and beyond while enjoying unlimited online gallery space, blogs, forums, chat, and tools to share / promote their artwork across the web.

 

BrooklynArtProject.com

  

13th annual D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the Bridge Festival® (Sept 25 to Sept 27, 2009)

www.dumboartfestival.org/press_release.html

 

The three-day multi-site neighborhood-wide event is a one-of-a-kind art happening: where serendipity meets the haphazard and where the unpredictable, spontaneous and downright weird thrive. The now teenage D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the Bridge Festival® presents touchable, accessible, and interactive art, on a scale that makes it the nation's largest urban forum for experimental art.

 

Art Under the Bridge is an opportunity for young artists to use any medium imaginable to create temporary projects on-the-spot everywhere and anywhere, completely transforming the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, New York, into a vibrant platform for self-expression. In addition to the 80+ projects throughout the historical post-industrial waterfront span, visitors can tour local artists' studios or check out the indoor video_dumbo, a non-stop program of cutting-edge video art from New York City and around the world.

 

The Dumbo Arts Center (DAC) has been the exclusive producer of the D.U.M.B.O Art Under the Bridge Festival® since 1997. DAC is a big impact, small non-profit, that in addition to its year-round gallery exhibitions, is committed to preserving Dumbo as a site in New York City where emerging visual artists can experiment in the public domain, while having unprecedented freedom and access to normally off-limit locations.

 

www.dumboartscenter.org

www.dumboartfestival.org

www.video_dumbo.org

  

Related SML

+ SML Fine Art (Flickr Group)

+ SML Flickr Collections: Events

+ SML Flickr Sets: Dumbo Arts Center: Art Under the Bridge Festival 2009

+ SML Flickr Tags: Art

+ SML Pro Blog: Art

Drawing, seen at the Brooklyn Art Project headquarter in Dumbo, during the Art Under the Bridge Festival organized by Dumbo Arts Center in New York city, 2009.

 

James Cospito (Brooklyn Art Project / Facebook / Flickr / LinkedIn / SML Flickr / Twitter) is an artist, painter, photographer, illustrator, designer in New York City. He is also the co-founder of Brooklyn Art Project.

 

You can check out James Cospito's portfolio at brooklynartproject.ning.com/profile/jcospito

 

See also the 720p high-def video of James Cospito talking about BAP on Flickr.

 

Brooklyn Art Project (FriendFeed / Twitter) is a free online social network that connects 5500+ artists, collectors, and art enthusiasts from over 44 countries featuring over 44,000 artworks and 800+ short films and videos.

 

Members can participate in collaborative exhibits in Brooklyn and beyond while enjoying unlimited online gallery space, blogs, forums, chat, and tools to share / promote their artwork across the web.

 

BrooklynArtProject.com

  

See also

+ Artits on Art: James Cospito talks about his NYC Subway series (Flickr HD video)

+ Art + Artists: James Cospito talks about Brooklyn Art Project (Flickr HD video)

  

13th annual D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the Bridge Festival® (Sept 25 to Sept 27, 2009)

www.dumboartfestival.org/press_release.html

 

The three-day multi-site neighborhood-wide event is a one-of-a-kind art happening: where serendipity meets the haphazard and where the unpredictable, spontaneous and downright weird thrive. The now teenage D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the Bridge Festival® presents touchable, accessible, and interactive art, on a scale that makes it the nation's largest urban forum for experimental art.

 

Art Under the Bridge is an opportunity for young artists to use any medium imaginable to create temporary projects on-the-spot everywhere and anywhere, completely transforming the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, New York, into a vibrant platform for self-expression. In addition to the 80+ projects throughout the historical post-industrial waterfront span, visitors can tour local artists' studios or check out the indoor video_dumbo, a non-stop program of cutting-edge video art from New York City and around the world.

 

The Dumbo Arts Center (DAC) has been the exclusive producer of the D.U.M.B.O Art Under the Bridge Festival® since 1997. DAC is a big impact, small non-profit, that in addition to its year-round gallery exhibitions, is committed to preserving Dumbo as a site in New York City where emerging visual artists can experiment in the public domain, while having unprecedented freedom and access to normally off-limit locations.

 

www.dumboartscenter.org

www.dumboartfestival.org

www.video_dumbo.org

  

Related SML

+ SML Fine Art (Flickr Group)

+ SML Flickr Collections: Events

+ SML Flickr Sets: Dumbo Arts Center: Art Under the Bridge Festival 2009

+ SML Flickr Tags: Art

+ SML Pro Blog: Art

Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

The National Security Agency has obtained direct access to the systems of Google, Facebook, Apple and other US internet giants, according to a top secret document obtained by the Guardian.

 

The NSA access is part of a previously undisclosed program called Prism, which allows officials to collect material including search history, the content of emails, file transfers and live chats, the document says.

 

The Guardian has verified the authenticity of the document, a 41-slide PowerPoint presentation – classified as top secret with no distribution to foreign allies – which was apparently used to train intelligence operatives on the capabilities of the program. The document claims "collection directly from the servers" of major US service providers.

 

Although the presentation claims the program is run with the assistance of the companies, all those who responded to a Guardian request for comment on Thursday denied knowledge of any such program.

 

In a statement, Google said: "Google cares deeply about the security of our users' data. We disclose user data to government in accordance with the law, and we review all such requests carefully. From time to time, people allege that we have created a government 'back door' into our systems, but Google does not have a back door for the government to access private user data."

 

Several senior tech executives insisted that they had no knowledge of Prism or of any similar scheme. They said they would never have been involved in such a program. "If they are doing this, they are doing it without our knowledge," one said.

 

An Apple spokesman said it had "never heard" of Prism.

 

The NSA access was enabled by changes to US surveillance law introduced under President Bush and renewed under Obama in December 2012.

  

The program facilitates extensive, in-depth surveillance on live communications and stored information. The law allows for the targeting of any customers of participating firms who live outside the US, or those Americans whose communications include people outside the US.

 

It also opens the possibility of communications made entirely within the US being collected without warrants.

 

Disclosure of the Prism program follows a leak to the Guardian on Wednesday of a top-secret court order compelling telecoms provider Verizon to turn over the telephone records of millions of US customers.

 

The participation of the internet companies in Prism will add to the debate, ignited by the Verizon revelation, about the scale of surveillance by the intelligence services. Unlike the collection of those call records, this surveillance can include the content of communications and not just the metadata.

 

Some of the world's largest internet brands are claimed to be part of the information-sharing program since its introduction in 2007. Microsoft – which is currently running an advertising campaign with the slogan "Your privacy is our priority" – was the first, with collection beginning in December 2007.

 

It was followed by Yahoo in 2008; Google, Facebook and PalTalk in 2009; YouTube in 2010; Skype and AOL in 2011; and finally Apple, which joined the program in 2012. The program is continuing to expand, with other providers due to come online.

 

Collectively, the companies cover the vast majority of online email, search, video and communications networks.

=================================================================

 

By Barton Gellman and Laura Poitras, Published: June 6 | Updated: Friday, June 7, 7:51 AM

 

The National Security Agency and the FBI are tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies, extracting audio and video chats, photographs, e-mails, documents, and connection logs that enable analysts to track foreign targets, according to a top-secret document obtained by The Washington Post.

 

The program, code-named PRISM, has not been made public until now. It may be the first of its kind. The NSA prides itself on stealing secrets and breaking codes, and it is accustomed to corporate partnerships that help it divert data traffic or sidestep barriers. But there has never been a Google or Facebook before, and it is unlikely that there are richer troves of valuable intelligence than the ones in Silicon Valley.

 

Equally unusual is the way the NSA extracts what it wants, according to the document: “Collection directly from the servers of these U.S. Service Providers: Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, PalTalk, AOL, Skype, YouTube, Apple.”

 

London’s Guardian newspaper reported Friday that GCHQ, Britain’s equivalent of the NSA, also has been secretly gathering intelligence from the same internet companies through an operation set up by the NSA.

 

According to documents obtained by The Guardian, PRISM would appear to allow GCHQ to circumvent the formal legal process required in Britain to seek personal material such as emails, photos and videos from an internet company based outside of the country.

 

PRISM was launched from the ashes of President George W. Bush’s secret program of warrantless domestic surveillance in 2007, after news media disclosures, lawsuits and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court forced the president to look for new authority.

 

Congress obliged with the Protect America Act in 2007 and the FISA Amendments Act of 2008, which immunized private companies that cooperated voluntarily with U.S. intelligence collection. PRISM recruited its first partner, Microsoft, and began six years of rapidly growing data collection beneath the surface of a roiling national debate on surveillance and privacy. Late last year, when critics in Congress sought changes in the FISA Amendments Act, the only lawmakers who knew about PRISM were bound by oaths of office to hold their tongues.

 

The court-approved program is focused on foreign communications traffic, which often flows through U.S. servers even when sent from one overseas location to another. Between 2004 and 2007, Bush administration lawyers persuaded federal FISA judges to issue surveillance orders in a fundamentally new form. Until then the government had to show probable cause that a particular “target” and “facility” were both connected to terrorism or espionage.

 

In four new orders, which remain classified, the court defined massive data sets as “facilities” and agreed to certify periodically that the government had reasonable procedures in place to minimize collection of “U.S. persons” data without a warrant.

 

In a statement issue late Thursday, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper said “information collected under this program is among the most important and valuable foreign intelligence information we collect, and is used to protect our nation from a wide variety of threats. The unauthorized disclosure of information about this important and entirely legal program is reprehensible and risks important protections for the security of Americans.”

 

Clapper added that there were numerous inaccuracies in reports about PRISM by The Post and the Guardian newspaper, but he did not specify any.

 

Jameel Jaffer, deputy legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, said: “I would just push back on the idea that the court has signed off on it, so why worry? This is a court that meets in secret, allows only the government to appear before it, and publishes almost none of its opinions. It has never been an effective check on government.”

 

Several companies contacted by The Post said they had no knowledge of the program, did not allow direct government access to their servers and asserted that they responded only to targeted requests for information.

 

“We do not provide any government organization with direct access to Facebook servers,” said Joe Sullivan, chief security officer for Facebook. “When Facebook is asked for data or information about specific individuals, we carefully scrutinize any such request for compliance with all applicable laws, and provide information only to the extent required by law.”

 

“We have never heard of PRISM,” said Steve Dowling, a spokesman for Apple. “We do not provide any government agency with direct access to our servers, and any government agency requesting customer data must get a court order.”

 

It is possible that the conflict between the PRISM slides and the company spokesmen is the result of imprecision on the part of the NSA author. In another classified report obtained by The Post, the arrangement is described as allowing “collection managers [to send] content tasking instructions directly to equipment installed at company-controlled locations,” rather than directly to company servers.

 

Government officials and the document itself made clear that the NSA regarded the identities of its private partners as PRISM’s most sensitive secret, fearing that the companies would withdraw from the program if exposed. “98 percent of PRISM production is based on Yahoo, Google and Microsoft; we need to make sure we don’t harm these sources,” the briefing’s author wrote in his speaker’s notes.

 

An internal presentation of 41 briefing slides on PRISM, dated April 2013 and intended for senior analysts in the NSA’s Signals Intelligence Directorate, described the new tool as the most prolific contributor to the President’s Daily Brief, which cited PRISM data in 1,477 items last year. According to the slides and other supporting materials obtained by The Post, “NSA reporting increasingly relies on PRISM” as its leading source of raw material, accounting for nearly 1 in 7 intelligence reports.

 

That is a remarkable figure in an agency that measures annual intake in the trillions of communications. It is all the more striking because the NSA, whose lawful mission is foreign intelligence, is reaching deep inside the machinery of American companies that host hundreds of millions of American-held accounts on American soil.

 

The technology companies, whose cooperation is essential to PRISM operations, include most of the dominant global players of Silicon Valley, according to the document. They are listed on a roster that bears their logos in order of entry into the program: “Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook, PalTalk, AOL, Skype, YouTube, Apple.” PalTalk, although much smaller, has hosted traffic of substantial intelligence interest during the Arab Spring and in the ongoing Syrian civil war.

 

Dropbox, the cloud storage and synchronization service, is described as “coming soon.”

 

Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Mark Udall (D-Colo.), who had classified knowledge of the program as members of the Senate Intelligence Committee, were unable to speak of it when they warned in a Dec. 27, 2012, floor debate that the FISA Amendments Act had what both of them called a “back-door search loophole” for the content of innocent Americans who were swept up in a search for someone else.

 

“As it is written, there is nothing to prohibit the intelligence community from searching through a pile of communications, which may have been incidentally or accidentally been collected without a warrant, to deliberately search for the phone calls or e-mails of specific Americans,” Udall said.

 

Wyden repeatedly asked the NSA to estimate the number of Americans whose communications had been incidentally collected, and the agency’s director, Lt. Gen. Keith B. Alexander, insisted there was no way to find out. Eventually Inspector General I. Charles McCullough III wrote Wyden a letter stating that it would violate the privacy of Americans in NSA data banks to try to estimate their number.

 

Roots in the ’70s

 

PRISM is an heir, in one sense, to a history of intelligence alliances with as many as 100 trusted U.S. companies since the 1970s. The NSA calls these Special Source Operations, and PRISM falls under that rubric.

 

The Silicon Valley operation works alongside a parallel program, code-named BLARNEY, that gathers up “metadata” — technical information about communications traffic and network devices — as it streams past choke points along the backbone of the Internet. BLARNEY’s top-secret program summary, set down in the slides alongside a cartoon insignia of a shamrock and a leprechaun hat, describes it as “an ongoing collection program that leverages IC [intelligence community] and commercial partnerships to gain access and exploit foreign intelligence obtained from global networks.”

 

But the PRISM program appears to more nearly resemble the most controversial of the warrantless surveillance orders issued by President George W. Bush after the al-Qaeda attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Its history, in which President Obama presided over exponential growth in a program that candidate Obama criticized, shows how fundamentally surveillance law and practice have shifted away from individual suspicion in favor of systematic, mass collection techniques.

 

The Obama administration points to ongoing safeguards in the form of “extensive procedures, specifically approved by the court, to ensure that only non-U.S. persons outside the U.S. are targeted, and that minimize the acquisition, retention and dissemination of incidentally acquired information about U.S. persons.”

 

And it is true that the PRISM program is not a dragnet, exactly. From inside a company’s data stream the NSA is capable of pulling out anything it likes, but under current rules the agency does not try to collect it all.

 

Analysts who use the system from a Web portal at Fort Meade, Md., key in “selectors,” or search terms, that are designed to produce at least 51 percent confidence in a target’s “foreignness.” That is not a very stringent test. Training materials obtained by The Post instruct new analysts to make quarterly reports of any accidental collection of U.S. content, but add that “it’s nothing to worry about.”

 

Even when the system works just as advertised, with no American singled out for targeting, the NSA routinely collects a great deal of American content. That is described as “incidental,” and it is inherent in contact chaining, one of the basic tools of the trade. To collect on a suspected spy or foreign terrorist means, at minimum, that everyone in the suspect’s inbox or outbox is swept in. Intelligence analysts are typically taught to chain through contacts two “hops” out from their target, which increases “incidental collection” exponentially. The same math explains the aphorism, from the John Guare play, that no one is more than “six degrees of separation” from any other person.

 

A ‘directive’

 

In exchange for immunity from lawsuits, companies such as Yahoo and AOL are obliged to accept a “directive” from the attorney general and the director of national intelligence to open their servers to the FBI’s Data Intercept Technology Unit, which handles liaison to U.S. companies from the NSA. In 2008, Congress gave the Justice Department authority for a secret order from the Foreign Surveillance Intelligence Court to compel a reluctant company “to comply.”

 

In practice, there is room for a company to maneuver, delay or resist. When a clandestine intelligence program meets a highly regulated industry, said a lawyer with experience in bridging the gaps, neither side wants to risk a public fight. The engineering problems are so immense, in systems of such complexity and frequent change, that the FBI and NSA would be hard pressed to build in back doors without active help from each company.

 

Apple demonstrated that resistance is possible when it held out for more than five years, for reasons unknown, after Microsoft became PRISM’s first corporate partner in May 2007. Twitter, which has cultivated a reputation for aggressive defense of its users’ privacy, is still conspicuous by its absence from the list of “private sector partners.”

 

Google, like the other companies, denied that it permitted direct government access to its servers.

 

“Google cares deeply about the security of our users’ data,” a company spokesman said. “We disclose user data to government in accordance with the law, and we review all such requests carefully. From time to time, people allege that we have created a government ‘back door’ into our systems, but Google does not have a ‘back door’ for the government to access private user data.”

 

Microsoft also provided a statement: “We provide customer data only when we receive a legally binding order or subpoena to do so, and never on a voluntary basis. In addition we only ever comply with orders for requests about specific accounts or identifiers. If the government has a broader voluntary national security program to gather customer data we don’t participate in it.”

 

Yahoo also issued a denial.

 

“Yahoo! takes users’ privacy very seriously,” the company said in a statement. “We do not provide the government with direct access to our servers, systems, or network.”

 

Like market researchers, but with far more privileged access, collection managers in the NSA’s Special Source Operations group, which oversees the PRISM program, are drawn to the wealth of information about their subjects in online accounts. For much the same reason, civil libertarians and some ordinary users may be troubled by the menu available to analysts who hold the required clearances to “task” the PRISM system.

 

There has been “continued exponential growth in tasking to Facebook and Skype,” according to the PRISM slides. With a few clicks and an affirmation that the subject is believed to be engaged in terrorism, espionage or nuclear proliferation, an analyst obtains full access to Facebook’s “extensive search and surveillance capabilities against the variety of online social networking services.”

 

According to a separate “User’s Guide for PRISM Skype Collection,” that service can be monitored for audio when one end of the call is a conventional telephone and for any combination of “audio, video, chat, and file transfers” when Skype users connect by computer alone. Google’s offerings include Gmail, voice and video chat, Google Drive files, photo libraries, and live surveillance of search terms.

 

Firsthand experience with these systems, and horror at their capabilities, is what drove a career intelligence officer to provide PowerPoint slides about PRISM and supporting materials to The Washington Post in order to expose what he believes to be a gross intrusion on privacy. “They quite literally can watch your ideas form as you type,” the officer said.

  

Poitras is a documentary filmmaker and MacArthur Fellow. Julie Tate, Robert O’Harrow Jr., Cecilia Kang and Ellen Nakashima contributed to this report.

 

Graphic: NSA slides explain the PRISM data-collection program Special Report: Top Secret America

It's Anime North in Toronto! The three-day event is Canada's premier fan-run anime convention! Fans, Cosplayers and more come from all around!

 

www.tyroneislington.com

 

All images appearing on any online social network are the exclusive property of Tyrone islington Photography© and Tyrone Mitchell and are protected under Canadian and International Copyright laws. The images may not be reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without the written permission of Tyrone Mitchell on behalf of Tyrone islington photography.

 

James Cospito, founder of the Brooklyn Art Project, talks about the art seen at the project's headquarter in Dumbo during the Art Under the Bridge Festival held annually by Dumbo Arts Center in New York City.

 

Brooklyn Art Project (FriendFeed / Twitter) is a free online social network that connects 5500+ artists, collectors, and art enthusiasts from over 44 countries featuring over 44,000 artworks and 800+ short films and videos.

 

Members can participate in collaborative exhibits in Brooklyn and beyond while enjoying unlimited online gallery space, blogs, forums, chat, and tools to share / promote their artwork across the web.

 

BrooklynArtProject.com

 

SML Simulcast

+ YouTube (720p high-def video)

+ Vimeo (720p high-def video)

  

13th annual D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the Bridge Festival® (Sept 25 to Sept 27, 2009)

www.dumboartfestival.org/press_release.html

 

The three-day multi-site neighborhood-wide event is a one-of-a-kind art happening: where serendipity meets the haphazard and where the unpredictable, spontaneous and downright weird thrive. The now teenage D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the Bridge Festival® presents touchable, accessible, and interactive art, on a scale that makes it the nation's largest urban forum for experimental art.

 

Art Under the Bridge is an opportunity for young artists to use any medium imaginable to create temporary projects on-the-spot everywhere and anywhere, completely transforming the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, New York, into a vibrant platform for self-expression. In addition to the 80+ projects throughout the historical post-industrial waterfront span, visitors can tour local artists' studios or check out the indoor video_dumbo, a non-stop program of cutting-edge video art from New York City and around the world.

 

The Dumbo Arts Center (DAC) has been the exclusive producer of the D.U.M.B.O Art Under the Bridge Festival® since 1997. DAC is a big impact, small non-profit, that in addition to its year-round gallery exhibitions, is committed to preserving Dumbo as a site in New York City where emerging visual artists can experiment in the public domain, while having unprecedented freedom and access to normally off-limit locations.

 

www.dumboartscenter.org

www.dumboartfestival.org

www.video_dumbo.org

  

Related SML

+ SML Fine Art (Flickr Group)

+ SML Flickr Collections: Events

+ SML Flickr Sets: Dumbo Arts Center: Art Under the Bridge Festival 2009

+ SML Flickr Tags: Art

+ SML Pro Blog: Art

Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

John noted in my journal entries over the summer that when I arrived in Algiers I put down my pen and switched to using my camera to continue the dialogue.

 

But this was not as straightforward as it might seem.

 

I had been warned before by several people that taking photographs in Algiers would not be easy - and is, in fact, to be discouraged. On my previous visit to the city a year earlier I had noted that the camera culture endemic to the UK's streets seemed nowhere to be found. I didn't think this was necessarily a question of limited means or access to photographic equipment: as any visitor to Algiers will immediately realise, mobile phones (many of which have cameras) are ubiquitous and there is no shortage of camera studios and film processing shops in the city centre. The invisibility of the street photographer seemed more down to local and cultural reasons rather than the socio-economic ones Western visitors may readily assume.

 

But, of course, not all street photographers in the city would be locals anyway: I might have expected to see a more visible presence of visitors there, but tourism clearly continues not to be a priority. This is not to say that Algiers is devoid of such influxes: many foreigners are residents, and the current numbers of Chinese migrants working on major construction projects across Algeria is testament to this. As I described earlier, summertime also heralds an increase in the circulation of diasporas between France and Algeria, and it was clear that many of the people thronging the city's streets in July were visiting family and friends during their summer holidays. Nevertheless, I very seldom saw someone actually using a camera - and on the very rare occasions when I have in the past, it has mostly been by the city's seafront, with families posing against the backdrop of the Mediterranean.

 

Discretion is therefore de rigueur, and from discussions I have had with local photographers, it's clear that surreptitiousness is crucial. Consequently, many of my photographs were taken in carefully chosen places: in famous sites outside the city and areas where I felt less conspicuous. But looking back at my images now, it's not a coincidence that few feature people: apart from the attendant ethical questions this would pose, I was also concerned by the more immediate consequences of being caught snapping by local police.

 

Indeed, my brief brush with the law during my stay was a case in point. Unable to sleep one morning as dawn broke, I decided to venture outside onto my fifth-floor hotel balcony in order to photograph the skyline and roofs opposite. Through blurry eyes, I dozily composed several images. My snapping abruptly stopped, however, when out of the corner of my left eye I discerned a policeman down below, hands firmly on his hips, silently staring up at me...

 

The automatic flash on my camera had given me away. Without wishing to acknowledge his presence - and keen to avoid the detailed conversation that would undoubtedly ensue - I quietly retired inside my room and gently closed the window behind me. I then waited for the knock on the door...

 

But none ever came. Now fully awake, and feeling suitably foolish, I returned to bed and tried to fall back to sleep. It would be easy to write off this incident as an illustration of the evident nervousness and suspicion that surrounds the use of photography within Algiers, but given recent events closer to home - that have notably inspired the British Journal of Photography's current `Not A Crime' campaign (http://www.not-a-crime.com/), alongside the `I'm a Photographer, Not a Terrorist' campaign (http://photographernotaterrorist.org/) - perhaps the plight of photographers in the UK is not so dissimilar...

 

Away from my travels, as a researcher in visual culture, over time I have become acutely conscious of how hazardous working with images can be and sometimes wondered if they shouldn't have a warning sign. It's often all too tempting to use images as mere `illustration' of a pre-existing argument, as if they were little more than an ingredient in a recipe. It seems far more preferable to let images `speak' for themselves... but if images could `talk', what would they say?

 

I have always been interested in how an image can denote very different things simply through the use of cropping and choice of scale, the location where it appears, and which text accompanies it. The seemingly ever-increasing circulation of images via online social networking and media sites serves as a reminder of how foolish it would be to assume that an image has any inherent meaning - or that there's only ever one and that this is immutable.

 

This thought leads me to recall Susan Sontag's assertion that:

 

`Strictly speaking, one never understands anything from a photograph'

 

Susan Sontag, On Photography (London: Penguin, 2002) (orig. publ. 1979), p. 23

 

...a timely reminder of how a photograph's veneer of veracity may peel back to reveal nothing: the more you look, the less you see.

 

Nevertheless, to reflect upon this collaboration with John, it's been enlightening to observe which photographs he has chosen from those I offered him, how he processed them, and which of the many possible narratives have developed over the time of my participation. The selection of images and positioning of text alongside them has duly shaped our narrative and undoubtedly encouraged certain meanings. Perhaps, in light of this, we could reformulate Sontag's statement: whilst one may never understand anything from a photograph, with the auxiliary power of an accompanying text, can't they be made to say almost anything?

 

As our dialogue in Left Luggage thus begins to draw to a close, John sent me an e-mail asking me to think about:

 

`The role of photography in your trip and its relationship with your simultaneous roles of researcher, tourist, diary writer, suitcase carrier, North European, and linguist. I was also thinking of the relationship between the snapshots and the texts you have produced, as well as the ensuing dialogue between us traced in Left Luggage.'

 

I now become conscious of a link between the function of the suitcase in Left Luggage and of photography within it. Whilst the use of accompanying texts, blog entry titles, photograph captions and sequencing of photographs all work to anchor the uploaded images, is not the fate of these images, circulating virtually via the blog, also to travel?

 

Participants in Left Luggage may briefly borrow John's suitcase, but perhaps its viewers could be interpreted in turn as `borrowers' too: the image here, like the case in between uses, an empty vessel filled with whatever significance its user chooses. The image considered thus would become an item of left luggage too: deposited online but in suspended animation until accessed or, indeed, reclaimed.

 

Or should we, alternatively, see the viewers as passengers too, transported elsewhere by the images? Do images travel with you, carried within your mind? Could viewers themselves be `carriers'? Photography as infection?

 

But as I muse about the role of images here, another voice from the past returns with a timely warning never to take photography at face value. For, as Barthes claimed:

 

`Au fond, une photo ressemble à n'importe qui, sauf à celui qu'elle représente'

(Ultimately, a photo resembles anyone, except the person it represents)

 

Roland Barthes, La Chambre claire: Note sur la photographie (Paris: Gallimard, 1980), p. 160.

 

I had hesitated before suggesting I participate personally in Left Luggage: perhaps I had had nothing to fear all along.

  

Text © Joseph McGonagle, 2009

 

08 - 02 - 2016

Camera : Sony A7R

Lens : FE 24-70 F4

Social networking, we have all likely heard of it before, but not everyone knows what it means?

If you were asked to define what social networking was, would you be able to give an accurate definition. Unfortunately, most individuals cannot, even though it is likely that they participate in some form of social networking, especially online.

 

Social networking is defined as the grouping of individuals together into to specific groups, often like a small community or a neighborhood. Although social networking is possible in person, especially in schools or in the workplace, it is most popular online. This is because unlike most high schools, colleges, or workplaces, the internet is filled with millions, if not more, of individuals who are looking to meet other internet users and develop friendships.

 

When it comes to social networking online, websites are used. These websites are known as social networking websites. Social networking websites are, in a way, like an online community of internet users. Depending on the social networking website in question, many of these online community members share a common bond, whether that bond be hobbies, religion, or politics. Once you are granted access to a social networking website you can begin to socialize. This socialization may include reading the profiles or profile pages of other members or even contacting them.

 

The friends that you can make are just one of the many benefits to social networking online. Another one of those benefits includes diversity. Unlike in most schools or workplaces, the internet gives individuals, from all around the world, access to social networking sties. This means that although you are in the United States, you could develop an online friendship with someone in Japan. Not only will you make a new friend, you but may also learn a thing or two about a new culture.

 

As previously mentioned, social networking often involves grouping specific individuals or organizations together. While there are a number of social networking websites that focus on particular interests, there are others that do not. These websites are often deemed traditional social networking websites. These types of websites typically have an open membership. This means that anyone can become a member, no matter what their hobbies, beliefs, or views are. However, once you are inside this online community, you can begin to create your own network of friends; thus eliminating others that do not meet your criteria.

 

If networking on the internet sounds like something you would be interested in, you are encouraged to learn more about it, such as the dangers of social networking. These dangers often involve online predators or individuals who claim to be someone that they are not. Although danger does exist with networking online, it also exists with networking out in the real world. As when you are meeting friends at a bar, school, or work, you are advised to proceed with caution online. By being aware of your surroundings and who you are talking to, you should be able safely enjoying social networking online. Once you have learned everything that you feel you need to learn, about social networking online, you can begin to search for networking communities to join. This can easily be done by performing a standard internet search. Your search will likely return a number of results, including MySpace, Facebook, Linkedin, and Ning.

martincanchola.podbean.com

twitter.com/seotips2go

myspace.com/martincanchola

8 Reasons Why People Feel Lost in Their Lives.

1. Drift Syndrome.

When we can’t figure out why we’re doing what we’re doing, or how we ended up working the job we’re working, a sense of “drift” settles in. It seems that instead of planning out our career, we just drifted along the tides and eventually found ourselves here. Or perhaps we had a plan, but lack of follow-through and/or a few of life’s hard knocks changed it, and we just drifted along. The truth is, most of us drifted to some extent into whatever it is we’re doing. I know precious few people who planned out every step and were able to remain untouched by the chaos of living to go precisely where they wanted to go. Nonetheless, feeling the “drift” is an emotional trigger for feeling lost.

 

2. Too Busy for Passion.

If you’re passionate about your main job, that’s great. But for many people, their job is a means to pay the bills, not an outlet for their deeply felt passions. But if we always think we’re too busy with our jobs and other parts of our daily routines to pursue anything we’re passionate about, then feeling incredibly bland, if not lost, is inevitable. I’m a firm believer that every schedule needs some time carved away for passionate pursuits, whatever they may be (music, art, writing, movies, volunteering, etc). If you’re always too busy for passion, the proverbial “rut” awaits you.

 

3. Can’t Locate a Purpose.

Right alongside passion is the necessity of perceiving that what you do has a purpose, a meaningful reason for being. One of the side effects of the knowledge worker revolution has been that many people work on discreet tasks that appear detached from a larger sense of purpose, and their supervisors feel no obligation to connect the dots (if they even know where all of the dots are and what they mean themselves). It’s hard to get motivated about the meaningfulness of your position when you have only a shallow sense of why what you’re doing contributes to the big picture. This may be one more reason to seek out a passionate sidebar, because it may also offer the sense of purpose you’re missing.

 

4. Social Support is Vacant.

How many of us are plugged into social networks that offer real, substantial support? More frequently we’re socially organized around hobbies and sports. Those networks may be great for talking over the specifics of our pass times, but they don’t offer vital connections between people who come to rely on one another. We live our lives largely untethered from others except for very specific needs, and this is contributing to a sense of isolation — one that’s ironically growing at the same time online social networks are exploding.

 

5. Cognitive Overload.

This is probably the easiest on the list to describe, because it affects all of us, and with increasing intensity. We simply have too much on our mental plates day-in and day-out to manage effectively. Without a quality external system for helping to manage it all, we can’t help but feel overloaded, and that contributes to a feeling of being out of sorts with the responsibilities and demands we face endlessly. Our brains didn’t evolve for nonstop information-driven, consumerism-driven, technology-laden societies, so we have to find tools to offload our cognitive load, or sink.

 

6. Distractions Fragment Focus.

About once a day I look at my iPhone and seriously consider throwing it into oncoming traffic. We have an abundance of ways to stay “connected” at our disposal, but hyper-connection invariably leads to attention fragmentation. When we can’t focus our time and energy on any one project without being distracted by our smart phones, email, news alerts, TV and everything else that’s barreling at us, then it’s natural to feel detached from the project and, quite possibly, lost about how to get it completed. We’ve got to lasso in the distractions to get quality work accomplished; there’s simply no other way to consistently get work done and feel good about the outcomes.

 

7. Bad Diets Fog the Mind.

By now we’re all well aware that our cultural obsession with fast food is leading to an obesity epidemic, and a slew of related health problems like diabetes, high blood pressure and coronary artery disease. But there’s also ample evidence to suggest that the amount of saturated fat, sodium and simple carbohydrates we’re ingesting is taking a toll on our ability to think clearly. Over time, deficits in speed of thought and memory can become major contributors to feeling lost, particularly if we look back on a time when those abilities were so much sharper than they are now. One more reason to stay away from the drive-thru and start making food at home.

 

8. Media Representations Create False Expectations.

We always seem to fall for whatever “perfect” and “ideal” representations are produced by ever-opportunistic media minds. Whether it’s the supermodel look, or the Lexus everyone deserves to have waiting for them in their driveways at Christmas — pick your poison — it’s all commercialized fantasy. When you find yourself trying to measure up to the fantasy and, of course, fall far short, it’s depressing. We think, “If that’s what ‘success’ looks like, then what am I?” Note that the effect is so insidious we’re usually processing that question in our minds without even consciously thinking it through. Over time those questions can lead to feeling lost. But they don’t have to if we can remind ourselves that “selling” is the prime mover of every commercialized fantasy we see. Without a buyer, the craftiest ploys of the seller are meaningless.

Barack Obama is the first major candidate to decline participation in the public financing system for presidential campaigns. He’s found a more effective way to raise money – by leveraging the power of the American people through online Social Networks. Get the pdf version here.

a companion piece to this.

 

can i just say that shooting with flickr friends in the city is the best? and then meeting up with other flickr friends and their flickr friends is even better? i'm not sure how this online social networking thing makes it all happen, but i'm amazed by it. especially living in nyc. there are so many people here, but everyone is so guarded. it's not exactly easy for a kinda shy girl from the midwest to make friends. so a BIG thank you to all of my flickr friends for being you. it makes my day that much better. and to those of you that i've met in person, an even bigger thanks. you make me so happy. looking forward to lots more meet-ups!!

Drawing, seen at the Brooklyn Art Project headquarter in Dumbo, during the Art Under the Bridge Festival organized by Dumbo Arts Center in New York city, 2009.

 

James Cospito (Brooklyn Art Project / Facebook / Flickr / LinkedIn / SML Flickr / Twitter) is an artist, painter, photographer, illustrator, designer in New York City. He is also the co-founder of Brooklyn Art Project.

 

You can check out James Cospito's portfolio at brooklynartproject.ning.com/profile/jcospito

 

See also the 720p high-def video of James Cospito talking about BAP on Flickr.

 

Brooklyn Art Project (FriendFeed / Twitter) is a free online social network that connects 5500+ artists, collectors, and art enthusiasts from over 44 countries featuring over 44,000 artworks and 800+ short films and videos.

 

Members can participate in collaborative exhibits in Brooklyn and beyond while enjoying unlimited online gallery space, blogs, forums, chat, and tools to share / promote their artwork across the web.

 

BrooklynArtProject.com

  

See also

+ Artits on Art: James Cospito talks about his NYC Subway series (Flickr HD video)

+ Art + Artists: James Cospito talks about Brooklyn Art Project (Flickr HD video)

  

13th annual D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the Bridge Festival® (Sept 25 to Sept 27, 2009)

www.dumboartfestival.org/press_release.html

 

The three-day multi-site neighborhood-wide event is a one-of-a-kind art happening: where serendipity meets the haphazard and where the unpredictable, spontaneous and downright weird thrive. The now teenage D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the Bridge Festival® presents touchable, accessible, and interactive art, on a scale that makes it the nation's largest urban forum for experimental art.

 

Art Under the Bridge is an opportunity for young artists to use any medium imaginable to create temporary projects on-the-spot everywhere and anywhere, completely transforming the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, New York, into a vibrant platform for self-expression. In addition to the 80+ projects throughout the historical post-industrial waterfront span, visitors can tour local artists' studios or check out the indoor video_dumbo, a non-stop program of cutting-edge video art from New York City and around the world.

 

The Dumbo Arts Center (DAC) has been the exclusive producer of the D.U.M.B.O Art Under the Bridge Festival® since 1997. DAC is a big impact, small non-profit, that in addition to its year-round gallery exhibitions, is committed to preserving Dumbo as a site in New York City where emerging visual artists can experiment in the public domain, while having unprecedented freedom and access to normally off-limit locations.

 

www.dumboartscenter.org

www.dumboartfestival.org

www.video_dumbo.org

  

Related SML

+ SML Fine Art (Flickr Group)

+ SML Flickr Collections: Events

+ SML Flickr Sets: Dumbo Arts Center: Art Under the Bridge Festival 2009

+ SML Flickr Tags: Art

+ SML Pro Blog: Art

Picture of KoRn basist performing Live. Tour guitarist in the background staying out of the lights..

  

Advertise yourself - Using the internet to document your career

  

After investing your time and money into getting pictures and moving your career forward, it would make no sense in an internet age to not show your work online. Social networking sights have a lot of benefits, but you must add something else for people to see. Just having your own website in general can make people take you seriously. Depending on what you want to spend, you can open a site for fractions less than your gear investment, and perhaps even for free! Do your research on websites, hosting, and design, and go with it. Sites like Smugmug ( www.taylormahaffey.com )let you design your own site with your own host name for pennies a day, and will make people realize that your serious about what you do. As the years go on and you grow as a photographer, let your website grow and change things up. Get a better host, or even hire a website expert to do it for you. Browse photography sites on the internet and get some ideas. Just remember to make it your own and dont steal ideas from people. Remember, other photographers are your freinds!

 

Social Network sites are a great way to get your pictures out there for free. Among them the heavy hitters like Flickr, Myspace, Facebook, and Twitter will allow more people to see your info, and let you add pictures and links to your website. The more your link to your site on these pages, the higher your personal website will rank on search engines like Google, Yahoo, and Bing. Just remember to take the pros advice and try to answer emails, requests, and questions from all your fans. Trust me they appreciate it! When they become famous Concert Photographers, they will return the favor.

___________________________________________

Taylor Mahaffey is available for national and international events, tour photography, portraits, show, venue reviews, venue photography and other assignments.

 

Previous taken photos are available for full resolution, or web sized, non watermarked downloads at www.taylormahaffey.com. To check Taylor's availability and to request a proposal, please get in touch:

 

WEBSITE- www.TaylorMahaffey.com

TWITTER- twitter.com/BandPhotography

 

Sun May 29th 2016 - All images appearing on this site or any online social network are the exclusive property of Tyrone Mitchell of Tyrone islington Photography© 2016 All Rights Reserved

September 27, 270/365 (1366/1461)- When I opened up Flckr this morning I had a message that one of my favorite faithful contacts, Cat Johnson, had passed away after a long hard battle with cancer. I never actually met Cat, she lives in England and I don't, but I met her through the "Bench Monday" group, she always had the best shots. She usually had her sweet little son in the shots, who now will be raised without a mother. All we can really do as an online social network is offer prayers . . .

 

Cat, I never met you in this world but I promise to do a Bench Monday shot with you in the next!

 

The term "selfie" was discussed by photographer Jim Krause in 2005, although photos in the selfie genre predate the widespread use of the term. In the early 2000s, before Facebook became the dominant online social network, self-taken photographs were particularly common on MySpace. However, writer Kate Losse recounts that between 2006 and 2009 (when Facebook became more popular than MySpace), the "MySpace pic" (typically "an amateurish, flash-blinded self-portrait, often taken in front of a bathroom mirror") became an indication of bad taste for users of the newer Facebook social network. Early Facebook portraits, in contrast, were usually well-focused and more formal, taken by others from distance. In 2009 in the image hosting and video hosting website Flickr, Flickr users used 'selfies' to describe seemingly endless self-portraits posted by teenage girls. According to Losse, improvements in design—especially the front-facing camera copied by the iPhone 4 (2010) from Korean and Japanese mobile phones, mobile photo apps such as Instagram, and selfie sites such as ItisMee—led to the resurgence of selfies in the early 2010s.

 

Self-portrait of a female Celebes crested macaque (Macaca nigra) in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, who had picked up a photographer's camera and photographed herself with it

Initially popular with young people, selfies gained wider popularity over time. By the end of 2012, Time magazine considered selfie one of the "top 10 buzzwords" of that year; although selfies had existed long before, it was in 2012 that the term "really hit the big time". According to a 2013 survey, two-thirds of Australian women age 18–35 take selfies—the most common purpose for which is posting on Facebook. A poll commissioned by smartphone and camera maker Samsung found that selfies make up 30% of the photos taken by people aged 18–24.

By 2013, the word "selfie" had become commonplace enough to be monitored for inclusion in the online version of the Oxford English Dictionary. In November 2013, the word "selfie" was announced as being the "word of the year" by the Oxford English Dictionary, which gave the word itself an Australian origin.

Selfies have also taken beyond the earth. A space selfie is a selfie that is taken in space. This include selfies taken by astronauts, machines and by an indirect method to have self-portrait photograph on earth retaken in space.

In January 2014, during the Sochi Winter Olympics, a "Selfie Olympics" meme was popular on Twitter, where users took self-portraits in unusual situations. The spread of the meme took place with the usage of the hashtags, #selfiegame, and #selfieolympics.

On March 2, 2014, Ellen DeGeneres tweeted a group selfie while hosting the 86th Academy Awards ceremony. The selfie included Hollywood celebrities Jared Leto, Jennifer Lawrence, Channing Tatum, Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Kevin Spacey, Brad Pitt, Lupita and Peter Nyong'o, and Angelina Jolie and set a record as the most retweeted photo in the history of the service, with more than 3 million retweets and momentarily shut down twitter.

Digital painting, seen at the Brooklyn Art Project HQ during the Dumbo Art Festival 2009.

 

Brooklyn Art Project (Flickr Group / FriendFeed / Twitter) is a free online social network that connects 5500+ artists, collectors, and art enthusiasts from over 44 countries featuring over 44,000 artworks and 800+ short films and videos.

 

Members can participate in collaborative exhibits in Brooklyn and beyond while enjoying unlimited online gallery space, blogs, forums, chat, and tools to share / promote their artwork across the web.

 

BrooklynArtProject.com

 

See also

+ Art + Artists: James Cospito (co-founder) talks about Brooklyn Art Project (Flickr HD video)

  

13th annual D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the Bridge Festival® (Sept 25 to Sept 27, 2009)

www.dumboartfestival.org/press_release.html

 

The three-day multi-site neighborhood-wide event is a one-of-a-kind art happening: where serendipity meets the haphazard and where the unpredictable, spontaneous and downright weird thrive. The now teenage D.U.M.B.O. Art Under the Bridge Festival® presents touchable, accessible, and interactive art, on a scale that makes it the nation's largest urban forum for experimental art.

 

Art Under the Bridge is an opportunity for young artists to use any medium imaginable to create temporary projects on-the-spot everywhere and anywhere, completely transforming the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, New York, into a vibrant platform for self-expression. In addition to the 80+ projects throughout the historical post-industrial waterfront span, visitors can tour local artists' studios or check out the indoor video_dumbo, a non-stop program of cutting-edge video art from New York City and around the world.

 

The Dumbo Arts Center (DAC) has been the exclusive producer of the D.U.M.B.O Art Under the Bridge Festival® since 1997. DAC is a big impact, small non-profit, that in addition to its year-round gallery exhibitions, is committed to preserving Dumbo as a site in New York City where emerging visual artists can experiment in the public domain, while having unprecedented freedom and access to normally off-limit locations.

 

www.dumboartscenter.org

www.dumboartfestival.org

www.video_dumbo.org

  

Related SML

+ SML Fine Art (Flickr Group)

+ SML Flickr Collections: Events

+ SML Flickr Sets: Dumbo Arts Center: Art Under the Bridge Festival 2009

+ SML Flickr Tags: Art

+ SML Pro Blog: Art

Quick 'n dirty visualization of the clusters of relationships among my facebook friends.

 

Data generated with Bernie Hogan's My Online Social Network app on facebook, and visualized with GUESS. Good stuff, Bernie!

 

Thanks to Marc Smith -- he's one of the nodes up there -- for the link to this image over at Connected Action.

 

Brayden King and Kieran Healy (they're up there in my visualization, too) have posted their own plots over at orgtheory: one, two.

Many of us know the story of how Marty McFly (Played by Michael J. Fox) ends up traveling to the (at the time) future – October 21, 2015. For those who do not know this story, I will ask just one thing: Why? Well, if you’ve come here for a rundown on the movie, you will be sad and perhaps a bit frustrated to find that this will not answer your burning questions, so you might as well watch this great film! This film, known as “Back to the Future” became one of the cult classic films of its time, pulling in over $300 million worldwide, and quickly becoming the highest-grossing film of 1985. Of course, when you make a film about time traveling in a modified DeLorean, this is bound to happen. The thing is, I could go on and on just talking about this amazing film – but that’s not why I’m writing this post. I’m writing this particular piece so we can dive back into a statement I had made in my first book, “Empty Spaces.” We will get to that in just a moment.

 

Back to the Future was released on July 3, 1985 making some very interesting predictions about our future – a future we have now officially made it to – however, things did not end up as hoped for. Marty McFly - through a big cluster of nonsense – ends up meeting an eccentric scientist by the name of Dr. Emmett “Doc” Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd.) The two end up meeting at a shopping mall; another occurrence largely unheard of in today’s society. To shorten this long and complicated list of events, I will say that Marty must find a way to return to 1985, after having returned to 1955 and becoming his own mother’s romantic interest. On a third venture through time, once this has all been settled for the better, and the timeline has been…somewhat fixed, Marty and Doc Brown travel to today’s date – October 21, 2015.

As I had stated earlier, this film had made a plethora of predictions about our “future,” and now that we are living that aforementioned future, we see that fantasy has not fully become reality. Our vision of the future was a bright one, where technology only helped, without damaging our society. Things were supposed to be great and we were supposed to have self-lacing tennis shoes! Sadly, we are greeted with a grey, cracking skyline and empty, dusty spaces – so much of our history being forgotten. In this future, we don’t have self-drying jackets and smooth riding hover boards. We don’t have regularly moving traffic with the zooming speed of hover cars. We do however have people arguing over who traveled back in time and changed how the “Berenstein Bears” was originally spelled; I believe it to be with an “E” and I won’t change. Computers in our pockets, more roads and more buildings…we have also become more wasteful of technology, a bit consumed by it all and furthermore, wasteful of our society.

 

An Alternate Perception:

 

Images of blighted, broken industry, through the decay and destruction of nearly post-apocalyptic scenes have become a much greater intriguing subject for the people of our world in current time, it seems. Flashback to the 1960s or even the 70s when life was a bit more carefree, lacking technology and the constant grinding chatter of an online social networking presence. The general outlook on our future world was a wondrous one, filled with smoothly operating hover cars, tall chrome and glass buildings, complete with an incredibly perfect networking community nearly free of depression, or half of the issues we are facing today.

 

Fast-forward 30+ years later, and here we are stuck in a madhouse.

 

The average outlook on our future world has become one of a gray, crumbling city skyline. Our industry has fallen, the community is very loosely knit, and we left behind many structures we once found wonderful. Prices are up, jobs are down, and sometimes it feels like you can’t do anything without having your life synced to a gmail account. Perhaps we must disconnect for just a day?

 

All of the technology we had dreamt of having in the 60s, 70s, and in today’s case the 80s has come partly to creation in reality, but at the same time it has broken us down as a community, causing just as many problems as it has created innovations. With new technology constantly building, many of these places around us are being forgotten, tossed aside as trash and left to rot under the elements. Fields of trees and open areas full of nothing but nature are being dug up, torn up, torn down, ripped to dirt for brand new shops, car dealerships, etc. while the old ones are left behind.

 

Enjoy this day as they would have back then. If you’re in Ohio, the weather will be wonderful. We should all get out and have an adventure today! Let’s do something positive and bring some more positivity into this future. We have made it this far, so let’s not let it all fall apart so easily!

  

Listen, Flickr. I love you. I do. You're good people. But here's the deal: you have too many Happy XXXX Photo Days going on.

 

I got on board HBW, Happy Bokeh Wednesday. I did. I like it. I'm on board. You had me at "hello."

 

But now, it's getting crazy.

 

I've seen something about green Thursdays? I've seen feathery Fridays, fly-Fridays, flowery Fridays.

 

At first I thought, I just don't have the time for this. I'm out there taking snaps of whatever subjects I can find that don't suck. I can't make sure that every week I take a picture of a flower (I'm lying) or something green (I'm probably lying again).

 

But then I figured, hey, this isn't just a photo sharing site. It's a community. An online social network.

 

So, seeing that Friday was clearly up for grabs as to its designation, I'm throwing my own idea into the ring. Let's see how it does.

 

HSIPF!

 

Holy S**t It's Penguins, Friday!.

 

Huh? How about it, Flickr? Could this be the crazy new craze that's crazily sweeping the nation? Please? Pretty please? Pretty please with penguin poop on top?

Hello one and all! I hope everyone is keeping well - and wish a belated Happy New Year to everyone!

 

As you can see, I'm just catching up with finishing off last year's 100x project, which, for me, was Flora on Black! This is the mosaic of the final 100 images I chose for the project!

 

I couldn't resist coming up with some statistics for the project, and I thought I'd share them with you!

 

I grew 34 of the flowers myself, and my dad grew 55 of them - the remaining 11 were shop bought!

 

There are 22 white blooms, 24 red/pink blooms, 21 yellow blooms, 21 blue blooms, 10 orange blooms, and 2 images with no blooms at all!

 

The most photographed type of flower was the lily, with 7 different examples! There were 4 roses, 3 tulips, 3 chrysanthemums, 3 daffodils, 3 pansies, 3 poppies, 2 geraniums, 2 coreopsis, 2 iris and 2 forest flame images! There were also 66 other different types of flora pictured!

 

In total, there were 77 different types of floral specimens used for the project!

 

Now, what's interesting is that 17 of these were shrubs, 2 were houseplants, 73 were flowers, 1 was a vegetable and 7 were (traditionally known as) weeds - although I'd argue whether they were weeds or flowers!

 

I took a total of 313 images, from which I selected the 100 for the project!

 

I picked a lot of flowers!

 

I learned that hardly any flowers grow in the winter!!

 

I shot lots of flowers between June and October!

 

I learned a lot about shooting floral images with up to three flashguns against a black background!

 

I learned that a black background doesn't look black when you point a flashgun at it!!

 

I learned that however perfect a specimen you think you've picked, it won't be perfect!

 

I learned that water, bright light and green leaves don't mix!

 

I learned that bugs get everywhere, and will photobomb you at every opportunity!

 

I learned that you can't shoot a flower without also shooting a spider web between October and November!

 

I learned that yellow is probably the hardest colour to shoot with flash!

 

I learned that I love shooting floral images against a black background - as long as they're not yellow!

 

My favourite images are number 33, 61, 78 and 85!

 

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I've joined a couple of groups, but don't seem to have set myself a goal of doing a project this year! I've been so busy that I haven't been able to keep up with everyone!

 

I'm still enjoying my photography, and shoot at least once a week, but with current work commitments, I've had to almost completely stop participating in online social networks, which is a shame, because I really miss being part of this group - especially so since they seem to have upgraded flickr so that it appears to be usable again! :)

 

I hope I'll see you around some time soon!

 

Bye for now, and happy shooting...

 

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~ ipernity ~ Google+ ~ Website ~ Blog ~ Getty ~

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