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and then make some 'pudina pulao' (mint rice) once in a while ;-)

This dish is made with cauliflower, potatoes, ghee, cumin seeds, ginger, tumeric, ground cumin, ground coriander, cayenne pepper, garam masala, salt, and fresh cilantro. I served this with Khara Masala Pulao, Dal Ghia, papadum, and yogurt/mint raita. If the ghee is replaced with oil, this dish would be vegan.

 

This recipe comes from one of my three favorite Indian Cookbooks: Vegetarian Nirvana by Santosh Jain. This book focuses on home-style North Indian cuisine, with many recipes suitable for a Jain vegetarian diet. My other two favorites are Dakshin by Chandra Padmanabhan and An Invitation to Indian Cooking by Madhur Jaffrey (I use the original edition).

I like to make dry-cooked dals because it is a nice change in texture from the more common soup-like dals. Even though this dish isn't all that interesting visually, it has a lot of flavor, partially because it blends two types of dal.

 

This dish contains urd (urad) dal, chana dal, ginger, cumin, tumeric, cayene, salt, ghee, and water. The baghar (a finishing mixture of spices, fat, and sometimes other ingredients) contains ghee, onions, tomatoes, paprika, and garam masala. I served this with Alu Methi, Matar Pulao, papadum, and yogurt/mint raita. If the ghee is replaced with oil, this dish would be vegan.

 

This recipe comes from one of my three favorite Indian Cookbooks: Vegetarian Nirvana by Santosh Jain. This book focuses on home-style North Indian cuisine, with many recipes suitable for a Jain vegetarian diet. My other two favorites are Dakshin by Chandra Padmanabhan and An Invitation to Indian Cooking by Madhur Jaffrey (I use the original edition).

Credit: the boyfriend.

 

Rogan Josh marinated lamb loins with pulao rice salad (sultanas, coriander, mint and mustard seed dressing).

Patrani macchi £11

Hara Bater £11

Chicken kolhapuri £17

Monkfish £11

Saffron Pulao £3

Peshwari naan £4

Cucumber/mint raita £3

Almond pudding £8

Berry Parfait £8

Filter coffee £4

375ml Groote Sauvignon carafe £20

2 Kingfisher beers £14

Classic Vodka Martini £9

Hot Vegetable Rice with onion tomato raita or cucumber raita or plain yogurt accompanied with papad and pickle.

Toor Dal with Tomatoes / Golden Beets with Coconut / Papadams / Pea Pulao / Potatoes with Mint and Jalapeno / Eggplant with Tamarind

Aromatic basmati rice with mushrooms and mint paste.

Pudina rice is also known as Mint fried rice/Pudina Pulao.Pudina is famous south indian recipe.Pudina rice is simple instant recipe.Pudina rice is very tasty .Pudina rice is generally served with raitha.

Tomato soup

Chinese gobi manchurian as a starter

Mint channa pulao

Raitha

carrot oothamppam and chutney

For desserts- Mysorpag and

carrot kheer

 

A samosa /səˈmoʊsə/ or samoosa is a fried or baked pastry with savory filling, such as spiced potatoes, onions, peas, lentils and sometimes ground lamb, ground beef or ground chicken. They may or may not also contain pine nuts. The samosa originated in the Middle East (where it is known as sambosa) prior to the 10th century. They were introduced to South Asia (India, Pakistan) during the Muslim Delhi Sultanate when cooks from Middle East and Central Asia migrated to work in the kitchens of the Sultan and the nobility. Its size and consistency may vary, but typically it is distinctly triangular or tetrahedral in shape. Indian samosas are usually vegetarian, and often accompanied by a mint sauce or chutney. With its origins in Uttar Pradesh, they are a popular entree appetizer or snack in the local cuisines of South Asia, Southeast Asia, Central Asia and Southwest Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, the Mediterranean, the Horn of Africa and North Africa. Due to cultural diffusion and emigration from these areas, samosas are today also prepared in other global regions.

 

HISTORY

The samosa originated in the Middle East (where it is known as sambosa[1]) prior to the 10th century. Abolfazl Beyhaqi (995-1077), an Iranian historian mentioned it in his history, Tarikh-e Beyhaghi.[7] It was introduced to the Arabian subcontinent in the 13th or 14th century by traders from the region.

 

Amir Khusro (1253–1325), a scholar and the royal poet of the Delhi Sultanate, wrote in around 1300 that the princes and nobles enjoyed the "samosa prepared from meat, ghee, onion and so on".

 

Ibn Battuta, the 14th-century traveller and explorer, describes a meal at the court of Muhammad bin Tughluq, where the samushak or sambusak, a small pie stuffed with minced meat, almonds, pistachio, walnuts and spices, was served before the third course, of pulao.

 

The Ain-i-Akbari, a 16th-century Mughal document, mentions the recipe for qutab, which it says, “the people of Hindustan call sanbúsah”.

 

SAMOSA IN INDIA

The samosa contains a maida flour shell stuffed with some filling, generally a mixture of mashed boiled potato, onion, green peas, spices and green chili.[12] The entire pastry is then deep fried to a golden brown colour, in vegetable oil. It is served hot and is often eaten with fresh Indian chutney, such as mint, coriander or tamarind. It can also be prepared as a sweet form, rather than as a savory one. Samosas are often served in chaat, along with the traditional accompaniments of yogurt, chutney, chopped onions, coriander, and chaat masala.

 

In Delhi, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand and other Northern States of India, a bigger version of the samosa with spicy filling of masala potatoes, peas, crushed green chilies, and sometimes dry fruits, and other variation fillings is quite popular. The samosa is bigger compared to other Indian and foreign variants.

 

In South India, samosas are slightly different, in that they are folded in a different way more like Portuguese chamuças, with a different style pastry. The filling also differs, typically featuring mashed potatoes with spices, fried onions, peas, carrots, cabbage, curry leaves, green chilies, etc.. It is mostly eaten without chutney. Samosas in South India come in different sizes, and fillings are greatly influenced by the local food habits. Samosas made with spiced mashed potato mixture are quite popular in the South Indian states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, and Tamil Nadu.

 

NEPAL

The samosa is called singoda in Nepal. As in India, it is a very popular part of local cuisine. Vendors sell the dish in various markets and restaurants.

   

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