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homemade apricot and plum jam and apple butter with fresh baked and toasted bread.

No Knead Homemade Bread. The less work, the better! Looking forward to slicing into this bread this evening.

...bread i 've ever made !

yes i ate half a slice & it is the biggest torture ever (i'm gluten-free if you don't know) because it is really delicious.

 

link to the recipe on my blog a little later...

 

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The crumb, the whole crumb, and nothing but the crumb.

 

And the color is how it came out of the camera--it was so cool that it didn't seem worth correcting the white balance.

it took 30 minutes covered, 12 minutes uncovered. she was already brown after the first 30 minutes! i love my red pot. :)

 

(i jumped on the bandwagon and decided to make the amazingly easy no knead bread that has been all over the internet lately. well, it really is so easy a 6 year old could make it. i will make it again and again and again. the only difficult part is waiting nearly 20 hours to eat it! best to start a batch right before you go to bed and then cook it with your dinner.)

 

No-Knead Bread

Jim Lahey at the Sullivan Street Bakery via Mark Bittman at New York Times

 

Yields one 1 1/2 pound loaf

 

3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting

¼ teaspoon instant yeast

1¼ teaspoons salt

Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.

 

1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.

 

2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.

 

3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.

 

4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.)

 

yum!!!!!

 

a breakfast pizza made with DIY ricotta + Jim's no-knead pizza dough

First bake in my new cloche, a crusty stoneground and golden linseed rustic boule. Just add butter; Delicious!

Pan co' Santi - Raisin Walnut Bread from Jim Lahey's bread book.

With tomato, avocado, grilled pepper and onions. Served with a big massive salad. Yum.

Mark Bittman's wonderful no-knead bread from the New York Times. Incredibly easy to make, and delicious. Like artisan bread from a good bakery.

 

Article with video.

 

The New York Times No-Knead Bread

 

Adapted from Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery

Time: About 1½ hours plus 14 to 20 hours’ rising

 

3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting

¼ teaspoon instant yeast

1¼ teaspoons salt

Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.

 

1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees F.

 

2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.

 

3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.

 

4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees F. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.

That is just the most gorgeous bread, so beautiful to look at and it is also super tasty with fabulous texture: www.suziethefoodie.com/annas-rustic-no-knead-artisan-bread/

no-knead bread.

The result turned out pretty good.

The best so far…

 

Up until now, I hadn't been having much luck with the starter; not that it didn't work but that even after five days of feeding it the yeast didn't look that active. The loaves that used it looked more like "biscotti" because of the lack-luster rise.

 

This time I decided to add a bit of orange juice (from out backyard tree). The starter responded by rising so much that it over-flowed its container.

homemade apricot and plum jam and apple butter with fresh baked and toasted bread.

This deep orange loaf is made with a base of no-knead sweet potato bread with swirls of vanilla sweet potato caramel to enhance the sweet potato flavour for that one-two punch. The vanilla perfumed the entire loaf of bread to complement that roasted sweet potato flavour. The bread is very tender yet not rich like a brioche. It is perfect for a special brunch or linger over a lazy weekend breakfast.

 

Read more about it and get the recipe at Dessert By Candy.

This bread is similar to the rye pugliese I made in September. I had some leftover durum flour from the semolina bread. In comparison to the rye, durum makes the crumb somewhat chewier and of course more golden. Because of this bread's high hydration, I also used the no-knead technique again.

 

This bread is made with durum flour, unbleached flour, malt powder, yeast, water, and salt.

 

Baking Details

Preferment: Biga

Hydration: 80%

On April 18 I am hosting round one of a "Come Dine With Me"-style night at my house. My starter is going to be home made chicken liver parfait with mini sourdough loaves.

 

As it's been a few years since I made mini loaves I decided to make some today as a trial run. And as they looked quite cute I thought they'd make a good subject for today's photo.

 

Blogged.

Lahey's carrot bread recipe, with carrot juice, walnuts and currants.

  

Made with Rogers bread machine flour which does not specify what % of wholewheat.

 

Note the significance of having the seam on top

Pizza Amatriciana

 

Tomato, onion, pancetta*, red chili flake.

 

*from Hapa Ramen

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