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Ness of Brodgar Guardstone

Ness of Brodgar Excavations Orkney 2016

Ness of Brodgar Guardstone

Megaliths - Two of the megaliths forming the Ring of Brodgar under a dramatic summer sky of cirrus cloud.

 

These are two of the remaining 27 stones from the original 60 vertical or standing stones of the ring, constructed circa 2500 BC. Situated on an isthmus between the Lochs of Stenness and Harray, close to the Standing Stones of Stenness, the Ring of Brodgar is a potent symbol of the Neolithic influence left on the islands and now represents an icon of Orkney. The ring is the 3rd largest in the British Isles being of diameter 104 metres or 125 megalithic yards and is the most northernmost henge circle in Britain.

 

Mainland Orkney, Northern Isles, Scotland

 

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Ness of Brodgar Excavations Orkney 2016

Taken under a brooding sky on 18th May 2017, the Ring of Brodgar is a Neolithic henge and stone circle in Orkney, Scotland.

 

According to Wikipedia, Most henges do not contain stone circles, but Brodgar is a striking exception, ranking with Avebury (and to a lesser extent Stonehenge) among the greatest of such sites.

 

The ring of stones stands on a small isthmus between the Lochs of Stenness and Harray. These are the northernmost examples of circle henges in Britain. Unlike similar structures such as Avebury, there are no obvious stones inside the circle... but since the interior of the circle has never been excavated by archaeologists, the possibility remains that wooden structures, for example, may have been present.

 

It is generally thought to have been erected between 2500 BC and 2000 BC, and was, therefore, the last of the great Neolithic monuments built on the Ness.

 

The stone circle is 104 metres (341 ft) in diameter, and the third largest in the British Isles. The ring originally comprised up to 60 stones, of which only 27 remained standing at the end of the 20th century. The tallest stones stand at the south and west of the ring, including the so-called "Comet Stone" to the south-east. The stones are set within a circular ditch up to 3 metres (9.8 ft) deep, 9 metres (30 ft) wide and 380 metres (1,250 ft) in circumference - being carved out of the solid sandstone bedrock by the ancient residents.

Taken under a brooding sky on 18th May 2017, the Ring of Brodgar is a Neolithic henge and stone circle in Orkney, Scotland.

 

According to Wikipedia, Most henges do not contain stone circles, but Brodgar is a striking exception, ranking with Avebury (and to a lesser extent Stonehenge) among the greatest of such sites.

 

The ring of stones stands on a small isthmus between the Lochs of Stenness and Harray. These are the northernmost examples of circle henges in Britain. Unlike similar structures such as Avebury, there are no obvious stones inside the circle... but since the interior of the circle has never been excavated by archaeologists, the possibility remains that wooden structures, for example, may have been present.

 

It is generally thought to have been erected between 2500 BC and 2000 BC, and was, therefore, the last of the great Neolithic monuments built on the Ness.

 

The stone circle is 104 metres (341 ft) in diameter, and the third largest in the British Isles. The ring originally comprised up to 60 stones, of which only 27 remained standing at the end of the 20th century. The tallest stones stand at the south and west of the ring, including the so-called "Comet Stone" to the south-east. The stones are set within a circular ditch up to 3 metres (9.8 ft) deep, 9 metres (30 ft) wide and 380 metres (1,250 ft) in circumference - being carved out of the solid sandstone bedrock by the ancient residents.

Ness of Brodgar Guardstone

Taken under a brooding sky on 18th May 2017, the Ring of Brodgar is a Neolithic henge and stone circle in Orkney, Scotland.

 

According to Wikipedia, Most henges do not contain stone circles, but Brodgar is a striking exception, ranking with Avebury (and to a lesser extent Stonehenge) among the greatest of such sites.

 

The ring of stones stands on a small isthmus between the Lochs of Stenness and Harray. These are the northernmost examples of circle henges in Britain. Unlike similar structures such as Avebury, there are no obvious stones inside the circle... but since the interior of the circle has never been excavated by archaeologists, the possibility remains that wooden structures, for example, may have been present.

 

It is generally thought to have been erected between 2500 BC and 2000 BC, and was, therefore, the last of the great Neolithic monuments built on the Ness.

 

The stone circle is 104 metres (341 ft) in diameter, and the third largest in the British Isles. The ring originally comprised up to 60 stones, of which only 27 remained standing at the end of the 20th century. The tallest stones stand at the south and west of the ring, including the so-called "Comet Stone" to the south-east. The stones are set within a circular ditch up to 3 metres (9.8 ft) deep, 9 metres (30 ft) wide and 380 metres (1,250 ft) in circumference - being carved out of the solid sandstone bedrock by the ancient residents.

The archeological dig is in full swing again this summer.

 

Here is a rough impression of what has been opened up.

The most exciting archaeological dig - a huge neolithic site! And Neil Oliver (in the blue shirt) doing his thing for the BBC. We were there for hours, totally immersed in the promises this dig offers, and the suggestions of how people lived all those years ago.

They have opened up a mere tenth of the site so far and Neil Oliver and the BBC are apparently doing a series of shows later in the year, about the history of the area.

 

www.orkneyjar.com/archaeology/nessofbrodgar/

This was the last public Open Day of the 2012 archaeological excavation season - some of the structures were already being covered over. The site is about a mile South of the "Ring Of Brodgar" neolithic stone circle.

 

There is a load more about this hugely significant ongoing Archaeological Investigation - that indicates that this very large Site pre-dates England's famous Stonehenge complex Online at ....

 

news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/120127-stonehenge-n...

 

The following I think also leads to a video sequence about the Ness Of Brodgar -

www.rtbot.net/Ness_of_Brodgar

This includes a distant view of the Ness of Brodgar where a very significant Neolithic archaeological dig has been ongoing for several years in July/August. This extensive site lies between the buildings in the centre of this photo.

 

There is quite a bit more about the Ness of Brodgar site Online - at:

www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=17401 - and at:

www.orkneyjar.com/archaeology/nessofbrodgar/

More pictures of the archeological dig in Orkney this summer.

 

A thoughtful addition to the site enabling visitors to gain an overview of what is happening. A guide is explaining aspects of this 5,500 year old site.

The Ness of Brodgar, a recently-discovered neolithic site close to the Ring of Brodgar. It is thought to be more important than more ordinary villages such as Scara Brae, perhaps either a rich village or a more communal place and not a village at all. Only a month before my visit, the archaeologists had found decoratively painted stone (as opposed to art) - the first evidence of this in neolithic British settlements.

More pictures of the archeological dig in Orkney this summer.

 

Given some clear soil, gentle scraping to dicover what might lie beneath.

Market forces make themselves felt at the excavation of the Neolithic site on the Ness of Brodgar.

www.orkneyjar.com/archaeology/nessofbrodgar/

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uyf0i0K-Nwc

Relaxing for a birthday break. Excavating a site on the archaeologically hectic spit of land between the two lochs there. The site's revealed large and puzzling structures: here's more.

 

www.orkneyjar.com/archaeology/nessofbrodgar/

The amazing excavation at the Ness of Brodgar.

These shots were taken in mid July 2014 when the dig had just re-opened for the six week stint. We duly sponsored our square and look forward to amazing revelations as the work progresses!

 

These shots were taken in mid July 2014 when the dig had just re-opened for the six week stint. We duly sponsored our square and look forward to amazing revelations as the work progresses!

 

Ness of Brodgar Excavations Orkney 2016

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