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Tombstone Hold 'Em, Italian Cemetery, 15 Oct 05

A blurry INCyr walks through the metro station as I accidentally take a time exposure.

You’re never too dead to play. See you at the cemeteries.

 

The complete rules here: www.lastcallpoker.com/allin/rules.aspx

 

Specific cemetery locations and times announced 7 days before the game, here: www.lastcallpoker.com/allin .

 

Find out more about the first game here: avantgame.blogspot.com/2005/10/play-with-me-graveyard-gam...

 

How it all came to be: avantgame.blogspot.com/2005/10/old-man-had-brilliant-idea...

Opened in the 1870s, the cemetery is home to both the newly and long departed. It'd definitely make for a good place to play some Tombstone Hold 'Em, as well.

Lucky's instructions: This one’s for Johnnie Whitecloud. Show me the grave of someone born on October 19, 1945 -- exactly one day after he died. Think there’s any chance his spirit was passing on?

 

Letter to Lucky:

Lucky,

 

I've got to tell you, October 19, 1945 is a rather difficult date to

find in a cemetery as a birthday, especially around here. Even with

the help of the directory in the cemetery's office, I had a tricky time

of finding David Lou Byrdl of the US Air Force. Find him I did,

though, only to find that his full dates of birth and death weren't

marked. In any case, I've included a photo of his resting place and

headstone, and I hope that that's sufficient. Seemed rather

appropriate that he was a soldier, himself.

 

-Jinxie

 

Status: APPROVED

You’re never too dead to play. See you at the cemeteries.

 

The complete rules here: www.flickr.com/photos/reality/64179804/sizes/o/in/photost...

 

Find out more about the first game here: avantgame.blogspot.com/2005/10/play-with-me-graveyard-gam...

 

How it all came to be: avantgame.blogspot.com/2005/10/old-man-had-brilliant-idea...

This was a MASSIVE online project. For the poker playing section you could choose between 40 different avatars. Every week or two the entire scene would change to a different era. In total there were 8 different table positions and 6 different eras for each player. This resulted in 1920 avatar images. I was the asset manager and was responsible for not only making sure these images were finished on time and ready to be delivered to the client, but I also had to go through and add shadows and color correct all of them. And if you look closely, that's me as the dealer!

Lucky's instructions.

 

Grave secrets

 

You’ve heard the phrase ‘he took his secrets to the grave’? That’s because the dead don’t tell. If you’ve got a confidence, there’s nobody better to confide in. And those of us from the older generation were always a little less…talkative about private things.

 

Find a grave at least 50 years old. Confess a secret about yourself to the person buried there. Leave your secret in a note on the grave. You don’t have to tell me your secret—I know enough for a lifetime—but show me something that symbolizes your secret.

Non-LCP chips

Lucky's Instructions: This one is for Damon Michael, broken-hearted visionary.

 

We have all had that moment when the world cracks open and you see the extraordinary. To most people, it looks like just an ordinary stone, tree or monument. But you know better. When you look at it from just the right angle, you can see the face of one of my friends… or something they left behind. Show me the secret sign of the ghost of a dearly departed, and include any hints I might need to see what you see.

 

Letter to Lucky:

Lucky,

 

While searching for my Wild Rose today, I passed by the sad grave of

Laura McConnel's baby boy, who was given just less than three weeks to

live his life. I took a moment to reflect on it; though the stone was

worn, it seemed like there was still love and attention put into the

upkeep of the grave. I smiled a little, nodded to nobody in

particular, and began to walk on past it, but found my eyes drawn back

to it as I passed by, at which point I stopped to take a closer look.

 

After a moment I realized that the grey marking was a scrape into the

back of the stone, into what I guess you could say is the shape of an

uppercase J. Before a proper double-take, though, I was sure as sin

that I'd seen a robed ghost rising up from the grave, freed from the

shackles of this life as he ascended into the great beyond. Maybe you

see it, maybe you don't. I'm sort of left wondering myself, but I

won't soon forget the impression it made on me in that single moment.

 

-Jinxie

 

Status: APPROVED

 

Letter from Lucky:

Well, you either saw something extraordinary or you indulge in the same sorts of vices as Major Michael. Either way, thanks.

This one is for Damon Michael, broken-hearted visionary.

 

We have all had that moment when the world cracks open and you see the extraordinary. To most people, it looks like just an ordinary stone, tree or monument. But you know better. When you look at it from just the right angle, you can see the face of one of my friends… or something they left behind. Show me the secret sign of the ghost of a dearly departed, and include any hints I might need to see what you see.

 

smallfavors@lastcallpoker.com

 

subject: Major Damon

 

Lucky,

 

Mr. Chou is fairly luxuriating six feet underneath some well-appointed and

polished stone, next to the lane so that everyone can see him.

 

I took a picture, but as I got closer I thought it might be fun to kinda

bounce down into a low squat and look *through* the stone.

 

I could see two things: a tree in the short distance, perfectly-centered and

reaching up to the sky, and half of my own reflection. Suddenly, I felt a

little more connection to the world around me. Seeing myself connected to the

tree, to the stone, to the air, to the camera, to the voice on the cellphone

... this strange non-telescope of a stone, shaped like a stylized coin. To me,

it was more like a peek into possibility. There is more of us in the world

than we know, and there is more of the world dropping into our eyes every

single moment than we really know what to do with.

 

Scary, glorious.

 

Pondering that a bit,

 

Krystyn

The other site of my LCP exploration in Boise, home to literally thousands of folks that've gone on to their eternal rest.

Before the Show

 

You know, a good performer will tell you that costume and make-up aren’t illusion. Put on a suit and suddenly you command a little respect. If you go to the oldest part of the cemetery, it looks the loneliest … because it is the loneliest. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

 

Bring a bunch of flowers to the cemetery—they don’t have to be the most expensive flowers, any flowers will do. Find the section of the cemetery with the oldest graves and leave a single flower on each grave. Like a boutonnière on a suit, I promise you, the whole section will change. Take a picture and send it to me.

   

smallfavors@lastcallpoker.com

 

subject: Anita Defazio

 

Lucky,

 

You were so right.

 

I reflected the falling leaves with bright orange and yellow mums, dressing up

the Civil War markers at Rosehill Cemetery that had not been replaced with

nicer, clearer marble stones just yet.

  

You were so, so right.

  

Krystyn

  

I'm an unworthy ball dropper. I was supposed to make a collage for LCP people who got bits of the gun but... Bad things happened around that time so I never finished it.

Lucky's instructions: Before the Show

 

You know, a good performer will tell you that costume and make-up aren’t illusion. Put on a suit and suddenly you command a little respect. If you go to the oldest part of the cemetery, it looks the loneliest … because it is the loneliest. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

 

Bring a bunch of flowers to the cemetery—they don’t have to be the most expensive flowers, any flowers will do. Find the section of the cemetery with the oldest graves and leave a single flower on each grave. Like a boutonnière on a suit, I promise you, the whole section will change. Take a picture and send it to me.

 

Letter to Lucky:

Lucky,

 

I picked a handful of daisies from a neglected flower garden nearby

before heading to the back of Pioneer Cemetery in downtown Boise,

finding a rather isolated group of 7 graves to rest the flowers on.

You're right, they clean up nice when you give them the attention they

deserve.

 

-Jinxie

 

Status: APPROVED

Lucky's Instructions: Kellie Sullivan was a true western woman. She was larger than life, and willing to take a gamble. The west produced characters the way Hollywood produces movies—good ones, bad ones, crazy ones, sane ones. If you’re a man, show me the grave of a woman who is truly worthy of the nickname “The Wild Rose.” And if you’re a woman, find me the grave of “Desperado Don.” Leave an appropriate token of your admiration behind.

 

Letter to Lucky:

Lucky,

 

Pioneer Cemetery is a rather modest place, but its history runs deep

into Boise's past, and it seemed an appropriate place to get this

week's favors done. Near the center of the grounds are several rather

tall obelisks that are easily visible from most parts of the cemetery,

so I thought it'd be a good idea to scope them out.

 

On the far right is the grave of Maggie R. Hawes, where she rests near

her husband and her brother in law. I don't know much about her, but

upon investigating their graves and those of the surrounding family, I

found a couple that had the short epitaph of "Killed by Indians" on

them. I try to reserve my opinions when it comes to the Indian

relations of the late 1800s, but losing kin to a perceived enemy is

never an easy thing. Maggie had to have endured hardship in a time

when this area was new and changing (apparently against the desire of

some of its older inhabitants). She died at 42 years old, a young age

by today's standards, but I'm willing to bet that she lived a life

with enough adventure in it to put some modern ladies to shame. Her

stone *is* taller than her husband's, after all.

 

I decided to leave an Ace of Spades at her grave. Leaving myself with

an unusable deck of cards is the least I can do to pay respect to a

pioneer.

 

-Jinxie

 

Status: APPROVED

Because of jet lag, I awoke well before my alarm was ever set to beep on my cellphone. I made use of my time by writing in my paper journal, as well as creating several haikus to have read at the final stop on our favor for Lucky after the poker tournament.

 

When Avatrix and imbri awoke, Avatrix was instrumental in helping to gel the format and concept of the haikus, namely having an intro haiku, one haiku for each of the eight archetypes presented in the game, and a closing haiku. We worked on those through the morning, and I wrote the final draft in ThaJinx's composition book when we were at Roscoe's for breakfast.

Traveling Picture show crew w/ Vic's Hat & beer at Sharkey's.

Lucky's Instructions: This one is for Damon Michael, broken-hearted visionary.

 

We have all had that moment when the world cracks open and you see the extraordinary. To most people, it looks like just an ordinary stone, tree or monument. But you know better. When you look at it from just the right angle, you can see the face of one of my friends… or something they left behind. Show me the secret sign of the ghost of a dearly departed, and include any hints I might need to see what you see.

 

Letter to Lucky:

Lucky,

 

While searching for my Wild Rose today, I passed by the sad grave of

Laura McConnel's baby boy, who was given just less than three weeks to

live his life. I took a moment to reflect on it; though the stone was

worn, it seemed like there was still love and attention put into the

upkeep of the grave. I smiled a little, nodded to nobody in

particular, and began to walk on past it, but found my eyes drawn back

to it as I passed by, at which point I stopped to take a closer look.

 

After a moment I realized that the grey marking was a scrape into the

back of the stone, into what I guess you could say is the shape of an

uppercase J. Before a proper double-take, though, I was sure as sin

that I'd seen a robed ghost rising up from the grave, freed from the

shackles of this life as he ascended into the great beyond. Maybe you

see it, maybe you don't. I'm sort of left wondering myself, but I

won't soon forget the impression it made on me in that single moment.

 

-Jinxie

 

Status: APPROVED

 

Letter from Lucky:

Well, you either saw something extraordinary or you indulge in the same sorts of vices as Major Michael. Either way, thanks.

No visit to the area would have been complete without seeing the remains of Coventry Cathedral, bombed during the blitz of 1940.

Greg across the metro tracks

Numerology

 

They call economics “the dismal science.” That’s half true. But the truth is, stocks are just poker, neither more scientific nor less. Big E “Economics” now…that’s astrology, or numerology. Ask Palmer Strauss.

 

Numerology for tombstones is easy. Just take the date of death or the date of birth, and keep adding up all the numbers in the date until you reach a single digit. Palmer Strauss was born on May 25, 1894.

 

5/25/1894 = 5 + 2 + 5 + 1 + 8 + 9 + 4 = 34, 3 + 4 = 7.

 

Find me a lucky stiff whose date of birth and date of death work out to a perfect pair of lucky sevens. Send me proof.

   

smallfavors@lastcallpoker.com

 

subject: Palmer Strauss

 

Lucky,

 

The following paragraph is a direct transcript of my brain in the minutes

shortly before I found Chiu Sook Kim:

 

yyyyyyyyrgggggggblghhhhhhhhhhhhuhfugjghjhgjghufgsdiuyftyieugjbfshfsgfsjhfvshhh

bip bip bip bip

hfdskgfsiufgifuwfieugagweasaadjavjbjgjkhfghsfuierrrrrrrrrrrllllffffff

murrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrpopopopopopopopsquish fizzle

  

Math is hard! Let's play poker!

 

Love,

 

Krystyn

My camera decided I should be purple and distorted. Kinda cool though.

In honor of Lucky's son Robert Brown, and to show respect to William Hamilton's lonely and neglected grave, I dressed the stone in flowers and lit a few tea lights.

 

In 1997, grave robbers attempted to dig up the grave, leaving a shallow pit that was not filled in for several months.

 

I felt like I was able to restore some safety to his resting place, for a short while.

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