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Urbex Benelux -

 

Urban planning is a technical and political process concerned with the development and design of land use and the built environment, including air, water, and the infrastructure passing into and out of urban areas, such as transportation, communications, and distribution networks Urban planning deals with physical layout of human settlements. The primary concern is the public welfare, which includes considerations of efficiency, sanitation, protection and use of the environment, as well as effects on social and economic activities. Urban planning is considered an interdisciplinary field that includes social, engineering and design sciences.

Food Network Urban Legends Cake

HONEVO STUDIO - MUSEUM MONSTERA ROOT NETWORK

Urban Biodiversity Madrid

Honevo Photography

honevo.com/

Urbex Benelux -

 

Urban planning is a technical and political process concerned with the development and design of land use and the built environment, including air, water, and the infrastructure passing into and out of urban areas, such as transportation, communications, and distribution networks. Urban planning deals with physical layout of human settlements. The primary concern is the public welfare, which includes considerations of efficiency, sanitation, protection and use of the environment, as well as effects on social and economic activities. Urban planning is considered an interdisciplinary field that includes social, engineering and design sciences. It is closely related to the field of urban design and some urban planners provide designs for streets, parks, buildings and other urban areas. Urban planning is also referred to as urban and regional planning, regional planning, town planning, city planning, rural planning, urban development or some combination in various areas worldwide.

If you like these notes, also have a look at my book on lulu.com which collects most ofl my notes from 2009 and 2010.

 

See the book's website: www.evalotta.net/sketchnotes/

 

Buy the book on lulu.com:

www.lulu.com/product/paperback/sketchnotes-2009-2010/1468...

If you like these notes, also have a look at my book on lulu.com which collects most ofl my notes from 2009 and 2010.

 

See the book's website: www.evalotta.net/sketchnotes/

 

Buy the book on lulu.com:

www.lulu.com/product/paperback/sketchnotes-2009-2010/1468...

If you like these notes, also have a look at my book on lulu.com which collects most ofl my notes from 2009 and 2010.

 

See the book's website: www.evalotta.net/sketchnotes/

 

Buy the book on lulu.com:

www.lulu.com/product/paperback/sketchnotes-2009-2010/1468...

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

Frame from an animation that computes what parts of the circulation network can be reached in less than 150 meters' walk from every node in the network (vertical extrusion visualizes distance to each segment (z-scale =.5)). Comparative metrics are saved to an external file to be compiled in a synthetic analysis. This image shows the division that is caused by the canal.

The underlying geography comes from Xiaozhoucun on Haizhu island in Guangzhou.

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

Murai Urban Training Facility to Hone the SAF's Networked Urban Operations Capability.

 

Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean launched the Murai Urban Training Facility (MUTF) and witnessed about 500 soldiers securing an objective in an urban operations exercise this afternoon. The exercise involved seven-man tactical sections which were equipped with the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS).

 

The introduction of the ACMS is part of the 3rd Generation SAF's move to progressively provide tactical units with network capabilities. With the section commanders and team leaders equipped with the ACMS, the entire section becomes part of a larger network that is able to tap on the wider resources of the battalion and call for more responsive and precise fire support. These sections function not only as fighting units but also as ground sensors, tracking the positions of friendly and hostile forces and feeding images back to the command headquarters for enhanced command and control of the battlefield. With the ACMS, the section's situational awareness, lethality and survivability are enhanced.

 

Located within the existing Lim Chu Kang training area, the MUTF allows the SAF to conduct urban operations training in a realistic environment. It is built to resemble a typical town and offers a range of training scenarios from tactical engagements to combined arms manoeuvres, Other than buildings, the MUTF also has ancillary features like bus stops, traffic lights and overhead bridges. The facility will be equipped with tools that help simulate varying operational environments as well as a video monitoring and recording system to facilitate effective learning.

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

The City of Montreal started a bicycle infrastructure program. They immediately created the two inseparable twin components of the necessary infrastructure: rentable bikes and urban bike paths.

Following the Danish example and listening to the results of numerous preference surveys they gave bicycles their own road lanes. In the new urban condition bikes, just as cars and pedestrians need their own space: Highways for cars, express lanes for buses, sub-ways for trains, sidewalks for pedestrians and bike-lanes for bikes. Each mode has its own design requirements for speed and safety.

(photos by Michael Afar, Flickr Pro)

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

Murai Urban Training Facility to Hone the SAF's Networked Urban Operations Capability.

 

Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean launched the Murai Urban Training Facility (MUTF) and witnessed about 500 soldiers securing an objective in an urban operations exercise this afternoon. The exercise involved seven-man tactical sections which were equipped with the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS).

 

The introduction of the ACMS is part of the 3rd Generation SAF's move to progressively provide tactical units with network capabilities. With the section commanders and team leaders equipped with the ACMS, the entire section becomes part of a larger network that is able to tap on the wider resources of the battalion and call for more responsive and precise fire support. These sections function not only as fighting units but also as ground sensors, tracking the positions of friendly and hostile forces and feeding images back to the command headquarters for enhanced command and control of the battlefield. With the ACMS, the section's situational awareness, lethality and survivability are enhanced.

 

Located within the existing Lim Chu Kang training area, the MUTF allows the SAF to conduct urban operations training in a realistic environment. It is built to resemble a typical town and offers a range of training scenarios from tactical engagements to combined arms manoeuvres, Other than buildings, the MUTF also has ancillary features like bus stops, traffic lights and overhead bridges. The facility will be equipped with tools that help simulate varying operational environments as well as a video monitoring and recording system to facilitate effective learning.

Murai Urban Training Facility to Hone the SAF's Networked Urban Operations Capability.

 

Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean launched the Murai Urban Training Facility (MUTF) and witnessed about 500 soldiers securing an objective in an urban operations exercise this afternoon. The exercise involved seven-man tactical sections which were equipped with the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS).

 

The introduction of the ACMS is part of the 3rd Generation SAF's move to progressively provide tactical units with network capabilities. With the section commanders and team leaders equipped with the ACMS, the entire section becomes part of a larger network that is able to tap on the wider resources of the battalion and call for more responsive and precise fire support. These sections function not only as fighting units but also as ground sensors, tracking the positions of friendly and hostile forces and feeding images back to the command headquarters for enhanced command and control of the battlefield. With the ACMS, the section's situational awareness, lethality and survivability are enhanced.

 

Located within the existing Lim Chu Kang training area, the MUTF allows the SAF to conduct urban operations training in a realistic environment. It is built to resemble a typical town and offers a range of training scenarios from tactical engagements to combined arms manoeuvres, Other than buildings, the MUTF also has ancillary features like bus stops, traffic lights and overhead bridges. The facility will be equipped with tools that help simulate varying operational environments as well as a video monitoring and recording system to facilitate effective learning.

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

Murai Urban Training Facility to Hone the SAF's Networked Urban Operations Capability.

 

Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean launched the Murai Urban Training Facility (MUTF) and witnessed about 500 soldiers securing an objective in an urban operations exercise this afternoon. The exercise involved seven-man tactical sections which were equipped with the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS).

 

The introduction of the ACMS is part of the 3rd Generation SAF's move to progressively provide tactical units with network capabilities. With the section commanders and team leaders equipped with the ACMS, the entire section becomes part of a larger network that is able to tap on the wider resources of the battalion and call for more responsive and precise fire support. These sections function not only as fighting units but also as ground sensors, tracking the positions of friendly and hostile forces and feeding images back to the command headquarters for enhanced command and control of the battlefield. With the ACMS, the section's situational awareness, lethality and survivability are enhanced.

 

Located within the existing Lim Chu Kang training area, the MUTF allows the SAF to conduct urban operations training in a realistic environment. It is built to resemble a typical town and offers a range of training scenarios from tactical engagements to combined arms manoeuvres, Other than buildings, the MUTF also has ancillary features like bus stops, traffic lights and overhead bridges. The facility will be equipped with tools that help simulate varying operational environments as well as a video monitoring and recording system to facilitate effective learning.

 

Fez (Est. 789) is one example of arrested evolution, hence a World Heritage site.

It is also an example of skipping technologies by virtue of inordinate obstacles, economic or physical.

The old Fez skipped the Horse-and-cart era and the bicycle, train, bus, tram eras. It also skipped the piped natural gas, wired telephone and cable television eras. All these civic infrastructure investments were either unaffordable or impossible to implement.

As soon the wireless, dish-based communication technology emerged, so did the individual exo-structure on practically every building; The view of a 1300-year old crumbling city with the ultra-modern technology on its roofs, says a lot about limitations and people's aspirations and needs.

 

The new urban mobility war is won by the contemporary hooded knights.

 

In a city with narrow, urban streets and with parking on one or both sides (eg Athens, Rome, Paris), traffic is usually clogged; mobility becomes an ironic term for crawling. The solution is the private horse-like motorbike: Slim, fast, and flexible it does not need to line up or follow the rules. Always at the front, the modern mobiity crusaders dart forward in between and past all obstacles. In the name of service, no surface is sacred no manoeuvre unacceptable.

The risk is high but the reward great; making a living.

 

Murai Urban Training Facility to Hone the SAF's Networked Urban Operations Capability.

 

Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean launched the Murai Urban Training Facility (MUTF) and witnessed about 500 soldiers securing an objective in an urban operations exercise this afternoon. The exercise involved seven-man tactical sections which were equipped with the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS).

 

The introduction of the ACMS is part of the 3rd Generation SAF's move to progressively provide tactical units with network capabilities. With the section commanders and team leaders equipped with the ACMS, the entire section becomes part of a larger network that is able to tap on the wider resources of the battalion and call for more responsive and precise fire support. These sections function not only as fighting units but also as ground sensors, tracking the positions of friendly and hostile forces and feeding images back to the command headquarters for enhanced command and control of the battlefield. With the ACMS, the section's situational awareness, lethality and survivability are enhanced.

 

Located within the existing Lim Chu Kang training area, the MUTF allows the SAF to conduct urban operations training in a realistic environment. It is built to resemble a typical town and offers a range of training scenarios from tactical engagements to combined arms manoeuvres, Other than buildings, the MUTF also has ancillary features like bus stops, traffic lights and overhead bridges. The facility will be equipped with tools that help simulate varying operational environments as well as a video monitoring and recording system to facilitate effective learning.

Murai Urban Training Facility to Hone the SAF's Networked Urban Operations Capability.

 

Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean launched the Murai Urban Training Facility (MUTF) and witnessed about 500 soldiers securing an objective in an urban operations exercise this afternoon. The exercise involved seven-man tactical sections which were equipped with the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS).

 

The introduction of the ACMS is part of the 3rd Generation SAF's move to progressively provide tactical units with network capabilities. With the section commanders and team leaders equipped with the ACMS, the entire section becomes part of a larger network that is able to tap on the wider resources of the battalion and call for more responsive and precise fire support. These sections function not only as fighting units but also as ground sensors, tracking the positions of friendly and hostile forces and feeding images back to the command headquarters for enhanced command and control of the battlefield. With the ACMS, the section's situational awareness, lethality and survivability are enhanced.

 

Located within the existing Lim Chu Kang training area, the MUTF allows the SAF to conduct urban operations training in a realistic environment. It is built to resemble a typical town and offers a range of training scenarios from tactical engagements to combined arms manoeuvres, Other than buildings, the MUTF also has ancillary features like bus stops, traffic lights and overhead bridges. The facility will be equipped with tools that help simulate varying operational environments as well as a video monitoring and recording system to facilitate effective learning.

Murai Urban Training Facility to Hone the SAF's Networked Urban Operations Capability.

 

Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean launched the Murai Urban Training Facility (MUTF) and witnessed about 500 soldiers securing an objective in an urban operations exercise this afternoon. The exercise involved seven-man tactical sections which were equipped with the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS).

 

The introduction of the ACMS is part of the 3rd Generation SAF's move to progressively provide tactical units with network capabilities. With the section commanders and team leaders equipped with the ACMS, the entire section becomes part of a larger network that is able to tap on the wider resources of the battalion and call for more responsive and precise fire support. These sections function not only as fighting units but also as ground sensors, tracking the positions of friendly and hostile forces and feeding images back to the command headquarters for enhanced command and control of the battlefield. With the ACMS, the section's situational awareness, lethality and survivability are enhanced.

 

Located within the existing Lim Chu Kang training area, the MUTF allows the SAF to conduct urban operations training in a realistic environment. It is built to resemble a typical town and offers a range of training scenarios from tactical engagements to combined arms manoeuvres, Other than buildings, the MUTF also has ancillary features like bus stops, traffic lights and overhead bridges. The facility will be equipped with tools that help simulate varying operational environments as well as a video monitoring and recording system to facilitate effective learning.

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

Murai Urban Training Facility to Hone the SAF's Networked Urban Operations Capability.

 

Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean launched the Murai Urban Training Facility (MUTF) and witnessed about 500 soldiers securing an objective in an urban operations exercise this afternoon. The exercise involved seven-man tactical sections which were equipped with the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS).

 

The introduction of the ACMS is part of the 3rd Generation SAF's move to progressively provide tactical units with network capabilities. With the section commanders and team leaders equipped with the ACMS, the entire section becomes part of a larger network that is able to tap on the wider resources of the battalion and call for more responsive and precise fire support. These sections function not only as fighting units but also as ground sensors, tracking the positions of friendly and hostile forces and feeding images back to the command headquarters for enhanced command and control of the battlefield. With the ACMS, the section's situational awareness, lethality and survivability are enhanced.

 

Located within the existing Lim Chu Kang training area, the MUTF allows the SAF to conduct urban operations training in a realistic environment. It is built to resemble a typical town and offers a range of training scenarios from tactical engagements to combined arms manoeuvres, Other than buildings, the MUTF also has ancillary features like bus stops, traffic lights and overhead bridges. The facility will be equipped with tools that help simulate varying operational environments as well as a video monitoring and recording system to facilitate effective learning.

Murai Urban Training Facility to Hone the SAF's Networked Urban Operations Capability.

 

Minister for Defence Teo Chee Hean launched the Murai Urban Training Facility (MUTF) and witnessed about 500 soldiers securing an objective in an urban operations exercise this afternoon. The exercise involved seven-man tactical sections which were equipped with the Advanced Combat Man System (ACMS).

 

The introduction of the ACMS is part of the 3rd Generation SAF's move to progressively provide tactical units with network capabilities. With the section commanders and team leaders equipped with the ACMS, the entire section becomes part of a larger network that is able to tap on the wider resources of the battalion and call for more responsive and precise fire support. These sections function not only as fighting units but also as ground sensors, tracking the positions of friendly and hostile forces and feeding images back to the command headquarters for enhanced command and control of the battlefield. With the ACMS, the section's situational awareness, lethality and survivability are enhanced.

 

Located within the existing Lim Chu Kang training area, the MUTF allows the SAF to conduct urban operations training in a realistic environment. It is built to resemble a typical town and offers a range of training scenarios from tactical engagements to combined arms manoeuvres, Other than buildings, the MUTF also has ancillary features like bus stops, traffic lights and overhead bridges. The facility will be equipped with tools that help simulate varying operational environments as well as a video monitoring and recording system to facilitate effective learning.

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

Athens is a densely populated city with narrow streets, narrower sidewalks and both overtaken by cars and motorcycles. There is hardly any green spaces. The solution: take back the streets and turn them in to mini-open spaces. Since the late 70s the City has embarked on an agressive transformation of streets following the principle of the fused grid. Pedestrian connectors link car-streets, thus maintaining the connectivity and walkability of the city while adding green, delight and respite. People flock to these open green spaces that are free of traffic and shops fronting them flourish.

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

About the same width as an old street , a connector through the building (Stoa) provides a clean, safe, tranquil means of connecting two parallel streets. It increses buildable space (above) and attracts pedestrian traffic, hence also retail activity. Othe functions can also be placed in it such as the foyer of a hotel and a skylit cafe (right).

In the new urban environment of congested, noisy and polluted streets, a building connector is the preffered link. It expresses the idea of the fused grid (see wiki and a photostream) where parallel streets can be connected with parks, paths, lanes and building "stoas".

Ideally much or most of the pedestrian movement should happen in such relaxing environments, particularly in city centres.

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

Who - The yellow loco is run by ETF. 'ETF-Eurovia Travaux Ferroviaires is a European leader in rail infrastructure and has been a subsidiary of Eurovia (part of the VINCI group) since 19 September 2008. The company specialises in the laying and maintenance of fixed rail installations on national rail networks, urban transport networks and industrial sidings...ETF-Eurovia Travaux Ferroviaires (formerly Cogifer TF, then Vossloh Infrastructure Services) grew out of successive mergers between French engineering firms Jardin et Billiard, S.E.I., DEHE et Montcocol.'

 

What - German loco in yellow in France:- ETF 99 87 9182 580-0 (ex DB 212-219-0, Deutz n° 57588/1963).

 

Where - Longeau, near Amiens. Longeau Poste 3 is the signalbox, in the distance is the southern end of the Longeau engine depot.

 

When - 12/10/12.

 

(with thanks to the ETF website and to railfaneurope.net)

As public real estate, streets are often used for profit-making. Cafés, sidewalk sales, stalls in pedestrian malls all reinforce the public-ness of the street space that now seems odd.

 

They also retrace the transient nature of trade in temporary stalls, before stores became a permanent fixture of the street or square. Who needs private real estate when the public one is already there and will do? And what better property than a corner lot to display and sell goods where traffic is high and visibilty superb.

 

Following the ancient Roman and Greek traditions, this house creates its own haven of peace, trannquility and security. The bountiful greenery supplies the daily contact with nature, an essential part of detente.

Life outside the wall can be noisy, irritating and sometimes threatening. This refuge and haven provides a full and stable antidote for an urban dweller, without regard to the "principles" of good urbanism (eg windows facing the street).

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

About the same width as the old street (right), a connector through the building (Stoa) provides a clean, safe, tranquil means of connecting two parallel streets. It increses buildable space (above) and attracts pedestrian traffic, hence also retail activity.

In the new urban environment of congested, noisy and polluted streets, a building connector is the preffered link. It expresses the idea of the fused grid (see wiki and a photostream) where parallel streets can be connected with parks, paths, lanes and building "stoas".

Ideally much or most of the pedestrian movement should happen in such relaxing environments.

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

Design engine generative logic diagram, part III: urban context

animated .gif

 

Slide 18

A city neighbourhood displays a perfect New Urbanist cul-de-sac:

This 400-foot long street has all the attributes of a new urban approach: density, diversity and design. Its density is high, it includes a wide range of housing types and is part of a neighbourhood that has a main shoping street two blocks away and is served by many transit routes. It has sidewalks and trees on both sides.

In summary, it is compact, connected, diverse and walkable; an example of a good urban place particularly because it excludes through traffic.

 

It is also a retrofit example of a new street pattern model - the Fused Grid - in which pedetrians enjoy greater connectivity than cars.

 

Urbanism comes in many guises - including an ideal a cul-de-sac.

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

 

This is just 1 of over 6,400 images taken on a walk across Mexico City. Start at Mexico City 0001 and explore the route yourself online or visit www.urbanearth.co.uk to watch the films.

 

URBAN EARTH is a project to (re)present our habitat by walking across some of Earth's biggest urban areas. The media distorts the way we see our world(s) with stereotypical images highlighting the most extremes of places. URBAN EARTH aims to expose what our cities really look like away from the bias and spin of commercial agendas.

 

URBAN EARTH: MEXICO CITY was created over three days in July 2008 and is made up of over 6,400 images... one for every 8 steps of the walk (roughly).

 

URBAN EARTH is a movement that anyone can join - just find an urban area and walk across it. URBAN EARTH is an opportunity for adventure, exploration, freedom, community activism and dialogue. Find out more at www.urbanearth.co.uk and join the URBAN EARTH social network.

 

URBAN EARTH ROUTES

 

Geography is more important than many people think. A random route across a city may expose many things, but an URBAN EARTH walk is special because it attempts to reveal what a city is like for the people who live in it. URBAN EARTH is not about following the tourist trail or tracking down the most extreme places... it is about finding normality.

 

The route was carefully designed to show the distribution of wealth within the city. For example where the poorest 20% of the population might occupy 14% of urban space, roughly 14% of the walk travels through these most deprived areas. The length of the walk is also propotionate to the size of the city. Where possible the route also travels through areas with the greatest population densities.

 

See the routes at www.urbanearth.co.uk

 

“In 2008, the world reaches an invisible but momentous milestone: For the first time in history, more than half its human population, 3.3 billion people, will be living in urban areas. By 2030, this is expected to swell to almost 5 billion. Many of the new urbanites will be poor. Their future, the future of cities in developing countries, the future of humanity itself, all depend very much on decisions made now in preparation for this growth.” STATE OF THE WORLD POPULATION REPORT 2007

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