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The is the LSE library, which I can't believe we visited 5 years ago to photograph!

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Last one from London for this week, this is another shot taken at the London School of Economics Library.

 

I had to email and get permission to shoot here but the staff were very welcoming and actually encouraged me to walk freely around the library to get the photos that I wanted.

 

The building was converted into a library in 1973 and redeveloped in 2000 by Foster & Partners. It is the world's largest social sciences library, with 50km of shelving and more than 4 million items.

 

I really love the design of this place, despite its contents, it looks so futuristic, like something from the new Star Trek films. I'm hoping to get another visit here later in the year so I can get a couple of other viewpoints from the top of the helical ramp.

This building the Saw Swee new Students Centre at the London School of Economics was the last I visited on the Sunday afternoon of Open House. I was leading a group of 12 of us from Bognor Regis Camera Club. The building was shortlisted for the Stirling Prize in Architecture in 2014. I last visited when it was in the Open House Program in 2014.

 

This is the bottom of one spiral staircase starting from the basement and believed to be the largest concrete staircase cast in place in Europe. The shot was taken at the bottom and there was a narrow space to get the image. Some of us from the Club took turns to stand there and get shots. This was an open access building for some areas with the option of taking a more though Tour which we opted for. We received a detailed 40 minute tour of the building with some fascinating information. The outside looks like an exercise in origami in brick and the inside has been carefully designed for minimum energy use

 

The picture was taken with a Sony A68 with a Sigma 10-20 wide angle zoom at 12mm. Taken handheld with 3 raw images 2EV spacing. HDR processing was with Photomatix using Fusion Natural preset for a natural look. Extra Detail was brought in with Topaz Clarity. Topaz DeNoise was used. The mono conversion was done with Topaz B&W using an underexposed preset for a darker look

 

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This is the library at the London School of Economics. It's an amazing space for learning right in the heart of London and well worth a visit.

 

Many thanks to Clare Carrier for the tip-off about the location.

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You gotta love the spiral at the LSE library!

This image was taken during a recent visit to the London School of Economics Library with fellow photographers Slawek Sondaj, Peter Li and Max Vassiades. On the last day of the university winter term we had the location -- which is visited by about 6,500 students and staff each day -- almost entirely to ourselves. Where the library's enormous atrium had been filled with sunlight during my previous visit, the scene late at night took on a much moodier tone, with the vibrant furniture on the now-renovated lower ground floor adding a cheerful splash of contrasting colour.

 

The set-up for the shot involved extending my tripod's neck horizontally over the spiral ramp's balustrade so that the camera was looking almost directly down. While the library had requested that the final selection of images we provided would not contain visitors, I couldn't resist leaving one student in the frame, who had made himself comfortable on one of the beanbags in the lower ground floor and who provided a sense of the scale of the enormous building.

 

The image is a blend of nine exposures combined in Photoshop using luminosity masks, with the darker exposures allowing me to tone down the highlights along the walls and inside the lifts, and the brighter exposures adding the cleanest possible finish to the shadows along the steps and lift shaft. Using reflective and radial gradient masks, I then used my brightest exposures to emphasise the light across the glass casing at the base of the lift shaft, as well as the overall exposure of the lower ground floor, where I wanted the viewer's eye to settle after taking in the geometric patterns along the helical ramp.

 

The colour-grading phase was carried out with a less-is-more approach: the blue along the spiral was desaturated, and the yellow between the seats on the lower-ground floor removed in order to simplify the overall palette to three tones: a muted blue for the spiral, a clean white for the walls, and a vibrant red for the seats. After this, I used a low-opacity monochrome Gradient Map set to Soft Light to gently emphasise the contrast across the image, and a Selective Colour adjustment to add a hint of magenta to the red furniture. Finally, inside Nik's Silver Efex Pro, I lowered the midtone and shadow structure in order to soften the texture of the walls and carpets, as well as amplifying the whites and Soft Contrast, which gave the image a softer feel without affecting the details.

 

The library's atrium has such a minimalist and contemporary ambience that it's easy to forget the building contains more than 4 million pieces of literature across 50km of shelving. At the same time, I like how the lone student in this image is inevitably working on a laptop, which seems to add a subtle commentary on how learning and research have evolved over the years.

 

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This is the library at the London School of Economics. It's an amazing space for learning right in the heart of London and well worth a visit. The basement level is full of red and blue beanbags which are pretty comfortable. Someone had even dragged one off to the side and was asleep on it!

 

Many thanks to Clare Carrier for the tip-off about the location.

The London School of Economics Library recently invited me back to photograph their interior, and having visited twice over the past year, most recently last December, it was fun to come back for a third time and try to capture the location from a different vantage point.

 

Even late in the evening and outside of university term time, the library was filled with visitors. While I waited for the place to quieten down, I selected a spot on one of the middle levels, looking towards the spiral ramp that circles the lift shaft throughout the atrium. My aim when shooting this scene was to try to convey the elegance of the lines, curves and complementing patterns, and at the same time a sense of the scene’s energy and creativity. As people gradually made their way down the ramp, two people caught my eye: one lady wearing a red head scarf, and another who was one level higher, leaning on the balcony and absorbed in an intense conversation on her phone. I was torn over which one to keep in the final image, and in the end settled on both, as I felt this reflected the depth and scale of the location, and perhaps more importantly how much was going on in the library at the same time.

 

The final image is a mixture of exposures: two sets of nine bracketed exposures, blended in Photoshop using luminosity masks to balance the highlights and shadows, and then combined to mask out lifts as they moved up and down the lift shaft. I then captured an additional exposure for the lady walking down the ramp, which required a much faster shutter speed and therefore a higher ISO and a wider aperture.

 

With the exposures blended and the emphasis on a high-key finish, I shifted the colour balance towards a palette with hints of cyan and green in order to complement the pristine surfaces and brilliant-white tones across the building. While the image was already bright and airy, I wanted to play this up even more, so I added a low-opacity Gradient Map and set the blend mode to screen, excluding the highlights while further brightening the midtones and shadows. Finally, using Nik plugins, I gently amplified the whites and added a Pro Contrast filter, which helped to give the details a little more definition and made the image pop.

 

The library wanted images without people so I’m unlikely to be able to supply this take to them, but it was a fun exercise and a joy to photograph, and also an interesting exploration of how people visiting a location can interact with their surroundings and complete the scene.

 

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Ramachandra Guha, historian reading a book at TIMES Litfest 2018 in Bengaluru.

 

"Ramachandra Guha is an Indian historian and writer whose research interests include environmental, social, political, contemporary and cricket history. He is also a columnist for The Telegraph and Hindustan Times. A regular contributor to various academic journals, Guha has also written for The Caravan and Outlook magazines. For the year 2011–12, he held a visiting position at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), the Philippe Roman Chair in History and International Affairs. His newest book is Gandhi Before India (2013), the first part of a planned two-volume biography of M. K. Gandhi. "

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This is the library at the London School of Economics. It's an amazing space for learning right in the heart of London and well worth a visit.

 

This is a 16 shot handheld panorama merged together in Photoshop to vie a 10,499x4468 image. I tried to use the new Lightroom panorama feature but it wouldn't process the image :-(

 

Many thanks to Clare Carrier for the tip-off about the location.

Another spiral staircase to add to my collection. This is more of a ramp with occasional steps very similar to City Hall. It is at the LSE Library in London. Note that this is not open to the public. I emailed them in advance for permission. It is necessary to explain the use of the pictures which are to be personal use only and in particular no commercial use is allowed and no pictures of Students without their permission as they have had complaints. Best time when there are less students around is mornings or out of term time. I would suggest allowing 4 working days for a decision.

 

This redesign of the building was by the Architects Norman Fosters and was opened in 2001. I thought that was a suitable date for the opening considering that the scene could have been out of the film.

 

The picture was taken handheld with a Sony A700 with a Sigma 10-20mm lens at 10 mm. 3 raw images 2EV spacing. The picture was a combination of HDR for the highlights and a single image edited in RAW and then the 2 images combined with a layer mask. I decided this produced the best look. A high ISO was needed to get a fast enough shutter speed producing Noise which I removed with Topaz DeNoise. Topaz Clarity was also used. Despite best efforts there were a few distant students visible on the ramp so I removed these with cloning. A slight vignette was applied with Topaz Adjust.

 

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This is another shot taken from Open House London. This is the spiral staircase in the Saw See Hock Student Union (part of the London School of Economics). I am a bit annoyed that I did not shoot at the correct angle to get the lower part of the bannister in the frame. I was part of a guided tour so one had to navigate through the other people on the tour and keep up with the tour so it was all a bit rushed.

 

Clearly I am not going to make my 215 photos in 2015 - so I am aiming for 50! Not very good I know but better than nothing I suppose.

 

Image 17/50

The London School of Economics and their gravity-defying spiral staircase... shot by Mark Higham

The College of Arms, also known as the College of Heralds, is a royal corporation consisting of professional officers of arms, with jurisdiction over England, Wales, and some Commonwealth realms. The heralds are appointed by the British Sovereign and are delegated authority to act on behalf of the Crown in all matters of heraldry, the granting of new coats of arms, genealogical research and the recording of pedigrees. The College is also the official body responsible for matters relating to the flying of flags on land, and it maintains the official registers of flags and other national symbols. Though a part of the Royal Household of the United Kingdom the College is self-financed, unsupported by any public funds. Founded by royal charter in 1484 by King Richard III, the College is one of the few remaining official heraldic authorities in Europe. Within the United Kingdom, there are two such authorities, the Court of the Lord Lyon in Scotland and the ColB George Edmund Street, who died before it was completed, it is a large gray stone edifice in the Victorian Gothic style built in the 1870s and opened by Queen Victoria in 1882. It is one of the largest courts in Europe. It is located on the Strand within the City of Westminster, near the border with the City of London. It is surrounded by the four Inns of Court, King's College London and the London School of Economics

Just returned from a trip to Thailand but until I get some of those files processed I'll revert to uploading shots from last months #Photo24 event. Here's one of my 8mm fisheye shots of County Hall on the South Bank.

 

Click here to see more photos from this and previous years Photo24 events : www.flickr.com/photos/darrellg/albums/72157667520181380

 

From Wikipedia : "The main six storey building was designed by Ralph Knott. It is faced in Portland stone in an Edwardian Baroque style. The construction, which was undertaken by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, started in 1911 and the building was opened in 1922 by King George V. The North and South blocks, which were built by Higgs and Hill, were added between 1936 and 1939. The Island block was not completed until 1974.

 

For 64 years County Hall served as the headquarters of local government for London. During the 1980s the then powerful Labour-controlled GLC led by Ken Livingstone was locked in conflict with the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher. Since the Parliament buildings were just across the river from County Hall, the façade of County Hall frequently in more than one year of her tenure served as a billboard for opposition slogans. When the government of Margaret Thatcher abolished the GLC in 1986, County Hall lost its role as the seat of London's government. Talk soon became of what was to happen to the building, and plans to relocate the London School of Economics to the site from its Westminster campus were overruled by Mrs Thatcher, seemingly disapproving of further slogans from students. The building remained in use by the Inner London Education Authority (ILEA) until its abolition in 1990 when the building was transferred to the London Residuary Body and eventually sold to private investors. On 21 October 2005, the High Court of England and Wales upheld a bid by the owners of the building, Shirayama Shokusan, to have the Saatchi Gallery evicted on grounds of violating its contract, particularly using space outside of the rented area for exhibits. Today, the majority of the building, including the entire fourth and fifth floors, remains empty since the dissolution of the GLC. Another small section of the building is occupied as a Premier Inn."

 

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The Old Curiosity Shop. 13-14 Portsmouth Street, London.

 

(Pre digital)

 

A shop named 'The Old Curiosity Shop' can be found at 13–14 Portsmouth Street, Holborn, London, WC2A 2ES, and is now owned by the London School of Economics. The building dates back to the sixteenth century in an area known as Clare Market, but the shop name was added after the novel was released, as it was thought to be the inspiration for Dickens's description of the antique shop. At one time it functioned as a dairy on an estate given by King Charles II to one of his many mistresses. It was built using timber from old ships, and survived the bombs of the Second World War.

 

Other real locations used in the novel include London Bridge, Bevis Marks, Finchley, and Minster-on-Sea.

This was one of my favourite locations from Open House London 2013. A hidden gem, with no pre-book required and only a handful of people in attendance. Once inside, a tour awaited us but also an opportunity to walk round unescorted. You kind of ask yourself if the 4/5 hour wait for the Gherkin was really worth it when this little beauty was also on offer? After all, both locations are much the work of internationally renowned architect sir Norman Foster.

 

My favourite bit of this image is the subtle refraction in the glass facia of the lift.

 

Have a great day! :-)

Another one from the London School of Economics library. This was taken from the top floor looking down.

 

I found it a bit weird that they had beanbags in an academic library. I can understand having beanbags in a library with story books where you would go to read and relax, but for studying? I am not so sure.

 

Image 9/215

- from 1908 "Lovell's Gazetteer of the Dominion of Canada" - BEAVER, a post settlement in East Kootenay County, B.C., on the Columbia River, the furthest north port of the C.P.R., called "Beaver Mouth." A very considerable amount of trapping and hunting takes place around Beaver. It contains 1 Presbyterian church, 1 store, 1 saw mill, telegraph and express offices. The population in 1908 was 100.

 

(from - Wrigley's 1918 British Columbia directory) - BEAVER - a post office near Beavermouth, on the C. P. R. main line, near Golden, in Columbia Provincial Electoral District. Business centre is Golden.

 

Beaver was named after Canada's national animal. Beaver was located 9 miles west of Donald on the C.P.R. mainline. It had a long life. It was opened - 1 March 1890 / 21 September 1890 and closed 2 June 1954. In later days the name was changed to Beavermouth. Six Mile Creek, in the same area, opened - 1 April 1913 and closed 31 October 1932. (written by Lester Small) LINK - www.vicstamps.com/displays/bc_postal_history_articles/bc_...

 

/ BEAVER / JU 8 / 36 / B.C. / - split ring cancel - this split ring hammer was proofed - 5 March 1890.

 

Addressed to: W. Kaye Lamb. Esq. / Public Library Commission / Victoria, B.C.

 

William Kaye Lamb, librarian, author, archivist (born at New Westminster, BC - 11 May 1904; died at Vancouver, 24 Aug 1999). Educated at UBC (BA, 1927, MA, 1930), the Sorbonne and London School of Economics (PhD, 1933), Lamb served as provincial librarian and archivist in BC 1934-1940. He founded and edited British Columbia Historical Quarterly, and managed the development of the provincial Document Disposal Act. He was the university librarian at UBC (1940-48) before being appointed Dominion Archivist by Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King in 1948. He drafted the National Library Act of 1952, and was instrumental in creating the National Library of Canada. Lamb published several books and articles on the Canadian Pacific Railway, the exploration and fur trade of the Pacific Northwest, and shipping on the Pacific Coast. In addition to his professional duties, Lamb established an imposing presence in scholarly publishing, achieving particular excellence with his editions of historical documents, of which George Vancouver, A Voyage of Discovery 1791-1795, 4 vols (1985), is an impressive culmination. Link to the complete article - www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/william-kaye-lamb

 

Link to a photo of William Kaye Lamb - www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/obj/015002/f1/0424160103.jpg

Group photograph of participants in a Fabian Society summer school in the 1920s.

 

IMAGELIBRARY/1360

Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&i...

I've photographed the LSE Saw Swee Hock Student Centre before but don't think I did this RIBA Stirling Prize 2014 nominated building justice.

 

I returned when I was in London last weekend to try again and this time the conditions helped me get some shots which capture some of the crispness of the architecture.

 

Click here for more Stirling Prize nominated buildings : www.flickr.com/photos/darrellg/albums/72157634329899070

 

A bit about the Architects O'Donnell & Tuomey from Wikipedia : "The practice became widely known when their Irish Film Centre and Gallery of Photography won the Downes Medal, in 1992 and 1996 respectively. They have since designed a number of notable buildings, including the Lewis Glucksman Gallery at University College Cork (commemorated by An Post stamp in 2013 ), the Irish installation at the Venice Biennale 2004, and the Ranelagh Multidenominational School, which won the RIAI Triennial Gold Medal in 2005. Five of their projects were shortlisted for Stirling Prize: Ranelagh Multidenominational School in 1999, Lewis Glucksman Gallery in 2005, Lyric Theatre (Belfast) in 2011, An Gaeláras Irish Language Centre in 2012 and London School of Economics Saw Swee Hock Students' Centre in 2014."

 

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Bridge of Aspiration, Royal Ballet School, London, England

 

This is an old one from the archives, all the way back from 2011! Its actually quite amazing how your processing techniques change over the years, theres no way I would have processed this image in this way 3 years ago.

 

Anyway, this is the Bridge of Aspiration at the Royal Ballet School in London. With the London Open House Weekend coming up soon and the venues for this year just put online yesterday I thought I would give you all a taster of what you might get if you go this year. Sadly though I don't think the Royal Ballet School are part of Open House this year.

 

For those who have never been before, basically around 800+ buildings in London open their doors to the public for a weekend. Most of them are not open throughout the year so its a rare opportunity to see inside some wonderful buildings. The good thing about Open House London is that its free too, only some of the buildings you need to pre-book or apply to a ballot but theres plenty of others for you to see and photograph for free!

 

This year will be my 4th Open House weekend and so I am looking forward to visiting some new buildings. I have managed to get a place for the London School of Economics and Abbey Mills Pumping Station, both of which I can't wait to visit. Still got to plan my list for the rest of the weekend.

 

Hope you all have a great weekend!

 

Photo Details

Sony Alpha A700 / ISO100 / f/6.3 / 1/60s / Tamron SP AF 17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di II @ 17mm

 

Software Used

Lightroom 5

 

Location Information

The Royal Ballet School is one of the world's greatest centres of classical ballet training. The School's aim is to train and educate outstanding classical ballet dancers for The Royal Ballet (based at the Royal Opera House in London) and Birmingham Royal Ballet. Admission to the School is based purely on talent and potential, regardless of academic ability or personal circumstances, and more than 90% of current students rely on financial support to attend the School. The school is based over two sites, White Lodge, Richmond Park (for students aged 11–16) and Covent Garden (for students from 16–19 years old) based in purpose-built studios on Floral Street, adjacent to the Royal Opera House. The Royal Ballet School has, for generations, produced dancers and choreographers of international renown, including Dame Margot Fonteyn, Dame Beryl Grey, Sir Kenneth MacMillan, Darcey Bussell and Alessandra Ferri, as well as current Director of The Royal Ballet Kevin O'Hare. Graduates of the school have also achieved employment in musical theatre, contemporary and jazz dance, television and film.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Ballet_School

An excerpt from the UK Guardian, as to why we are so drawn to this design: Alain Samson, a social psychologist at the London School of Economics, says that in times of difficulty, "people are brought together by looking for common values or purposes, symbolised by the crown and the message of resilience. The words are also particularly positive, reassuring, in a period of uncertainty, anxiety, even perhaps of cynicism."

 

blogged.

     

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This is the library at the London School of Economics. It's an amazing space for learning right in the heart of London and well worth a visit.

 

Many thanks to Clare Carrier for the tip-off about the location.

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8è dia de vaga de fam

 

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More than 400 academics in the fields of political science, law and other disciplines express their worries that electoral monitors in Spain are being threatened with jail over their role in Catalonia’s independence referendum

 

Letters

 

Fri 7 Dec 2018 17.00 GMT

Last modified on Fri 7 Dec 2018 19.19 GMT

 

Following the decision of four Catalan political prisoners to go on hunger strike (Report, theguardian.com, 4 December), we write to draw attention to the plight of many others who remain under the radar of international attention. As academics in the fields of political science, law and other disciplines, we are particularly concerned about the decision by the Spanish judiciary to prosecute two political science scholars and two law scholars based at three different universities in Barcelona. The four academics, (Jordi Matas, Tània Verge, Marc Marsal and Josep Pagès) along with a lawyer (Marta Alsina) were appointed members of the electoral commission in September 2017 by the parliament of Catalonia to monitor the 1 October 2017 referendum.

 

Even though the Spanish constitutional court forced them to resign through fines of €12,000 per person for each day that they remained in their position, the Spanish judiciary has charged the electoral monitors with the offences of “disobedience” and “usurpation of functions” and they are facing the very real possibility of up to two years and nine months in prison.

 

It is probably the first time in the history of the EU that political scientists and lawyers are being threatened with a prison sentence for using their expertise to guarantee that a referendum is held in a fair and impartial way. In doing so, they acted at the request of the parliament of Catalonia, which had a valid legal mandate at the time.

 

While we do not take a position on the question of Catalonia’s independence in this letter, we are indignant over the prosecution of our colleagues and demand the immediate removal of the threat of a prison sentence and the dropping of all criminal charges against them.

Monica Clua-Losada University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA, David Whyte University of Liverpool, UK, Noam Chomsky MIT, USA, Yanis Varoufakis University of Athens, Greece, Alain-G Gagnon Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada, Jane Mansbridge Harvard Kennedy School, USA, Fiona MacKay University of Edinburgh, Scotland, Bart Maddens Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, Meryl Kenny University of Edinburgh, Scotland, Angela Wilson On behalf of the Political Studies Association of the United Kingdom, UK, Lars-Erik Cederman ETH Zürich – International Conflict Research, Switzerland, James Galbraith University of Texas at Austin, USA, Jill Vickers Carleton University, Canada, Mona Lena Krook Rutgers University, USA, Shirin Rai University of Warwick, UK, Joan Ramon Resina Stanford University, USA, Pablo Beramendi Duke University, USA, Carles Boix Princeton University, USA, Louise Chappell University of New South Wales, Australia, Sarah Childs Birkbeck College, University of London, UK, Klaus Detterbeck Universität Göttingen, Germany, Mario Diani University of Trento, Italy, David Farrell University College Dublin, Ireland, André Freire ISCTE-IUL, Lisbon, Portugal, Jonathan Hopkin London School of Economics and Political Science, UK, John Kincaid Lafayette College, USA, Joni Lovenduski Birkbeck College, University of London, UK, Shirin Rai University of Warwick, UK, Joan Ramon Resina Stanford University, USA, Birgit Sauer Universität Wien, Austria, Michael Saward University of Warwick, UK, Klaus Stolz Technische Universität Chemnitz, Germany, Wilfried Swenden University of Edinburgh, Scotland, Linda Trimble University of Alberta, Canada, Ingrid Van Biezen Leiden University, Netherlands, Mieke Verloo Radboud University, Netherlands, Georgina Waylen University of Manchester, UK, Paul Webb University of Sussex, UK, and more than 400 others (full list of signatories at tinyurl.com/y8k3yc4b)

Zoar Street Once One Of The Worst Areas Around Here For Overcrowding...Victorian Days It Was Cramped,Dark, And Narrow With Open Sewers Running Down The Middle...The Street Is More Of A Service Street Now `Bankside House On The Right `London School Of Economics Hall Of Residence`..Im Surprised Given Its Location It Has Not Been Sold For Rich Apartments...Zoar Street Has Been Curtailed Over The Years It Once Ran Down To Sumner Street But The Blue Fin Building Has Put A Stop To That...

By London School of Economics

 

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The Royal Courts of Justice, usually just referred to as the RCJ by practitioners, is a court building in London which houses both the High Court and Court of Appeal of England and Wales. It was designed by George Edmund Street, who died before it was completed. Built in the Victorian Gothic style built in the 1870s it was opened by Queen Victoria in 1882. It is located on the Strand within the City of Westminster, near the border with the City of London (Temple Bar). It is surrounded by the four Inns of Court, King's College London and the London School of Economics.

 

View On Black

 

This photo was taken during last weekends Open House. It is simply one of the many staircases that peel off from the main lobby. But it is nonetheless atmospheric.

 

Please don't use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission. ©M Kiedyszko All rights reserved.

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After yesterday's classical Tulip Staircase today I bring you something ultra modern.

 

This is the spiral at the London School of Economics and Political Science Library. This isn't one of those places you can just walk into, I'd emailed a few weeks before to arrange my visit and I had a window of two hours to get the shots that I wanted. The staff there were very friendly and let me have free roam of the library.

It's a busy place with thousands of students and visitors coming in and out of its doors each day. On the day I visited they were having a group in for a guided tour.

I set up my tripod and had to be very quiet as there was a student asleep on a huge bean bag right next to where I needed to be, fortunately he must have had a late night studying as he didn't even flinch. It was a bit of a challenge as the two lifts in the centre are constantly in use, so trying to get both of them in the same spot took a bit of patience.

 

The building itself was converted into a library in 1973 and redeveloped in 2000 by Foster & Partners. It is the world's largest social sciences library, with 50km of shelving and more than 4 million items.

A shot from the London School of Economics' library by Mark Higham

This is the interior of the library of the London School of Economics. It has been an Open House London venue before. I contacted the library and requested permission to visit and they were very accommodating so no long queues and other photographers to contend with.

 

8/215

So the weekend just gone was open house in London, I wasn’t able to attend on the Saturday but I did manage to go into London on the Sunday and meet up with The Green Album, Martin Turner, Paul Stokes, lilypops1 and Ed Bentley to shoot a couple of locations. This was taken at the “London School of Economics and Political Science” and was a real hidden gem; while we had a guided tour we were able to spend enough time shooting this lovely staircase…

 

I took this at a few different angles and I was really tempted to put the central straight up version on but so many of my pictures involve symmetry and central compositions that it’s nice to mix it up and try different things… I hope that you agree

 

Thanks all to a fun filled day of shooting and conversation it was also great to meet a couple of new faces too (Janet and Ed).

 

I was supposed to upload this yesterday but I forgot to export it from Lightroom, I'm glad that I didn't now as Paul and Tim put similar versions up yesterday (Friday)... Have a great weekend all!

 

***I've just started a Facebook page it would be great if some of you came to visit and maybe even "Like" it :-)***

 

Lens: Samyang 7.5mm Fisheye

AV: f/8

TV: 1/6

ISO 200

Just returned from a trip to Thailand but until I get some of those files processed I'll revert to uploading shots from last months #Photo24 event. Here's another 8mm fisheye shot of County Hall on the South Bank. This is one of my entries to the 'Icons of London' category of the competition.

 

Click here to see more photos from this and previous years Photo24 events : www.flickr.com/photos/darrellg/albums/72157667520181380

 

From Wikipedia : "The main six storey building was designed by Ralph Knott. It is faced in Portland stone in an Edwardian Baroque style. The construction, which was undertaken by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, started in 1911 and the building was opened in 1922 by King George V. The North and South blocks, which were built by Higgs and Hill, were added between 1936 and 1939. The Island block was not completed until 1974.

 

For 64 years County Hall served as the headquarters of local government for London. During the 1980s the then powerful Labour-controlled GLC led by Ken Livingstone was locked in conflict with the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher. Since the Parliament buildings were just across the river from County Hall, the façade of County Hall frequently in more than one year of her tenure served as a billboard for opposition slogans. When the government of Margaret Thatcher abolished the GLC in 1986, County Hall lost its role as the seat of London's government. Talk soon became of what was to happen to the building, and plans to relocate the London School of Economics to the site from its Westminster campus were overruled by Mrs Thatcher, seemingly disapproving of further slogans from students. The building remained in use by the Inner London Education Authority (ILEA) until its abolition in 1990 when the building was transferred to the London Residuary Body and eventually sold to private investors. On 21 October 2005, the High Court of England and Wales upheld a bid by the owners of the building, Shirayama Shokusan, to have the Saatchi Gallery evicted on grounds of violating its contract, particularly using space outside of the rented area for exhibits. Today, the majority of the building, including the entire fourth and fifth floors, remains empty since the dissolution of the GLC. Another small section of the building is occupied as a Premier Inn."

 

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© D.Godliman

All Rights Reserved. Please do not use without prior permission.

~~~

The magnificent staircase at the London School of Economics, shot by Mark Higham

A square format view of County Hall and the London Eye, as seen from Westminster Bridge late on the first afternoon of this years #Photo24 event back in July.

 

Click here to see more photos from this and previous years Photo24 events : www.flickr.com/photos/darrellg/albums/72157667520181380

 

From Wikipedia : "The main six storey building was designed by Ralph Knott. It is faced in Portland stone in an Edwardian Baroque style. The construction, which was undertaken by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, started in 1911 and the building was opened in 1922 by King George V. The North and South blocks, which were built by Higgs and Hill, were added between 1936 and 1939. The Island block was not completed until 1974.

 

For 64 years County Hall served as the headquarters of local government for London. During the 1980s the then powerful Labour-controlled GLC led by Ken Livingstone was locked in conflict with the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher. Since the Parliament buildings were just across the river from County Hall, the façade of County Hall frequently in more than one year of her tenure served as a billboard for opposition slogans. When the government of Margaret Thatcher abolished the GLC in 1986, County Hall lost its role as the seat of London's government. Talk soon became of what was to happen to the building, and plans to relocate the London School of Economics to the site from its Westminster campus were overruled by Mrs Thatcher, seemingly disapproving of further slogans from students. The building remained in use by the Inner London Education Authority (ILEA) until its abolition in 1990 when the building was transferred to the London Residuary Body and eventually sold to private investors. On 21 October 2005, the High Court of England and Wales upheld a bid by the owners of the building, Shirayama Shokusan, to have the Saatchi Gallery evicted on grounds of violating its contract, particularly using space outside of the rented area for exhibits. Today, the majority of the building, including the entire fourth and fifth floors, remains empty since the dissolution of the GLC. Another small section of the building is occupied as a Premier Inn."

 

My Website : Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : Photocrowd

 

© D.Godliman

Another shot from the LSE Library in London. Note that this is not open to the public. I emailed them in advance for permission. It is necessary to explain the use of the pictures which are to be personal use only and in particular no commercial use is allowed and no pictures of Students without their permission as they have had complaints. Best time when there are less students around is mornings or out of term time. I would suggest allowing 4 working days for a decision.

 

This redesign of the building was by the Architects Norman Fosters and was opened in 2001. I thought that was a suitable date for the opening considering that the scene could have been out of the film.

 

The picture was taken handheld with a Sony A700 with a Sigma 10-20mm lens at 10 mm. A single image edited in RAW. A high ISO was needed to get a fast enough shutter speed producing Noise which I removed with Topaz DeNoise. Topaz Clarity was also used. There being a lot of lights I decided to make them a feature using another Topaz filter, Topaz Star Effects. This creates a star out of any bright light. I used this on a duplicate layer with a layer mask to confine the effect only to the lights I wanted it for.

 

To comply with the permission this image is not available for sale either direct or through my website.

 

For my Photography books Understand Your Camera and Compose Better Pictures see My Author Page USA or My Author Page UK

 

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Here's another #Photo24 8mm fisheye shot of County Hall on the South Bank. I thought it would be interesting to see what effect the lens would have on the semi-circular form of the building.

 

Click here to see more photos from this and previous years Photo24 events : www.flickr.com/photos/darrellg/albums/72157667520181380

 

From Wikipedia : "The main six storey building was designed by Ralph Knott. It is faced in Portland stone in an Edwardian Baroque style. The construction, which was undertaken by Holland, Hannen & Cubitts, started in 1911 and the building was opened in 1922 by King George V. The North and South blocks, which were built by Higgs and Hill, were added between 1936 and 1939. The Island block was not completed until 1974.

 

For 64 years County Hall served as the headquarters of local government for London. During the 1980s the then powerful Labour-controlled GLC led by Ken Livingstone was locked in conflict with the Conservative government of Margaret Thatcher. Since the Parliament buildings were just across the river from County Hall, the façade of County Hall frequently in more than one year of her tenure served as a billboard for opposition slogans. When the government of Margaret Thatcher abolished the GLC in 1986, County Hall lost its role as the seat of London's government. Talk soon became of what was to happen to the building, and plans to relocate the London School of Economics to the site from its Westminster campus were overruled by Mrs Thatcher, seemingly disapproving of further slogans from students. The building remained in use by the Inner London Education Authority (ILEA) until its abolition in 1990 when the building was transferred to the London Residuary Body and eventually sold to private investors. On 21 October 2005, the High Court of England and Wales upheld a bid by the owners of the building, Shirayama Shokusan, to have the Saatchi Gallery evicted on grounds of violating its contract, particularly using space outside of the rented area for exhibits. Today, the majority of the building, including the entire fourth and fifth floors, remains empty since the dissolution of the GLC. Another small section of the building is occupied as a Premier Inn."

 

My Website : Twitter : Facebook : Instagram : Photocrowd

 

© D.Godliman

An interior shot of the spiral staircase inside the Saw Swee Hock student centre at the London School of Economics, taken during the London Open House Event. The couple of faces appeared just as I was taking my photos!

Not really, of course, but it looks so much like a Cubist spiral!

 

London School of Economics.

 

Explored September 5, 2009

A more 'classic' view of the interior of library at the London School of Economics & Politics, with its sweeping and swirling staircase. Love the way that the lift looks like it will eject you right through the roof. This location was a brilliant end to our visit to the London Open House event.

Fresh out of the works, 86621 stands in the yard opposite Doncaster station on 21st October 1992.

Taken from the 8th floor of the New Academic Building @ London School of Economics... early morning!

 

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About London's Skyline >>> My blog [ricci-armani.com/the-londons-skyline/]

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