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- In the film Midnight in Paris, the Pont Alexandre III is depicted in multiple scenes, including the final one.

- Adele's music video for the song "Someone Like You" was shot on Bridge Alexandre III.

 

Invalides (French State. L ' Hôtel national des Invalides) or disabled (Les Invalides) in Paris is an architectural monument, the construction of which was begun on the orders of Louis XIV, dated February 24, 1670, as the House of charity honoured army veterans ("war"). It was one of the first (if not the first) wheel houses in Europe. Today, he continues to take disabled and there are several museums and the necropolis of the military.

Midnight at Les Invalides.

 

Les Invalides, officially known as L'Hôtel national des Invalides (The National Residence of the Invalids), is a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement of Paris, France, containing museums and monuments, all relating to the military history of France, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the building's original purpose. The buildings house the Musée de l'Armée, the military museum of the Army of France, the Musée des Plans-Reliefs, and the Musée d'Histoire Contemporaine, as well as the burial site for some of France's war heroes, notably Napoleon Bonaparte.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invalides

seen from Notre Dame de Paris

 

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L'Hôtel national des Invalides was a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans. Napoleon was entombed under the Dome of the Invalides with great ceremony in 1840.

Sunset in the summer in Paris is late. And actually getting black, well, that is really late (like post-12am). So if you wait it it out till 10pm-ish, you get a long lasting beautiful blue-hour. Like this. With lots of things lit up. Like this.

 

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Hôtel National des Invalides, Paris, França

L'Hôtel des Invalides

Louis XIV initiated the project by an order dated 24 November 1670, as a home and hospital for aged and unwell soldiers: the name is a shortened form of hôpital des invalides.

 

The most notable tomb at Les Invalides is that of Napoleon Bonaparte (1769–1821). Napoleon was initially interred on Saint Helena, but King Louis-Philippe arranged for his remains to be brought to France in 1840

I was visiting the church with a friend. This alter literally stopped everyone in their steps. I tried to capture it's majesty in several different shots. For this one, I wanted to capture the expanse with a fish eye lens.

From the official web site, "On 5 May 1821, Napoleon I passed away on the island of St. Helena, where he had been in exile since 1815. He was buried near a spring, in the shade of a few weeping willows, in the "valley of Geraniums". His remains stayed there until 1840. In 1840, King Louis-Philippe decided to transfer the Emperor's body. French sailors, under the command of the Prince of Joinville, brought his coffin to France aboard the ship "Belle Poule".

 

A state funeral accompanied the return of Emperor Napoleon I's ashes, which were transferred to Les Invalides on 15 December 1840 while the tomb was being built. The architect Visconti (1791-1853) was commissioned to make it in 1842 by King Louis-Philippe, who had extensive work carried out beneath the Dome, involving an immense excavation to create a space for the tomb. The body of Emperor Napoleon I was placed there on 2 April 1861.

 

The tomb, sculpted from blocks of red quartzite and placed on a green Vosges granite base, is surrounded by a laurel crown and inscriptions referring to the Empire's great victories. Surrounding the Tomb, twelve "Victories" sculpted by Pradier symbolise Napoleon's military campaigns. 8 famous victories are inscribed on the polychrome marble floor. In the circular gallery, a set of 10 bas-reliefs sculpted by Simart depict the main achievements of his reign: pacification of the nation, administrative centralisation, State Council, Civil Code, Concordat, Imperial University, court of accounts, code of commerce, Major Works and the Legion of Honour. At the back of the crypt, above the slab on top of the King of Rome's grave, stands a statue of the Emperor clad in the symbols of the Empire."

Postcard. Postally used. Stamp missing. Cancellation date of September 1905.

 

Bought from an eBay seller in Menigoute, France.

 

Location: Google Maps Street View

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Les_Invalides

Candid outside L'Hôtel national des Invalides, Paris France - 24th August 2013

The Tomb of Marshall Foch - Dome des Invalides

The interior of the Chapel of Saint Louis des Invalides, painted by Charles de La Fosse (or Lafosse) (1636-1716).

 

Les Invalides (fully L'Hôtel national des Invalides) was ordered in 1670 by Louis XIV ('The Sun-King') as a home and hospital for aged and unwell soldiers. The architect of the scheme was Libéral Bruant (1635-97), who build the site in a High Baroque style.

Today the site still maintains facilities for elderly and injured soldiers, although there are now smaller sites outside the city.

This site was the prompt for William III to create 1694's Greenwich Military Hospital.

 

The site also includes l'Église du Dôme des Invalides dedicated to Saint Louis; designed in 1680 by Jules Hardouin-Mansart (1646-1708) in the Late Baroque style.

L'Église du Dôme was designed as a private royal chapel to Louis; it was completed in 1708.

In 1840 King Louis Philippe I (1773-1850) arranged for the remains of Napoleon Bonaparte (1769–1821) to be brought back an interred here.

 

Taken in the 7e Arrondissement of Paris.

From official web site, "In 1676, the Secretary of State for War, Marquis de Louvois, entrusted the young architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart with the construction of the chapel which Libéral Bruant has been unable to complete. The architect designed a building which combined a royal chapel, the "Dôme des Invalides", and a veterans' chapel achieving consistency and harmony.

 

In this way, the King and his soldiers could attend mass simultaneously, while entering the place of worship though different entrances, as prescribed by etiquette. This separation was reinforced in the 19th century with the erection of the tomb of Napoleon I, the creation of the two separate altars and then with the construction of a glass wall between the two chapels."

Inside the Dome of L'Hôtel national des Invalides, Paris, France

Detail on the alter of Chapel of Saint Louis des Invalides

 

Les Invalides (fully L'Hôtel national des Invalides) was ordered in 1670 by Louis XIV ('The Sun-King') as a home and hospital for aged and unwell soldiers. The architect of the scheme was Libéral Bruant (1635-97), who build the site in a High Baroque style.

Today the site still maintains facilities for elderly and injured soldiers, although there are now smaller sites outside the city.

This site was the prompt for William III to create 1694's Greenwich Military Hospital.

 

The site also includes l'Église du Dôme des Invalides dedicated to Saint Louis; designed in 1680 by Jules Hardouin-Mansart (1646-1708) in the Late Baroque style.

L'Église du Dôme was designed as a private royal chapel to Louis; it was completed in 1708.

In 1840 King Louis Philippe I (1773-1850) arranged for the remains of Napoleon Bonaparte (1769–1821) to be brought back an interred here.

 

Taken in the 7e Arrondissement of Paris.

This amazingly gilded alter was built for Louis XIV and has the same look and feel of his palace at Versailles.

 

Behind the alter, you can see into the Veteran's Chapel through the glass panels.

Les Invalides

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