new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged malay+lacewing

Night after night I hear myself say

Why can't this feeling just fade away

There's no one like you

You speak to my heart

It's such a shame we're worlds apart

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NrQei36fJk

 

Day after day

Time passed away

And I just can't get you off my mind

 

But if I let you go I will never know

What my life would be holding you close to me

Will I ever see you smiling back at me?

How will I know if I let you go?

 

There's no one like you.....

 

© All rights reserved Anna Kwa. Please do not use this image on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit written permission.

 

Malay Lacewing {cethosia hypsea hypsina}

 

A beautiful butterfly with wings of orange and red surrounded by broad black borders. The wings are scalloped, giving the hind-wings its sawtooth-like edges. The undersides are orange and red with white fasciae and black spots forming an intricate pattern.

 

This photo was taken at Kipandi Butterfly Park which is 36 km from Kota Kinabalu City and 700m (2,100 feet) above sea level. It shows a lacewing on the lantana. (There are quite a number of subspecies with different patterns and colours.)

 

~Lightbox~

 

.

____________________________________________________________________

 

Have a moment?

See more of my work on black here

or for my explored photos click here

_____________________________________________________________________

  

The Flying fox or Fruit Bat is a bat in the genus Pteropus, belonging to the Megachiroptera sub-order, the largest bats in the world. There are many sub-species in this genus.They live in the tropics and subtropics of Asia and a number of remote oceanic islands in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

 

The genus Pteropus goes back a long time. Fossils unearthed were dated 35 million years old. The notable difference in the fossil being the presence of a tail for stabilisation in early flight adaptation.

 

Pteropus do not possess echolocation. They do not have super-sonar like the microbats. However, they have well developed sense of smell and sight. Pteropus feed only on nectar, blossom, pollen and fruits. When it locates food, it often crash into the foliage and grabs for it. Feeding ranges can reach up to 40 miles.

 

Many species are threatened with extinction today. All Pteropus are listed in Appendix II (threatened) of CITES. (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). {Condensed from wikipedia}.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Photographed through the wire mesh of a large cage at Lok Kawi Wildlife Park. (macro lens). Unfortunately, it was not possible to get a frontal shot.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

My butterfly photo "Malay Lacewing II" is on frontpage this week at Vos plus belles photos . Many thanks to everyone. :-)))

 

The Leopard Lacewing (Cethosia cyane) is a species of heliconiine butterfly found from India to southern China (southern Yunnan), and Indochina. Its range has expanded in the last few decades, and its arrival in the southern part of the Malay Peninsula, including Singapore, is relatively recent.

Malay Lacewing at Kipandi Butterfly Park.

 

#201008-36~Lightbox~

The Leopard Lacewing (Cethosia cyane) is a species of heliconiine butterfly found from India to southern China (southern Yunnan), and Indochina. Its range has expanded in the last few decades, and its arrival in the southern part of the Malay Peninsula, including Singapore, is relatively recent.

Malay Lacewing {cethosia hypsea hypsina} on lantana at Kipandi Butterfly Park.

 

#201101-04 ~Lightbox~ My butterfly set

The Key West Butterfly & Conservatory is a joy to experience.

 

Explore 12/17/11

 

.

Copyright 2011 © Merilee Phillips. All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without my written explicit permission. All rights reserved - Copyright 2011 © Merilee Phillips

scientific name " Malay Lacewing " info courtesy from dr. zulbaning www.flickr.com/photos/zulbaning/ [ tq v much doc! ]

Cethosia hypsea

 

Thank you for your comments and faves – they are greatly appreciated!

 

Select photos from my Flickr stream are available for purchase as prints or personal download at [www.winterfirephotographicarts.com].

Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University , Phila -- Live butterfly exhibit

Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University , Phila -- Live butterfly exhibit

A Malay Lacewing Butterfly at the American Museum of Natural History’s Butterfly Conservatory (New York, New York)—April 14, 2012

Malay Lacewing at Kipandi Butterfly Park.

 

201008-35~Lightbox~

The Leopard Lacewing (Cethosia cyane) is a species of heliconiine butterfly found from India to southern China (southern Yunnan), and Indochina. Its range has expanded in the last few decades, and its arrival in the southern part of the Malay Peninsula, including Singapore, is relatively recent.

malay lacewing (cethosia hypsea)

這隻曾被選為全世界最美的七種蝴蝶之一. 不過個人覺得比他漂亮的蝶種還很多,每個人審美觀不同啦 :)

This species was ever chosen to be one of the seven most beautiful butterflies in the world. A common species in Malay Penisula. Taken at Penang Butterfly Farm.

A Malay Lacewing butterfly blends in with the leaves. More to follow on our FB page:

 

www.facebook.com/implausibleblog

We had a lovely time at RHS Wisley yesterday. We specifically went to see the "Butterflies in the Glasshouse". They didn't disappoint with plenty flying around, feeding and resting. The most gorgeous colours - very beautiful. This is the blue morpho (Morpho peleides).

 

"See exotic butterflies take flight amongst the flowers and fruit of the nectar plants in the tropical paradise of the Glasshouse. The tree ferns, tall palms, lush-leaved creepers and dazzling flower displays give an air of expectation and drama – like walking in to a jungle. Butterflies such as the striking blue morpho, giant owl, king swallowtail and colourful Malay lacewing will settle amongst the tropical plantings. Marvel at the colours and sizes of the different species - if you're lucky, one might even land on you!

 

You’ll be able to see butterflies feeding at special feeding stations, and learn about the lifecycle of butterflies with our puparium. New for 2015 will be a display of sculptures depicting butterflies and caterpillars, by Alison Catchlove an artist based in Shere. Her work has been inspired by previous visits to Butterflies in the Glasshouse.

 

Aside from the butterfly-friendly plants, such as Plumbago indica, calliandras and lantanas there’s a world-class horticultural display to see. Look out for Magnolia doltsopa with scented creamy white flowers as you enter the Glasshouse. Inside you’ll see the Clivia collection in mid-February, with more unusual variegated cultivars in flower. Aloe x spinosissima in the arid section begins to look its best early in the new year with fantastic grey leaves and spikes of orange flowers." www.rhs.org.uk/gardens/wisley

I was lucky enough to be able to photograph this butterfly which was feeding on flowers growing on the hill-slopes of Pedong (in West Bengal, India).

 

"The Malay Lacewing (Cethosia hypsea) is a butterfly of the Nymphalidae family. It is found in from Burma to Indonesia and the Philippines.

 

The wingspan is about 80 mm.Adults are bright orange-red above with broad black borders, warning predators of their toxicity. The underside is orange-red with white fasciae and is spotted with black. The wings are scalloped.

 

The larvae feed on Adenia species. They are wine red and have long spines. They are also poisonous." - Information Source, Wikipedia.

 

Enjoy this photo with a fullscreen view: Press 'F11' and 'L'. Press 'F11' again & 'Esc' to return to normal.

A Malay Lacewing butterfly (Cethosia Hypsea Hypsina) at rest on Sentosa island.

The Leopard Lacewing (Cethosia cyane) is a species of heliconiine butterfly found from India to southern China (southern Yunnan), and Indochina. Its range has expanded in the last few decades, and its arrival in the southern part of the Malay Peninsula, including Singapore, is relatively recent.

Malay Lacewing (Cethosia hypsea hypsina) - Underside

 

A subspecies of Cethosia hypsea found in forested areas and in nature reserves of the Malay Peninsula, from Burma to Singapore.

 

Most probably derives its name from the intricate colourful patterns on its underside; the wing borders are dark coloured and deeply indented with lace-like pattern of white markings.

 

Male specimens possess bright red wings with black borders whilst females have an orange hue in place of the red. In addition, the female has a white spot on each upperside forewing in the orange area. Both sexes have their hindwing edges shaped like the teeth of a saw.

 

Family:Nymphalidae

 

This picture is taken in the indoor live butterfly garden of the Sensational Butterflies Exhibition, Natural History Museum, London

**View On Black** (Please Press "L")

  

© All rights reserved Anna Kwa. Please do not use this image on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit written permission.

 

Malay Lacewing {cethosia hypsea hypsina}

______________________________________________________________________

A beautiful butterfly with wings of orange and red surrounded by broad black borders. The wings are scalloped, giving the hind-wings its sawtooth-like edges. The undersides are orange and red with white fasciae and black spots forming an intricate pattern.

 

This photo was taken at Kipandi Butterfly Park which is 36 km from Kota Kinabalu City and 700m (2,100 feet) above sea level. It shows a lacewing on the lantana. (There are quite a number of subspecies with different patterns and colours.)

_____________________________________________________________________

An unusual combination are of winged beauties are sitting together! An Asian Cethosia hypsea or Malay Lacewing and a rare Florida Atala Eumaeus.

 

The Lacewing with its rick rack black and white wing edges has two distinct looks, open and closed. I thought they were different butterflies the first time I saw them! The male Lacewing is a rich reddish tawny when newly hatched fading to tawny. The female is lighter. The upperside of the fore wing is black on the outer edges with a rick racky white-bar crossing near the tip as on the underside.

 

The underside, shown here, is an ecstatic black, white and bright orange pattern of squiggly lines, dots and dashes a kite designer would be thrilled to have created!

 

Wings of the Tropics, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Miami, FL

The Malay Lacewing (Cethosia hypsea)

299V1008a

 

View Large

 

The Malay Lacewing (Cethosia hypsea hypsina) belongs to the genus Cethosia, which includes some of the most beautiful butterflies in the region. The upperside of the wings of both the male and female of this species feature a bright orange-red colour with black borders. The outer margins of both wings are serrated, particularly more so on the hindwings, giving the wings a saw-toothed appearance. The intricate 'lace' patterns on the undersides of the wings are likely to have given rise to the origin of its English common name, Lacewing.

 

The Malay Lacewing is described as the commonest species of the genus in Malaysia and Singapore. It is characterised by the pale yellow subapical border on the forewing above. Males tend to fly more energetically than the females. It is essentially a forest butterfly, preferring to stay within the confines of the nature reserves in Singapore, and the forested areas. The Malay Lacewing can often be observed at the flowers of Leea indica, Snakeweed (Stachytarpeta indica), Mile-a-Minute (Mikania cordata), Ixora spp. and Lantana camara. It is always a joy to watch this pretty butterfly flutter amongst the flowering bushes, searching for its favourite nectaring source to feed upon, and flying nonchalantly in a spectacular display of its bright cheerful colours.

 

Females of the Malay Lacewing have a yellowish-white dorsal patch on the forewings above, which is absent in the males. The females also appear a paler orange-red whereas the males sport a darker shade of orange-red on the wings above.

 

The wine-red caterpillars of this species are known to feed on Passifloraceae. The species is distateful to predators.

 

See butterflycircle.blogspot.com/2007/12/butterfly-of-month-d...

  

The Malay Lacewing (Cethosia hypsea)

The Leopard Lacewing (Cethosia cyane) is a species of heliconiine butterfly found from India to southern China (southern Yunnan), and Indochina. Its range has expanded in the last few decades, and its arrival in the southern part of the Malay Peninsula, including Singapore, is relatively recent

Malay Lacewing butterfly feeding on lantana. Photographed at Kipandi Butterfly Park.

#201008-05 ~Lightbox.

 

More info on Wikipedia: Cethosia.

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 14 15