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Mrs. Bao Thao, 32 years old, killed April 6, 2006.

 

**EXCLUSIVE, no tabloids without permission**

Pictured are a group of Hmong people who report an attack against them April 6, 2006 by Lao and Vietnamese military forces. 26 people perished, 5 were injured, and 5 babies died shortly after because their dead mothers could not breast-feed them. Only one adult male was killed, the other 25 victims were women and children (17 children). The Lao Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs says this is a fabrication, an investigation has been completed, and there was no attack. The Hmong group says no officials have interviewed witnesses or visited the crime scene, a point the Lao Spokesman did not deny.

 

The Hmong people pictured have hidden in remote mountains of Laos for more than 30 years, afraid to come out. At least 12,000 are said to exist, with little food, scavenging in the jungle. Most have not seen the modern world. The CIA trained and funded many Hmong hill tribes in Laos from 1961 to 1973 to fight communism. The Hmong suffered massive casualties defending their homeland and rescuing US pilots. When America withdrew from the conflict most Hmong were left alone to face the might of the North Vietnamese Army. The Royal Lao Government fell to the communists and the Hmong became outcasts in the country they fought to defend. Since 1975, under the communists, thousands of reports evidence the Hmong have suffered frequent persecution, torture, mass executions, imprisonment, and possible chemical weapons attacks. Reports of these atrocities continue to this day. The Lao Government generally denies the jungle people exist or that any of this is happening. The Hmong group leader, Blia Shoua Her, says they are not part of the Hmong resistance and want peace. He claims they are just civilians defending their families, hoping to surrender to the UN.

Mrs. Za Thao, 34 years old, killed April 6, 2006.

 

**EXCLUSIVE, no tabloids without permission**

Pictured are a group of Hmong people who report an attack against them April 6, 2006 by Lao and Vietnamese military forces. 26 people perished, 5 were injured, and 5 babies died shortly after because their dead mothers could not breast-feed them. Only one adult male was killed, the other 25 victims were women and children (17 children). The Lao Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs says this is a fabrication, an investigation has been completed, and there was no attack. The Hmong group says no officials have interviewed witnesses or visited the crime scene, a point the Lao Spokesman did not deny.

 

The Hmong people pictured have hidden in remote mountains of Laos for more than 30 years, afraid to come out. At least 12,000 are said to exist, with little food, scavenging in the jungle. Most have not seen the modern world. The CIA trained and funded many Hmong hill tribes in Laos from 1961 to 1973 to fight communism. The Hmong suffered massive casualties defending their homeland and rescuing US pilots. When America withdrew from the conflict most Hmong were left alone to face the might of the North Vietnamese Army. The Royal Lao Government fell to the communists and the Hmong became outcasts in the country they fought to defend. Since 1975, under the communists, thousands of reports evidence the Hmong have suffered frequent persecution, torture, mass executions, imprisonment, and possible chemical weapons attacks. Reports of these atrocities continue to this day. The Lao Government generally denies the jungle people exist or that any of this is happening. The Hmong group leader, Blia Shoua Her, says they are not part of the Hmong resistance and want peace. He claims they are just civilians defending their families, hoping to surrender to the UN.

Mrs. Lou Her, 30 years old, killed April 6, 2006.

 

**EXCLUSIVE, no tabloids without permission**

Pictured are a group of Hmong people who report an attack against them April 6, 2006 by Lao and Vietnamese military forces. 26 people perished, 5 were injured, and 5 babies died shortly after because their dead mothers could not breast-feed them. Only one adult male was killed, the other 25 victims were women and children (17 children). The Lao Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs says this is a fabrication, an investigation has been completed, and there was no attack. The Hmong group says no officials have interviewed witnesses or visited the crime scene, a point the Lao Spokesman did not deny.

 

The Hmong people pictured have hidden in remote mountains of Laos for more than 30 years, afraid to come out. At least 12,000 are said to exist, with little food, scavenging in the jungle. Most have not seen the modern world. The CIA trained and funded many Hmong hill tribes in Laos from 1961 to 1973 to fight communism. The Hmong suffered massive casualties defending their homeland and rescuing US pilots. When America withdrew from the conflict most Hmong were left alone to face the might of the North Vietnamese Army. The Royal Lao Government fell to the communists and the Hmong became outcasts in the country they fought to defend. Since 1975, under the communists, thousands of reports evidence the Hmong have suffered frequent persecution, torture, mass executions, imprisonment, and possible chemical weapons attacks. Reports of these atrocities continue to this day. The Lao Government generally denies the jungle people exist or that any of this is happening. The Hmong group leader, Blia Shoua Her, says they are not part of the Hmong resistance and want peace. He claims they are just civilians defending their families, hoping to surrender to the UN.

Mr. Tong Fang, injured April 6, 2006. His wife was killed.

 

**EXCLUSIVE, no tabloids without permission**

Pictured are a group of Hmong people who report an attack against them April 6, 2006 by Lao and Vietnamese military forces. 26 people perished, 5 were injured, and 5 babies died shortly after because their dead mothers could not breast-feed them. Only one adult male was killed, the other 25 victims were women and children (17 children). The Lao Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs says this is a fabrication, an investigation has been completed, and there was no attack. The Hmong group says no officials have interviewed witnesses or visited the crime scene, a point the Lao Spokesman did not deny.

 

The Hmong people pictured have hidden in remote mountains of Laos for more than 30 years, afraid to come out. At least 12,000 are said to exist, with little food, scavenging in the jungle. Most have not seen the modern world. The CIA trained and funded many Hmong hill tribes in Laos from 1961 to 1973 to fight communism. The Hmong suffered massive casualties defending their homeland and rescuing US pilots. When America withdrew from the conflict most Hmong were left alone to face the might of the North Vietnamese Army. The Royal Lao Government fell to the communists and the Hmong became outcasts in the country they fought to defend. Since 1975, under the communists, thousands of reports evidence the Hmong have suffered frequent persecution, torture, mass executions, imprisonment, and possible chemical weapons attacks. Reports of these atrocities continue to this day. The Lao Government generally denies the jungle people exist or that any of this is happening. The Hmong group leader, Blia Shoua Her, says they are not part of the Hmong resistance and want peace. He claims they are just civilians defending their families, hoping to surrender to the UN.

Mrs. Doua Thao, 30 years old, killed April 6, 2006.

 

**EXCLUSIVE, no tabloids without permission**

Pictured are a group of Hmong people who report an attack against them April 6, 2006 by Lao and Vietnamese military forces. 26 people perished, 5 were injured, and 5 babies died shortly after because their dead mothers could not breast-feed them. Only one adult male was killed, the other 25 victims were women and children (17 children). The Lao Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs says this is a fabrication, an investigation has been completed, and there was no attack. The Hmong group says no officials have interviewed witnesses or visited the crime scene, a point the Lao Spokesman did not deny.

 

The Hmong people pictured have hidden in remote mountains of Laos for more than 30 years, afraid to come out. At least 12,000 are said to exist, with little food, scavenging in the jungle. Most have not seen the modern world. The CIA trained and funded many Hmong hill tribes in Laos from 1961 to 1973 to fight communism. The Hmong suffered massive casualties defending their homeland and rescuing US pilots. When America withdrew from the conflict most Hmong were left alone to face the might of the North Vietnamese Army. The Royal Lao Government fell to the communists and the Hmong became outcasts in the country they fought to defend. Since 1975, under the communists, thousands of reports evidence the Hmong have suffered frequent persecution, torture, mass executions, imprisonment, and possible chemical weapons attacks. Reports of these atrocities continue to this day. The Lao Government generally denies the jungle people exist or that any of this is happening. The Hmong group leader, Blia Shoua Her, says they are not part of the Hmong resistance and want peace. He claims they are just civilians defending their families, hoping to surrender to the UN.

Mrs. Lou Her, 30 years old, killed April 6, 2006.

 

**EXCLUSIVE, no tabloids without permission**

Pictured are a group of Hmong people who report an attack against them April 6, 2006 by Lao and Vietnamese military forces. 26 people perished, 5 were injured, and 5 babies died shortly after because their dead mothers could not breast-feed them. Only one adult male was killed, the other 25 victims were women and children (17 children). The Lao Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs says this is a fabrication, an investigation has been completed, and there was no attack. The Hmong group says no officials have interviewed witnesses or visited the crime scene, a point the Lao Spokesman did not deny.

 

The Hmong people pictured have hidden in remote mountains of Laos for more than 30 years, afraid to come out. At least 12,000 are said to exist, with little food, scavenging in the jungle. Most have not seen the modern world. The CIA trained and funded many Hmong hill tribes in Laos from 1961 to 1973 to fight communism. The Hmong suffered massive casualties defending their homeland and rescuing US pilots. When America withdrew from the conflict most Hmong were left alone to face the might of the North Vietnamese Army. The Royal Lao Government fell to the communists and the Hmong became outcasts in the country they fought to defend. Since 1975, under the communists, thousands of reports evidence the Hmong have suffered frequent persecution, torture, mass executions, imprisonment, and possible chemical weapons attacks. Reports of these atrocities continue to this day. The Lao Government generally denies the jungle people exist or that any of this is happening. The Hmong group leader, Blia Shoua Her, says they are not part of the Hmong resistance and want peace. He claims they are just civilians defending their families, hoping to surrender to the UN.

Mrs. Za Thao, 34 years old, killed April 6, 2006.

 

**EXCLUSIVE, no tabloids without permission**

Pictured are a group of Hmong people who report an attack against them April 6, 2006 by Lao and Vietnamese military forces. 26 people perished, 5 were injured, and 5 babies died shortly after because their dead mothers could not breast-feed them. Only one adult male was killed, the other 25 victims were women and children (17 children). The Lao Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs says this is a fabrication, an investigation has been completed, and there was no attack. The Hmong group says no officials have interviewed witnesses or visited the crime scene, a point the Lao Spokesman did not deny.

 

The Hmong people pictured have hidden in remote mountains of Laos for more than 30 years, afraid to come out. At least 12,000 are said to exist, with little food, scavenging in the jungle. Most have not seen the modern world. The CIA trained and funded many Hmong hill tribes in Laos from 1961 to 1973 to fight communism. The Hmong suffered massive casualties defending their homeland and rescuing US pilots. When America withdrew from the conflict most Hmong were left alone to face the might of the North Vietnamese Army. The Royal Lao Government fell to the communists and the Hmong became outcasts in the country they fought to defend. Since 1975, under the communists, thousands of reports evidence the Hmong have suffered frequent persecution, torture, mass executions, imprisonment, and possible chemical weapons attacks. Reports of these atrocities continue to this day. The Lao Government generally denies the jungle people exist or that any of this is happening. The Hmong group leader, Blia Shoua Her, says they are not part of the Hmong resistance and want peace. He claims they are just civilians defending their families, hoping to surrender to the UN.

Mr. Wang Chai Her, 40 years old, killed April 6, 2006. He was the oldest son of group leader Blia Shoua Her.

 

**EXCLUSIVE, no tabloids without permission**

Pictured are a group of Hmong people who report an attack against them April 6, 2006 by Lao and Vietnamese military forces. 26 people perished, 5 were injured, and 5 babies died shortly after because their dead mothers could not breast-feed them. Only one adult male was killed, the other 25 victims were women and children (17 children). The Lao Spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs says this is a fabrication, an investigation has been completed, and there was no attack. The Hmong group says no officials have interviewed witnesses or visited the crime scene, a point the Lao Spokesman did not deny.

 

The Hmong people pictured have hidden in remote mountains of Laos for more than 30 years, afraid to come out. At least 12,000 are said to exist, with little food, scavenging in the jungle. Most have not seen the modern world. The CIA trained and funded many Hmong hill tribes in Laos from 1961 to 1973 to fight communism. The Hmong suffered massive casualties defending their homeland and rescuing US pilots. When America withdrew from the conflict most Hmong were left alone to face the might of the North Vietnamese Army. The Royal Lao Government fell to the communists and the Hmong became outcasts in the country they fought to defend. Since 1975, under the communists, thousands of reports evidence the Hmong have suffered frequent persecution, torture, mass executions, imprisonment, and possible chemical weapons attacks. Reports of these atrocities continue to this day. The Lao Government generally denies the jungle people exist or that any of this is happening. The Hmong group leader, Blia Shoua Her, says they are not part of the Hmong resistance and want peace. He claims they are just civilians defending their families, hoping to surrender to the UN.

Friendly people inside the big hills in the north of Laos.

Local bus from Vang Vieng to Vientiane