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Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill. This fabulous neon sign for the old Tropicana Motor Hotel went through expensive restoration and was re-lit on April 27, 2012.

 

The city of Tucson must be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There's an interesting article posted by Dave Devine at Tucson Weekly, titled "Motel Memories,". The article delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

This decaying, abandoned motel/coffee shop sign is at the corner of 10th Avenue and W. Polk Street in downtown Phoenix, Arizona.

 

The huge chunk that is missing from the left side of the sign included the words "Desert Inn," "Swimming Pool," and an arrow. You can just make out what remains of the tip of the arrow. Text can be read for "Featuring On TV" and "Optional On TV" -- from what I can find, "On TV" was somewhat similar to cable in the 1970s. I can't locate information as to whether "On TV" was limited to the Phoenix Metro area or if it was national.

 

A photo of the sign from a few years back, before half of it was torn off, is posted at Modern Phoenix. More info about this sign, the motel, and their sad demise is posted at Roadside Peek: Lost Treasures.

 

Desert Inn Motel has been demolished and no longer exists, but its signage is still erected on a vacant lot (photo posted here).

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

 

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill. This fabulous neon sign for the old Tropicana Motor Hotel went through expensive restoration and was re-lit on April 27, 2012.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby, March 20, 2016

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill. This fabulous neon sign for the old Tropicana Motor Hotel went through expensive restoration and was re-lit on April 27, 2012.

 

The city of Tucson must be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There's an interesting article posted by Dave Devine at Tucson Weekly, titled "Motel Memories,". The article delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

Location:

Tucson Inn

127 W. Drachman Street

Tucson, Arizona

 

The vintage Tucson Inn was built in 1952 and is still in operation. Sadly, from several reviews I read, the motel is decaying and about the only thing that it currently has going for it is its awesome Googie-era neon sign (I've seen photos of the retro sign's six fanning spikes with each letter of "Tucson" topping them and the swooping arrow it lit at night, so I plan to return soon for night shots). Back many decades ago, this reportedly was one of Arizona's largest motels.

 

Hopefully, the owner will invest money soon for renovations to improve on this gem-in-the-rough's overall structure, as well as cleanliness (or lack thereof) and basic amenities. If not, the 1950's inn could easily become a distant memory after being bulldozed like so many other old, blighted motels before it.

 

A bit about Tucson's mid-century neon signs and the ongoing efforts to restore and preserve them, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby, March 20, 2016

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

 

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill. This fabulous and funky neon sign for the old Magic Carpet Golf is a favorite of mine.

 

The city of Tucson must be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There's an interesting article posted by Dave Devine at Tucson Weekly, titled "Motel Memories," The article delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

Cold War Mushrooms (Dendriform Column) - Frank Henry, 1967

44th Street and Camelback Road, Phoenix, AZ

 

Unfortunately at least some of this icon may soon be gone in favor of more condos.

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

 

Location:

Tucson Inn

127 W. Drachman Street

Tucson, Arizona

 

The vintage Tucson Inn was built in 1952 and is still in operation. Regrettably, from a number of online reviews I read, this old motel is rapidly decaying and about the only thing that it currently has going for it is its awesome Googie-era neon sign.

 

Bucket list check off: I finally accomplished photographing this iconic Tucson Inn neon sign lit up at night. While the sign's letters are illuminated, the curved arrow that encircles the word "Inn" is not, so isn't easily seen at night.

 

Back many decades ago, this reportedly was one of Arizona's largest motels.

 

Hopefully, the owner will invest money soon for renovations to improve on this gem-in-the-rough's overall structure, as well as cleanliness (or lack thereof) and basic amenities. If not, the 1950's inn could easily become a distant memory after being bulldozed like so many other old, blighted motels before it.

 

A bit about Tucson's mid-century neon signs and the ongoing efforts to restore and preserve them, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic PReservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016

Location:

Tucson Inn

127 W. Drachman Street

Tucson, Arizona

 

The vintage Tucson Inn was built in 1952 and is still in operation. Regrettably, from a number of online reviews I read, this old motel is rapidly decaying and about the only thing that it currently has going for it is its awesome Googie-era neon sign.

 

Bucket list check off: I finally accomplished photographing this iconic Tucson Inn neon sign lit up at night. While the sign's letters are illuminated, the curved arrow that encircles the word "Inn" is not, so isn't easily seen at night.

 

Back many decades ago, this reportedly was one of Arizona's largest motels.

 

Hopefully, the owner will invest money soon for renovations to improve on this gem-in-the-rough's overall structure, as well as cleanliness (or lack thereof) and basic amenities. If not, the 1950's inn could easily become a distant memory after being bulldozed like so many other old, blighted motels before it.

 

A bit about Tucson's mid-century neon signs and the ongoing efforts to restore and preserve them, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic PReservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill. This fabulous and funky neon sign for the old Magic Carpet Golf is a favorite of mine.

 

The city of Tucson must be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There's an interesting article posted by Dave Devine at Tucson Weekly, titled "Motel Memories," The article delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

 

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill. This fabulous neon sign for the old Magic Carpet Golf is a favorite of mine.

 

The city of Tucson must be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There's an interesting article posted by Dave Devine at Tucson Weekly, titled "Motel Memories," The article delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

This side dish at Southern Rail was so awesome, I still get weak in the knees thinking about it... creamy Southern-style mac 'n' cheese with pigtail pasta, toasty cornbread crumble, and extra bacon. Yes, it was food for the gods. It took less than 5 minutes for hubby, son, and me to devour it.

 

Location:

Southern Rail

300 W. Camelback Road

Phoenix, AZ 85013

 

Birthday dinner celebration - my son turned 22, and this was his choice for dinner. Everything was delicious, the service was excellent, and my husband wants to return to Southern Rail soon.

 

About The Newton, the 1960s Phoenix building complex (former iconic Beef Eaters restaurant) where Southern Rail resides:

An adaptive reuse project by Venue Projects, LLC and John Douglas Architects, The Newton is a mixed-use concept housed inside Phoenix's former (but iconic) Beef Eaters building. Named after Beef Eaters' Founder Jay Newton, today The Newton is a place where people can read, dine, gather, and shop.

 

The Newton is home to the Phoenix location of Changing Hands Bookstore, Southern Rail Restaurant, Southwest Gardener, and Christofolo Schermer Consulting.

 

Local businessman, Arizona celebrity, and former Utah sheep rancher Jay Newton passed away in 2006 at the age of 87. Newton had opened his popular Beef Eaters restaurant in 1961, and after his death, the restaurant shut down and the huge building was for sale (empty and abandoned) until late 2013 - mid 2014.

 

Restaurant description from the Southern Rail website:

America was galvanized by the railroad system, as it moved people and their dreams from east to west. There was promise of a better life on those southern rail-cars, with hope and adventure bundled in suitcases and stowed in their hearts. Stations and whistle-stops along the way were brief respites to nourish and energize the body. The engagement of people unknown, sights unseen, and smells unknown were the threads of the moment.

 

Southern Rail is a nostalgic gastronomical journey inspired by the “flavors from the American south”. Regional influences stretch from the coastal Carolinas of “low‐country” cooking through the soulful belt of Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. A sense of place is unveiled by the famous New Orleans cuisine so driven by Cajun and Creole cultures. The Gulf coast bounty of seafood and the slow‐smoke barbeque of south Texas all find a home on our menus.

 

Our all American wine and beverage program is drawn from the passion and perseverance that united this great country. The independent spirit is truly expressed in our hand crafted offerings, with a strong focus on local wines, craft beers, and boutique spirits as our hallmarks. We ask our guests to support local and the pursuit of the American dream.

 

A slice of warm hospitality infused with flavors steeped richly from the American south, Southern Rail is a place to gather. Whether to meet friends for a light bite, after work for cocktails and company, with associates to broker a deal, or with family for dinner out; it is a destination for our community. Pay us a visit, pull up a chair, and share the bounty of our passion over food, drink, and welcoming conversation.

 

Description of the former restaurant, via the Beef Eaters website -- sadly, the website hasn't been updated in years and is written in the present tense, making readers believe that Beef Eaters still exists:

Beef Eaters Restaurant in Phoenix Arizona is a rambling Arizona style adobe and heavy timber building with oak paneled walls, pitched beam ceilings, black leather booths, high wing-back chairs and linen table service. Trips to London added rare English art to its decor.

 

Beef Eaters Restaurant features two connected grand dining rooms and a cocktail-dining lounge.

 

It has 4 private party and banquet rooms serving from 10 to 300, plus a quaint wine cellar table for 10. It has two bars, 4 fireplaces, 3 shaded patios, and a large porte cochere drive entrance.

 

Modern Phoenix has an excellent article about Beef Eaters and a variety of photos of the old eatery.

Location:

Tucson Inn

127 W. Drachman Street

Tucson, Arizona

 

The vintage Tucson Inn was built in 1952 and is still in operation. Sadly, from several reviews I read, the motel is decaying and about the only thing that it currently has going for it is its awesome Googie-era neon sign (I've seen photos of the retro sign's six fanning spikes with each letter of "Tucson" topping them and the swooping arrow it lit at night, so I plan to return soon for night shots). Back many decades ago, this reportedly was one of Arizona's largest motels.

 

Hopefully, the owner will invest money soon for renovations to improve on this gem-in-the-rough's overall structure, as well as cleanliness (or lack thereof) and basic amenities. If not, the 1950's inn could easily become a distant memory after being bulldozed like so many other old, blighted motels before it.

 

A bit about Tucson's mid-century neon signs and the ongoing efforts to restore and preserve them, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic PReservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby, March 20, 2016

734 W. Cambridge Ave.

Phoenix, AZ 85007

 

4 bedrooms

3 bathrooms

3,753 sq ft

13,242 sq ft lot

Located in Encanto Vista historic district

View more information on our website:

twinsandcorealty.com/2017/02/04/734-w-cambridge-ave/

View 3D tour here:

my.matterport.com/show/?m=qAo7Tf8Gip2

View photo album here:

www.facebook.com/TwinsAndCoRealty/photos/?tab=album&a...

 

This historic Peter Hauskens, AIA home combines enchanting mid-century modern architecture with classic finishes in a $240,000+ renovation. 150’ of Encanto golf course frontage delivers epic sunset, golf and park views. Take in views from a 25’ wall of glass in the family room. A fireplace, vaulted ceilings and clerestory windows are sure to impress in the living room. The interior courtyard is framed in windows. A high-design kitchen features Thomasville cabinetry, Silestone counters and stainless steel appliances. The master suite has a sitting area and walk-in closet. Retro-cool baths retain vintage charm, with modern updates. Summers are a dream with a salt water diving pool, which has arching waterfalls, LED light, sun shelf and 8-person inground spa. New roof, windows and flooring in 2016.

WANNA KNOW THIS HOME'S STORY...

Storytime with the Twins: 734 W. Cambridge Ave.

Once upon a time, cotton grew high in the fields at 7th Ave and Thomas. Cotton was one of the 5 Cs that the pre-war economy was based on in Phoenix: cotton, citrus, cattle, climate and copper. Cotton was used extensively during WWI to manufacture wartime necessities like tires, airplane wings and airships . The cotton industry crashed, primarily due to reduced demand, after the war. Many acres of these cotton fields were owned by a successful local grocer, J. W. Morris. Morris sold 101 acres to the city of Phoenix in 1934 for $400/acre . 104 additional acres were sold to the city by Dr. James Norton, of Norton Dairy, in 1934, for $350/acre. Norton also sold 6 acres of his Norton Dairy farm to the city for $350/acre. Phoenix Parks and Recreation, with the assistance of its president at the time, William Hartranft, created the vision of Encanto Park. Construction started in 1935 and was completed in 1938. The Enchanted Island amusement park opened in 1948 and is still a local attraction.

In 1943, J. W. Morris sold 20 acres of former cotton farmland along 7th Ave, and 25 acres along Thomas Rd, to developers, John H. Lester and L.M Hamman; the Encanto Vista subdivision was born. Encanto Vista means “enchanted view” in Spanish. There was a deed restriction on the land that specified that any homes built must be of a “$6,000 class or better”, and in time of war, that just wasn’t possible. While Lester and Hamman weren’t able to start construction on the homes just yet, the streets were graded in 1943. Fast forward to 1945, post-WWII, and the construction of the first 2 houses in Encanto Vista were underway (702 W. Encanto Blvd and 701 W. Lewis Ave). Due to its desirable location, unique “horseshoe” street layout and proximity to Encanto Golf Course and Park, Encanto Vista was a popular home destination for wealthy buyers. The homesites were marketed March of 1945 for between $1,175-1,275. Encanto Vista was built as a neighborhood of custom homes, many of which were built by prominent local architects and builders.

Peter Bert Hauskens, a.k.a P. B. Hauskens, was a successful local architect, a member of the American Institute of Architects. He advertised his services in the classified advertising section of the Arizona Republic in the 1940s. He is credited with designing the Florence City Hall building in 1948.

Mr. Hauskens and his wife, Alberta Hauskens, set their sights on building a family home for themselves and requested a building permit for a “concrete block residence and carport” on July 6th, 1948. They selected the homesite at 734 W. Cambridge Ave. The cost of construction was estimated at $10,000, according to the original building permit. The home was completed before the end of 1948.

The home has had a handful of owners since 1948, all adding their own touches, and pieces of history, to the home. The clain of title goes something like this…The Hauskens family only owned the home for about a year and then sold to Mr. And Mrs. John C. Pence on May 3rd, 1949. On February 29th, 1956 the Pence family sold to George S. and Dorothea Davison. George Davison quit-claim deeded the property to Dorothea on June 7th, 1957. On December 22nd, 1958, Dorothea sold the property to R. W. Chittester, husband of Frida E Chittester and G. Parks McNaull, husband of Agnes B. McNaull, as a co-partnership of Chittester- McNaull Co. Chittester was the president of Modern Glass Co. 3 years later, on May 23rd, 1961, Chittester-McNaull Co. sells the property to Vee Jayne Hofer, wife of Jacob H. Hoffer. On 1/21/1966, there was a deed release to Guild VeeJayne Van from Hoffer Vee Jayce, but I am not sure if they sold the property the same year because there is a permit record in the names of Dr. John Van Guilder and Jan Van Guilder from 1966. Jan Van Guilder was the director at Cambridge Day School. It has been said that the Van Guilders had many birds living at the home. In fact, neighbors have said that the central courtyard was once an massive aviary. The current owner tells a funny story that confirms the bird history. While renovating the home, he was replacing electrical outlets and came to one in the kitchen area, off the central courtyard. As he was unscrewing the outlet, some small debris fell onto the floor; it ended up being bird seed. A pizza delivery man who was delivering a pizza to the current owner immediately recognized the home from his childhood. He recalls going to the house after Cambridge Day School let out for the day. He reminisced about the black plaster pool with Asian characters/symbols at the bottom. The home was decorated with an Asian-inspired style, which extended to the gardens of the home, ala the Japanese Friendship Gardens. In 1995, after 29 years of ownership, the Van Guilder estate fixed up the house and it was put up for sale. On June 5th, 1995, the John Van Guilder estate sold to Bernard Steinfelt, the uncle of the current owner. Title was then transferred to the current owner, Ted Ciccone.

Encanto Vista was added the Phoenix historic register and the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. The district is bounded by Windsor Ave, Encanto Blvd, 7th Ave. and 8th Ave. 734 W. Cambridge Ave. currently receives historic tax incentives for its inclusion as a conforming property within the district.

This historic Peter Hauskens, AIA, home combines enchanting mid-century modern architecture with classic finishes in a $240,000+ renovation. 150’ of Encanto golf course frontage delivers epic sunset, golf & park views + access. This home sits on the 8th hole with picturesque views. An extended concrete walkway, sits aside a broad front lawn and leads to the oversized front door, which is set back 65’ from the front sidewalk. Upon entering the home, you arrive in the entry foyer, which features exposed, painted block walls, Dal-Tile porcelain floor tile with decorative mosaic insert and Jaima Brown designer wallpaper.

One of the distinguishing features of this home is the huge central courtyard, which is framed on all 4 sides by walls of floor-to-ceiling windows and French doors. It is a virtual extension of the living space and a perfect outdoor room for all seasons. It includes a brick, wood-burning fireplace, built-in planters and Dal-Tile 18”x18” Continental Slate porcelain tile.

The eat-in kitchen is all new in 2016. Delight in golf course and park views from your kitchen window, along with views to the interior courtyard, through the 15’ floor-to-ceiling wall of glass. The classic white shaker-style cabinetry by Thomasville has solid wood, dovetail construction, soft-close doors + drawers and glass front display doors. Non-porous, highly-stain resistance Silestone quartz countertops and the crackle-finish gray glass subway tile backsplash are the perfect complements to the timeless design. High-performance appliance package includes Kitchenaid Superba and Bosch stainless steel appliances. Gorgeous tongue and groove, beamed ceilings run throughout much of the home. The contemporary 18” x 18” continental slate porcelain floor tile flows throughout the space.

The expansive family room has a 25’ wall of glass with some of the best views you can find in a single-level home in Central Phoenix. A butler’s pantry connects the family room to the kitchen and features a bar with built-in wine refrigerator. The contemporary Armstrong premium 12mm laminate flooring comes with a 50-year warranty. The dining area is finished with a reproduction sputnik chandelier. Recessed lighting has been added, along with a modern ceiling fan.

The living room is a perfect combination of mid-century modern and usonian styles, with features rarely seen in homes of this era. Some might call the room style ‘rustic modern’, but whatever you call it, it is exquisite. Soaring, vaulted ceilings adjoin an expanse of clerestory windows, which let in gorgeous light throughout the day. The ceilings are adorned with natural tongue and groove wood. A 20’ wall of glass overlooks the interior courtyard. A substantial brick-lined, corner fireplace harkens a modern chalet. Dal-Tile 18”x18” Continental Slate porcelain tile is accented with a decorative mosaic border. A formal dining room shares the natural wood tones and usonian vibe.

The master suite is quite spacious with an attached sitting room that would be perfect for a yoga/meditation space, sewing room, home office, exercise room, craft room, etc. Something you don’t see often in a 1940s Phoenix home are soaring vaulted ceiling with clerestory windows in all of the bedrooms. The Traffic Master commercial-grade carpeting comes with a 10-year warranty. There is a large walk-in closet next to the master bathroom. The master bath maintains a clean, minimalist look with expanses of white tile and Hansgrohe faucets.

The 3 secondary bedrooms all have vaulted and beamed ceilings with clerestory windows, Traffic Master commercial grade carpeting with a 10-year warranty and spacious closets.

A separate office/den is multi-functional and would be perfect for an office or playroom. There are gallery-style halogen track lighting with 8 fixtures. The

Traffic Master commercial grade carpeting comes with a 10-year warranty. There is also a large walk-in closet, which could be used as a workshop space.

One of the hall baths features the original retro-cool powder blue bathtub, toilet and sink. It is updated with penny-round mosaic floor tile, white tiled shower surround with penny-round tile accents and new reproduction mid-century fixtures. The other guest bathroom features period-appropriate basket-weave floor tile, porcelain vessel sink, classic tiled shower and retro-inspired mirror and lighting.

This home has been updated with many new home systems. There are 2 Trane HVAC systems with Trane programmable digital thermostats. An efficient Whirlpool 50-gallon gas water heater is newer, as well. There is an ADT Security System with entry, motion and smoke detectors (existing lease to be taken over by buyer).

This is a one-of-a-kind lot with over 150 feet of golf course frontage. There is a gate for golf course access, which many nearby residents use as a walking path. Check out the sunset photos taken from this home. Some of the best on the horizon in central Phoenix. The front and rear yards have Rainbird zoned irrigation systems.

There is a new front yard landscape design plan and rendering by SUSTAINscape, if someone wanted to take the landscaping to the next level.

Talk about next level outdoor living…it doesn’t get much better than this entertainer’s paradise rear yard. The deep diving pool is a Shasta Built Master pool with a salt-water system, sun shelf and QuikClean in-floor cleaning system. The pool is finished in a 3M quartz finish and has an LED color-changing pool light and fiber optic surround lighting. The 5 arching fountains can be remote-controlled. The 8-person in-ground spa features 2 hydrotherapy jet settings and new Sta-Rite pool and spa heater (2015).

The patio is finished in ShastaDeck patio coating and has a custom Sunbrella cover with retractable privacy screens. The built-in barbeque has a workspace counter with a Turbo 3 burner gas barbeque, complete with dedicated plumbed gas line. The block fencing features a unique pattern of “cross” architectural breeze block and pop-out blocks. A generous 2 car carport offers a separate storage space and a brand new modern entry door.

Homes of this price point rarely offer this caliber of architectural details, distinctive finishes and stellar views. This home is truly designed for indoor/outdoor living; the outdoor spaces are a virtual extension of the livable space. The home's windows frame the exquisite views and the outdoor spaces were designed with privacy and entertaining in mind. With the home feeling very private and tranquil, it should be noted that the location is convenient to many destinations. Outdoor enthusiasts will love being close to Encanto Park. Within 1 mile, you will find great coffee shops (Vovomeena, D’Lish, Starbucks, Central Café, etc.), popular restaurants (Original Hamburger Works, Sacks sandwiches, Z Pizza, Wild Thaiger, Durants, Duck And Decanter, Zoes Kitchen, etc) and city parks (Encanto Park, Monterey Park, Margaret T Hance park and dog park, etc), It is a rare opportunity that a treasured residence such as this comes to market, especially at an affordable price.

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby, March 20, 2016

734 W. Cambridge Ave.

Phoenix, AZ 85007

 

4 bedrooms

3 bathrooms

3,753 sq ft

13,242 sq ft lot

Located in Encanto Vista historic district

View more information on our website:

twinsandcorealty.com/2017/02/04/734-w-cambridge-ave/

View 3D tour here:

my.matterport.com/show/?m=qAo7Tf8Gip2

View photo album here:

www.facebook.com/TwinsAndCoRealty/photos/?tab=album&a...

 

This historic Peter Hauskens, AIA home combines enchanting mid-century modern architecture with classic finishes in a $240,000+ renovation. 150’ of Encanto golf course frontage delivers epic sunset, golf and park views. Take in views from a 25’ wall of glass in the family room. A fireplace, vaulted ceilings and clerestory windows are sure to impress in the living room. The interior courtyard is framed in windows. A high-design kitchen features Thomasville cabinetry, Silestone counters and stainless steel appliances. The master suite has a sitting area and walk-in closet. Retro-cool baths retain vintage charm, with modern updates. Summers are a dream with a salt water diving pool, which has arching waterfalls, LED light, sun shelf and 8-person inground spa. New roof, windows and flooring in 2016.

WANNA KNOW THIS HOME'S STORY...

Storytime with the Twins: 734 W. Cambridge Ave.

Once upon a time, cotton grew high in the fields at 7th Ave and Thomas. Cotton was one of the 5 Cs that the pre-war economy was based on in Phoenix: cotton, citrus, cattle, climate and copper. Cotton was used extensively during WWI to manufacture wartime necessities like tires, airplane wings and airships . The cotton industry crashed, primarily due to reduced demand, after the war. Many acres of these cotton fields were owned by a successful local grocer, J. W. Morris. Morris sold 101 acres to the city of Phoenix in 1934 for $400/acre . 104 additional acres were sold to the city by Dr. James Norton, of Norton Dairy, in 1934, for $350/acre. Norton also sold 6 acres of his Norton Dairy farm to the city for $350/acre. Phoenix Parks and Recreation, with the assistance of its president at the time, William Hartranft, created the vision of Encanto Park. Construction started in 1935 and was completed in 1938. The Enchanted Island amusement park opened in 1948 and is still a local attraction.

In 1943, J. W. Morris sold 20 acres of former cotton farmland along 7th Ave, and 25 acres along Thomas Rd, to developers, John H. Lester and L.M Hamman; the Encanto Vista subdivision was born. Encanto Vista means “enchanted view” in Spanish. There was a deed restriction on the land that specified that any homes built must be of a “$6,000 class or better”, and in time of war, that just wasn’t possible. While Lester and Hamman weren’t able to start construction on the homes just yet, the streets were graded in 1943. Fast forward to 1945, post-WWII, and the construction of the first 2 houses in Encanto Vista were underway (702 W. Encanto Blvd and 701 W. Lewis Ave). Due to its desirable location, unique “horseshoe” street layout and proximity to Encanto Golf Course and Park, Encanto Vista was a popular home destination for wealthy buyers. The homesites were marketed March of 1945 for between $1,175-1,275. Encanto Vista was built as a neighborhood of custom homes, many of which were built by prominent local architects and builders.

Peter Bert Hauskens, a.k.a P. B. Hauskens, was a successful local architect, a member of the American Institute of Architects. He advertised his services in the classified advertising section of the Arizona Republic in the 1940s. He is credited with designing the Florence City Hall building in 1948.

Mr. Hauskens and his wife, Alberta Hauskens, set their sights on building a family home for themselves and requested a building permit for a “concrete block residence and carport” on July 6th, 1948. They selected the homesite at 734 W. Cambridge Ave. The cost of construction was estimated at $10,000, according to the original building permit. The home was completed before the end of 1948.

The home has had a handful of owners since 1948, all adding their own touches, and pieces of history, to the home. The clain of title goes something like this…The Hauskens family only owned the home for about a year and then sold to Mr. And Mrs. John C. Pence on May 3rd, 1949. On February 29th, 1956 the Pence family sold to George S. and Dorothea Davison. George Davison quit-claim deeded the property to Dorothea on June 7th, 1957. On December 22nd, 1958, Dorothea sold the property to R. W. Chittester, husband of Frida E Chittester and G. Parks McNaull, husband of Agnes B. McNaull, as a co-partnership of Chittester- McNaull Co. Chittester was the president of Modern Glass Co. 3 years later, on May 23rd, 1961, Chittester-McNaull Co. sells the property to Vee Jayne Hofer, wife of Jacob H. Hoffer. On 1/21/1966, there was a deed release to Guild VeeJayne Van from Hoffer Vee Jayce, but I am not sure if they sold the property the same year because there is a permit record in the names of Dr. John Van Guilder and Jan Van Guilder from 1966. Jan Van Guilder was the director at Cambridge Day School. It has been said that the Van Guilders had many birds living at the home. In fact, neighbors have said that the central courtyard was once an massive aviary. The current owner tells a funny story that confirms the bird history. While renovating the home, he was replacing electrical outlets and came to one in the kitchen area, off the central courtyard. As he was unscrewing the outlet, some small debris fell onto the floor; it ended up being bird seed. A pizza delivery man who was delivering a pizza to the current owner immediately recognized the home from his childhood. He recalls going to the house after Cambridge Day School let out for the day. He reminisced about the black plaster pool with Asian characters/symbols at the bottom. The home was decorated with an Asian-inspired style, which extended to the gardens of the home, ala the Japanese Friendship Gardens. In 1995, after 29 years of ownership, the Van Guilder estate fixed up the house and it was put up for sale. On June 5th, 1995, the John Van Guilder estate sold to Bernard Steinfelt, the uncle of the current owner. Title was then transferred to the current owner, Ted Ciccone.

Encanto Vista was added the Phoenix historic register and the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. The district is bounded by Windsor Ave, Encanto Blvd, 7th Ave. and 8th Ave. 734 W. Cambridge Ave. currently receives historic tax incentives for its inclusion as a conforming property within the district.

This historic Peter Hauskens, AIA, home combines enchanting mid-century modern architecture with classic finishes in a $240,000+ renovation. 150’ of Encanto golf course frontage delivers epic sunset, golf & park views + access. This home sits on the 8th hole with picturesque views. An extended concrete walkway, sits aside a broad front lawn and leads to the oversized front door, which is set back 65’ from the front sidewalk. Upon entering the home, you arrive in the entry foyer, which features exposed, painted block walls, Dal-Tile porcelain floor tile with decorative mosaic insert and Jaima Brown designer wallpaper.

One of the distinguishing features of this home is the huge central courtyard, which is framed on all 4 sides by walls of floor-to-ceiling windows and French doors. It is a virtual extension of the living space and a perfect outdoor room for all seasons. It includes a brick, wood-burning fireplace, built-in planters and Dal-Tile 18”x18” Continental Slate porcelain tile.

The eat-in kitchen is all new in 2016. Delight in golf course and park views from your kitchen window, along with views to the interior courtyard, through the 15’ floor-to-ceiling wall of glass. The classic white shaker-style cabinetry by Thomasville has solid wood, dovetail construction, soft-close doors + drawers and glass front display doors. Non-porous, highly-stain resistance Silestone quartz countertops and the crackle-finish gray glass subway tile backsplash are the perfect complements to the timeless design. High-performance appliance package includes Kitchenaid Superba and Bosch stainless steel appliances. Gorgeous tongue and groove, beamed ceilings run throughout much of the home. The contemporary 18” x 18” continental slate porcelain floor tile flows throughout the space.

The expansive family room has a 25’ wall of glass with some of the best views you can find in a single-level home in Central Phoenix. A butler’s pantry connects the family room to the kitchen and features a bar with built-in wine refrigerator. The contemporary Armstrong premium 12mm laminate flooring comes with a 50-year warranty. The dining area is finished with a reproduction sputnik chandelier. Recessed lighting has been added, along with a modern ceiling fan.

The living room is a perfect combination of mid-century modern and usonian styles, with features rarely seen in homes of this era. Some might call the room style ‘rustic modern’, but whatever you call it, it is exquisite. Soaring, vaulted ceilings adjoin an expanse of clerestory windows, which let in gorgeous light throughout the day. The ceilings are adorned with natural tongue and groove wood. A 20’ wall of glass overlooks the interior courtyard. A substantial brick-lined, corner fireplace harkens a modern chalet. Dal-Tile 18”x18” Continental Slate porcelain tile is accented with a decorative mosaic border. A formal dining room shares the natural wood tones and usonian vibe.

The master suite is quite spacious with an attached sitting room that would be perfect for a yoga/meditation space, sewing room, home office, exercise room, craft room, etc. Something you don’t see often in a 1940s Phoenix home are soaring vaulted ceiling with clerestory windows in all of the bedrooms. The Traffic Master commercial-grade carpeting comes with a 10-year warranty. There is a large walk-in closet next to the master bathroom. The master bath maintains a clean, minimalist look with expanses of white tile and Hansgrohe faucets.

The 3 secondary bedrooms all have vaulted and beamed ceilings with clerestory windows, Traffic Master commercial grade carpeting with a 10-year warranty and spacious closets.

A separate office/den is multi-functional and would be perfect for an office or playroom. There are gallery-style halogen track lighting with 8 fixtures. The

Traffic Master commercial grade carpeting comes with a 10-year warranty. There is also a large walk-in closet, which could be used as a workshop space.

One of the hall baths features the original retro-cool powder blue bathtub, toilet and sink. It is updated with penny-round mosaic floor tile, white tiled shower surround with penny-round tile accents and new reproduction mid-century fixtures. The other guest bathroom features period-appropriate basket-weave floor tile, porcelain vessel sink, classic tiled shower and retro-inspired mirror and lighting.

This home has been updated with many new home systems. There are 2 Trane HVAC systems with Trane programmable digital thermostats. An efficient Whirlpool 50-gallon gas water heater is newer, as well. There is an ADT Security System with entry, motion and smoke detectors (existing lease to be taken over by buyer).

This is a one-of-a-kind lot with over 150 feet of golf course frontage. There is a gate for golf course access, which many nearby residents use as a walking path. Check out the sunset photos taken from this home. Some of the best on the horizon in central Phoenix. The front and rear yards have Rainbird zoned irrigation systems.

There is a new front yard landscape design plan and rendering by SUSTAINscape, if someone wanted to take the landscaping to the next level.

Talk about next level outdoor living…it doesn’t get much better than this entertainer’s paradise rear yard. The deep diving pool is a Shasta Built Master pool with a salt-water system, sun shelf and QuikClean in-floor cleaning system. The pool is finished in a 3M quartz finish and has an LED color-changing pool light and fiber optic surround lighting. The 5 arching fountains can be remote-controlled. The 8-person in-ground spa features 2 hydrotherapy jet settings and new Sta-Rite pool and spa heater (2015).

The patio is finished in ShastaDeck patio coating and has a custom Sunbrella cover with retractable privacy screens. The built-in barbeque has a workspace counter with a Turbo 3 burner gas barbeque, complete with dedicated plumbed gas line. The block fencing features a unique pattern of “cross” architectural breeze block and pop-out blocks. A generous 2 car carport offers a separate storage space and a brand new modern entry door.

Homes of this price point rarely offer this caliber of architectural details, distinctive finishes and stellar views. This home is truly designed for indoor/outdoor living; the outdoor spaces are a virtual extension of the livable space. The home's windows frame the exquisite views and the outdoor spaces were designed with privacy and entertaining in mind. With the home feeling very private and tranquil, it should be noted that the location is convenient to many destinations. Outdoor enthusiasts will love being close to Encanto Park. Within 1 mile, you will find great coffee shops (Vovomeena, D’Lish, Starbucks, Central Café, etc.), popular restaurants (Original Hamburger Works, Sacks sandwiches, Z Pizza, Wild Thaiger, Durants, Duck And Decanter, Zoes Kitchen, etc) and city parks (Encanto Park, Monterey Park, Margaret T Hance park and dog park, etc), It is a rare opportunity that a treasured residence such as this comes to market, especially at an affordable price.

Built in 1948, the vintage, five-building, red brick Sandman Motel in Phoenix sits on a lot just shy of an acre and is still in operation. Many decades back, the motel was originally across the street at 2129 W. Van Buren Street. Because of the excellent condition of this sign, I doubt this is the original sign from the 1940s, but from the late 1950s or 1960s.

 

Location:

2120 W. Van Buren Street

Phoenix, Arizona

 

More information about the history of vintage signage on Van Buren Street (during its pre- and post-glory days) is posted at Modern Phoenix.

Location:

Circle K Motel

1939 W. Van Buren Street

Phoenix, Arizona

 

This small, 18-unit economy motel is in fairly good condition despite its age and it is currently for sale. Back in the 1940s, it was called the Circle K Motor Hotel.

 

It's unlikely that this mid-century motel is connected in any way to the Circle K convenience store chain.

 

More information about the history of vintage signage in Phoenix on Van Buren Street (during its pre- and post-glory days) is posted at Modern Phoenix.

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill. This fabulous neon sign for the old Tropicana Motor Hotel went through expensive restoration and was re-lit on April 27, 2012.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby, March 20, 2016

Location:

Tucson Inn

127 W. Drachman Street

Tucson, Arizona

 

The vintage Tucson Inn was built in 1952 and is still in operation. Regrettably, from a number of online reviews I read, this old motel is rapidly decaying and about the only thing that it currently has going for it is its awesome Googie-era neon sign.

 

Bucket list check off: I finally accomplished photographing this iconic Tucson Inn neon sign lit up at night. While the sign's letters are illuminated, the curved arrow that encircles the word "Inn" is not, so isn't easily seen at night.

 

Back many decades ago, this reportedly was one of Arizona's largest motels.

 

Hopefully, the owner will invest money soon for renovations to improve on this gem-in-the-rough's overall structure, as well as cleanliness (or lack thereof) and basic amenities. If not, the 1950's inn could easily become a distant memory after being bulldozed like so many other old, blighted motels before it.

 

A bit about Tucson's mid-century neon signs and the ongoing efforts to restore and preserve them, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic PReservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016

This was my dinner order: Smoked chicken and grilled andouille sausage gumbo ya ya with rice and topped with green onions. Outstanding! Loved the grill marks on the andouille.

 

Location:

Southern Rail

300 W. Camelback Road

Phoenix, AZ 85013

 

Birthday dinner celebration - my son turned 22, and this was his choice for dinner. Everything at Southern Rail was delicious, the service was excellent, and my husband wants to return soon.

 

About The Newton, the 1960s Phoenix building complex (former iconic Beef Eaters restaurant) where Southern Rail resides:

An adaptive reuse project by Venue Projects, LLC and John Douglas Architects, The Newton is a mixed-use concept housed inside Phoenix's former (but iconic) Beef Eaters building. Named after Beef Eaters' Founder Jay Newton, today The Newton is a place where people can read, dine, gather, and shop.

 

The Newton is home to the Phoenix location of Changing Hands Bookstore, Southern Rail Restaurant, Southwest Gardener, and Christofolo Schermer Consulting.

 

Local businessman, Arizona celebrity, and former Utah sheep rancher Jay Newton passed away in 2006 at the age of 87. Newton had opened his popular Beef Eaters restaurant in 1961, and after his death, the restaurant shut down and the huge building was for sale (empty and abandoned) until late 2013 - mid 2014.

 

Restaurant description from the Southern Rail website:

America was galvanized by the railroad system, as it moved people and their dreams from east to west. There was promise of a better life on those southern rail-cars, with hope and adventure bundled in suitcases and stowed in their hearts. Stations and whistle-stops along the way were brief respites to nourish and energize the body. The engagement of people unknown, sights unseen, and smells unknown were the threads of the moment.

 

Southern Rail is a nostalgic gastronomical journey inspired by the “flavors from the American south”. Regional influences stretch from the coastal Carolinas of “low‐country” cooking through the soulful belt of Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. A sense of place is unveiled by the famous New Orleans cuisine so driven by Cajun and Creole cultures. The Gulf coast bounty of seafood and the slow‐smoke barbeque of south Texas all find a home on our menus.

 

Our all American wine and beverage program is drawn from the passion and perseverance that united this great country. The independent spirit is truly expressed in our hand crafted offerings, with a strong focus on local wines, craft beers, and boutique spirits as our hallmarks. We ask our guests to support local and the pursuit of the American dream.

 

A slice of warm hospitality infused with flavors steeped richly from the American south, Southern Rail is a place to gather. Whether to meet friends for a light bite, after work for cocktails and company, with associates to broker a deal, or with family for dinner out; it is a destination for our community. Pay us a visit, pull up a chair, and share the bounty of our passion over food, drink, and welcoming conversation.

 

Description of the former restaurant, via the Beef Eaters website -- sadly, the website hasn't been updated in years and is written in the present tense, making readers believe that Beef Eaters still exists:

Beef Eaters Restaurant in Phoenix Arizona is a rambling Arizona style adobe and heavy timber building with oak paneled walls, pitched beam ceilings, black leather booths, high wing-back chairs and linen table service. Trips to London added rare English art to its decor.

 

Beef Eaters Restaurant features two connected grand dining rooms and a cocktail-dining lounge.

 

It has 4 private party and banquet rooms serving from 10 to 300, plus a quaint wine cellar table for 10. It has two bars, 4 fireplaces, 3 shaded patios, and a large porte cochere drive entrance.

 

Modern Phoenix has an excellent article about Beef Eaters and a variety of photos of the old eatery.

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby, March 20, 2016

Location:

Southern Rail

300 W. Camelback Road

Phoenix, AZ 85013

 

Birthday dinner celebration, restaurant's interior - my son turned 22 this day, and this was his choice for dinner. Everything at Southern Rail was delicious, the service was excellent, and my husband wants to return soon.

 

About The Newton, the 1960s Phoenix building complex (former iconic Beef Eaters restaurant) where Southern Rail resides:

An adaptive reuse project by Venue Projects, LLC and John Douglas Architects, The Newton is a mixed-use concept housed inside Phoenix's former (but iconic) Beef Eaters building. Named after Beef Eaters' Founder Jay Newton, today The Newton is a place where people can read, dine, gather, and shop.

 

The Newton is home to the Phoenix location of Changing Hands Bookstore, Southern Rail Restaurant, Southwest Gardener, and Christofolo Schermer Consulting.

 

Local businessman, Arizona celebrity, and former Utah sheep rancher Jay Newton passed away in 2006 at the age of 87. Newton had opened his popular Beef Eaters restaurant in 1961, and after his death, the restaurant shut down and the huge building was for sale (empty and abandoned) until late 2013 - mid 2014.

 

Restaurant description from the Southern Rail website:

America was galvanized by the railroad system, as it moved people and their dreams from east to west. There was promise of a better life on those southern rail-cars, with hope and adventure bundled in suitcases and stowed in their hearts. Stations and whistle-stops along the way were brief respites to nourish and energize the body. The engagement of people unknown, sights unseen, and smells unknown were the threads of the moment.

 

Southern Rail is a nostalgic gastronomical journey inspired by the “flavors from the American south”. Regional influences stretch from the coastal Carolinas of “low‐country” cooking through the soulful belt of Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. A sense of place is unveiled by the famous New Orleans cuisine so driven by Cajun and Creole cultures. The Gulf coast bounty of seafood and the slow‐smoke barbeque of south Texas all find a home on our menus.

 

Our all American wine and beverage program is drawn from the passion and perseverance that united this great country. The independent spirit is truly expressed in our hand crafted offerings, with a strong focus on local wines, craft beers, and boutique spirits as our hallmarks. We ask our guests to support local and the pursuit of the American dream.

 

A slice of warm hospitality infused with flavors steeped richly from the American south, Southern Rail is a place to gather. Whether to meet friends for a light bite, after work for cocktails and company, with associates to broker a deal, or with family for dinner out; it is a destination for our community. Pay us a visit, pull up a chair, and share the bounty of our passion over food, drink, and welcoming conversation.

 

Description of the former restaurant, via the Beef Eaters website -- sadly, the website hasn't been updated in years and is written in the present tense, making readers believe that Beef Eaters still exists:

Beef Eaters Restaurant in Phoenix Arizona is a rambling Arizona style adobe and heavy timber building with oak paneled walls, pitched beam ceilings, black leather booths, high wing-back chairs and linen table service. Trips to London added rare English art to its decor.

 

Beef Eaters Restaurant features two connected grand dining rooms and a cocktail-dining lounge.

 

It has 4 private party and banquet rooms serving from 10 to 300, plus a quaint wine cellar table for 10. It has two bars, 4 fireplaces, 3 shaded patios, and a large porte cochere drive entrance.

 

Modern Phoenix has an excellent article about Beef Eaters and a variety of photos of the old eatery.

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby, March 20, 2016

East Osborn Road

Phoenix, Arizona

 

The middle building is affectionately called "The Punchcard Building". It was designed by W.A. Sarmiento.

 

9221

"Wendell Burnette"

"Will Bruder"

"Frank Lloyd Wright"

Architecture

Modern

"Modern Architecture"

Design

"Modern Design"

"Modern Phoenix"

Masonry

"Solar Panels"

USGBC

LEED

"Wendell Burnette"

"Will Bruder"

"Frank Lloyd Wright"

Architecture

Modern

"Modern Architecture"

Design

"Modern Design"

"Modern Phoenix"

Masonry

"Solar Panels"

USGBC

LEED

"Wendell Burnette"

"Will Bruder"

"Frank Lloyd Wright"

Architecture

Modern

"Modern Architecture"

Design

"Modern Design"

"Modern Phoenix"

Masonry

"Solar Panels"

USGBC

LEED

"Wendell Burnette"

"Will Bruder"

"Frank Lloyd Wright"

Architecture

Modern

"Modern Architecture"

Design

"Modern Design"

"Modern Phoenix"

Masonry

"Solar Panels"

USGBC

LEED

"Wendell Burnette"

"Will Bruder"

"Frank Lloyd Wright"

Architecture

Modern

"Modern Architecture"

Design

"Modern Design"

"Modern Phoenix"

Masonry

"Solar Panels"

USGBC

LEED

"Wendell Burnette"

"Will Bruder"

"Frank Lloyd Wright"

Architecture

Modern

"Modern Architecture"

Design

"Modern Design"

"Modern Phoenix"

Masonry

"Solar Panels"

USGBC

LEED

"Wendell Burnette"

"Will Bruder"

"Frank Lloyd Wright"

Architecture

Modern

"Modern Architecture"

Design

"Modern Design"

"Modern Phoenix"

Masonry

"Solar Panels"

USGBC

LEED

"Wendell Burnette"

"Will Bruder"

"Frank Lloyd Wright"

Architecture

Modern

"Modern Architecture"

Design

"Modern Design"

"Modern Phoenix"

Masonry

"Solar Panels"

USGBC

LEED

"Wendell Burnette"

"Will Bruder"

"Frank Lloyd Wright"

Architecture

Modern

"Modern Architecture"

Design

"Modern Design"

"Modern Phoenix"

Masonry

"Solar Panels"

USGBC

LEED

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill. This fabulous neon sign for the old Tropicana Motor Hotel went through expensive restoration and was re-lit on April 27, 2012.

 

The city of Tucson must be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There's an interesting article posted by Dave Devine at Tucson Weekly, titled "Motel Memories,". The article delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

Designed by Frank Henry and constructed in 1966, the Valley National Bank received the prestigious 25-Year award from the Central Arizona AIA in 1992. Read more about Henry and his career here: www.legacy.com/obituaries/azcentral/obituary.aspx?pid=166...

 

And here:

 

modernphoenix.net/henry/henryobit.htm

  

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

 

Casa de Surya (House of the Sun)

Architect: Harold Ekman

Year: 1951

Style: Historic Restoration with

Contemporary Interpretation

Designed and built in 1951 by Arizona Native and early modernist Harold Ekman for a local Phoenix family, Casa de Surya stands proudly on Marion Way below the Praying Monk on Camelback Mountain as a true representation of mid-century design. In 1982 the previous homeowners added a gallery walkway from the front door, south to a new master suite. The (current) master bedroom closet was originally a bedroom, linked to the hall bath and kitchen via a hallway on the east side of the home. Layers of carpet, tile and linoleum were removed to reveal a beautiful, original nutmeg tinted concrete foundation. The current homeowners had the original foundation polished, and the grey foundation that was poured for the 1982 remodel tinted to generally match the original flooring. The floors now gleam a burnished brown. New stucco finishes throughout are enough to make you rethink what stucco can do!

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

 

Location:

Circle K Motel

1939 W. Van Buren Street

Phoenix, Arizona

 

This small, 18-unit economy motel is in fairly good condition despite its age and it is currently for sale. Back in the 1940s, it was called the Circle K Motor Hotel. So far, I've been able to find out when it was originally constructed.

 

It's unlikely that this mid-century motel is connected in any way to the Circle K convenience store chain.

 

More information about the history of vintage signage in Phoenix on Van Buren Street (during its pre- and post-glory days) is posted at Modern Phoenix.

 

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill.

 

Tucson is to be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There is an interesting article posted by Dave Devine, titled "Motel Memories," that delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill. This fabulous and funky neon sign for the old Magic Carpet Golf is a favorite of mine.

 

The city of Tucson must be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There's an interesting article posted by Dave Devine at Tucson Weekly, titled "Motel Memories," The article delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

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Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

Location:

Pima Community College Downtown Campus

1255 N. Stone Avenue (erected along W. Drachman Street, north side of college)

Tucson, Arizona

 

This is one of several magnificent vintage neon signs in Tucson, Arizona that has been saved from deterioration or ending up buried in a landfill. This fabulous neon sign for the old Tropicana Motor Hotel went through expensive restoration and was re-lit on April 27, 2012.

 

The city of Tucson must be commended for its efforts to preserve and restore what is left of some of the city's mid-century neon signs, plus display them to the public so that future generations can view such unique (and disappearing) Americana up close and personal. Here is some information about those restoration efforts of these iconic signs, via Modern Phoenix:

Throughout the middle of the 20th century, Miracle Mile, Oracle Road, and Drachman Street were together known as Tucson's "Miracle Mile Strip." This was the northern segment of Tucson's primary automotive corridor: the vehicular route into the city from the North, a crossroads for those traversing the nation on Routes 80 and 89, and an economic arterial that fostered development in several regionally popular architectural styles.

 

For many, this defined their Tucson experience; for others, it shaped their first impression of the Old Pueblo. Swimming pools, flickering neon and lush grassy courtyards welcomed visitors to motels with names like La Siesta, El Rey, Frontier, and El Rancho. Restaurants served steak and music for under $2.00.

 

Today, these iconic buildings and glowing signs have emerged from history to provide a persistent reminder of the continuing American fascination with the Automobile, and to enhance our society's understating of the mythic 20th century West. Classic neon still signs evoke an era of fast cars and a slower pace of life. These wonderful examples of mid-20th century commercial art are an evocative night experience.

 

Working in partnership with Pima Community College, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation (THPF) restored and reinstalled a series of historic neon signs along Drachman (between Stone Avenue and Oracle Road) along the alignment of Tucson's Mid-Century Modern highway: Historic Route 80 & 89 and State Route 84.

 

There's an interesting article posted by Dave Devine at Tucson Weekly, titled "Motel Memories,". The article delves into the history of many of Tucson's 1950's motels and auto courts, some of which are still in operation.

 

********

Mini-road trip with hubby and daughter, December 2016.

This decaying motel/coffee shop sign is at the corner of 10th Avenue and W. Polk Street in downtown Phoenix, Arizona.

 

The huge chunk that is missing from the left side of the sign included the words "Desert Inn," "Swimming Pool," and an arrow. You can just make out what remains of the tip of the arrow. Text can be read for "Featuring On TV" and "Optional On TV" -- from what I can find, "On TV" was somewhat similar to cable in the 1970s. I can't locate information as to whether "On TV" was limited to the Phoenix Metro area or if it was national.

 

A photo of the sign from a few years back, before half of it was torn off, is posted at Modern Phoenix. More info about this sign, the motel, and their sad demise is posted at Roadside Peek: Lost Treasures.

 

Desert Inn Motel has been demolished and no longer exists, but its signage is still erected on a vacant lot (photo posted here).

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