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No Knead Homemade Bread. The less work, the better! Looking forward to slicing into this bread this evening.

homemade apricot and plum jam and apple butter with fresh baked and toasted bread.

*recipe here*

 

Nice and soft and love that sprinkling of salt on top. I doubled it and sent one up to the neighbors. I love making 2 small loaves in cast iron skillets.

 

It and copious amounts of coffee are treating me right this morning, which is good, because Pippa got up at 5.

 

...bread i 've ever made !

yes i ate half a slice & it is the biggest torture ever (i'm gluten-free if you don't know) because it is really delicious.

 

link to the recipe on my blog a little later...

 

lightbox

a breakfast pizza made with DIY ricotta + Jim's no-knead pizza dough

Soft and Hard Pretzels with Murray River Salt and Black Sea Salt

it took 30 minutes covered, 12 minutes uncovered. she was already brown after the first 30 minutes! i love my red pot. :)

 

(i jumped on the bandwagon and decided to make the amazingly easy no knead bread that has been all over the internet lately. well, it really is so easy a 6 year old could make it. i will make it again and again and again. the only difficult part is waiting nearly 20 hours to eat it! best to start a batch right before you go to bed and then cook it with your dinner.)

 

No-Knead Bread

Jim Lahey at the Sullivan Street Bakery via Mark Bittman at New York Times

 

Yields one 1 1/2 pound loaf

 

3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting

¼ teaspoon instant yeast

1¼ teaspoons salt

Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.

 

1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.

 

2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.

 

3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.

 

4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.)

 

yum!!!!!

 

The best so far…

 

Up until now, I hadn't been having much luck with the starter; not that it didn't work but that even after five days of feeding it the yeast didn't look that active. The loaves that used it looked more like "biscotti" because of the lack-luster rise.

 

This time I decided to add a bit of orange juice (from out backyard tree). The starter responded by rising so much that it over-flowed its container.

Home baked artisan boule with poppy seeds. Very delicate flavor with a nutty aftertaste. Taken immediately after coming out of the oven.

 

ODC: Sinful

That is just the most gorgeous bread, so beautiful to look at and it is also super tasty with fabulous texture:

 

suziethefoodie.blogspot.ca/2011/01/annas-rustic-no-knead-...

Since learning the no-knead recipe, we've been having fresh baked homemade bread every morning. This baguette didn't last too long after this photo was taken.

 

Our Daily Challenge: Too much of a good thing

 

"How can you tell how good bread is without tasting it? Not the smell, not the look, but the sound of the crust. Listen. [bread crackles] Oh, the symphony of crackle. Only great bread sounds this way."

 

-Colette

from The Movie "Ratatouille"

www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk6j7lhNf1o

With tomato, avocado, grilled pepper and onions. Served with a big massive salad. Yum.

homemade apricot and plum jam and apple butter with fresh baked and toasted bread.

Mark Bittman's wonderful no-knead bread from the New York Times. Incredibly easy to make, and delicious. Like artisan bread from a good bakery.

 

Article with video.

 

The New York Times No-Knead Bread

 

Adapted from Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery

Time: About 1½ hours plus 14 to 20 hours’ rising

 

3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting

¼ teaspoon instant yeast

1¼ teaspoons salt

Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.

 

1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees F.

 

2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.

 

3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.

 

4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees F. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.

no-knead bread.

The result turned out pretty good.

This deep orange loaf is made with a base of no-knead sweet potato bread with swirls of vanilla sweet potato caramel to enhance the sweet potato flavour for that one-two punch. The vanilla perfumed the entire loaf of bread to complement that roasted sweet potato flavour. The bread is very tender yet not rich like a brioche. It is perfect for a special brunch or linger over a lazy weekend breakfast.

 

Read more about it and get the recipe at Dessert By Candy.

This bread is similar to the rye pugliese I made in September. I had some leftover durum flour from the semolina bread. In comparison to the rye, durum makes the crumb somewhat chewier and of course more golden. Because of this bread's high hydration, I also used the no-knead technique again.

 

This bread is made with durum flour, unbleached flour, malt powder, yeast, water, and salt.

 

Baking Details

Preferment: Biga

Hydration: 80%

Pizza Amatriciana

 

Tomato, onion, pancetta*, red chili flake.

 

*from Hapa Ramen

i baked the other day. standard loaf, but with 1/3 durum atta flour mixed in to the all-purpose, along with a half cup of yoghurt. it's a no-knead loaf, since i'm lazy and crippled.

 

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 cup durum atta flour

1/2 cup plain yoghurt

1 cup (+ 2tbsp.) water

1/4 tsp. quick-rise yeast

1 tsp. salt

 

sift the flour, combine all ingredients (reserving the 2 tbsp. water and adding if needed). place dough ball in lightly greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap (or plastic bag held in place with a rubber band, if you're cheap like me). allow to rest in a warm spot for the best part of a full day, minimally 12-14 hours - this loaf rested from midnight until 7pm, about the same amount i sleep.

 

dump the dough ball out onto a lightly floured counter and glare at it. smack once or twice, fold over on itself a few times, then cover again for half an hour. uncover and glare some more, then encourage it to leap into a floured teatowel, seam down. dust with more flour, cover with the rest of the towel (if large enough, or use yet another towel if you like washing floury teatowels). allow to rest for a couple of hours, during which time the dough ball will grow like your anger. while it rests, preheat your oven to 450° f with a big-ass cast iron pot (with lid) inside. the pot should be heated for about 20-30 minutes, or several years if you're feeling crabby.

 

pot heated, extract from oven and remove lid. dump dough ball in, seam up. bake with lid on for 25 minutes, then remove lid for final 30 minutes. cool, eat.

 

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