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Explore Page.

 

Winner of Best Photographers Portfolio's themed contest, Faces.

 

See my shots on Darckr (two by two) or one by one.

 

So let me say hi to you all, too. I hope you're doing fine. I have been getting around to some of your streams a little bit as I'm pool monitoring, but wish my visits could be regular. I'm still slogging through my workload--it's a good thing I love what I do!

 

We're still in severe (Level 4) drought, with no relief in sight. There is a total ban on outdoor watering by homeowners (not businesses, at least not yet, though I'm hoping that will happen soon). I've been writing letters to the editor imploring our "leaders" to impose a total ban on new construction and to have public service announcements about wise use, but to date the word "moratorium" hasn't even entered the conversation about conservation.

 

Enough of my rant. I hope you like this silly photo of my pooch. Her tongue often is visible this way ever since she had her top front teeth removed.

 

Notice I have a new camera, the PowerShot S5 IS. I wasn't quite ready to get the XTi yet, not just because of the money but because I don't have the time to learn a dSLR and how to process RAW images. I'll be very pleased with this one in the meantime.

 

View On Black

“Despite the moratorium on commercial whaling, Japan has continued to claim the lives of thousands of the gentle giants of the sea in a place that should be their safe haven,” said Sea Shepherd Founder, Captain Paul Watson. “Sea Shepherd and I, along with millions of concerned people around the world, certainly hope that Japan will honor this ruling by the international court and leave the whales in peace.”

 

Sea Shepherd Global will have the ships prepared to return to the Southern Ocean in December 2014 should Japan choose to ignore this ruling. If the Japanese whaling fleet returns, Sea Shepherd crew will be there to uphold this ruling against the pirate whalers of Japan.

 

More info :

 

www.seashepherd.org/news-and-media/2014/03/31/the-whales-...

 

prevarication is on the tongue

 

Y'all remember the Bowling Green massacre, right? Oh, yeah, it was the Kent State Massacre. Or was it the Bowlmor Lanes massacre, when Sonny "Kid Twist" Valentin blowed away the Jeramino siblings. Oh, no, it was...

 

Right: it wasn't any damn thing, it never happened except in the recesses and ratholes of KellyAnn's mind.

 

Where to first? Her defenders, well-oiled robots all, asked what the big deal about her claims was, she simply mispoke, so forget it and move on. Fake News media hacks. Of course, our beloved Tweetident, like any mutt with a bone, refuses to let go: if a reporter mispeaks and says a bust of MLK jr was removed from the Awful Office, ole Tweetyboid brings it up again and again, before implying that Frederick Douglass is doing a great job, tremendous guy, Frederick.

 

OK, so why did KellyAnn even step foot in that verbal doodoo? Why, to put the admin's notaban into context. After all, right after the Bowling Green terrorist attack, didn't Obama ban Iraqis?

 

Well, no. First, while the two Iraqis involved did live in Bowling Green, their crimes were, one, attempting to acquire and ship arms to Al Queda and, two, attacking friendly forces in Iraq. They did nothing here. Nothing happened here. And the moratorium was simply to revise methods to put more extreme vetting in place.

 

Now, why can't all you liberal/progressive/fake news media suckers simply understand that KellyAnn was following the boss's lead and exercising her Tweetident given right to voice alternative facts when they were better suited to her needs. (And speaking of "better suited," who can forget her Nutcracker Suite toy soldier costume at the regurgitation.)

 

Speaking of suits, Nordstrom is axing Ivanka's fashion line. I don't know if the clothes are made in America, but they're not making any impact on the market.

 

Query: how many of you remember Nina Haspel? She's the new Deputy Chief of the CIA, a position that doesn't require legislative branch approval. So, you know her qualifications, right? She was one of the people involved in destroying the tapes of the interrogations of Abu Zubaydah and Abd al-Rahim al-Nashri, interrogations at which she had been present three years earlier. Black site interrogations. Interrogations so brutal, at one point a doctor had to be called in to make certain Zulbaydah was alive or dead; finding he was alive (barely) the doctor had to bring him back fully because there was still more water on the board. She was one of the cogs in CIA's kidnap and interrogate operations...

 

Now she's deputy chief of the Agency, appointed by Trump. You remember him. He's the one who thinks torture works, but agreed to go along with James Mattis who said that a couple of cans of beer and a pack of smokes were more effective. I'm guessing Don has once again changed what's left of his mind.

 

As he appears to be doing about Israeli settlements, with the admin line now being: the old settlements don't have any effect on peace talks, but new or expanded ones might. Should be an interesting meeting between Tweetie and Netanyahu.

 

A question: why was the phone call between Tweetlethumbs and Puta not recorded, as it was supposed to be. Bet Puta has it on tape. Bet he has it on a bunch of tapes, all altered to suit his various needs. Or maybe not. Vlad's as honorable as any KGB officer I can think of.

 

Meanwhile, here in America, a white woman in LA attacked a Korean woman on the street, after screaming "White Power."

 

In Houston, the boys in a high school senior class photo all raised their right arms and hands in the Nazi salute. At last reading, the board said only that boys will be stormtroopers and it didn't mean anything. The boys pointed out that the girls were giving the black power salute. Anyone old enough to have gone to school when history was being taught (for real, not according to DeVos) knows the difference.

 

At a high school basketball game, fans of the predominately white team kept chanting Build the Wall.

 

In Arkansas, the GOP (good ole peckerwoods) passed a resolution which would, if voted into law, allow a rapist to sue to block his victim from having an abortion.

 

Tweetieboid is certainly keeping his promise: he's bringing the country together. BAD!

  

a's

This must be my ophthalmologist's car, as it was parked in the "doctor's only" parking spot when I was leaving my last appointment. Although I don't know the man personally, Dr. Markham's friends probably describe him as a "bitchin' dude". I bet he plays in a Ratt cover band too.

 

I cut out one of his eyes, didn't eye? Don't know why I did that, but now I wish I hadn't. (Haha... I just realized the irony of cutting out one of the eyes....)

 

And PS, I took this weeks ago, before my self-imposed no-more-taking-pictures-of-cars moratorium (which flew out the window this weekend anyway).

 

I've never been this accountable-less and within

I've never known focuslessness on any form

I've never had this lack of ache for dalliance

To let go ....

 

Ah to breathe

Stop looking outside

stop searching in corners of rooms

Not my business or timing

 

I declare a moratorium on things relationship

I declare a respite from the toils of liaison

I do need a breather from the flavors of entanglement

I declare a full time out from all things commitment .

   

Enjoy the photo and the song:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ARBLIT95Im4&feature=related

The song is new & mind-blowing .. enjoy it's dark vibe.

  

This is gona be dedicated to the 1st commentor

and it goes to No.signal :)

        

EXPLORE

 

flickr.com/explore/interesting/2008/07/02

"Waiting on John"

 

Crosbie Announces First steps in Northern Cod Recovery Plan

 

That was the headline on July 2, 1992. John C. Crosbie, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and Minister for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency announced a two-year moratorium on the northern cod fishery. The moratorium was to take effect immediately and would continue until the spring of 1994.

Mr. Crosbie also announced that emergency assistance payments of $225 a week will be made for the next 10 weeks to fishermen and plant workers affected by the moratorium.

 

Fishermen left their boats saying good-bye to the only life they knew. Twenty two years later ... there is no one waiting and the fishing boats rest in an optimism eroded by time.

 

“We can hear you singing

But it’s a song of pain

An ocean blue this morning

Has turned to red again” – Ian Quinn.

Such is the fate of the world’s most majestic creature, the

whale. If the International Whaling Commission can’t save

it, who can? A commercial fisherman, and a bushwacker?

Award winning singer songwriter, and commercial fisher,

Ian Quinn has released the second single ‘Swimming Home’ photo: Michael Dawes

off his latest album Quinny, a collection of country-folk-rock songs including duets with Bill Chambers and Dobe Newton.

Co-written and produced by Roger Corbett (The Bushwackers) at The Valley Studio ‘Swimming Home’ protests the senseless and brutal slaughter of thousands of whales in the Southern Ocean each year for so called ‘scientific’ reasons.

“It’s not as though I’m a radical conservationist because I’ve had a long association with the commercial fishing

industry for over 20 years, but I think when topics are this important, and this big, I’m quite prepared to throw my weight behind writing a protest song if it helps the cause.”

Although the song pleads for the slaughter to stop Ian Quinn says a compromise must be found before it’s too late.

“We need to also respect the Japanese and the whalers for their right to hunt, and why they have done it for so many years, but we’ve got to find a resolution to make sure we have these creatures in our oceans in 10,000 years time.”

The Golden Guitar winner penned the final words to the whale anthem following a yarn with an old school mate from Bundaberg, and now environmental activist, Madeleine Habib from Greenpeace.

“I found out Madeleine had became the captain of the ship the Esperanza , which is a Greenpeace ship heavily involved in some of these operations, so a conversation with her gave me the catalyst to finish writing the song.”

Although sitting in the final position on his new album Ian Quinn says “the whale song” is definitely one of his favourites.

"Two powerful protest songs grace the album. Leave The Mary Mighty was a rallying call in opposition to the damming of the fragile Mary River. We can only hope that Swimming Home is equally successful in stopping the slaughter of the whales.“

– Deborah Minter, Capital News.

Ian

  

The Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12–16 metres (40–50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The Humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating.

 

Found in oceans and seas around the world, Humpback Whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, Humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods, including the spectacular bubble net fishing technique.

 

Like other large whales, the Humpback was a target for the whaling industry, and its population fell by an estimated 90% before a whaling moratorium was introduced in 1966. Stocks of the species have since partially recovered, however entanglement in fishing gear, collisions with ships, and noise pollution are ongoing concerns. Current estimates for the abundance of Humpback Whales range from about 30,000 to 60,000, approximately one third of pre-whaling levels. Once hunted to the brink of extinction, Humpbacks are now sought out by whale-watchers, particularly off parts of Australia and the United States.

 

è un comune spagnolo di 1.369 abitanti situato nella comunità autonoma dell'Estremadura , in provincia di Badajoz .

Situata a 401 m s.l.m. con una superfice di 90 Km° , popolazione 1.369 ab. densità 1.369 ab.

15,21 ab./km²

 

cercando notizie su Valdecaballeros , ne ho trovate due , una brutta ed una bella .

Comincio dalla brutta :- in questo paradiso c'è una centrale elettronucleare ..agrrr agrrr .

La notizia bella è :- nel 1984 la costruzione fu bloccata ....e vaiii

 

La Centrale nucleare Valdecaballeros, è una centrale elettronucleare spagnola situata presso la città di Valdecaballeros, in Estremadura, in Spagna. L'impianto doveva essere composto da 2 reattori BWR da 1878MW di potenza netta, la costruzione fu sospesa nel 1984 a causa della moratoria sul nucleare.

 

Io la vedrei in ________View large________ il posto lo merita !! no , non dicevo la foto !!!!

 

Valdecaballeros (spagna) 10 giugno 2011

postata il 20 giugno 2011 alle ore

 

La vita è un viaggio , viaggiare con amici è vivere due volte

Omar khayyan

(ho aggiunto nella frase " con amici " )

Tiny is a township, part of Simcoe County in south-central Ontario, Canada. The Township of Tiny can be found in the Southern Georgian Bay region and is approximately 43 miles long or 160 square miles.

 

The township was named, in 1822, after a pet dog of Lady Sarah Maitland (1792-1873), wife of Sir Peregrine Maitland, Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada. Two other adjoining townships were also named for her pet dogs, Tay and Flos (now Springwater Township).

 

The history of Tiny Township reflects its three founding cultures: Native, French and British. Located within Wendake, the historical homeland of the Huron people, the region is closely tied to early missionary exploration of the region, including the Jesuit mission of Sainte-Marie among the Hurons in nearby Midland.

 

The township is also the location of an important archaeological site, the 17th century ossuary of the community of Ossossane, the capital of the Huron Confederacy.

In 1798, the British government purchased the land in the area and soon after established a naval base at Penetanguishene. By the mid 1800s, families from Quebec began moving to the Tiny Township area for the cheap and fertile land to farm.

 

Today, the Tiny Township area is still very much a bilingual (French and English) area of Ontario, and is one of 25 municipalities in Ontario designated for bilingual government services under the French Language Services Act. In honour of the region's French history, Lafontaine hosts the annual Le Festival du Loup, a festival of francophone music and culture which celebrates the death of a wolf that terrorised the village in the 1800s, which takes place in July.

 

Lafontaine was originally called Sainte-Croix (French for Holy Cross) due to many large crosses found in the area that were planted by the Jesuits. It was renamed Lafontaine to honor the politician Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine, one of the early Joint Premiers of the Province of Canada.

 

Tiny contains an artesian well that produces some of the purest spring water in the world. Many residents were concerned that a proposed garbage dump over the aquifer would contaminate the water, and a series of protests achieved a one-year moratorium on the dump.

 

Source

Fort Pokaran folk shrine, Rajasthan, India 2001

 

:radio_button: π pics - all photos and collages Ⓒ Peter Callas

 

All photos taken with Canon G2

 

Located in the remote Thar Desert, the 14th century citadel of Fort Pokaran is located about 40km from the site of India’s first underground nuclear test, known as Operation Smiling Buddha, in 1974 - provocatively close to the border with Pakistan. Five more nuclear tests were conducted in Pokaran’s Test Range in 1998, after which India declared a moratorium on testing. The pee green hall of the fort, now a hotel, hosted cavernous cracks when we visited in 2001, en route to Jaisalmer. Someone suggested that the building is haunted and it certainly had an eerie feel about it, with faded family portraits occupying the interior like stranded rock jocks as they teeter forward from the walls.

 

On the far side of the central courtyard we were delighted to find a local folk shrine. Hundreds of figures, some made from papier-mâché and others from plaster, were laid out in an apparent sequence (or not) in a long hallway that looked like it had once been used as a horse stable. Unfortunately the exuberant colours of the statues were subdued by the accretion of extremely copious amounts of red dust. I have never seen any other documentation of this shrine but would love to be enlightened about who some of the figures are that are represented here, and about its author.

The Arch, St. Louis, view from Missouri

 

(From Wikipedia):

In 1947, a group of civic leaders held a national competition to select a design for the main portion of the Memorial space. Eero Saarinen won this competition with plans for a 590-foot (180-metre) catenary arch to be placed on the banks of the Mississippi River. However, these plans were modified over the next 15 years, placing the arch on higher ground and adding 40 feet (12 m) in height and width.

 

Saarinen developed the shape with the help of architectural engineer Hannskarl Bandel. It is not a pure inverted catenary. Saarinen preferred a shape that was slightly elongated and thinner towards the top, a shape that produces a subtle soaring effect, and transfers more of the structure's weight downward rather than outward at the base.

 

The construction of the Arch began February 12, 1963 and was completed on October 28, 1965, costing less than US$15 million to build. On the day the keystone was placed, City fire trucks hosed down the south leg to cool it because civic leaders insisted on a public ceremony. Engineers had planned on doing this in the dead of the night as the sun's heat causes the steel to expand, possibly beyond the precise measurements the keystone was designed for. Along with all other historical areas of the National Park Service, the memorial was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on October 15, 1966. Vice President Hubert Humphrey and Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall dedicated the Arch on May 25, 1968.

 

In 1984, Congress authorized the enlargement of the Memorial to include up to 100 acres on the east bank of the Mississippi River in East St. Louis, Illinois. Funds were authorized to begin land acquisition, but Congress placed a moratorium upon NPS land acquisitions in fiscal year 1998. The moratorium continued into the 21st century, with expansion becoming less likely because of the construction of a riverboat gambling facility and related amenities.

 

In 1999, the Arch tram queue areas were completely renovated at a cost of approximately $2.2 million.

----------------------------------------------

 

Thanks everybody for the nice comments, faves and invites!!!

Fort Pokaran folk shrine, Rajasthan, India 2001

 

:radio_button: π pics - all photos and collages Ⓒ Peter Callas

 

All photos taken with Canon G2

 

Located in the remote Thar Desert, the 14th century citadel of Fort Pokaran is located about 40km from the site of India’s first underground nuclear test, known as Operation Smiling Buddha, in 1974 - provocatively close to the border with Pakistan. Five more nuclear tests were conducted in Pokaran’s Test Range in 1998, after which India declared a moratorium on testing. The pee green hall of the fort, now a hotel, hosted cavernous cracks when we visited in 2001, en route to Jaisalmer. Someone suggested that the building is haunted and it certainly had an eerie feel about it, with faded family portraits occupying the interior like stranded rock jocks as they teeter forward from the walls.

 

On the far side of the central courtyard we were delighted to find a local folk shrine. Hundreds of figures, some made from papier-mâché and others from plaster, were laid out in an apparent sequence (or not) in a long hallway that looked like it had once been used as a horse stable. Unfortunately the exuberant colours of the statues were subdued by the accretion of extremely copious amounts of red dust. I have never seen any other documentation of this shrine but would love to be enlightened about who some of the figures are that are represented here, and about its author.

The Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12–16 metres (40–50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The Humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating.

 

Found in oceans and seas around the world, Humpback Whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, Humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods, including the spectacular bubble net fishing technique.

 

Like other large whales, the Humpback was a target for the whaling industry, and its population fell by an estimated 90% before a whaling moratorium was introduced in 1966. Stocks of the species have since partially recovered, however entanglement in fishing gear, collisions with ships, and noise pollution are ongoing concerns. Current estimates for the abundance of Humpback Whales range from about 30,000 to 60,000, approximately one third of pre-whaling levels. Once hunted to the brink of extinction, Humpbacks are now sought out by whale-watchers, particularly off parts of Australia and the United States.

 

Moratorium over - the @liebzeit Jr and Gracie.

 

8 Likes on Instagram

  

Luftgewehr / Air Gun

Mord steht allgemein für ein vorsätzliches Tötungsdelikt, dem gesellschaftlich ein besonderer Unwert zugeschrieben wird. In der Regel unterscheiden historische und aktuelle Strafrechtssysteme zwischen einer einfachen oder minder qualifizierten vorsätzlichen Tötung und einer besonders verwerflichen Form, nach deutschem Sprachgebrauch dem „Mord“.[1] Die Definition und systematische Stellung der in der Regel mit einem höheren Strafmaß sanktionierten zweiten Tötungsart variiert jedoch recht stark zwischen den verschiedenen Rechtssystemen. Bezüglich der strafrechtsdogmatischen Systematik wird „Mord“ in unterschiedlichen Rechtsordnungen als Grundtatbestand, Qualifikation oder eigenes Delikt sui generis angesehen. Hinsichtlich der Definition bezieht die Unterscheidung sich in den meisten Fällen entweder auf das „ethische Moment des Gesamtbilds der Tat“ oder auf das „psychologische Moment der Entschlussfassung“.[2] Im letzteren Fall unterscheidet sich Mord von anderen Tötungsdelikten oft nur in der mens rea (subjektiver Tatbestand). Diese auf das römische Recht zurückgehende Abgrenzung zwischen Affekts- und Vorbedachtstötung, die kennzeichnend für das psychologische Moment der Entschlussfassung ist, wird von Teilen der Literatur als „Weltrecht“ (Kohler) angesehen, was aber zweifelhaft ist.[3] Eine über alle Zeiten und Kulturen anerkannte Definition des Mordes gibt es nämlich nicht. Im Völkerstrafrecht wird Mord wegen der daraus resultierenden Abgrenzungsschwierigkeit zum Teil mit vorsätzlicher Tötung gleichgesetzt.

Die Unterscheidungen zwischen Mord und anderen Tötungsdelikten wird in der Literatur auf die antike jüdische und griechische Rechtstradition zurückgeführt. Ein fundamentales Verbot zu Morden ergibt sich aus der sumerischen Ethik, siehe Codex Ur-Nammu. Ähnliche Verbote finden sich in den zehn Geboten der israelitischen Religion. Im mosaischen Recht wurde zwischen Mord und Totschlag differenziert.[4]

 

In Drakons Gesetzen zwingt der Mord, das heißt die Tötung mit Vorbedacht (ek pronoia) und Planung (bouleusis) nach Auffassung des Kieler Rechtshistorikers Richard Maschke zur Blutrache, der sich der Mörder nur durch Flucht entziehen konnte.[5] Dagegen war zur Abgeltung des Totschlags die Zahlung eines Wehrgeldes möglich.[6] Als Voraussetzung für die Rache, bzw. private Vollstreckung wurde schließlich ein zwingendes Gerichtsverfahren (Areopag) erforderlich.

 

Ausgehend vom römischen Recht, in dem der homicidium praemeditatum dem Mord am ehesten entspricht, wurde die Unterscheidung von Affekt und Vorbedacht für die Abgrenzung zu anderen Tötungsdelikten in vielen Rechtskreisen kennzeichnend.

 

Im deutschen Mittelalter galt Mord jedoch als die verheimlichte Tötung im Gegensatz zur Tötung im offenen Kampf Mann gegen Mann.[7][8] Die Heimlichkeit konnte auch in der Wahl der Waffen zum Ausdruck kommen, z. B. Dolch statt Schwert. Der Strafgrund soll damit zu tun gehabt haben, dass sich der Täter der Verantwortung (Blutrache) entziehen wollte. Dagegen gab es den „ehrlichen Totschlag“.[9]

 

An diese Rechtstradition wurde in der Zeit des Nationalsozialismus mit Einführung des Mordmerkmals der Heimtücke in der Strafrechtsreform vom 4. September 1941 angeknüpft. Der „germanische“ ethische Begriff, der eine besonders verwerfliche oder besonders gefährliche Begehung voraussetzt, löste dabei den seit der Constitutio Criminalis Carolina vorherrschenden römisch-rechtlich geprägte Mordbegriff ab, der auf Überlegung oder Vorbedacht, also psychologische Gesichtspunkte, abstellte.

 

Als rechtlicher Begriff ist Mord je nach Rechtsordnung von ganz unterschiedlichen rechtsdogmatischen Ausprägungen und Voraussetzungen geprägt:

 

Mord (Deutschland), im deutschen Strafrecht eine besonders verwerfliche Art der vorsätzlichen Tötung (Qualifikation zu Totschlag oder eigenständiger Tatbestand)

Mord (England und Wales), ein Straftatbestand im Recht von England und Wales

Mord (Österreich), den Grundtatbestand der vorsätzlichen Tötungsdelikte im österreichischen Strafrecht

Mord (Schweiz), eine Qualifikation der Vorsätzlichen Tötung im schweizerischen Strafrecht

Zweifelsfälle bei fremdkulturellen Maßstäben

Die unterschiedlichen gesellschaftlichen Wertungen, die mit der Unterscheidung von Mord und Totschlag in verschiedenen Kulturen verbunden sind, werden zum Teil in Fällen von Ehrenmord thematisiert.

 

Im Völkerstrafrecht wird zwischen Mord und vorsätzlicher Tötung nicht mehr differenziert, so zum Beispiel im Celebici-Fall vor dem Internationaler Strafgerichtshof für das ehemalige Jugoslawien, in dem wilful killing und murder in Bürgerkriegssituationen gleichgesetzt wurde.

In Friedrich Kirchners Wörterbuch der philosophischen Grundbegriffe wird in Anlehnung an das römische Recht Mord als absichtliche und unbefugte Tötung eines Menschen definiert.[12] Für den neuhegelianischen (und später nationalsozialistischen) Rechtsphilosophen Julius Binder liegt die Unterscheidung zwischen Mord und einer staatlich angeordneten Hinrichtung darin, dass letztere „Rechtsbewährungshandlung“ sei, während sich der „besondere Wille“ des Mörders gegen den allgemeinen Willen des Gesetzes richte.

 

Der Rechtsökonom Richard Posner ist der Auffassung, dass der Satz „Mord ist Unrecht“ („murder is wrong“) tautologisch sei, als mit der Aussage nur analytisch bestätigt würde, was im Begriff des Mordes (im Sinne von unrechtmäßiger Tötung) rein definitorisch als Wertung enthalten wäre.[13] Am Beispiel von Mord und Bestechung (bribery) zeigt er, dass Straftatbestände zwischen den Kulturen sehr stark variieren. Daher sei eine Form des Relativismus angebracht und akademische Moralphilosophie nicht dazu geeignet, zu konkreten Aussagen zu kommen.

 

Murder is the unlawful killing, with malice aforethought, of another human, and generally this premeditated state of mind distinguishes murder from other forms of unlawful homicide (such as manslaughter).

 

As the loss of a human being may inflict grief upon the individuals close to the victim, and the commission of a murder is highly detrimental to the good order within society, most societies both present and in antiquity have considered it a most serious crime worthy of the harshest of punishment. In most countries, a person convicted of murder is typically given a long prison sentence, possibly a life sentence where permitted, and in some countries, the death penalty may be imposed for such an act – though this practice is becoming less common.

William Blackstone (citing Edward Coke), in his Commentaries on the Laws of England set out the common law definition of murder, which by this definition occurs

 

when a person, of sound memory and discretion, unlawfully kills any reasonable creature in being and under the king's peace, with malice aforethought, either express or implied.[2]

 

The elements of common law murder are:

 

Unlawful

killing

of a human

by another human

with malice aforethought.[3]

The Unlawful – This distinguishes murder from killings that are done within the boundaries of law, such as capital punishment and justified self-defense. The killing of enemy combatants by lawful combatants and non-combatants killed due to collateral damage during an armed conflict are also excluded from the definition of murder.[4]

 

Killing – At common law life ended with cardiopulmonary arrest[3] – the total and permanent cessation of blood circulation and respiration.[3] With advances in medical technology courts have adopted irreversible cessation of all brain function as marking the end of life.[3]

 

of a human – This element presents the issue of when life begins. At common law a fetus was not a human being.[5] Life began when the fetus passed through the birth canal and took its first breath.[3]

 

by another human – At early common law, suicide was considered murder.[3] The requirement that the person killed be someone other than the perpetrator excluded suicide from the definition of murder.

 

with malice aforethought – Originally malice aforethought carried its everyday meaning – a deliberate and premeditated (prior intent) killing of another motivated by ill will. Murder necessarily required that an appreciable time pass between the formation and execution of the intent to kill. The courts broadened the scope of murder by eliminating the requirement of actual premeditation and deliberation as well as true malice. All that was required for malice aforethought to exist is that the perpetrator act with one of the four states of mind that constitutes "malice."

 

The four states of mind recognized as constituting "malice" are:

 

Intent to kill,

Intent to inflict grievous bodily harm short of death,

Reckless indifference to an unjustifiably high risk to human life (sometimes described as an "abandoned and malignant heart"), or

Intent to commit a dangerous felony (the "felony-murder" doctrine).

Under state of mind (i), intent to kill, the deadly weapon rule applies. Thus, if the defendant intentionally uses a deadly weapon or instrument against the victim, such use authorizes a permissive inference of intent to kill. In other words, "intent follows the bullet." Examples of deadly weapons and instruments include but are not limited to guns, knives, deadly toxins or chemicals or gases and even vehicles when intentionally used to harm a victim.

 

Under state of mind (iii), an "abandoned and malignant heart", the killing must result from defendant's conduct involving a reckless indifference to human life and a conscious disregard of an unreasonable risk of death or serious bodily injury. An example of this is a 2007 law in California where an individual could be convicted of third-degree murder if he or she kills another person while driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or controlled substances.

 

Under state of mind (iv), the felony-murder doctrine, the felony committed must be an inherently dangerous felony, such as burglary, arson, rape, robbery or kidnapping. Importantly, the underlying felony cannot be a lesser included offense such as assault, otherwise all criminal homicides would be murder as all are felonies.

 

Many jurisdictions divide murder by degrees. The most common divisions are between first and second degree murder. Generally, second degree murder is common law murder, and first degree is an aggravated form. The aggravating factors of first degree murder are a specific intent to kill, premeditation, and deliberation. In addition, murder committed by acts such as strangulation, poisoning, or lying in wait are also treated as first degree murder.[6]

 

As with most legal terms, the precise definition of murder varies between jurisdictions and is usually codified in some form of legislation. Even when the legal distinction between murder and manslaughter is clear, it is not unknown for a jury to find an defendant to murder guilty of the lesser offence. The jury might sympathise with the defendant (e.g. in a crime of passion, or in the case of a bullied victim who kills her tormentor), and the jury may wish to protect the defendant from a sentence of life imprisonment or execution.

 

According to Blackstone, English common law identified murder as a public wrong.[7] At common law, murder is considered to be malum in se, that is an act which is evil within itself. An act such as murder is wrong/evil by its very nature. And it is the very nature of the act which does not require any specific detailing or definition in the law to consider murder a crime.[8]

 

Some jurisdictions still take a common law view of murder. In such jurisdictions, precedent case law or previous decisions of the courts of law defines what is considered murder. However, although the common law is by nature flexible and adaptable, in the interests both of certainty and of securing convictions, most common law jurisdictions have codified their criminal law and now have statutory definitions of murder.

Although laws vary by country, there are circumstances of exclusion that are common in many legal systems.

 

Self-defense: acting in self-defense or in defense of another person is generally accepted as legal justification for killing a person in situations that would otherwise have been murder. However, a self-defense killing might be considered manslaughter if the killer established control of the situation before the killing took place. In the case of self-defense it is called a "justifiable homicide".[9]

Unlawful killings without malice or intent are considered manslaughter.

In many common law countries, provocation is a partial defense to a charge of murder which acts by converting what would otherwise have been murder into manslaughter (this is voluntary manslaughter, which is more severe than involuntary manslaughter)

Accidental killings are considered homicides. Depending on the circumstances, these may or may not be considered criminal offenses; they are often considered manslaughter.

Suicide does not constitute murder in most societies. Assisting a suicide, however, may be considered murder in some circumstances.

Killing of enemy combatants by lawful combatants in accordance with lawful orders in war, although illicit killings within a war may constitute murder or homicidal war crimes. (see the Laws of war article)

 

Capital punishment: some countries practice the death penalty. Capital punishment ordered by a legitimate court of law as the result of a conviction in a criminal trial with due process for a serious crime. The 47 Member States of the Council of Europe are prohibited from using the death penalty.

Euthanasia, doctor assisted suicide: the administration of lethal drugs by a doctor to a terminally ill patient, if the intention is solely to alleviate pain, is seen in many jurisdictions as a special case (see the doctrine of double effect and the case of Dr John Bodkin Adams).[10]

A killing simply to prevent the theft of one's property may or may not be legal, depending on the jurisdiction. In the US, such a killing is legal in Texas.[11] In recent years, Texas has been the scene of some very controversial incidents that involved killing to protect property, that have led to discussions of the laws and social norms of the state (see Joe Horn shooting controversy). In a highly controversial case, in 2013, a jury in south Texas acquitted a man who killed a prostitute, who, after receiving $150 from the man in exchange for sex, refused to have sex with the man, and attempted to run away with his money. The man's lawyer argued that the man was trying to retrieve property which was stolen during night time, an action which allows for the use of deadly force in Texas. The jury accepted this defense. There was major controversy in this case, due to the fact that there were questions about whether the money was in fact stolen, since the man had given it voluntarily to the prostitute, and the "contract" of prostitution is in fact an illegal contract in Texas, since both buying and selling sex are criminal offenses.[12][13]

Killing an intruder who is found by an owner to be in the owner's home (having entered unlawfully): legal in most US states (see Castle doctrine).

Killing to prevent specific forms of aggravated rape or sexual assault - killing of attacker by the potential victim or by witnesses to the scene; this is especially the case in regard to child rape- legal in parts of the US and in various countries[14]

In some parts of the world, especially in jurisdictions which apply Sharia law, the killing of a woman or girl in specific circumstances (e.g., when she commits adultery) and is killed by husband or other family members, known as honor killing, is not considered murder. For example, in Jordan, part of article 340 of the Penal Code states that "he who discovers his wife or one of his female relatives committing adultery and kills, wounds, or injures one of them, is exempted from any penalty.

 

All jurisdictions require that the victim be a natural person; that is a human being who was still alive before being murdered. In other words, under the law, one cannot murder a cadaver, a corporation, a non-human animal, or any other non-human organism such as a plant or bacterium.

 

California's murder statute, Penal Code Section 187, was interpreted by the Supreme Court of California in 1994 as not requiring any proof of the viability of the fetus as a prerequisite to a murder conviction.[16] This holding has two implications. The first is a defendant in California can be convicted of murder for killing a fetus which the mother herself could have terminated without committing a crime.[16] The second, as stated by Justice Stanley Mosk in his dissent, because women carrying nonviable fetuses may not be visibly pregnant, it may be possible for a defendant to be convicted of intentionally murdering a person he did not know existed.

 

Some countries allow conditions that "affect the balance of the mind" to be regarded as mitigating circumstances. This means that a person may be found guilty of "manslaughter" on the basis of "diminished responsibility" rather than murder, if it can be proved that the killer was suffering from a condition that affected their judgment at the time. Depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and medication side-effects are examples of conditions that may be taken into account when assessing responsibility.

 

Mental disorder may apply to a wide range of disorders including psychosis caused by schizophrenia and dementia, and excuse the person from the need to undergo the stress of a trial as to liability. Usually, sociopathy and other personality disorders are not legally considered insanity, because of the belief they are the result of free will in many societies. In some jurisdictions, following the pre-trial hearing to determine the extent of the disorder, the defense of "not guilty by reason of insanity" may be used to get a not guilty verdict.[17] This defense has two elements:

 

That the defendant had a serious mental illness, disease, or defect.

That the defendant's mental condition, at the time of the killing, rendered the perpetrator unable to determine right from wrong, or that what he or she was doing was wrong.

 

Under New York law, for example:

 

§ 40.15 Mental disease or defect. In any prosecution for an offense, it is an affirmative defense that when the defendant engaged in the proscribed conduct, he lacked criminal responsibility by reason of mental disease or defect. Such lack of criminal responsibility means that at the time of such conduct, as a result of mental disease or defect, he lacked substantial capacity to know or appreciate either: 1. The nature and consequences of such conduct; or 2. That such conduct was wrong.

 

—N.Y. Penal Law, § 40.15

Under the French Penal Code:

 

Article 122-1

 

A person is not criminally liable who, when the act was committed, was suffering from a psychological or neuropsychological disorder which destroyed his discernment or his ability to control his actions.

A person who, at the time he acted, was suffering from a psychological or neuropsychological disorder which reduced his discernment or impeded his ability to control his actions, remains punishable; however, the court shall take this into account when it decides the penalty and determines its regime.

Those who successfully argue a defense based on a mental disorder are usually referred to mandatory clinical treatment until they are certified safe to be released back into the community, rather than prison.

 

Post-partum depression

Some countries, such as Brazil, Canada, Mexico, Italy, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, and Australia, allow postpartum depression (also known as post-natal depression) as a defense against murder of a child by a mother, provided that a child is less than two years old (this may be the specific offense of infanticide rather than murder and include the effects of lactation and other aspects of post-natal care).[citation needed]

 

Unintentional

For a killing to be considered murder, there normally needs to be an element of intent. A defendant may argue that he or she took precautions not to kill, that the death could not have been anticipated, or was unavoidable. As a general rule, manslaughter[20] constitutes reckless killing, but manslaughter also includes criminally negligent (i.e. grossly negligent) homicide.[21]

 

Diminished capacity

In those jurisdictions using the Uniform Penal Code, such as California, diminished capacity may be a defense. For example, Dan White used this defense[22] to obtain a manslaughter conviction, instead of murder, in the assassination of Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk.

 

Aggravating circumstances[edit]

Murder with specified aggravating circumstances is often punished more harshly. Depending on the jurisdiction, such circumstances may include:

 

Premeditation

Poisoning

Murder of a police officer, judge, fireman or witness to a crime

Murder of a pregnant woman[24]

Crime committed for pay or other reward

Exceptional brutality or cruelty

In the United States, these murders are referred to as first-degree or aggravated murders.

  

In some common law jurisdictions, a defendant accused of murder is not guilty if the victim survives for longer than one year and one day after the attack.[26] This reflects the likelihood that if the victim dies, other factors will have contributed to the cause of death, breaking the chain of causation. Subject to any statute of limitations, the accused could still be charged with an offence representing the seriousness of the initial assault.

 

With advances in modern medicine, most countries have abandoned a fixed time period and test causation on the facts of the case.

 

In England and Wales, the "year-and-a-day rule" was abolished by the Law Reform (Year and a Day Rule) Act 1996. However, if death occurs three years or more after the original attack then prosecution can take place only with the Attorney-General's approval.

 

In the United States, many jurisdictions have abolished the rule as well.[27][28] Abolition of the rule has been accomplished by enactment of statutory criminal codes, which had the effect of displacing the common-law definitions of crimes and corresponding defenses. In 2001, the Supreme Court of the United States held that retroactive application of a state supreme court decision abolishing the year-and-a-day rule did not violate the Ex Post Facto Clause of Article I of the United States Constitution.[29]

 

In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a 74-year-old man, William Barnes, was acquitted of murder charges on May 24, 2010. He was on trial for murder for the death of Philadelphia police officer Walter Barkley. Barnes shot Barkley on November 27, 1966, and served 16 years in prison for attempted murder. Barkley died on August 19, 2007, allegedly from complications of the wounds suffered nearly 41 years earlier.

In the past, certain types of homicide were lawful and justified. Georg Oesterdiekhoff wrote that:

 

Evans-Pritchard says about the Nuer from Sudan: "Homicide is not forbidden, and Nuer do not think it wrong to kill a man in fair fight. On the contrary, a man who slays another in combat is admired for his courage and skill." (Evans-Pritchard 1956: 195) This statement is true for most African tribes, for pre-modern Europeans, for Indigenous Australians, and for Native Americans, according to ethnographic reports from all over the world. ... Homicides rise to incredible numbers among headhunter cultures such as the Papua. When a boy is born, the father has to kill a man. He needs a name for his child and can receive it only by a man, he himself has murdered. When a man wants to marry, he must kill a man. When a man dies, his family again has to kill a man.[31]

 

One of the oldest known prohibitions against murder appears in the Sumerian Code of Ur-Nammu written sometime between 2100 and 2050 BC. The code states, "If a man commits a murder, that man must be killed." The payment of weregild was an important legal mechanism in early Germanic society. If someone was killed, the guilty person would have to pay weregild to the victim's family. The other common form of legal reparation at this time was blood revenge.

 

In Judeo-Christian traditions, the prohibition against murder is one of the Ten Commandments given by God to Moses in (Exodus: 20v13) and (Deuteronomy 5v17). The Vulgate and subsequent early English translations of the Bible used the term secretly killeth his neighbour or smiteth his neighbour secretly rather than murder for the Latin clam percusserit proximum.[32][33] Later editions such as Young's Literal Translation and the World English Bible have translated the Latin occides simply as murder[34][35] rather than the alternatives of kill, assassinate, fall upon, or slay.

 

In Islam according to the Qur'an, one of the greatest sins is to kill a human being who has committed no fault. "For that cause We decreed for the Children of Israel that whosoever killeth a human being for other than manslaughter or corruption in the earth, it shall be as if he had killed all mankind, and whoso saveth the life of one, it shall be as if he had saved the life of all mankind."[Quran 5:32] "And those who cry not unto any other god along with Allah, nor take the life which Allah hath forbidden save in (course of) justice, nor commit adultery - and whoso doeth this shall pay the penalty."[Quran 25:68]

 

The term 'Assassin' derives from Hashshashin,[36] a militant Ismaili Shi`ite sect, active from the 8th to 14th centuries. This mystic secret society killed members of the Abbasid, Fatimid, Seljuq and Crusader elite for political and religious reasons.[37] The Thuggee cult that plagued India was devoted to Kali, the goddess of death and destruction.[38][39] According to some estimates the Thuggees murdered 1 million people between 1740 and 1840.[40] The Aztecs believed that without regular offerings of blood the sun god Huitzilopochtli would withdraw his support for them and destroy the world as they knew it.[41] According to Ross Hassig, author of Aztec Warfare, "between 10,000 and 80,400 persons" were sacrificed in the 1487 re-consecration of the Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan

 

An estimated 520,000 people were murdered in 2000 around the globe. Another study estimated the world-wide murder rate at 456,300 in 2010 with a 35% increase since 1990.[45] Two-fifths of them were young people between the ages of 10 and 29 who were killed by other young people.[46] Because murder is the least likely crime to go unreported, statistics of murder are seen as a bellwether of overall crime rates.[47]

 

Murder rates vary greatly among countries and societies around the world. In the Western world, murder rates in most countries have declined significantly during the 20th century and are now between 1 and 4 cases per 100,000 people per year.

  

UNODC : Per 100,000 population (2011)

Murder rates by country. Murder rates in jurisdictions such as Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Austria are among the lowest in the world, around 0.5 cases per 100,000 people per year; the rate of the United States is among the highest of developed countries, around 5.5 in 2004,[48] with rates in larger cities sometimes over 40 per 100,000.[49] The top ten highest murder rates are in Honduras (91.6 per 100,000), El Salvador, Ivory Coast, Venezuela, Belize, Jamaica, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guatemala, Saint Kitts and Nevis and Zambia. (UNODC, 2011 - full table here).

 

The following absolute murder counts per-country are not comparable because they are not adjusted by each country's total population. Nonetheless, they are included here for reference, with 2010 used as the base year (they may or may not include justifiable homicide, depending on the jurisdiction). There were 52,260 murders in Brazil, consecutively elevating the record set in 2009.[50] More than 500,000 people died from gun violence in Brazil between 1979 and 2003.[51] 33,335 murder cases were registered across India,[52] about 19,000 murders committed in Russia,[53] approximately 17,000 murders in Colombia (the murder rate was 38 per 100,000 people, in 2008 murders went down to 15,000),[54] approximately 16,000 murders in South Africa,[55] approximately 15,000 murders in the United States,[56] approximately 26,000 murders in Mexico,[57] approximately 13,000 murders in Venezuela,[58] approximately 4,000 murders in El Salvador,[59] approximately 1,400 murders in Jamaica,[60] approximately 550 murders in Canada[61] and approximately 470 murders in Trinidad and Tobago.[60] Pakistan reported 12,580 murders.

 

In the United States, 666,160 people were killed between 1960 and 1996.[64] Approximately 90% of murders in the US are committed by males.[65] Between 1976 and 2005, 23.5% of all murder victims and 64.8% of victims murdered by intimate partners were female.[66] For women in the US, homicide is the leading cause of death in the workplace.[67]

 

In the US, murder is the leading cause of death for African American males aged 15 to 34. Between 1976 and 2008, African Americans were victims of 329,825 homicides.[68][69] In 2006, Federal Bureau of Investigation's Supplementary Homicide Report indicated that nearly half of the 14,990 murder victims were Black (7421).[70] In the year 2007 non-negligent homicides, there were 3,221 black victims and 3,587 white victims. While 2,905 of the black victims were killed by a black offender, 2,918 of the white victims were killed by white offenders. There were 566 white victims of black offenders and 245 black victims of white offenders.[71] The "white" category in the Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) includes non-black Hispanics.[72] In London in 2006, 75% of the victims of gun crime and 79% of the suspects were "from the African/Caribbean community."[73] Murder demographics are affected by the improvement of trauma care, which has resulted in reduced lethality of violent assaults – thus the murder rate may not necessarily indicate the overall level of social violence.[74]

 

Workplace homicide is the fastest growing category of murder in America.[67]

 

Development of murder rates over time in different countries is often used by both supporters and opponents of capital punishment and gun control. Using properly filtered data, it is possible to make the case for or against either of these issues. For example, one could look at murder rates in the United States from 1950 to 2000,[75] and notice that those rates went up sharply shortly after a moratorium on death sentences was effectively imposed in the late 1960s. This fact has been used to argue that capital punishment serves as a deterrent and, as such, it is morally justified. Capital punishment opponents frequently counter that the United States has much higher murder rates than Canada and most European Union countries, although all those countries have abolished the death penalty. Overall, the global pattern is too complex, and on average, the influence of both these factors may not be significant and could be more social, economic, and cultural.

 

Despite the immense improvements in forensics in the past few decades, the fraction of murders solved has decreased in the United States, from 90% in 1960 to 61% in 2007.[76] Solved murder rates in major U.S. cities varied in 2007 from 36% in Boston, Massachusetts to 76% in San Jose, California.[77] Major factors affecting the arrest rate include witness cooperation[76] and the number of people assigned to investigate the case.

 

According to scholar Pieter Spierenburg homicide rates per 100,000 in Europe have fallen over the centuries, from 35 per 100,000 in medieval times, to 20 in 1500 AD, 5 in 1700, to below two per 100,000 in 1900.[78]

 

In the United States, murder rates have been higher and have fluctuated. They fell below 2 per 100,000 by 1900, rose during the first half of the century, dropped in the years following World War II, and bottomed out at 4.0 in 1957 before rising again.[79] The rate stayed in 9 to 10 range most of the period from 1972 to 1994, before falling to 5 in present times.[78] The increase since 1957 would have been even greater if not for the significant improvements in medical techniques and emergency response times, which mean that more and more attempted homicide victims survive. According to one estimate, if the lethality levels of criminal assaults of 1964 still applied in 1993, the country would have seen the murder rate of around 26 per 100,000, almost triple the actually observed rate of 9.5 per 100,000.

A similar, but less pronounced pattern has been seen in major European countries as well. The murder rate in the United Kingdom fell to 1 per 100,000 by the beginning of the 20th century and as low as 0.62 per 100,000 in 1960, and was at 1.28 per 100,000 as of 2009. The murder rate in France (excluding Corsica) bottomed out after World War II at less than 0.4 per 100,000, quadrupling to 1.6 per 100,000 since then.[81]

 

The specific factors driving this dynamics in murder rates are complex and not universally agreed upon. Much of the raise in the U.S. murder rate during the first half of the 20th century is generally thought to be attributed to gang violence associated with the Prohibition. Since most murders are committed by young males, the near simultaneous low in the murder rates of major developed countries circa 1960 can be attributed to low birth rates during the Great Depression and World War II. Causes of further moves are more controversial. Some of the more exotic factors claimed to affect murder rates include the availability of abortion[82] and the likelihood of chronic exposure to lead during childhood (due to the use of leaded paint in houses and tetraethyllead as a gasoline additive in internal combustion engines).

 

Southern slave codes did make willful killing of a slave illegal in most cases.[83] For example, the 1860 Mississippi case of Oliver v. State charged the defendant with murdering his own slave.[84] In 1811, the wealthy white planter, Arthur Hodge, was executed for murdering several of his slaves on his plantation in the British West Indies.[85]

 

In Corsica, vendetta was a social code that required Corsicans to kill anyone who wronged their family honor. It has been estimated that between 1683 and 1715, nearly 30,000 out of 120,000 Corsicans lost their lives to vendetta,[86] and between 1821 and 1852, no less than 4,300 murders were perpetrated in Corsica.

 

Quelle:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder

de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mord

   

Pompeii has been a popular tourist destination for 250 years; it was on the Grand Tour. In 2008, it was attracting almost 2.6 million visitors per year, making it one of the most popular tourist sites in Italy.[27] It is part of a larger Vesuvius National Park and was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1997. To combat problems associated with tourism, the governing body for Pompeii, the Soprintendenza Archaeological di Pompei have begun issuing new tickets that allow for tourists to also visit cities such as Herculaneum and Stabiae as well as the Villa Poppaea, to encourage visitors to see these sites and reduce pressure on Pompeii.

Pompeii is also a driving force behind the economy of the nearby town of Pompei. Many residents are employed in the tourism and hospitality business, serving as taxi or bus drivers, waiters or hotel operators. The ruins can be easily reached on foot from the Circumvesuviana train stop called Pompei Scavi, directly at the ancient site. There are also car parks nearby.

 

Excavations in the site have generally ceased due to the moratorium imposed by the superintendent of the site, Professor Pietro Giovanni Guzzo. Additionally, the site is generally less accessible to tourists, with less than a third of all buildings open in the 1960s being available for public viewing today. Nevertheless, the sections of the ancient city open to the public are extensive, and tourists can spend many days exploring the whole site.

 

Comments and Critiques are most welcome on this picture and I'll glad to read them but my prime purpose of posting this picture is to spread the awareness about growing Danger of Genetically Modified Food.

_________________

 

So what is GM Food???

Genetically modified (GM) foods are foods produced from genetically modified organisms (GMO) that have had their DNA altered through genetic engineering.These plants have been modified in the laboratory to enhance desired traits such as increased resistance to herbicides or improved nutritional content.

_________________

 

Fair enough, so what's the problem with that?

No one can assure that what'll be the consequence of this genetic engineering in long run …. Might be good might be Really BAD (which is more likely) . . . . but if it goes into wrong direction then there is no turning back.

 

http://www.newscientist.com/channel/life/gm-food/dn9921

_________________

 

What India has to do with this?

We are running on the risk of field test of GM food …. Because it is easy to do this test in developing countries due to weak regulations, lack of political will-power and last but not least high corruption rate.

 

In field test GM crops will be grown in open fields for testing but it won't be limited to that area …. The GM plants will produce seeds and they will spread in near and far areas with wind and water . . . .

 

This crop will the part of food chain so all the above levels of food pyramid will swallow the new "Genetic Code" directly or indirectly . . . .

 

So Developing nations are actually like Gini Pigs for GM crop testing.

_________________

 

Is there someone doing something about it?

Ammm… sort of .. there is a trial happening in the supreme court of India … but -

http://www.financialexpress.com/news/Supreme-Court-vacates-ban-order-on-GM-crops-trials/272520/

_________________

 

For more information just Google – "GM food Danger"

 

Thanks for Reading

© All rights reserved. Use without permission is illegal.

 

Yes, It has been raining off and on for three days. Only about an inch has fallen on my garden, but without sun and hot temperatures, the moisture isn’t evaporating. Unfortunately, there is no more rain in the forecast for the next 15 days. The situation with our depleting water remains dire. I had a letter to the editor published in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution yesterday, urging conservation and, again, a building moratorium, but from what I hear, the Atlanta Regional Council and other governmental bodies have no intention to stop construction, which proceeds at an obscene pace, thus creating more demand on a very rapidly depleting natural resource. The stupidity of our "leaders" here is astonishing. They should have been planning for growth thirty years ago, and now it's too little (or nothing at all), too late. I despair.

 

Anybody want to advise me where to move to where there is "smart growth," sufficient natural resources, wise planning, great weather, progressive politics and no tornadoes or hurricanes or floods or fires or ice?

 

This leaf is only about an inch and a half long.

 

See my shots on Darckr (two by two) or one by one.

 

No, I'm not back, really, but I just wanted to share this with you. I'm actually making good headway with my workload.

 

Fort Pokaran folk shrine, Rajasthan, India 2001

 

:radio_button: π pics - all photos and collages Ⓒ Peter Callas

 

All photos taken with Canon G2

 

Located in the remote Thar Desert, the 14th century citadel of Fort Pokaran is located about 40km from the site of India’s first underground nuclear test, known as Operation Smiling Buddha, in 1974 - provocatively close to the border with Pakistan. Five more nuclear tests were conducted in Pokaran’s Test Range in 1998, after which India declared a moratorium on testing. The pee green hall of the fort, now a hotel, hosted cavernous cracks when we visited in 2001, en route to Jaisalmer. Someone suggested that the building is haunted and it certainly had an eerie feel about it, with faded family portraits occupying the interior like stranded rock jocks as they teeter forward from the walls.

 

On the far side of the central courtyard we were delighted to find a local folk shrine. Hundreds of figures, some made from papier-mâché and others from plaster, were laid out in an apparent sequence (or not) in a long hallway that looked like it had once been used as a horse stable. Unfortunately the exuberant colours of the statues were subdued by the accretion of extremely copious amounts of red dust. I have never seen any other documentation of this shrine but would love to be enlightened about who some of the figures are that are represented here, and about its author.

Like any normal person shopping I was carrying my camera and just so happened to have a 70-200mm lens on me. How lucky? :-)

 

I'm not into people photography really but this guy I HAD to shoot. If a face can tell a story then this guy's face can tell a library full of stories. Really nice bloke to talk to and a pleasure to shoot. Fact is I think this is my first ever portrait.

 

Shot was taken outside Foodtown, Whangaparaoa LOL

 

CC welcome.

  

The man behind the Tā moko:

 

Tuhoe Isaac was born in Wairoa, New Zealand in 1954. By the age of 18 he had moved to the city, shifted to Australia, been imprisoned in jail and joined one of New Zealand’s most notorious gangs — The Mongrel Mob. Entering the mob world where the bull dog wearing a German helmet was their insignia and the lawlessness or anarchy ruled, Tuhoe took on the name ‘Bruno’ after the German helmet worn by the dog. Here he found true brotherhood and comradeship in the ‘house of the dog’ at a crucial time in his life. Amidst a raft of crimes and a number of lags in New Zealand maximum and minimum security prisons, Tuhoe emerged to become the leader of the King Country Mongrel Mob chapter. Shifting to Auckland as the President he presided over the infamous Ambury Park Convention of 1986 where a vicious rape occurred, despite a moratorium on violence. This incident led to the laying down of his presidency and his patch, but more than that it destroyed Tuhoe’s dream of a new and unified Mongrel Mob.

 

Tired of fighting, beer, drugs and a life in and out of prison he tried to find a new life. However, no matter what he did to change, his life always reverted back to the way of the mongrel. In 1989 Tuhoe was faced with a very real death situation. With no where to go he called out to God and found salvation in Jesus Christ. His eyes were opened to the reality of the darkness and futility of his gang lifestyle. Leaving the gang to live a God-centered life was hard.

 

In 1992 he joined Te Whare Amorangi Bible School at Pukekohe. After two years training he moved into full-time mission work from 1994 to 1999 traveling to Fiji, the Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, Tonga, Samoa, Australia, Finland and throughout New Zealand as an evangelist. In 1997 he ran a successful gang reconciliation hui.

 

In 2000 Tuhoe created a trust to support the unloved of society, visiting the prisons and motivational speaking at schools. In 2003 he started a Diploma of Counseling and pastoral care. He worked alongside a qualified team in the counseling arena until 2007. Still involved in community work he runs a men’s group and visits the prisons to facilitate a prisoner’s mentoring program. He sat on the COGs committee at Manukau city for a number of years. He is also a well-known face at the markets and on the streets of Auckland selling ‘Kia Ora’ cards.

 

Above taken with kind permission from Mr Isaac from his website www.true-red.com

 

View On Black

Fort Pokaran folk shrine, Rajasthan, India 2001

 

:radio_button: π pics - all photos and collages Ⓒ Peter Callas

 

All photos taken with Canon G2

 

Located in the remote Thar Desert, the 14th century citadel of Fort Pokaran is located about 40km from the site of India’s first underground nuclear test, known as Operation Smiling Buddha, in 1974 - provocatively close to the border with Pakistan. Five more nuclear tests were conducted in Pokaran’s Test Range in 1998, after which India declared a moratorium on testing. The pee green hall of the fort, now a hotel, hosted cavernous cracks when we visited in 2001, en route to Jaisalmer. Someone suggested that the building is haunted and it certainly had an eerie feel about it, with faded family portraits occupying the interior like stranded rock jocks as they teeter forward from the walls.

 

On the far side of the central courtyard we were delighted to find a local folk shrine. Hundreds of figures, some made from papier-mâché and others from plaster, were laid out in an apparent sequence (or not) in a long hallway that looked like it had once been used as a horse stable. Unfortunately the exuberant colours of the statues were subdued by the accretion of extremely copious amounts of red dust. I have never seen any other documentation of this shrine but would love to be enlightened about who some of the figures are that are represented here, and about its author.

Only very recently via a petition on FB, I learned about the disturbing truth regarding the Namibian slaughter of the seals, which is also taking place at this very seal "reserve" Cape Cross. After the tourist visit which strictly ends at 17:00 and which is too early to see a nice sunset, the massacre begins.

www.thepetitionsite.com/6/please-grant-a-moratorium-to-su...

Zitat Wikipedia: "Das Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg (KKP) befindet sich nahe Philippsburg im Landkreis Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg.

 

Der erste Block (KKP 1), ein Siedewasserreaktor, wurde 1970 begonnen und ging am 7. Mai 1979 ans Netz. Er ist nahezu baugleich mit den drei anderen deutschen Siedewasserreaktoren der Baulinie 69 (nämlich dem Kernkraftwerk Krümmel, dem Kernkraftwerk Brunsbüttel (beide in Schleswig-Holstein) und dem Kernkraftwerk Isar Block 1) und dem Kernkraftwerk Zwentendorf (Österreich), das nach einem Volksentscheid nicht in Betrieb ging.[2]

 

Der zweite Block (KKP 2) besitzt einen Druckwasserreaktor der 3. Generation (Vor-Konvoi-Anlage) und ging am 17. Dezember 1984 in Betrieb. Die nominelle elektrische Leistung des KKP 1 beträgt 926 MW, die des KKP 2 1468 MW. Das KKP wird von der EnBW Kernkraft GmbH betrieben.

 

Gemäß Atomausstiegsbeschluss von 2002 war die endgültige Abschaltung des KKP 1 für 2011/2012 vorgesehen, die des KKP 2 für 2016/2017.[3] Nach der erneuten Novellierung des Atomgesetzes 2010 („Laufzeitverlängerung“) war die endgültige Abschaltung von KKP 1 für 2026 und von KKP 2 für 2032 vorgesehen.[4]

 

KKP 1 wurde am Morgen des 17. März 2011 für das von der Bundesregierung (Kabinett Merkel II) beschlossene dreimonatige Atom-Moratorium heruntergefahren.[5] Ende Mai 2011 wurde von den Umweltministern der Länder und des Bundes beschlossen, den Block 1 dauerhaft stillzulegen.[6] Am 30. Juni 2011 beschloss der Bundestag die Energiewende (siehe auch Atomausstieg)."

This is the "Hudson River Hospital" located in Poughkeepsie, New York. It was built between 1868 and 1871, designed by Frederick Clarke Withers an associate of famed Gothic architect Andrew Jackson Downing. The grounds were designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux, of New York City Central Park fame.

 

It now sits vacant and abandoned (although the grounds are patrolled and secured by private security). It is also at the center of a redevelopment controversy with the Town of Poughkeepsie having instituted a building moratorium in response to this project and another at the Casperkill Golf Course.

 

For more information visit the project website.

I couldn't decide which of these I liked the best visually (although, honestly, I kinda think this one's my fave, haha), so I just made three songlists, one to go with each. I used all different artists (I think) and they're kinda themed. Enjoy.

 

This is the kinda emo soundtrack. If I had it all to do over, I would probably change the Natalie Imbruglia track, feels outta place, but oh well.

 

Opening Credits: Regina Spektor - Aching to Pupate

Waking Up: Eels - Elizabeth on the Bathroom Floor

Average Day: Loquat - Swingset Chain (10" Version)

Falling in Love: Adele - Make you Feel my Love

Love Scene: Leah Andreone - Dive in

Secret Love: Cassie Steele - Love Cost

Breaking Up: Bright Eyes - It's Cool, we can Still be Friends

Life's Okay: Natalie Imbruglia - Intuition

Mental Breakdown: Nine Inch Nails - Somewhat Damaged

Saying Goodbye: Joydrop - Strawberry Marigold

Starting Over: K's Choice - What the Hell is Love?

Lessons: David Schultz and the Skyline - Abyss

Flashback: Charlotte Martin - Darkest Hour

Realization: Kim Richey - A Place Called Home

Long Night Alone: Alanis - Moratorium

Death Scene: Maria Mena - Calm Under the Waves

Closing Credits: Cat Power - I Found a Reason

I have a general moratorium on taking more photos of this photogenic bird. This one all but demanded I take its picture.

Edited By Angelica~

  

Background:

Tahiti

The French annexed various Polynesian island groups during the 19th century. In September 1995, France stirred up widespread protests by resuming nuclear testing on the Mururoa atoll after a three-year moratorium. The tests were suspended in January 1996.

 

Tahiti inIncludes five archipelagoes (4 volcanic, 1 coral); Makatea in French Polynesia is one of the three great phosphate rock islands in the Pacific Ocean - the others are Banaba (Ocean Island) in Kiribati and Nauru

 

Origin of the Polynesian languages

All Polynesian languages are derived from Indo-Malaysian also called today austronesian languages. The relation between Tahitian and Malaysian was established by European linguists in the 18th century thanks to the visit of Ahutoru, the first Tahitian brought back by Bougainville while traveling to Tahiti. The autronesian is divided into 2 branches :

   

Easter Pacific languages (or Oceanian languages) : French Polynesia, Hawaii, Cook, New Zeland

Western Pacific languages : Philipins, Indonesia

In French Polynesia, there is not one but several Polynesian languages due to large distances separating archipelagos. All of them are known under the generic term Reo ma’ohi (reo means language). The designation of these languages comes from the island’s name of the people speaking them. Thus, we can distinguish 5 different Polynesian languages, showing sometimes important differences :

This has no cropping..... The whale was that close.....a great experience....

 

The Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12–16 metres (40–50 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The Humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex whale song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating.

 

Found in oceans and seas around the world, Humpback Whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, Humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods, including the spectacular bubble net fishing technique.

 

Like other large whales, the Humpback was a target for the whaling industry, and its population fell by an estimated 90% before a whaling moratorium was introduced in 1966. Stocks of the species have since partially recovered, however entanglement in fishing gear, collisions with ships, and noise pollution are ongoing concerns. Current estimates for the abundance of Humpback Whales range from about 30,000 to 60,000, approximately one third of pre-whaling levels. Once hunted to the brink of extinction, Humpbacks are now sought out by whale-watchers, particularly off parts of Australia and the United States.

  

See where this picture was taken. [?]

all rights reserved

multimedia art, acrylic paint

 

If you dont know how human existence is connected to sea turtle existence, go here for info:

www.flickr.com/photos/38493797@N07/3887767409/in/set-7215...

 

BAD NEWS:

 

A federal judge in New Orleans on Tuesday sided with the oil industry, striking down the temporary moratorium on new offshore exploration and deepwater drilling the Obama administration imposed last month. That judge, it turns out, has in recent years had interests in Transocean—the world's largest offshore drilling company and the owner of the Deepwater Horizon rig—as well as other energy companies engaged in offshore oil extraction.

 

According to the most recently available financial disclosure form for US District Court Judge Martin Feldman, he had holdings of up to $15,000 in Transocean in 2008. He has also recently owned stock in offshore drilling or oilfield service providers Halliburton, Prospect Energy, Hercules Offshore, Parker Drilling Co., and ATP Oil & Gas. Feldman was appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1983.

 

IMPORTANT: Call or email your state representatives and senators and voice your complaint about this.

  

GOOD NEWS:

 

An effort to save thousands of sea turtle hatchlings from dying in the oily Gulf of Mexico will begin in the coming weeks in a desperate attempt to keep an entire generation of threatened species from vanishing.

 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will coordinate the plan, which calls for collecting about 70,000 turtle eggs in up to 800 nests buried in the sand across Florida Panhandle and Alabama beaches.

 

sites for rescue help:

 

The Louisiana Marine Mammal and Sea Turtle Rescue Program:

www.auduboninstitute.org/gulf-oil-spill-resources

 

Gulf Coast Turtle and Tortoise Society:

www.gctts.org/

 

Help Save Sea Turtles:

www.theanimalrescuesite.com/clickToGive/campaign.faces?si...

 

New England Aquarium - Marine Animal Rescue Team Blog:

rescue.neaq.org/

 

The Institute for Marine Mammal Studies:

www.imms.org/index.php

 

Gulf Coast Wildlife Rescue :

gcwr.org/how_can_i_help.html

 

Virginia Aquarium & Marine Science Center

www.virginiaaquarium.com/Pages/default.aspx

 

The Gulf Of Mexico Sea Grant Programs:

gulfseagrant.tamu.edu/oilspill/index.htm

 

US Fish and Wildlife Service:

www.fws.gov/home/dhoilspill/index.html

 

To Report an Oiled Animal — call 1-800-557-1401 and leave message with OWCN (Oiled Wildlife Care Network.) Messages checked hourly.

 

To volunteer — call OWCN on 1-866-448-5816

 

Oiled Wildlife Care Network (for info):

www.owcn.org/

On July 16, 1945, the United States Army detonated the world’s first nuclear weapon in New Mexico’s Jornada del Muerto desert. The test, code-named “Trinity,” was a success, unleashing an explosion with the energy of about 20 kilotons of TNT and beginning the nuclear age. Since then, nearly 2,000 nuclear tests have been performed. Most of these took place during the 1960s and 1970s. When the technology was new, tests were frequent and often spectacular, and they led to the development of newer, more deadly weapons. Since the 1990s, there have been efforts to limit the testing of nuclear weapons, including a U.S. moratorium and a U.N. comprehensive test ban treaty. As a result, testing has slowed—though not halted—and there are looming questions about who will take over for those experienced engineers who are now near retirement.

 

Robert Oppenheimer (16 November 1945):

"Despite the vision and farseeing wisdom of our wartime heads of state, the physicists have felt the peculiarly intimate responsibility for suggesting, for supporting, and in the end, in large measure, for achieving the realization of atomic weapons. Nor can we forget that these weapons as they were in fact used dramatized so mercilessly the inhumanity and evil of modern war. In some sort of crude sense which no vulgarity, no humor, no overstatement can quite extinguish, the physicists have known sin; and this is a knowledge which they cannot lose."

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gz0haLU0pvA

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8w3Y-dskeg

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=htJS5GKdaXs

 

www.armscontrol.org/factsheets/nucleartesttally

  

"AE EHL-E-WAFA DARS-E-WAFA KEUN NAHEN DETAY"

The stupid war against terrorism:

This is the stupidest war that I have ever seen.

Michael L. Love Ph.D

01/29/06 02:39 PM

US aggression against so-called terrorists has led predictably to bad results, and we should take all necessary action to stop the war now: It is a stupid, stupid war.

The state of the nation is appalling, but US power is clustered primarily around the centers of wealth (military might, and oil resources) in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere, and the situation is only getting worse. This result is not surprising since the premise of the war was flawed to begin with, and the execution of the war has devolved over the course of the past three years, so that the US is stuck in a sink hole, as it were. We must find a way to end this ridiculous war against terrorism and get the US out of Iraq and Afghanistan now. Stop the war now!

The leader of the US is clearly slow of mind, and the claims in support of the war are dubious at best. The resources that are being spent in the pursuit of al-Qaida are largely wasted because they are probably dead. Most of them died on 9/11 on the airplanes, and no terrorism has been reported since that time. Why are the resources of the US being wasted on this demented pursuit?

A simple review of the our history in Iraq will show the idiocy of our leaders. Despite this fact, that all known terrorists died in airplanes on 9/11, we subjected Iraq to repeated bombings, laid waste to their national infrastructure, starved their children with sanctions, and poisoned their environment with depleted uranium, among other egregious things. Then, after using the UN to emasculate their military, we took our exit from international chambers and viciously preempted, an invasion with an aim to throw down a sitting head of state, conquer cities, ports, and oil fields. We cruelly deprived the people of Iraq of their self-determination, lives, and wealth. After all of this depraved behavior on the part of the US, we expect the people of Iraq to welcome us as "liberators", and lay themselves low before our military power. How can we possibly be such imbeciles!

Clearly, the US has fully lost credibility as the protector of any values or virtues in the world; We should disavow the actions of the nation, end the current administration, and bring the troops home expeditiously. In the execution of this war the US appears as the equivalent of perdition's son and a whited sepulchre, vacuously quoting scripture as they kill proudly. They are full of bloodthirsty torture and murders in the dark; attacking their supposed enemies before they even become a credible threat. Given such a history I fear that the US is past redemption, so that no one should be judged for wishing to dissaciate themselves from the nation and their actions. It had such better potential than this.

Saddam was certainly a bad governor and evil person, but for purposes of US global domination, he was also established, propped up, and deliberately genocide-enabled by the US. When he lost favor with the oilygarchy, it was taken it out on the people of Iraq, in a US instigated downward spiral of misery. Before US intervention, Iraq was a secular modern state and friends of the US, not terrorists. Terrorism was no justification for the war, and in fact the war itself was a very act of terrorism. The US has become what we loathe.

At the outset of the war Mr Bush was a weak president, unsupported by a democratic majority, yet he presumed to lead the US into an unpopular war against the wishes of our closest friends. One might expect him to learn the lessons of history and know better, but instead we are subjected to more and more lies from his weak-minded, frenetic, and untrustworthy administration. He has propped up his power with egregious violations of our constitutional principles, such as the Patriot Act, FISA court violations, secret detentions, deportions, tortures, and killings.

This inane government will certainly retort that, "We are killing the terrorists", and if that were true, then it would destroy this argument. I say, "Show me the terrorists, Mr Bush, if you have killed so many". You have not produced a single one since 9/11. Your failure to combat the real problem is exasperating! Senseless.

It is our duty to express our opposition by taking action against this outrageous, evil, and stupid war. For example, we could plan an anti-war moratorium; a national strike, a stay home against the war protest. Many people are boycotting US corporations or attacking centers of wealth in the US. Practice austerity and boycott food products, technology products, computers, and pharmacuticals especially. Use the web and your prescriptions to get generic medicines abroad. Use free software instead of Microsoft. Sell your car, and buy a bicycle. Use public transportation, and send the money that you save to your favorite organization resisting the war. If you feel strongly against the war, then you should do something about it now, even if the impact is low, because it adds to what others are doing. All of these actions will let people know that it is important to stop the war. It is a statement and demonstration against the war, and if we all do it together, then we can stop the madness of the US and Bush administration. This type of activism works.

Use the "Resist War!" banner on your websites to spread the word against the war. Turn your websites black in protest, and link your sites together, and with ours. If we were joined by many other websites, then it could possibly have a major impact, and turn back from this egregious situation. Hundreds of millions of people now agree that the war is wrong, and that it should be ended. If everyone does everything that we can, then the situation will become even more intolerable, and the US will withdraw.

The truth is that the people of Iraq are defending their homeland against an un-provoked act of aggression. The US has killed many of their brave fighters, but they continue to fight. In their desolation, there are many Iraqis remaining who have welcomed us into their cities, but given our abysmal performance, even such subjugation is seriously in doubt. Despite this abhorrent situation, the war continues, and it is madness to think that the continued presence of the US contributes anything positive to the situation. It is in no way possible that the presence of such a desolator can offer any betterment to the people of Iraq. Still I am advocating for enforced reparations to be paid by the US to Iraq and Afghanistan after withdrawl. The dubious leaders of the US are misusing their armed forces in an egregious way. Bring the troops home now before they are ordered to commit any more barbarities. This will have the added benefit of sparing the people of Iraq any further misery at the hand of the US nation. US out! End the conquest and occupation of Iraq now!

 

this year, photography wise, i would like to take a lot of pictures. a lot. most days i don't carry my camera around, because my arms are too frail - i usually have heavy baggage anyway and i don't want to add a dslr to it but i don't want to be fine with that! chances are everywhere.

 

i find myself shying away from pursuing journalistic or street photography these days, but i still take anthropological photos for reference.

 

but artistic photography wise, i only like to take photos of beautiful things. and those are the ones i'd like to represent myself in, i think. beautiful sceneries, beautiful people, and combination of both.

 

i only really take pictures of people i really like and/or like a lot. but sometimes in class or in the streets i come across people who catch my eye, and again, chances are everywhere - i want to summon up the courage to ask to take their picture.

 

i got some nudes taken, but the photographer doesn't want to make them public. i want to do it again, before i get too old and wrinkly!

 

a book that i am working on as a photographer is going to get published this year. i'm way excited for that.

 

i have wanted to do an exhibition for a flipping long time and perhaps if i make some.. eh.. if shitloads of money fell from the sky or i get lucky i may hold one.

 

i'm graduating uni this year and i will have a lot less free time, so i want to take full advantage of my moratorium student life.

 

a very happy new year to you!

Tiny is a township, part of Simcoe County in south-central Ontario, Canada. The Township of Tiny can be found in the Southern Georgian Bay region and is approximately 43 miles long or 160 square miles.

 

The township was named, in 1822, after a pet dog of Lady Sarah Maitland (1792-1873), wife of Sir Peregrine Maitland, Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada. Two other adjoining townships were also named for her pet dogs, Tay and Flos (now Springwater Township).

 

The history of Tiny Township reflects its three founding cultures: Native, French and British. Located within Wendake, the historical homeland of the Huron people, the region is closely tied to early missionary exploration of the region, including the Jesuit mission of Sainte-Marie among the Hurons in nearby Midland.

 

The township is also the location of an important archaeological site, the 17th century ossuary of the community of Ossossane, the capital of the Huron Confederacy.

In 1798, the British government purchased the land in the area and soon after established a naval base at Penetanguishene. By the mid 1800s, families from Quebec began moving to the Tiny Township area for the cheap and fertile land to farm.

 

Today, the Tiny Township area is still very much a bilingual (French and English) area of Ontario, and is one of 25 municipalities in Ontario designated for bilingual government services under the French Language Services Act. In honour of the region's French history, Lafontaine hosts the annual Le Festival du Loup, a festival of francophone music and culture which celebrates the death of a wolf that terrorised the village in the 1800s, which takes place in July.

 

Lafontaine was originally called Sainte-Croix (French for Holy Cross) due to many large crosses found in the area that were planted by the Jesuits. It was renamed Lafontaine to honor the politician Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine, one of the early Joint Premiers of the Province of Canada.

 

Tiny contains an artesian well that produces some of the purest spring water in the world. Many residents were concerned that a proposed garbage dump over the aquifer would contaminate the water, and a series of protests achieved a one-year moratorium on the dump.

 

Source

 

With two "one more..." images, to be uploaded as last in this series, I'm parting with Sri Lankan wildlife here on Flickr - at least for a while.

There are some very interesting facts about this awesome cetacean that I have not shared so far, although I should have... better late than never, here follows a clipping from Wikipedia:

 

The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), or cachalot, is the largest of the toothed whales and the largest toothed predator. It is the only living member of genus Physeter, and one of three extant species in the sperm whale family, along with the pygmy sperm whale and dwarf sperm whale of the genus Kogia.

 

Mature males average at 16 metres (52 ft) in length but some may reach 20.5 metres (67 ft), with the head representing up to one-third of the animal's length. The sperm whale feeds primarily on squid. Plunging to 2,250 metres (7,380 ft) for prey, it is the second deepest diving mammal, following only the Cuvier's beaked whale. The sperm whale's clicking vocalization, a form of echolocation and communication, may be as loud as 230 decibels (re 1 µPa at 1 m) underwater, making it the loudest sound produced by any animal. It has the largest brain of any animal on Earth, more than five times heavier than a human's. Sperm whales can live for more than 60 years.

 

The sperm whale can be found anywhere in the open ocean. Females and young males live together in groups while mature males live solitary lives outside of the mating season. The females cooperate to protect and nurse their young. Females give birth every four to twenty years, and care for the calves for more than a decade. A mature sperm whale has few natural predators. Calves and weakened adults are taken by pods of orcas.

 

From the early eighteenth century through the late 20th the species was a prime target of whalers. The head of the whale contains a liquid wax called spermaceti, from which the whale derives its name. Spermaceti was used in lubricants, oil lamps, and candles. Ambergris, a waste product from its digestive system, is still used as a fixative in perfumes. Occasionally the sperm whale's great size allowed it to defend itself effectively against whalers. The species is now protected by a whaling moratorium, and is currently listed as vulnerable by the IUCN.

For further reading on this topic please click over to this site:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sperm_whale

 

2014-03-15_15-52-10__VV_4648 - Version 2

THE WIND OF HEAVEN IS THAT WHICH BLOWS BETWEEN A HORSE'S EARS.

 

www.thepetitionsite.com/petition/710080115

 

humaneobserver.blogspot.com/

 

thecloudfoundation.wordpress.com/2010/02/04/petaluma-pres...

 

abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/wild-horses-rounded-west-9706248

This is relatively current coverage, now posting on February 2, 2010

 

Please let our voices be heard. Protest the BLM roundups of our wild horses!!

Click the links for info. Sign petitions , make calls and write letters!

STOP THE CALICO COMPLEX roundup in Northern Nevada NOW.

 

This is our neighborhood horse. He is a very sweet old one, out to pasture.

I come to visit him on my walks and he is asking me now, where is my treat??

Adopt a mustang!!

 

www.idausa.org/campaigns/horses/index.html

 

humanitythrougheducation.com/ Timely information! www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-0OK3i1YFI&NR=1

 

Link for PETA.... www.peta.org/actioncenter/ActionAlerts-item.asp?id=2982

 

PRESERVE OUR WILD HORSES IN NEVADA!!!!!

 

The Cloud Foundation, a very important link.... www.thecloudfoundation.org/

 

PLEASE SIGN THIS PETITION!

www.change.org/actions/view/a_unified_call_for_an_immedia...

 

NEW POST FROM * THECLOUDFOUNDATION * OF THE CALICO COMPLEX ROUND UPS AND MORE! posted here....January 7, 2010

www.thecloudfoundation.org/index.php/news-events-a-media/...

 

A video from Sheryl Crow and Viggo Mortensen, WILD HORSE EMERGENCY! Not sure as of the date of this video. <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVSIDH

PRESERVE OUR WILD HORSES IN NEVADA!!!!! wildhorsepreservation.com/

  

Advocates are protesting the roundups of our wild horses and burros which were once Federally protected. An amendment of excess animals, slipped through during the Bush administration!!! Is there anything he did right?? The most unpopular president in history made several errors and this was a major one, blindly signing away their protection!! Horse advocates wish to see the federal protection reinstated and that they be kept free roaming, wild and free. That those in captivity be returned to their homelands! Millions of taxpayers dollars are being used in these roundups and incarcerations. Not needed!!! Don't let private industry cattlemen steal our wild horse lands for grazing their livestock!!

 

They are being run for many miles , chased by helicopters in dead of winter, when they are on survival mode. Totally unacceptable, this is government sponsered cruelty to animals. We finally got rid of the slaughter houses and kill buyers posing as horse adopters, although I am sure it still goes on.

The wild horse is an icon of the West. Horses have fought our wars and taken hits just as man has. They have transported us across country over mountains and plains, on their backs and pulling covered wagons. Native Americans always had a horse too, for hunting buffalo and their transportation also! They have tilled our soil and been our beautiful friends. They have been tamed and ridden for pleasures, Western, English and bareback style!! Raced for money and used in other sports as you know. Is this their reward? My big joy is just to see them in the hills running and playing, a symbol of freedom, yes, freedom, the symbol of America!!

 

Please stop the mismanagement to extinction by BLM. Last year they nearly euthanized 33,000 horses!!! Public outcry then, halted this action!!! They are giving mares birth control that, to my knowledge, has not been tested! They are gelding stallions ad therefore leaving only non-viable herds on public lands! There are some who would like to see them sold for slaughter to foreign countries!! I do not want to see our beautiful horses being dined on in foreign countries!!! Canada has offered to buy 10,000 for slaughter! BLM is moving mass amounts of horses to the mid west that have been branded and numbered, like cattle. The facility is not available to public viewing! Where is the change Mr. Obama!! The abusive roundups go on! Where is the transparency? I don't trust the BLM and think even the management should be given over to another more caring agency. But which one? How about PETA!!! Anyway, please stand up for our wild horses and burros now!! NOW is the time to stop them on their tracks! Protest loudly!! Call president Obama. Call Senator Harry Reid in Nevada, sign the petitions, and protest! All information needed for these actions are available at the given websites! Thanks, <3

 

SEE ABOVE LINKS NOW...I posted this on ..JAN. 5, 2010

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJJJZs0KUpk ....for your pleasure!

 

New Links...............http://www.idanews.org/ida-breaking-news/death-toll-rises-

 

OUR CALICO COMPLEX HORSES ARE NOT STARVING, BUT STRONG AND HEALTHY!!! www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSMZmlWgeXs

 

NEWS COVERAGE OF THE RENO WILD HORSE ADVOCATES PROTEST...1/18/10

Also some footage of a roundup.

 

www.mynews4.com/story.php?id=9154

  

The half-million acre Calico Complex herd management area is the last stronghold of the American mustang and was designated by Congress principally for the wild horses and burros. Millions of head of livestock graze at a cost of $1.35/cow-calf pair/month.

Overall welfare livestock constitute a net loss of $123 million annually to the American tax payer.

The scapegoating of wild horses and burros for range deterioration must stop—they comprise only a tiny fraction of animals and wildlife grazing on our public lands.

Cows graze within a mile of water. In comparison wild horses are highly mobile, moving 5-10 miles from water and grazing on more rugged terrain.

BLM does not adequately control cattle on the public’s land and has does not sustainably balancing use of the “forage”, water and space.

A 1000-lb cow not only eats 26lbs. of forage daily but they consume as much as 30 gallons of water a day and defecate in it as well.

Private and corporate livestock outnumber wild horses at least 100 to 1 on public lands.

Fort Pokaran folk shrine, Rajasthan, India 2001

 

:radio_button: π pics - all photos and collages Ⓒ Peter Callas

 

All photos taken with Canon G2

 

Located in the remote Thar Desert, the 14th century citadel of Fort Pokaran is located about 40km from the site of India’s first underground nuclear test, known as Operation Smiling Buddha, in 1974 - provocatively close to the border with Pakistan. Five more nuclear tests were conducted in Pokaran’s Test Range in 1998, after which India declared a moratorium on testing. The pee green hall of the fort, now a hotel, hosted cavernous cracks when we visited in 2001, en route to Jaisalmer. Someone suggested that the building is haunted and it certainly had an eerie feel about it, with faded family portraits occupying the interior like stranded rock jocks as they teeter forward from the walls.

 

On the far side of the central courtyard we were delighted to find a local folk shrine. Hundreds of figures, some made from papier-mâché and others from plaster, were laid out in an apparent sequence (or not) in a long hallway that looked like it had once been used as a horse stable. Unfortunately the exuberant colours of the statues were subdued by the accretion of extremely copious amounts of red dust. I have never seen any other documentation of this shrine but would love to be enlightened about who some of the figures are that are represented here, and about its author.

Seeing whales was on our longtime 'wishlist'. We tried to see them in New Zealand two years ago, but failed, and finally we got the chance to board a whale watching tour from Monterey, California, and spotted a total of five humpback whales. A tremendous sight! We saw, smelled and heard them... they produce unique songs too! We saw one of them completely emerge from the sea, however the water was too choppy and I was too late shooting it. Quite pleased though with some of the photos of one of the tails slowely going down.. like this one. This was shot with the 100-400 mm lens at 220mm. All in all, we had a great ride on the Pacific, also spotting sea-otters!

 

@ Wikipedia:

 

The humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) is a species of baleen whale. One of the larger rorqual species, adults range in length from 12–16 metres (39–52 ft) and weigh approximately 36,000 kilograms (79,000 lb). The humpback has a distinctive body shape, with unusually long pectoral fins and a knobbly head. It is an acrobatic animal, often breaching and slapping the water. Males produce a complex song, which lasts for 10 to 20 minutes and is repeated for hours at a time. The purpose of the song is not yet clear, although it appears to have a role in mating.

 

Found in oceans and seas around the world, humpback whales typically migrate up to 25,000 kilometres (16,000 mi) each year. Humpbacks feed only in summer, in polar waters, and migrate to tropical or sub-tropical waters to breed and give birth in the winter. During the winter, humpbacks fast and live off their fat reserves. The species' diet consists mostly of krill and small fish. Humpbacks have a diverse repertoire of feeding methods, including the bubble net feeding technique.

 

Like other large whales, the humpback was and is a target for the whaling industry. Due to over-hunting, its population fell by an estimated 90% before a whaling moratorium was introduced in 1966. Stocks have since partially recovered; however, entanglement in fishing gear, collisions with ships, and noise pollution also remain concerns. There are at least 80,000 humpback whales worldwide. Once hunted to the brink of extinction, humpbacks are now sought by whale-watchers, particularly off parts of Australia, New Zealand, South America, Canada, and the United States.

This lot on Gore Avenue at Pender Street will be the next condo to go up in Vancouver's Chinatown. It is on the east edge of the community.

 

The vultures are circling. To date most of the new development is around the perimeter but already 3 developments are eating at the heart of the community.

 

THE HERITAGE BATTLE FOR CHINATOWN

 

Historic Vancouver neighbourhood is being redeveloped, raising fears it will lose its character.

 

By JOHN MACKIE, VANCOUVER SUN November 15, 2014

 

The marketing line for the Keefer Block condo development in Chinatown is “Heritage Meets Modern.”

 

But just how much heritage will be left after a wave of modern developments washes over the historic district is a matter of debate.

 

A new proposal for the 700-block of Main Street would demolish the last three buildings from Hogan’s Alley, a once-notorious back lane that was the longtime home of Vancouver’s black community.

 

Another condo development at 231 Pender would replace a funky, Chinese-themed garage that is listed on Canada’s Register of Historic Places. Angelo Tosi’s family has owned their building at 624 Main since 1930. It may date back to 1895, and looks it — the fixtures and shelving are as old as the hills.

 

But Tosi is 82, and will probably sell when the price is right. He doesn’t expect his store to survive.

 

“It’ll be gobbled up by the monstrous buildings,” said Tosi. “And then they’ll take it all, and it’s finished. They won’t keep the heritage on the bottom, they’ll put down whatever they want.”

 

His fatalistic attitude reflects the changes in Chinatown, which is undergoing a development boom after zoning changes by the City of Vancouver.

 

The protected “historic” area of Chinatown is now Pender Street, while much of Main, Georgia and Keefer can now be redeveloped, with heights of up to 90 feet (nine storeys). A few sites can go even higher.

 

Two towers are going up at Keefer and Main — the nine-storey, 81-unit Keefer Block, and the 17-storey, 156-unit 188 Keefer. Up the street at 137 Keefer, a development permit application has just gone in for a new nine-storey “multi-family building.”

 

None of them has stirred up much controversy. But a recent public meeting about a 12-storey, 137-unit condo to be built on an empty lot at Keefer and Columbia got people riled up.

 

“There was a lot of angry people that night,” said Henry Yu, a UBC history professor who feels a “vision plan” the Chinatown community worked on with the city for several years is being ignored.

 

“The vision plan gets passed, (but it has) no teeth,” said Yu. “Actually (there is) no policy, it’s a wish list of ‘Oh, we’d like seniors housing, we’d like to do this, we’d like to do that.’

 

“Almost immediately, the two (highrise) buildings in the 600-, 700-block Main go up, and they’re just basically Yaletown condos. Not even Yaletown — Yaletown has more character.

 

“These are straight out of the glass tower (model), no (historic) character, obliterating everything in terms of tying it to the kind of streetscape of Chinatown. You’re going to split the historic two or three blocks of Chinatown with a Main Street corridor of these glass towers.”

 

Yu says Chinatown has historically been small buildings on 25-foot lots, which makes for a jumble of small stores that gives it a unique look and character. But the new developments are much wider, and just don’t look like Chinatown.

 

“The two 600-, 700-block buildings have a rain shield that’s an awning, a glass awning that runs the whole block,” said Yu. “That’s the design guideline for the city as a whole, but it was nothing to do with Chinatown, (which is) narrow frontages, changing awnings.

 

“We said that (to the city planners), we raised it and raised it, but the planners just shoved it down our throat.”

 

Kevin McNaney is Vancouver’s assistant director of planning. He said the city changed the zoning in parts of Chinatown to help revitalize the neighbourhood, which has been struggling.

 

“We have been taking a look across Chinatown,” said McNaney. “What we’re finding is that rents are dropping, and vacancies are rising. And that’s a big part of the strategy of adding more people to revitalize Chinatown.

 

“There are only 900 people currently living in Chinatown, many of them seniors. It’s just not the population base needed to support businesses, so a lot of the businesses are going under. Along Pender Street you see a lot of vacancies right now.

 

“So at the heart of this plan is to bring more people to revitalize Chinatown, and also use that development to support heritage projects, affordable housing projects and cultural projects.”

 

Henry Yu disagrees. “The idea that you need density in Chinatown itself, that you need your own captive customer base, is moronic,” he said.

 

“Where else in the city would you make that argument, that nobody can walk more than two blocks, that no one is going to come in here from somewhere else?

 

“They will. People go to the International Summer Market in Richmond in an empty gravel field. Ten thousand people at night come from everywhere in the Lower Mainland, because there’s something worth going to.

 

“The problem isn’t that you need a captive audience that has no other choice but to shop in Chinatown — that’s just stupid, there’s plenty of people in Strathcona. The problem is, is there something worth coming to (in Chinatown)? And that has to do with the character, what the mix is, what kind of commercial.”

 

Ironically, all the new construction comes just as Chinatown seems to be undergoing a bit of a renaissance. Several new businesses have popped up in old buildings, attracted by the area’s character and cheap rents.

 

The très-hip El Kartel fashion boutique recently moved into a 6,000 sq. ft space at 104 East Pender that used to house Cathay Importers. It’s on the main floor of the four-storey Chinese Benevolent Association Building, which was built in 1909.

 

Across the street at 147 East Pender is Livestock, a runner and apparel store that is so cool it doesn’t even have a sign. “We were in Gastown at the corner of Cordova and Abbott, (and) just felt a change was needed,” said store manager Chadley Abalos.

 

“We found the opportunity in Chinatown, so we decided to move here. We feel it’s one of the new spots that are booming. You see a lot of new businesses — restaurants, clothing stores, furniture. We see the potential in it growing.”

 

Russell Baker owns Bombast, a chic furniture store at 27 East Pender. But he is not new to the neighbourhood — Bombast has been there for 10 years.

 

“I think (Chinatown is) one of the most interesting parts of the city,” he said.

 

“It’s still got some variety, some texture, architecturally, socially, economically. A lot of what’s happened to the downtown peninsula (in recent years) constitutes erasure. This is one of the places that still sort of feels like … it feels more urban than some parts of downtown. I would say downtown is a vertical suburb.

 

“If you like cities, Chinatown feels like one. That’s why we’re here.”

 

Baker said he expected Chinatown to happen a lot sooner than it did. Retailers that do well there still tend to be destinations, rather than stores that rely on heavy street traffic. “The buzz is that Chinatown is happening, but it’s really strategic, what’s happening,” he said. “Fortune Sound Club, that’s a niche market that’s destination. That’s the kind of thing that works down here. We’re destination, Bao Bei (restaurant) is destination.”

 

The new businesses make for an interesting mix with the old ones. The 200 block East Georgia Street is hopping with hipster bars (the Pacific Hotel, Mamie Taylor’s) and art galleries (Access Gallery, 221A, Centre A). But it also retains classic Chinatown shops like the Fresh Egg Mart and Hang Loong Herbal Products.

 

The question is whether the small businesses will be displaced as the area gentrifies. Real estate values have soared — Soltera paid $6.5 million for the northwest corner of Keefer and Main in 2011, Beedie Holdings paid $16.2 million for two parcels of land at Columbia and Keefer in 2013.

 

That seems like a lot for a site that’s two blocks from the troubled Downtown Eastside, but Houtan Rafii of the Beedie Group said that’s what land costs in Vancouver.

 

“It is a significant, substantial amount of money, but compared to most every area in Vancouver, it’s not dissimilar, whether you’re in Gastown, downtown, Concord-Pacific, even on the boundaries of Strathcona or on Hastings close to Clark or Commercial,” said Rafii. “It’s not an obscene amount of money, it’s market.”

 

Rafii said the Beedie Group met with local groups for a year about its development, and was surprised at the reaction it got at the public meeting, which was held because Beedie is looking to rezone the site to add an additional three storeys.

 

Yu doesn’t have a problem with the Beedie proposal per se, but feels it’s on a key site in Chinatown, and should be developed accordingly.

 

“It’s not the building’s fault,” said Yu.

 

“People are going ‘What’s wrong with this glass tower, it’s working everywhere else, and Chinese people love buying this stuff if it’s UBC.’

 

“That’s not the point. There’s plenty of room around the city to build glass towers (that are) 40 storeys, 50 storeys, whatever. Why do they need to be in this spot?

 

“This one is right in the heart (of Chinatown). Across the street is the Sun Yat-sen (garden), the Chinese Cultural Centre. On the same street is the (Chinese workers) monument. Next door is the back alley of Pender.”

 

Yu said a recent study found there will be a need for 3,300 income-assisted senior housing beds in the Lower Mainland over the next 15 years. He said the Columbia and Keefer site would be perfect for a seniors project.

 

“There’s a particular kind of resonance to the idea this is a traditional place where a lot of Chinese seniors can retire to,” he said.

 

“There is a five-year waiting list for the Simon K.Y. Lee Success long-term care home, so there’s huge demand, huge need, this is a place where they want to go. (Building a seniors home) would actually would help revitalize (Chinatown), because seniors bring sons, daughters, grandsons and granddaughters into a community.

 

“That’s the Chinatown vision plan, that’s what’s in there, that’s what those discussions were about. And yet what we’ve got is 137 luxury condo units for hip youngsters. That’s the Beedie proposal, and that’s what the last two towers (on Main) were. It’s not just insulting, it’s the thwarting of the very promise (of the vision plan).”

 

Wu would like to see a moratorium on new developments in Chinatown “until design guidelines are actually built to create a zone that respects the (area’s special) character.”

 

Retired city planner Nathan Edelson agrees. Which is significant, because he worked on the Chinatown vision plan for over a decade.

 

“My suggestion is that there should be a moratorium on the rezonings, for sure, until they can get an assessment of what the current new development is,” said Edelson. “To what degree are they contributing to, or harming Chinatown, the historic character of Chinatown? And it’s not an obvious answer.”

 

jmackie@vancouversun.com

  

Read more: www.vancouversun.com/business/Battle+Chinatown/10384991/s...

Beautiful clean blue waters and white sandy beaches at Naples, Florida, on the Gulf Coast. This is the way we want to keep it!

 

An underwhelming response by the White House has not help in the Gulf Oil Spill cleanup. We understand that the BP Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico is an unexpected and unprecedented event that cannot be blamed on the U.S. administration. However, the response to a crisis of this magnitude speaks volumes about our nation’s leadership.

 

President Obama keeps talking about the future of off-shore drilling, underscoring the need for additional restrictions and extending the moratorium on oil drilling. However these matters don´t deal with the realities of the present and growing crisis in the Gulf of Mexico. Someone asked: “Could it be that the White House desires that the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico gets as bad as it possibly can for them to finally enact its cap and trade and the green agenda?” I hope not.

 

Next week I will be going back to the Florida Gulf Coast. I will try to have some photos worth uploading.

 

Eutanasia e testamento biologico

Coppie di fatto e unioni omosessuali

moratoria sull'aborto e legge 194

Tutela dell'embrione e referendum sulla fecondazione assistita

  

I Patti lateranensi presero il nome del palazzo di San Giovanni in Laterano in cui avvenne la firma degli accordi che furono negoziati tra il cardinale Segretario di Stato Pietro Gasparri per conto della Santa Sede e Benito Mussolini, capo del Fascismo, come primo ministro italiano. Sottoscritti l'11 febbraio 1929 stabilirono il mutuo riconoscimento tra il Regno d'Italia e lo Stato della Città del Vaticano.

   

Friday's flower power.

Straight out of the camera.

 

A drought was officially declared in Georgia yesterday, and some counties have totally banned outdoor watering. In my county, not only must I water on alternate days (Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday), as has been the case since the last drought that ended in 2003, but now I can water ONLY from 8 pm to 5 am. What annoys me is that businesses such as car washes and pressure washers are allowed to operate without restriction, though admittedly many car washes supposedly use recycled water. What I don't understand is that there are no public service announcements on how to conserve water, and there are absolutely no moves afoot to declare a moratorium on construction, as McMansions and mega-townhouses and business "parks" that consume far, far more water than I continue to be built on every available piece of undeveloped land.

 

Please, no notes and no photos in comments. (If I don't say this...)

 

© All rights reserved. No usage allowed in any form without the written consent of Mim Eisenberg.

 

This week's going to be like this so a bit of a moratorium. Catch u soon. Take care.

 

7 Likes on Instagram

  

One of Silver Lake's largest estates at 11,743 square feet on a lot of 82,764 square feet. This huge residence has a storied history, culminating in the development of the Hathaway Estates, a planned subdivision within Silver Lake. The house was built in 1923 and has a commanding 360 Degree View atop one of Silver Lake's highest hills. The house is built entirely of reinforced concrete; there is not one stick of wood in its structure. Mr. Hathaway apparently had a great fear of fire, and did not want his house burning down! It was recently (September 2004) on the market for $3,250,000. The house is located at 1809 Apex Avenue in Silver Lake. It is currently owned by Dov Charney, founder and CEO of American Apparel, known for his success as an entrepreneur and passion for simple clothing. His leadership style has drawn extensive praise and criticism. He has earned recognition in the media for management decisions to pay a fair wage and refusing to outsource manufacturing. The Los Angeles Times named him as one of the Top 100 powerful people in Southern California and in 2009, he was nominated as a Time 100 finalist by Time magazine.

 

If any of our readers know about the development of Hathaway Estates, details about the original owner, architect or builder, please feel free to contact the editor of this column.

 

NOTES: I recently received an e-mail from Michele Martin informing me that 'the Estate belonged to a Charles Hathaway, a director/studio head from the silent screen era. His great granddaughter, Robin Clarke, was my best friend and neighbor when I lived at 2400 Micheltorena Street.'

 

Michele Martin

Greenwich Library

 

SLN Subscriber Ken Puchlik writes: 'From 1950 to 1965 I lived on Redesdale Ave. on the west side of the valley looking east at the Hathaway house on top of the hill. It was always vacant and never a light on. One night, the mansion was ablaze with light and everyone came out to wonder what was going on. It was simply the moon rising behind the home and the light was passing through the windows and out the other side. Obviously, it was devoid of furniture or curtains.

 

I also remember that there was another large building or home next to it; people said it was another mansion. It apparently was demolished during the construction of the 'tract' homes that I believe were a poor use of the viewscape. Having half the number of lots with higher end-well designed homes, taking better advantage of the pre-existing topography, would have been better use of the land. The developer should have used the axiom of 'less is more' and probably realized more investment return by developing premium lots on what was a rare piece of land. Paradise lost.

 

Mr. Hathaway had good reason to fear fire. In the early 50's a grass fire at the end of summer burnt up to the edge of the estate. Every local fire unit was on the scene. Dry summer grass was prevalent with all the vacant lots at the time. After that, the fire department started controlled burns of the lots every summer.

 

Before the hum of the freeways diminished the neighborhood's ambient sound, you could hear the trains switching in the yards off Fletcher Dr. late at night. The greatest chili dogs in the world were sold out of the old Signal Gas station at Effie and Silver Lake Blvd. Across the street, the 7/11 was a Union Oil Gas station with the friendliest guys who took good care of you at 20 cents a gallon of gas. And a kid could walk the 0.75 mile to catch the PE and go to the Ramona and see a 25 cent movie without any concern for safety, even at night.

 

Craig Collins writes 'When I moved here in 1982, the subdivision was just being built. The land had been bought by CalTrans for continuation of the Glendale Freeway, which was to connect with the Hollywood Freeway (near Vermont...where there's that very wide median), then on to Beverly Hills, which was to be the name of the freeway. As a result of that unfortunate choice of name and alignment, one of the very first successful opposition to a California freeway project was mounted, and the freeway ended at Glendale Boulevard. After many years, CalTrans began selling off the property, and you can pretty much trace the path by much of the newer construction, especially on the south side of Sunset.

 

I had heard about an effort to create a park on the Hathaway hill, but know nothing further about it. How spectacular that would have been!

 

Anyway, Peggy Stevenson was City Councilperson at the time, was a fervent supporter of the development community, and she evidently got quick approval of the housing project. After the development was completed, it mysteriously became a gated community. It's worth noting that Stevenson was defeated in a reelection bid by Michael Woo, who shepherded many of the pro-planning and more progressive changes in the city (such as getting a moratorium on the explosive development of mini-malls that was then in full swing). Upon her defeat, Stevenson systematically destroyed all the district constituent and project files in her office, forcing Woo to begin his office with nothing to aid projects and constituent concerns. That was the good old days in the LA City Council!

 

Well, that's what I know, subject to verification by others who may have a better historical perspective.

 

Veteran Silver Lake activist Maryann Kuk writes 'My recollection about Hathaway is that it had nothing to do with the #2 freeway. It was before I participated in any community stuff. The Hathaway estate (they are old money LA Athletic club, Riviera Country club, CA yacht club) sold it to a developer who wanted to build 100's of condos. SLRA got heavily involved opposing along with the immediate 'hood and the developer backed down to the 40+ or so [ugly, tract, crappy] houses. He promised to leave all of the mature tress, but the day after he got his permit he cut them all down. The Hathaway family had been collectors of specimens and I'm told it was beautiful.'

 

The Silver Lake News thanks our readers for their generous contributions of history and insights of Silver Lake!

 

Update: Without editing the content, I found some new "wrinkles" to our ongoing story, as reported in the popular real estate blog, "Take Sunset", March 28th, 2011:

 

"The Garbutt House actually has a very interesting history. It’s one of Silver Lake’s largest estates at 11,743 square feet of interior space, 3-stories tall with 20 rooms. It was built by Frank A. Garbutt, a movie pioneer, inventor, industrialist, and “one of the most prominent citizens of Los Angeles in the late 19th and early 20th Century” according to the Los Angeles Times. In 1923, Garbutt acquired the 37-acre hilltop site overlooking the Silver Lake Reservoir with views of the Pacific Ocean, the Santa Monica and Verdugo Mountains, and the downtown skyline. He built three houses on the site, which came to be known as the Garbutt-Hathaway Estate. (Garbutt’s son-in-law was Charles F. Hathaway, a shipbuilder and real estate developer.) The structures were built primarily of concrete, and were designed to withstand earthquakes, floods, and fire, which Garbutt was particularly afraid of. (There were also no fireplaces in the home.) He did allow some design touches, however. There were bronze window frames, hand carved teak and marble floors, and the first floor was entirely travertine.

 

Garbutt lived in the mansion until his death in 1947. In his spare time, he experimented with new inventions, built race cars, (his homemade car appears in the photograph above), invented a soapless detergent, and worked on a superior chewing gum.

Garbutt’s three children and their families lived on the estate after his death in 1947. The estate was eventually sold by his daughter in 1960. According to the LATs, The houses sat dormant for several years as owners battled with the city and preservationists over plans to raze the three houses and build condominiums or a large housing development on the site. In 1978, two of the houses were torn down to make room for a 100-home development, but the Garbutt House was spared. In 1987, the Garbutt House was listed in the National Register of Historic Places. It’s now part of the gated community Hathaway Hill Estates, and it most recently sold in 2004 for $3,250,000".

   

Obama's Solar Nightmare

By Ed Lasky

The Democrats have been busy the last two years, and not just reengineering the healthcare industry, restructuring the auto sector, assaulting Wall Street and the financial sector, harming our public finances. They have also been trying to transform America's energy industry at our expense. This is Barack Obama at his worst -- picking losers and winners by personal whim, donations for dollars deals, and ideological zeal.

  

Who have been the losers and who have been the winners? And have the winners just been taking the taxpayers for a ride while their guy has been driving the bus -- with taxpayers sitting in the back?

  

The Obama administration has tried to kill off the oil industry. Offshore moratoriums have been unilaterally imposed by executive orders and justified using scientific panel studies that were misrepresented-if not distorted- by the administration. The drilling permitting process has been afflicted with sclerosis. Federal lands are becoming less and less available for development.

  

Obama does not like carbon; he boasted during the campaign that he would bankrupt coal power plants and that his policies would necessarily boost the price of power. Those words were ignored by much of the media, in thrall to the man they so wanted to win. When the rapture swept journalists into ecstasy who cared about little details here and there about Obama's agenda?

  

He tried and failed to get a cap and trade bill through Congress. He warned that if that effort failed he would do another end run around Congress and rely on his Environmental Protection Agency to do his dirty work.

  

Who knows? Maybe Obama has personalized his gripes and made them the basis of public policy. We know how he feels about George Bush and Dick Cheney -- both with strong ties to the oil industry. Maybe he just doesn't care for the South where much of our carbon wealth is found -- a Republican redoubt that he may have just written off as a political wasteland for him.

  

Hence, gas prices approaching $4 dollars a gallon -- and this is not yet the summer driving season that typically boosts gas prices as demand increases.

  

This price hike may make New York Times columnist Tom Friedman gleeful. He considers high priced gas (and Chinese authoritarianism) the answer to all ills. He writes column after column on these topics from the baronial splendor of his homes (here is a photo of one of them; he earned his fortune, by the way, by marrying it). Undoubtedly, he salves his conscience regarding the carbon footprints of his homes with checks to buy carbon credits -- and writes more columns castigating us for our addiction to carbon.

  

But I digress.

  

How else have the Democrats been trying to change our power industry? By the old-fashioned way: changing the rules of the game (as noted above) and then using our tax dollars to enrich green schemers. The grand champion of spending boosts by Barack Obama and the Democratic Congress has been a 1014% boost in spending for the "Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program." Then there is something called the Green Jobs Labor Fund-which did not even exist prior to 2009 and has received hundreds of millions of dollars.

  

But wait...there is more.

  

Much of the stimulus money also went toward funding green schemes, and one of the major beneficiaries have been solar power promoters. These are, in the words of Washington Post columnist Robert Samuelson, "pipe dreams." Many of the promoters and hucksters behind these "ventures" have chummy relationships with Democrats-as will be covered below.

  

How are these solar dreams playing out? As nightmares, at least for taxpayers.

  

The latest to turn off the lights is a Massachusetts venture promoted by its Governor, Deval Patrick.

  

From the Boston Globe:

  

Evergreen Solar Inc. will eliminate 800 jobs in Massachusetts and shut its new factory at the former military base in Devens, just two years after it opened the massive facility to great fanfare and with about $58 million in taxpayer subsidies.

  

The company announced yesterday that it will close the plant by the end of March, calling itself a victim of weak demand and competition from cheaper suppliers in China, where the government provides solar companies with generous subsidies.

  

Evergreen itself has a factory in Wuhan, China, built in collaboration with a Chinese company, Jiawei Solarchina Co. Ltd., and with money from a Chinese government investment fund. The company had previously said it would shift some production from Devens to the Wuhan plant but yesterday was the first time it said Devens would be closed.

  

The Devens closing is a major hit to Governor Deval Patrick's efforts to make Massachusetts a hub of the emerging clean-energy industry. The administration persuaded Evergreen to build at Devens with a package of grants, land, loans, and other aid originally valued at $76 million. The company ended up taking about $58 million, one of the largest aid packages Massachusetts has provided to a private company, and the governor was the featured guest at Evergreen's ribbon-cutting in July 2008.

  

Governor Patrick had been criticized during his re-election campaign for providing aid to the plant during a time of economic stress. He ignored the criticism and plowed ahead. He and Barack Obama shared more than plagiarized speech lines and campaign strategist David Axelrod.

  

There are claw-back provisions allowing the state to recover some of the lost money. But these are mostly window dressing. Officials admit the terms are so complicated and generous that any recovery will be only a token amount. Company officials agree.

  

This is, of course, an outrage. Money is fungible. Evergreen used its own money to expand in China, took taxpayer dollars to take a fling in Massachusetts, and when that venture failed, just closed the doors and walked away. What a deal! Taxpayers take the risk. If the venture had succeeded, the company and its promoters and investors would have pocketed the gains; when it failed, they just walked away with nary an ounce of obligations to taxpayers. Were the lights, at least, run on solar power?

  

The landscape of America will be littered with these green scheme boondoggles going belly-up after gorging at the pig trough filled by American taxpayer dollars. Another taxpayer subsidized solar cell maker shut down recently in New York, for example.

  

Solar power subsidies have helped bankrupt the Spanish economy, and the very government officials who have peddled these schemes are backpedaling furiously to keep their jobs as their taxpayers rise in revolt. The government is slashing subsidies left and right, but may already be too late to save their economy. Meanwhile, at least one Spanish solar power company has found a temporary bandage to slow its fiscal hemorrhaging -- the American taxpayer. Democratic Congressman Paul Kanjorksi, who was not reelected in November, has a nephew who "worked" for the Spanish solar company Abound. Somehow this foreign company was blessed with a 400 million dollar federal grant. Abound will probably join its rivals in Spain into ruin -- the Spanish landscape will be littered with uneconomic solar power plants that will bear more than a little resemblance, metaphorically speaking, to the windmills of Miguel Cervantes Don Quixote.

  

Even the Spanish media have warned America that Obama is driving America off the green energy cliff. Other European governments are slashing solar tariffs as fast as they can as they to save themselves from drowning in red ink.

  

Does anyone believe that Barack Obama listens or that this self-declared "student of history" would learn from the Spanish tragedy? Did he listen to Larry Summer, his own resident genius (who recently left the administration) when Summers highlighted a study from the OMB and Treasury Department that found severe problems with the "economic integrity of government support for renewables"?

  

Only in Washington would a term such as ‘economic integrity" be used to describe a fiscally foolish program that will lead to massive problems in the future.

  

This tsunami of bankruptcies is headed our way.

  

Many of the execs and investors behind these green schemes are Democratic donors and those who have toiled in Democratic party politics for years. Solyndra was another solar scheme that received 535 million dollars in federal tax dollars. The "investment" was widely touted by the Obama administration. The firm was chock-full of investors and executives who were generous Democratic donors and activists. One of its biggest investors was a big bundler for the Obama-Biden campaign.

  

Solyndra also closed one of its plants and laid off workers after gouging on the aid .

  

But wait... there is more. The hucksterism runs rampant.

  

Solyandra's auditor could not issue an opinion that would have allowed the company to go public and for its investors to cash out. The reason? Solyndra was so badly run that doubts were raised regarding its ability to continue as a going concern. The backers may have lacked much as investors and scientists. But as crony capitalists, they excelled.

  

A cloud is passing over these solar schemes.

  

They are inefficient boondoggles. They generate electric power at a cost vastly more expensive than electricity generated by natural gas (a relatively clean-burning fuel), hydro, coal -- and of, course, nuclear. But the Obama administration and Democrats in Congress are on a crusade to foreclose the use of these fuels to power our nation. The Democrats are "enemies" (to use a word Obama has used to describe opponents) of natural gas development (see my column Cheap Natural Gas and its Democratic Enemies ); want to blow up dams; kill coal -- the EPA is on a rampage against Big Coal; and choke off nuclear power plants by stopping the development of a repository for nuclear waste. We are being force-fed green schemes like so much spinach Michelle Obama might forcing down our gullets.

  

Solar power plants are inefficient and cannot survive on their own. Instead, they survive by virtue of an IV flowing from taxpayers to tax-takers. Eventually, reality catches up to fantasy and they close. Solar stocks are losers in the stock market, that harsh judge of economics.

  

Death panels would be better used to evaluate the values of these ventures, not the value of our lives.

  

Much of the stimulus money, as well as the Department of Energy budget, went toward these renewable green energy schemes. A quarter of a billion dollars (chump change in Washington; but real money to us who are paying for it) went to fund a weatherization program in Obama's hometown of Chicago that was marked by fraud and shoddy work. That is but just one example.

  

The solar power schemes will become one bright, shining example of liberal politics run amok. We will be paying the price for these schemes and boondoggles for years to come. Meanwhile, the Chinese are happy that we are in hock to them as we borrow billions to pay for these fantasies and schemes. They also benefit since many of the green jobs that Obama touts happen to be in China -- a nation that may be violating World Trade Organization rules when it exports solar panels (don't believe the hype regarding China and solar power; they will sell us uneconomic solar panels but meanwhile, back at home, burn massive amounts of coal to fuel their growing economy).

  

The government is a notoriously bad investor when it comes to clean energy. Barack Obama and his band of zealots have very little real world business experience -- and seem to disdain free enterprise. But this green energy crusade may have more than just ideological zealotry fueling its drive. Recall, Obama likes to pick winners and losers, and not just in basketball tournaments.

  

He hails from Chicago, after all.

  

Darrell Issa, now chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, will investigate these green energy projects and get to the bottom of how we have been ripped off by green schemers and their friends in high places. He has already announced that one item on his agenda will be how the Obama administration has spent our money. He may have misspoken a bit when he called the Obama administration the most corrupt in history, but corruption there has been and he is ideally positioned to ferret it out and to prevent it from happening in the future.

  

Issa made his fortune creating and selling Viper car alarms.

  

He does not care for wrongdoers, and neither should we because we, the taxpayers, are the ones being ripped off.

  

Ed Lasky is news editor of American Thinker.

 

www.americanthinker.com/

 

LOL HEY KIDDIES THIS IS HOW GLOBAL WARMING REALLY WORKS (OR GLOBAL WARMING SIMPLY EXPLAINED FOR SIMPLE PEOPLE)

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdxaxJNs15s

 

The Facts

It is estimated that over 35,000 animals are used in cosmetic tests every year throughout the European Union alone.

 

In other countries such as the United States and Japan, where testing is extensive, such information is not publicly available.

 

This is despite:

 

extensive public opposition;

the development of 'non-animal' alternative tests and;

the availability of thousands of ingredients that can be safely and creatively used to make new products without the need for further animal tests.

The most common tests involve dripping a material into rabbits' eyes or applying it to the shaved backs of rabbits or guinea pigs and studying the resulting irritation or damage.

 

Animals are also force-fed or dosed with substances to assess affects. The tests can cause great suffering and in some cases death.

 

THESE COMPANIES TEST ON ANIMALS:

The following companies manufacture products that ARE tested on animals. Those marked with a  are currently observing a moratorium on (i.e., current suspension of) animal testing. Please encourage them to announce a permanent ban. Listed in parentheses are examples of products manufactured by either the company listed or, if applicable, its parent company. For a complete listing of products manufactured by a company on this list, please visit the company’s Web site or contact the company directly for more information. Companies on this list may manufacture individual lines of products without animal testing (e.g., Clairol claims that its Herbal Essences line is not animal-tested). They have not, however, eliminated animal testing from their entire line of cosmetics and household products.

 

Similarly, companies on this list may make some products, such as pharmaceuticals, that are required by law to be tested on animals. However, the reason for these companies’ inclusion on the list is not the animal testing that they conduct that is required by law, but rather the animal testing (of personal care and household products) that is not required by law.

 

What can be done about animal tests required by law?

Although animal testing of pharmaceuticals and certain chemicals is still mandated by law, the arguments against using animals in cosmetics testing are still valid when applied to the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. These industries are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, respectively, and it is the responsibility of the companies that kill animals in order to bring their products to market to convince the regulatory agencies that there is a better way to determine product safety. PETA is actively working on this front by funding development and validation of non-animal test methods and providing input through our involvement on government advisory committees at both the national and international levels. Companies resist progress because the crude nature of animal tests allows them to market many products that might be determined to be too toxic if cell culture tests were used. Let companies know how you feel about this.

 

Arm & Hammer (Church & Dwight), P.O. Box 1625, Horsham, PA 19044-6625;

609-683-5900; 800-524-1328; www.armhammer.com

Bic Corporation, 500 Bic Dr., Milford, CT 06460; 203-783-2000; www.bicworld.com

Boyle-Midway (Reckitt Benckiser), 2 Wickman Rd., Toronto, ON M8Z 5M5

Canada; 416-255-2300

Braun (Gillette Company), 400 Unicorn Park Dr., Woburn, MA 01801;

800-272-8611; www.braun.com

Chesebrough-Ponds (Fabergé, Ponds, Vaseline), 800 Sylvan Ave., Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632; 800-743-8640; www.pondssquad.com

Church & Dwight (Aim, Arm & Hammer, Arrid, Brillo, Close-up, Lady’s

Choice, Mentadent, Nair, Orange Glo International, Pearl Drops), P.O. Box 1625, Horsham, PA 19044-6625; 609-683-5900; 800-524-1328; www.churchdwight.com

Clairol (Aussie, Daily Defense, Herbal Essences, Infusium 23, Procter & Gamble), 1 Blachley Rd., Stamford, CT 06922; 800-252-4765; www.clairol.com

Clorox (ArmorAll, Formula 409, Fresh Step, Glad, Liquid Plumber, Pine-Sol, Soft Scrub, S.O.S., Tilex), 1221 Broadway, Oakland, CA 94612; 510-271-7000;

800-227-1860; www.clorox.com

Colgate-Palmolive Co. (Hills Pet Nutrition, Mennen, Palmolive, SoftSoap, Speed Stick), 300 Park Ave., New York, NY 10022; 212-310-2000; 800-221-4607; www.colgate.com

Coty (Adidas, Calvin Klein, Davidoff, Glow, The Healing Garden, JOOP!, Jovan, Kenneth Cole, Lancaster, Marc Jacob, Rimmel, Stetson), 1325 Ave. of the Americas, 324th Fl., New York, NY 10019; 212-389-7000; www.coty.com

Cover Girl (Procter & Gamble), One Procter & Gamble Plz., Cincinnati, OH 45202; 513-983-1100; 800-543-1745; www.covergirl.com

Del Laboratories (CornSilk, LaCross, Naturistics, New York Color, Sally Hansen), 178 EAB Plz., Uniondale, NY 11556; 516-844-2020; 800-952-5080; www.dellabs.com

Dial Corporation (Dry Idea, Purex, Renuzit, Right Guard, Soft & Dri), 15101 N. Scottsdale Rd., Ste. 5028, Scottsdale, AZ 85254-2199; 800-528-0849; www.dialcorp.com

Gillette Co. (Braun, Duracell, Procter & Gamble), Prudential Tower Bldg., Boston, MA 02199; 617-421-7000; 800-872-7202; www.gillette.com

Helene Curtis Industries (Salon Selectives, Thermasilk, Unilever), 800 Sylvan Ave., Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632; 800-621-2013; www.helenecurtis.com

Johnson & Johnson (Aveeno, Clean & Clear, Listerine, Lubriderm, Neutrogena, Rembrandt, ROC), 1 Johnson & Johnson Plz., New Brunswick, NJ 08933; 732-524-0400; 800-526-3967; www.jnj.com

Lever Bros. (Unilever), 800 Sylvan Ave., Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632; 212-888-1260; 800-598-1223; www.unilever.com

L’Oréal U.S.A. (Biotherm, Cacharel, Garnier, Giorgio Armani, Helena

Rubinstein, Lancôme, Matrix Essentials, Maybelline, Ralph Lauren

Fragrances, Redken, Soft Sheen, Vichy), 575 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10017;

212-818-1500; www.lorealcosmetics.com

Max Factor (Procter & Gamble), One Procter & Gamble Plz., Cincinnati, OH 45202; 513-983-1100; 800-543-1745; www.maxfactor.com

Mead, 10 W. Second St., #1, Dayton, OH 45402; 937-495-6323; www.meadweb.com

Melaleuca, 3910 S. Yellowstone Hwy., Idaho Falls, ID 83402-6003; 208-522-0700; www.melaleuca.com

Mennen Co. (Colgate-Palmolive), 191 E. Hanover Ave., Morristown, NJ 07960-3151; 973-631-9000; www.colgate.com

Neoteric Cosmetics, 4880 Havana St., Denver, CO 80239-0019; 303-373-4860

New Dana Perfumes, 470 Oakhill Rd., Crestwood Industrial Park, Mountaintop,

PA 18707; 800-822-8547

Noxell (Procter & Gamble), 11050 York Rd., Hunt Valley, MD 21030-2098;

410-785-7300; 800-572-3232; www.pg.com

Olay Co./Oil of Olay (Procter & Gamble), P.O. Box 599, Cincinnati, OH 45201;

800-543-1745; www.oilofolay.com

Oral-B (Gillette Company), 600 Clipper Dr., Belmont, CA 94002-4119;

415-598-5000; www.oralb.com

Pantene (Procter & Gamble), One Procter & Gamble Plz., Cincinnati, OH 45202;

800-945-7768; www.pantene.com

Pfizer (BenGay, Desitin, Listerine, Lubriderm, Plax, Visine), 235 E. 42nd St., New York, NY 10017-5755; 212-573-2323; www.pfizer.com

Physique (Procter & Gamble), One Procter & Gamble Plz., Cincinnati, OH 45202; 800-214-8957; www.physique.com

Playtex Products (Banana Boat), 300 Nyala Farms Rd., Westport, CT 06880; 203-341-4000; www.playtex.com

Procter & Gamble Co. (Clairol, Cover Girl, Crest, Gillette, Giorgio, Iams, Max Factor, Physique, Tide), One Procter & Gamble Plz., Cincinnati, OH 45202; 513-983-1100; 800-543-1745; www.pg.com

Reckitt Benckiser (Easy Off, Lysol, Mop & Glo, Old English, Resolve, Spray ’N Wash, Veet, Woolite), 1655 Valley Rd., Wayne, NJ 07474-0943; 973-633-3600; 800-232-9665; www.reckittbenckiser.com

Richardson-Vicks (Procter & Gamble), One Procter & Gamble Plz., Cincinnati, OH 45202; 513-983-1100; 800-543-1745; www.pg.com

Sally Hansen (Del Laboratories), 178 EAB Plz., Uniondale, NY 11556; 800-645-9888; www.sallyhansen.com

Schering-Plough (Bain de Soleil, Coppertone, Dr. Scholl’s), 1 Giralda Farms, Madison, NJ 07940-1000; 201-822-7000; 800-842-4090; www.sch-plough.com

S.C. Johnson (Drano, Edge, Fantastik, Glade, OFF!, Oust, Pledge, Scrubbing Bubbles, Shout, Skintimate, Windex, Ziploc), 1525 Howe St., Racine, WI 53403;

800-494-4855; www.scjohnson.com

SoftSoap Enterprises (Colgate-Palmolive), 300 Park Ave., New York, NY 10022; 800-221-4607; www.colgate.com

Suave (Unilever), 800 Sylvan Ave., Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632; 212-888-1260;

800-782-8301; www.suave.com

Unilever (Axe, Dove, Helene Curtis, Lever Bros., Suave), 800 Sylvan Ave., Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632; 212-888-1260; 800-598-1223; www.unilever.com

 

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