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Red is any of a number of similar colors evoked by light consisting predominantly of the longest wavelengths of light discernible by the human eye, in the wavelength range of roughly 630–740 nm.

 

Red is used as a symbol of emotions. Emotions are associated with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, and motivation.

 

What is the importance of emotions in architecture?

 

At the beginning of this century neuromarketing started to be used as part of the development of a new science using magnetic resonance to define what motivates consumers in their decision making. Such studies have had many revealing results but one in particular has generated a new way of understanding architecture. The way that the brain codifies the majority of the information that it receives is by translating it into emotions, like this it gives a value to things, good brands are connected emotionally with their users through experiences and the great majority of the experiences take place in built spaces. In order for architecture to be transcendent it will have to be defined as starting with the search for emotions that will enable it to connect with its users.

 

In the case of the BSSR-House - Ambassador of Abstract Art in the Maastricht Region - the fundamentally functional aspects were worked on at the same time as working on the emotional definition of the space, the great majority of the persons that use these spaces take advantage of them to live and work. The emotional solutions would have to be very functional as well being able to give a solution to all the users’ different needs and work habits. That is how the BSSR-Building is made up with private space, informal meeting rooms, Wi-Fi and support areas.

 

In general the BSSR-House is a taster of what many other building spaces will be like in the not so distant future, spaces that will represent properly the expectations of their owners and that will be sufficiently flexible to practically support any way of living, working and meeting.

 

Ground area BSSR-House 250 mq

Entrance hall - 'van Wijk' sliding doors, cloakroom and concrete stairs, Alessi (guests) toiltet - with floorstanding toilet sink, living room - furnitured with 'van Wijk' wall-filling bookshelves, sociable kitchen - with the work island in the middle of the room as the beating heart, scullery, portal, master bedroom, Alessi ensuite bathroom - walk in shower and double washbasin and separate a two car garage (50 mq).

 

First floor area BSSR-House 200 mq

Corridor, Alessi toilet with floorstanding toilet sink, Alessi bathroom - free-standing bathtub and double washbasin, Alessi bathroom - walk in shower and double washbasin, four double bedrooms and Apple office space furnitured with 'van Wijk' wall-filling bookshelves.

 

Link slideshow BSSR  House

www.flickr.com/photos/55176801@N02/sets/72157625373026635/

  

A BCI provides a direct link between the brain and an external device. 20 years ago, BCIs could only spell or move computer cursors. Today, BCIs are being used in many different fields of neuroscience, such as motor rehabilitation for stroke patients, assessment of and communication with coma patients, control of devices for disabled people, cognitive training or neuromarketing. Machine learning, dry electrodes, wireless electrode caps, and other technologies are making BCIs more powerful and practical for a growing number of users. The BR41N.IO Brain-Computer Interface Designers Hackathon Series has been created to show these current and future developments, and the unlimited possibilities of BCIs in creative or scientific fields, and brings together engineers, programmers, designers and artists.

 

Credit: vog.photo

Artist: Fabian Monge

Design: Ferdy Eguez

La Universidad de Valladolid, en colaboración con el MUVa y la empresa consultora Sociograph Neuromarketing, realizan un estudio para analizar la incidencia de diferentes factores ambientales y características de la visita en la experiencia del visitante de un museo

Evidence Based MedTech Marketing Delivered by MedTech Professionals (www.medtechmomentum.com)

Evidence Based MedTech Marketing Delivered by MedTech Professionals (www.medtechmomentum.com)

One of the hardest things to achieve on internet marketing is to keep those clients that bought from us coming back again. Online and offline customers have been conditioned over the years to keep on looking for bargains and through recent Neuromarketing discoveries. Click Here: goo.gl/hM8FX3

"En psicología, el concepto de color se refiere a un estado de consciencia".

This event forms part of a series curated by the Editor of New Scientist, Roger Highfield.

 

Why do people who prefer the taste of Pepsi faithfully buy Coke? Will a movie trailer make you want to see the film? And are women subconsciously drawn to the sight of a bikini-clad model hawking beer on television?

 

Scientists and ad executives hope to unravel advertising mysteries like these with neuromarketing - a novel spin on market research, which shuns customer surveys and focus groups in favour of technologies that peer directly into consumers' brains in an attempt to find out what they really want.

 

At this event one of the leading figures in the field, Dr A K Pradeep of Neurofocus, will provide an overview of the latest developments, Graham Lawton of New Scientist will discuss the results of a remarkable neuromarketing experiment carried out to improve sales of New Scientist magazine, and Mike Page of the University of Hertfordshire will join them to discuss the results and weigh up the implications.

 

Perhaps you are sceptical, like Mike. Perhaps you think that no-one has the right to read your mind. But neuromarketing, once dismissed as a fad, is fast becoming part and parcel of our modern consumer society.

 

www.rigb.org/contentControl?action=displayEvent&id=1169

Dirección de arte: David Rodríguez.

Tambien puedes seguirnos en facebook o twitter:

  

(www.facebook.com/pages/MyiPop/286505184719488)

  

(www.twitter.com/MyiPop)

  

Please do not copy or use images without permission

Por favor no copie o use imagenes sin mi permiso

Wat koopt ons brein?

What does our brain buy?

 

Illustratie Folia magazine

Artist: Fabian Monge

Design: Ferdy Eguez

A BCI provides a direct link between the brain and an external device. 20 years ago, BCIs could only spell or move computer cursors. Today, BCIs are being used in many different fields of neuroscience, such as motor rehabilitation for stroke patients, assessment of and communication with coma patients, control of devices for disabled people, cognitive training or neuromarketing. Machine learning, dry electrodes, wireless electrode caps, and other technologies are making BCIs more powerful and practical for a growing number of users.

 

Credit: Jürgen Grünwald

El sistema de control del cerebro reacciona con más intensidad ante un objeto cuyo precio no está rebajado que ante uno que sí lo está.

LONDON, ENGLAND - APRIL 02: (L-R) Michael Smith, Director, Industry Relations, Nielsen, Carla Nagel, Neuromarketing Science & Business Association, Executive Director, Martin de Munnik, Neurensic, Founding Partners, Pranav Yadav, Neuro-Insight US, CEO speak during ÔIt's Not Brain Surgery, But It's Brain ScienceÕ in the News Room Studio B during day three of Advertising Week Europe at BAFTA 195 Piccadilly Venue on April 2, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Tristan Fewings/Getty Images For Advertising Week)

La Clase Magistral se ha cerlbrado en la Facultad de Comercio de la UVa, en la que han participado 40 alumnos de Creación de Empresas

Hernán Rivera Letelier/ Himno del Ángel parado en una pata | Cristián León / Neuromarketing

Neuroscience is undoubtedly the hottest topic in advertising research at the moment. It generates high hopes for understanding consumer behaviour from a completely new perspective. From reading the brain’s activity, can you find out what really drives choices and consumer preferences beyond what people are able and willing to tell you on a questionnaire and in focus groups? Can brain imaging even reveal hidden desires and covert mechanisms that consumer themselves are not aware of? In sum, can neuroscience give us access to what people really think and feel?

 

As I said, the hopes for neuromarketing are high and thus no wonder recent years have seen a huge boom not only in academic studies but also in commercial companies popping up all around the world offering neuro-studies to the advertising and marketing world. To get a better understanding of this rapidly evolving area DDB hosted last week the first of its Brainsurgery workshops for clients and staff titled “Neuromarketing – Neuroscience or Neurononsense?” Two renowned neuroscientists from Goldsmiths, University of London, DDB’s academic partner, attacked this question from two complementary perspectives.

 

Dr Lauren Stewart kicked off the evening with a ‘bluffer’s guide to neuroscience’, briefly explaining the general principles by which the brain works, i.e. how information is transmitted and processed in the brain and what the relevant brain structures are that you often find in colourful images on the science pages of the popular press. Dr Stewart’s own expertise is in structural (MRI) and functional brain imaging (fMRI) and she gave a brief but nevertheless very thorough account of how these state-of-the-art neuro-imaging techniques work and what they can tell us about consumers’ minds. This distinction between brain and mind was quite an interesting point she made which subsequently triggered a few questions from the audience. “The mind is what the brain does”, is the quote that I wrote down by which she was hinting at the fact that, yes, with modern neuroscience we can observe biological activity but we still need to know what this activity means in psychological terms. A red blob on an fMRI image in a particular brain area can indicate that the pleasure centre of the brain is active while seeing a TV ad. But it is no less plausible that the emotional reaction related to this red blob is actually disgust or maybe it just means the brain is ‘on’? Observing brain activity is only part of the message, the other half is finding out what this activity stands for. This is precisely why academic neuroscientists are always very careful to control their results with behavioural data, rigorous statistical analyses, and appropriate experimental control conditions – scientific practice that commercial studies need to adopt as well if they want to be credible.

 

The second talk of the evening by Prof Joydeep Bhattacharya, head of the EEG lab at Goldsmiths, then went straight into the current battlefield of neuromarketing. Prof Bhattacharya used the metaphor of ‘forced marriage’ to investigate how well modern neuroscience and marketing go together in reality. Both disciplines are interested in understanding and explaining human behaviour and both are very keen to learn about its implicit and underlying mechanisms. Quite a few recent academic studies have aimed at ‘mind reading’, that is analysing brain signals with advanced statistical and machine learning techniques to predict the future behaviour of a consumer. Admittedly, most of these studies were lab studies in a controlled environment but their results are nonetheless impressive; well, you can judge for yourself:

a)From an EEG signal it is possible to predict which of two very similar human faces a participant would like better; and this is before the participant actually makes the explicit decision. (Lindsen et al., 2010, NeuroImage)

b)Testing Coca-Cola vs. a no-name cola brand, the fMRI signal of participants in a brain scanner tells us that the brain’s reward system is involved when products are judged by their attractive packaging and that packaging seems to be more important than price and familiarity with the brand (Reiman et al., 2010, Journal of Consumer Psychology)

c)The medial orbitofrontal cortex is a structure that is associated with the willingness to pay (is the brain’s mythical button that marketers are so desperate to find?). It is the same structure that is active when we experience social reward, when we are looking at beautiful faces or when we anticipate a pleasant taste (Plassmann et al., 2007, Journal of Neuroscience).

 

No doubt, this all seems to be very relevant to marketing and advertising but Prof Bhattacharya also pointed to a few issues that made him speak of a forced marriage between neuroscience and marketing. The problems seem to start when neuroscientific results - that usually take a long time and require a lot of money - need to be produced under the financial and time pressures of the commercial world. Typically, there is very little time to test sufficient numbers of people and perform the rigorous statistical analyses that are a firm requirement for publishing in top academic journals. And then studies run in the commercial realm are hardly ever published (which, from an academic perspective, is at complete odds with the huge claims that some neuro-companies make). That means no-one can replicate those results, no peer-community can help to detect ambiguities and flaws in the experimental design or analysis, and worst of all, no-one can learn from the many commercial neuromarketing studies that are run around the globe. The danger of this practice is that neuromarketing as a discipline, unlike biomedical applications of neuroimaging techniques, doesn’t advance as much as it could, despite the huge interest and the huge sums of money that are currently invested in it. Of course, you can understand why big brands don’t want to give away the results of expensive neuromarekting studies that are intended to provide them with a market advantage over their competitors. But unless the bulk of commercial neuromarketing studies are published and made fully transparent, at least at some point in time, it is difficult to say what the potential of neuromarketing as a discipline really is; and that is not only an unfortunate situation from an academic perspective but it directly relates to how much you can trust the results of the next neuromarketing study that your own company is about to pay for.

 

A BCI provides a direct link between the brain and an external device. 20 years ago, BCIs could only spell or move computer cursors. Today, BCIs are being used in many different fields of neuroscience, such as motor rehabilitation for stroke patients, assessment of and communication with coma patients, control of devices for disabled people, cognitive training or neuromarketing. Machine learning, dry electrodes, wireless electrode caps, and other technologies are making BCIs more powerful and practical for a growing number of users. The BR41N.IO Brain-Computer Interface Designers Hackathon Series has been created to show these current and future developments, and the unlimited possibilities of BCIs in creative or scientific fields, and brings together engineers, programmers, designers and artists.

 

Credit: vog.photo

Positionierung erfolgreicher Händlermarken auf der Limbic Map von Dr. Hans-Georg Häusel.

 

Was bewegt meine Zielgruppe und wie erreiche ich sie?

 

Mit der Beantwortung dieser Frage befasst sich das Neuromarketing als interdisziplinärer Ansatz der Wirtschaftswissenschaften, der Psychologie und der Neurowissenschaften und verzeichnet seit über 8 Jahren zunehmendes öffentliches Interesse und steigende Relevanz für die Marketing Kommunikation. Mehr zum Thema Neuromarketing erfahren unter: www.arsunikum.de/marketing.htm

Artist: Fabian Monge

´´´Felinos Marketeros´´, colaboracion con julio rojas, acrilico y marcadores sobre lienzo, 115x84cms, 2012, $1000.00

¿A qué nos referimos con "neuromarketing"? Pues a navegar entre las emociones del consumidor para saber con éxito cuáles son sus deseos para poder elegir algo.

Innoesfera

Roberto Carreras

Evento de referencia sobre innovación. Evento de libre participación.

Fecha: 11-10-2011

Lugar: C/ Matilde Díez, 11 - garAJE

One of the key factors in the human brain’s ability to change via neuroplasticity is that neurons form interconnections based on simultaneous firing over a period of time. According to Norman Doidge, author of The Brain That Changes Itself, this theory was first proposed by none other than Sigmund Freud, but was articulated in more detail by Canadian psychologist Donald Hebb. Doidge attributes this neat summary to neuroscientist Carla Shatz: Neurons that fire together wire together.

This phenomenon has profound implications for many areas of brain science. Researchers have found that brain maps (the locations of the brain that correspond to individual body parts) can be altered by training. One experiment attached two fingers of a monkey together for a period of months so that they acted, in essence, as a single finger; tests showed that the previously separate brain mappings for the two fingers had indeed become one.

 

www.neurosciencemarketing.com/blog/articles/neurons-fire-...

The RAMA CMO Summit provides a unique opportunity to build and enhance relationships with senior marketing and advertising leaders from top retailers with global reach.

 

Thought-provoking sessions centered on Consumer and Retail Trends, Personalization, NeuroMarketing, Leadership Lessons, Mobile and more.

 

This year the event is held at the W Times Square in New York City.

 

Visit www.nrf.com/cmosummit for more details.

Artist: Fabian Monge

´´pattern´´, 100x70cms, acrilico sobre carton, 2012, $600.00

www.insights-qualitativos.com/2008/06/strategy-of-desire-...

 

Ernest Dichter is famous as one of the founding fathers of motivational research. In applying the social sciences to a variety of problems, Dichter emphasized new approaches to problem solving, advertising, politics, and selling, and issues of social significance such as urban renewal, productivity, and drug addiction. As an author and corporate adviser, he used psychoanalytic theory and depth interviewing to uncover unconsciously held attitudes and beliefs. He goal was to help explain why people act the way they do and how positive behavioral change might be achieved. In The Strategy of Desire, Dichter both counters the argument that motivational research amounts to manipulation, and shows how the understanding and modification of human behavior is necessary for progress.

 

Dichter's survey and analysis of behavior ranges widely. He examines everyday matters of product choice, as well as such broad civic issues as voter participation, religious toleration, and racial understanding. He shows thatin order to achieve socially constructive goals, it is necessary to move beyond theological exhortation, which takes an unrealistic view of human morality, as well as beyond the limits of empirically oriented social science research, which only deals in appearances. Dichter sees human action as rooted in irrational and often unconscious motivation, which can usually be uncovered if the correct approach is used. In his consumer research, he analyzes the nonutilitarian importance of objects in everyday life, as well as how products and materials become bound with emotional resonance or acquire different meanings from different contexts or points of view. Dichter shows that success depends on thesatisfaction of desires and a movement beyond the ethic of work and saving.

  

This is the centerpiece of MR, Dichter's method of discovering the motivations behind consumer behavior. A protege of Stekel, and therefore an indirect descendent of Freud, Dichter was another Austrian emigre who polished American consumerism with continental sophistication in the years following WWII.

 

"The Strategy of Desire" explores the anatomy and etiology of motivation as a whole, with interesting sub-studies on specific commercial issues. With the revival of MR under the guise of deep qual and "neuromarketing" and the meteoric careers of Rapaille and Zaltman, it is astonishing that so much of what Dichter explored as early as the late-1930s has come back into vogue.

 

That said, there is a good deal here that renders large chunks of his argument locked in the 1950s of Ike's baggily pleated golf trousers and soaring silliness of sweeping tailfins. Speaking of tailfins, don't deny yourself the pleasure of reading Dichter's 1939 Plymouth study; it appears as an appendix. There may be portions of the picture that have been brought into closer focus, but it was he who painted the landscape.

 

My professional interest in this material -- as principal and founder of Applied Iconology, Inc. -- lies in how one uses knowledge of emotional drivers to effect more pwerful brand, package and advertising design. Dichter was one of the very first to suggest the lineaments of a neuroscientifically-inspired design imagery. Depsite the enormous strides in research technologies and methodologies in the last decade alone, Ernest Dichter still has a good deal to teach us about a commonsensical approach to crafting meaningful, emotionally resonant messages for consumers!

8 de julio de 2016.

El tema del X Congreso CREAN fue Tendencias Innovadoras para Liderar Negocios. Como todos los años anteriores, el congreso fue organizado por estudiantes de la carrera de Administración de Agronegocios.

Cool website and blog! check it out!

A BCI provides a direct link between the brain and an external device. 20 years ago, BCIs could only spell or move computer cursors. Today, BCIs are being used in many different fields of neuroscience, such as motor rehabilitation for stroke patients, assessment of and communication with coma patients, control of devices for disabled people, cognitive training or neuromarketing. Machine learning, dry electrodes, wireless electrode caps, and other technologies are making BCIs more powerful and practical for a growing number of users. The BR41N.IO Brain-Computer Interface Designers Hackathon Series has been created to show these current and future developments, and the unlimited possibilities of BCIs in creative or scientific fields, and brings together engineers, programmers, designers and artists.

 

Credit: vog.photo

Innoesfera

Roberto Carreras

Evento de referencia sobre innovación. Evento de libre participación.

Fecha: 11-10-2011

Lugar: C/ Matilde Díez, 11 - garAJE

Artist: Fabian Monge

´´ikaro y 4 moscaas´´, 100x70cms, acrilico sobre carton, 2012, $600.00

Habla el neuroprofesor Dr. Joachim Bauer. Tema: por que yo siento lo que tu sientes. Las neuronas espejo. En vivo desde Munich BME World.

Artist: Fabian Monge

´´simetria y palindrome´´, 56x93cms, acrilico sobre lienzo,$800.00

Que tiene narices que hagan estas cosicas, la publi dice "oferta pack de tres zumos" oh wow!, si, una mier.... vale lo mismo si lo compras suelto!

 

Hay vídeos bastante curiosetes sobre estos temas...

Este mola sobre el minuto 13, que hacen pruebas con compradores y es para flipar! la señora y el niño, que se piensan que han comprado superbien, y juas!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnGb-VmhiJc

En el minuto 33 mas o menos se sobran haciendo vídeo de la prueba con tomógrafo y los estímulos cerebrales a unas determinadas imágenes, aunque bueno, a mi me mola ver que hacen pero, yssss que miedito, donde puede llegar esto... si no me equivoco el señor Nielsen ya tiene una empresa con estos servicios desde hace algún tiempo

 

Aquí hay otro vídeo (eye-tracking en supermercado)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5-xN4Wte8E

 

Artist: Fabian Monge

´´la poderosa muerte´´, 160x64cms, acrilico sobre lienzo, 2012, $1500.00

Hans-Georg Häusel, pionero del neuromarketing, durante el encuentro anual de EAPC (European Association of Political Consultants) en Viena, mayo de 2010.

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