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You know what's great about a 1.4? The shallow dof makes the mess on your counter look almost artistic!

no knead bread!

 

Mehl, Wasser, etwas Salz und nur 1g Hefe.

18 Stunden geht der Teig, einmal falten, nochmal 2 1/4 Stunden gehen lassen und anschließend in einem Bräter, oder wie bei mir im Wok, 45 min.im Backofen backen.

1 Stunde auskühlen lassen und nach 22 Stunden aufessen;)

  

oh yes i did

June 4 2017

ローズマリー入り捏ねないパン

Joined the cult. This is my first attempt at no-knead bread, yes, the famous recipe from the New York Times. In case you haven't tried it, well, what's the weather like ON MARS? ha ha ha. Seriously though, it's everything they say it is. Easy, fun, tasty, chewy, good crumb and texture.

 

I used all white flour, and eschewed sensible timing-- I mixed up the dough in the morning before work, thus ensuring that it would have a 24-hour rise (instead of 12-18). The next morning we had an appointment so I folded it and let the second 2-hour rise stretch out to more like 4 hours. Then when we got home I baked it in our wonderful terracotta daubiere, which seems to be a perfect vessel for this technique.

 

I think next time I will try it with about half wheat flour... I want to add cheese and pepper but that may be too much variation too soon. Also perhaps a spritz of water before baking, and a bit more time uncovered to tighten the crust a bit. What fun!

 

~patrick

February 10 2017

I opened up my own Boulangerie in Paris (just kidding). I've been trying the no-knead bread recipe for a few weeks now and today I had great success with this boule bread - came out nice and fluffy on the inside with a nice light crust on the outside. This recipe (thanks to Jim Lahey from Sullivan Street Bakery) was made famous by a New York Times article written by Mark Bittman. www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html

Here's the youtube video of Jim Lahey and Mark Bittman: www.youtube.com/watch?v=13Ah9ES2yTU

 

Making your own no knead bread is economical, easy, and fun! It costs about $0.60 or less to make this loaf versus paying almost $4 for a bread like this at the supermarket or bakery.

 

Hajar, and my fellow foodies, you must try this at home! Chances are you probably are much better at baking bread than I am!

Added to Explore April 14

June 4 2017

ローズマリー入り捏ねないパン

No-Knead Crusty White Bread: by King Arthur Flour - 2016 Recipe of the Year - VIDEO

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FGeNl2JHSI

 

No-Knead Crusty White Bread RECIPE by King Arthur Flour

www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/no-knead-crusty-white-bre...

 

NO-KNEAD BREAD: THE CRUNCHIEST-CRACKLIEST-CHEWIEST-LIGHTEST-EASIEST BREAD YOU'LL EVER BAKE. By P J Hamel at King Arthur Flour – PHOTO TUTORIAL

www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2009/12/01/the-crunchiest-cr...

 

it took 30 minutes covered, 12 minutes uncovered. she was already brown after the first 30 minutes! i love my red pot. :)

 

(i jumped on the bandwagon and decided to make the amazingly easy no knead bread that has been all over the internet lately. well, it really is so easy a 6 year old could make it. i will make it again and again and again. the only difficult part is waiting nearly 20 hours to eat it! best to start a batch right before you go to bed and then cook it with your dinner.)

 

No-Knead Bread

Jim Lahey at the Sullivan Street Bakery via Mark Bittman at New York Times

 

Yields one 1 1/2 pound loaf

 

3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting

¼ teaspoon instant yeast

1¼ teaspoons salt

Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.

 

1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.

 

2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.

 

3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.

 

4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.)

 

yum!!!!!

 

Mark Bittman's wonderful no-knead bread from the New York Times. Incredibly easy to make, and delicious. Like artisan bread from a good bakery.

 

Article with video.

 

The New York Times No-Knead Bread

 

Adapted from Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery

Time: About 1½ hours plus 14 to 20 hours’ rising

 

3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting

¼ teaspoon instant yeast

1¼ teaspoons salt

Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.

 

1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees F.

 

2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.

 

3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.

 

4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees F. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.

Fig & Quince | Twitter

 

A new Fig & Quince post mixing up yoga, mantras, & in-laws with I NEED no-knead bread | The Story!

No-Knead Crusty White Bread: by King Arthur Flour - 2016 Recipe of the Year - VIDEO

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FGeNl2JHSI

 

No-Knead Crusty White Bread RECIPE by King Arthur Flour

www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/no-knead-crusty-white-bre...

 

NO-KNEAD BREAD: THE CRUNCHIEST-CRACKLIEST-CHEWIEST-LIGHTEST-EASIEST BREAD YOU'LL EVER BAKE. By P J Hamel at King Arthur Flour – PHOTO TUTORIAL

www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2009/12/01/the-crunchiest-cr...

 

no-knead bread.

The result turned out pretty good.

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