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Spiky headgear… This 7 week old caterpillar is growing very slowing on Garden Privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium). It is 60mm long and in its 4th instar (stage). The final instar is said to be spectacular and involves a major colour change! The Citheronia laocoon moth is a member of the Saturniidae family and found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

This 9 week old caterpillar is growing very slowing on Garden Privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium). It is 60mm long and is in its final stage before spinning a silk cocoon. The Citheronia laocoon moth is a member of the Saturniidae family and found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

The Citheronia laocoon moth is a member of the Saturniidae family and found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina. This one is captive bred.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photograph is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

This photo took my thoughts to the famous sculpture of Laocoön and His Sons, exposed in Vatican:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laocoön_and_His_Sons

HAPPY BLUE MONDAY. Hugs

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Sperlonga was an ancient Roman resort: Roman emperor Tiberius built here a famous villa, including one of the grottoes (Latin: speluncae) which gave the name to the town.

 

According to Suetonius,[1] the roof of the grotto collapsed while Tiberius was dining. Supposedly Sejanus rushed to save Tiberius, for which Tiberius in gratitude promoted him, launching his rise to power. Tiberius moved to Capri after 26 AD.

 

In the grotto where some noteworthy sculptures, now housed in the museum, have been found: these portrayed the assault of Scylla to Odysseus' ship, the blinding of Polyphemus, the theft of the Palladium and Odysseus lifting Achilles's corpse. The works have been attributed to Rhodian sculptors Agesander, Athenedoros and Polydoros, and are thought to be the same authors of the group of "Laocoön and His Sons" (as attributed by Pliny the Elder).[2]

Artist Sandord Bigger's sculpture LAOCOÖN references not only the ancient tale of a a Trojan priest killed with his sons after warning the Trojans against the wooden horse but also the contemporary black lives matter movement.

 

It makes a statement on the terrace between the South and North Galleries of the American Academy of Arts and Letters

The Citheronia laocoon moth is a member of the Saturniidae family and found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina. This fresh male is captive bred.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photograph is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

a cast in the Ashmolean. The original (about 50 to 20 BC) was excavated in Rome in 1506. Now in the Vatican.

Mythology

As described in Virgil's Aeneid, Laocoon was a Trojan priest. When the Greeks, who were holding Troy under siege, left the famous Trojan Horse on the beach, Laocoon tried to warn the Trojan leaders against bringing it into the city, in case it was a trap. The Greek goddess Athena, acting as protector of the Greeks, punished Laocoon for his interference by having him and his two sons attacked by the giant sea serpents Porces and Chariboea. In the sculpture, one son can be seen to break free from the snakes, and looks across to see his father and brother in their death agonies. www.visual-arts-cork.com/sculpture/laocoon.htm

Although the attribution of this iconic work to Copley has been questioned,this may be a rapid study after the first of three versions painted by the artist around 1778.The original is now in the National Gallery is Art in Washington DC;a second version is in the Museum of Fine Arts,Boston;and a third dated 1782,is in the Detroit Institute of Arts.The painting depicts the future Lord Mayor of London Brook Watson's loss of his leg to a shark while swimming in Havana Harbor in 1749.By representing this dramatic episode in Watson's youth,Copley furthered the revolutionary approach to history painting-practiced by fellow artists Benjamin West and John Trumbull-highlighting an ordinary man in the midst of an extraordinary event-The MET

 

Copley and Brook Watson became friends after the American artist arrived in London in 1774.Watson commissioned him to create a painting of the 1749 event,and Copley produced three versions.It was the first of a series of large-scale historical paintings that Copley would concentrate after settling in London.The painting is romanticized:the gory detail of the injury is hidden beneath the waves,though there is a hint of blood in the water. The figure if Watson is based on a statue of the "Borghese Gladiator",by Agasias of Ephesus,in the Louvre.Other apparent influences are Renaissance art,and the ancient statue of Laocoön and his Sons which Copley may have seen in Rome.Copley was probably influenced by Benjamin West's The Death of General Wolfe,and the growing popularity of romantic painting.

 

The composition of the rescuers in the boat shows hints of Peter Paul Rubens's Jonah Thrown into the Sea,and both Rubens's Miraculous Draught of Fishes and Raphael's painting of the same name.The facial expressions show a marked resemblance to those in Charles Le Brun's Conference de M.Le Brun sur l'expression generale et particulière,an influential work published in 1698;they portray a range of emotions,from fear to courage.Various elements of composition were changed as the painting progressed.Infrared analysis shows that the old boatswain was originally a young man,and preliminary sketches reveals that the black sailor at the rear of the boat,who also appears as the subject of Copley's Head of a Negro painted around the same time,was originally envisioned as a white man with long, flowing hair.

 

Copley had never visited Havana,and it is likely he had never seen a shark,much less one attacking a person. He may have gleaned details of Havana harbor from prints and book illustrations: he includes the real landmark of Morro Castle in the background on the right.The shark is less convincing and includes anatomical features not found in sharks,such as lips,forward-facing eyes that resembles a tiger's more than a shark's and air blowing out of the animal's "nostrils".-Wikipedia

Le Musée d'archéologique fut l'un des premiers de son genre dans l'empire soviétique, date de 1825, la statue est la reproduction d'une œuvre grecque.

Le groupe du Laocoon est une sculpture grecque antique conservée au musée Pio-Clementino, au Vatican, dans la collection Vaticane, Belvédère, n°74. Elle est en marbre à grains fins. Contrairement à la croyance populaire, le groupe n'est pas issu d'un seul bloc de marbre mais bien de 8 blocs. Elle mesure 2,42 m de hauteur et 1,60 de largeur. Elle représente le prêtre troyen Laocoon et ses deux fils attaqués par des serpents, scène décrite notamment dans l’Odyssée et l’Énéide. C'est l'une des œuvres les plus représentatives de l'art hellénistique.

 

The Archaeological Museum was one of the first of its kind in the Soviet Empire, dates from 1825, the statue is the reproduction of a Greek work.

The Laocoon group is an ancient Greek sculpture preserved in the Pio-Clementino Museum, Vatican, in the Vatican Collection, Belvedere, n ° 74. It is made of fine-grained marble. Contrary to popular belief, the group is not from a single block of marble but from 8 blocks. It measures 2.42 m in height and 1.60 in width. She represents the Trojan priest Laocoon and his two son attacked by snakes, scene described in particular in the Odyssey and the Aeneid. It is one of the most representative works of Hellenistic art.

The Trojan Horse is a crafty contraption that allowed the Greeks to put an end to the 10-year-old Trojan War. The wily Greek hero Odysseus conceived the project and design for the Trojan Horse; Epeus, is credited with the actual building of the Trojan Horse.

The Greeks left a giant wooden object made to look like a horse at the Trojan city gates. Some of the Greeks pretended to sail away, but actually sailed just out of sight. The other Greeks stood waiting, inside the belly of the wooden beast.

When the Trojans saw the giant wooden horse and the departing Greek troops, they thought the wooden horse was a parting gift for the gods, so most of them wanted to wheel it into their city. The decision to move the Trojan Horse into the city was opposed by Cassandra, the prophetess whose fate was never to be believed, and Laocoon, who was destroyed, along with his two sons, by sea serpents after pleading with his fellow Trojans to leave the Trojan Horse outside their city walls. The Trojans took this as a sign that the gods were displeased with Laocoon's message. Besides, the Trojans preferred to believe that since the Greeks were gone, the long war was over. The city opened the gates, let the horse in, and celebrated riotously. When the Trojans passed out or fell asleep, the Greeks climbed down from the belly of the Trojan Horse, opened the city gates and ushered the rest of the troops into the city. The Greeks then sacked, destroyed, and burned Troy.

 

Laocoön and His Sons - statue by Agesander of Rhodes, Athanadoros, Athenodoros of Rhodes, and Polydorus of Rhodes. Galleria degli Uffizi, Firenze. (3/2/2019)

Digging the new wide angle (Tokina 11-16mm).

 

The Laocoön is of the most the famous Hellenistic sculptures in the Vatican (and well known and discussed in the ancient world). Laocoön in mythology was a priest who warned the Trojans not to take the horse into the palace and was punished by the gods by being killed along with his sons by snakes. On the flight tomorrow, back home eventually.

The Nike of Samothrace, discovered in 1863, is estimated to have been created around 190 BC. It was created to not only honor the goddess, Nike, but to honor a sea battle. It conveys a sense of action and triumph as well as portraying artful flowing drapery through its features which the Greeks considered ideal beauty.

Modern excavations suggest that the Victory occupied a niche in an open-air theater and also suggest it accompanied an altar that was within view of the ship monument of Demetrius I Poliorcetes (337-283 BC). Rendered in white Parian marble, the figure originally formed part of the Samothrace temple complex dedicated to the Great Gods, Megaloi Theoi. It stood on a rostral pedestal of gray marble from Lartos representing the prow of a ship (most likely a trihemiolia), and represents the goddess as she descends from the skies to the triumphant fleet. Before she lost her arms, which have never been recovered, Nike's right arm was raised, cupped round her mouth to deliver the shout of Victory. The work is notable for its convincing rendering of a pose where violent motion and sudden stillness meet, for its graceful balance and for the rendering of the figure's draped garments, compellingly depicted as if rippling in a strong sea breeze. Similar traits can be seen in the Laocoön group which is a reworked copy of a lost original that was likely close both in time and place of origin to Nike, but while Laocoon, vastly admired by Renaissance and classicist artists, has come to be seen[by whom?] as a more self-conscious and contrived work, Nike of Samothrace is seen as an iconic depiction of triumphant spirit and of the divine momentarily coming face to face with man. It is possible, however, that the power of the work is enhanced by the very fact that the head and arms are missing.

The statue’s outstretched right wing is a symmetric plaster version of the original left one. As with the arms, the figure's head has never been found, but various other fragments have since been found: in 1950, a team led by Karl Lehmann unearthed the missing right hand of the Louvre's Winged Victory. The fingerless hand had slid out of sight under a large rock, near where the statue had originally stood; on the return trip home, Dr Phyllis Williams Lehmann identified the tip of the Goddess's ring finger and her thumb in a storage drawer at the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, where the second Winged Victory is displayed; the fragments have been reunited with the hand, which is now in a glass case in the Louvre next to the podium on which the statue stands.

This is a spectacular 5 day old, 10mm caterpillar of the Citheronia laocoon moth, a member of the Saturniidae family. This is a second generation caterpillar from Goias Goiana, Brazil, and hatched on 09.07.2016. Citheronia laocoon is found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

This final caterpillar is 11cm long and is feeding on Garden Privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium). It will soon start to spin a silken cocoon. The Citheronia laocoon moth is a member of the Saturniidae family and found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

Saint Petersburg, Russia. State Hermitage Museum

This is a 30mm captive bred caterpillar of the Citheronia laocoon moth, a member of the Saturniidae family. This is a second generation caterpillar from Goias Goiana, Brazil, and hatched on 09.07.2016. Citheronia laocoon is found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

The statue of Laocoön and His Sons in the Musei Vaticani in Rome

Odyssey

Nostoi ReShade

This is a spectacular 20 day old, 15mm caterpillar of the Citheronia laocoon moth, a member of the Saturniidae family. This is a second generation caterpillar from Goias Goiana, Brazil, and hatched on 09.07.2016. Citheronia laocoon is found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

This 5 week old caterpillar is growing very slowing on Garden Privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium). It is 40mm long and in its 4th instar (stage). The final instar is said to be spectacular and involves a major colour change! The Citheronia laocoon moth is a member of the Saturniidae family and found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

One of two newly pupated Citheronia laocoon moths - note the slight differences. Each pupa is 41mm long and was bred from second generation eggs from Goiana, Brazil, which hatched on 09.07.2016 and fed on Garden Privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium).

 

The Citheronia laocoon moth is a member of the Saturniidae family and found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina. Adult males have a wingspan of 6.5 - 9cm, while females are larger with a wingspan of 9 - 11cm. In captivity, they brood continuously as long as there are high temperatures (above 25 degrees Celsius) and a medium to high humidity. With lower temperatures and humidity the pupae can remain dormant for several months.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

Familia: Saturniidae

 

© Marcos Cesar Campis

Leia meu perfil (readme my profile):

www.flickr.com/people/mcampis/

Vatican City, a city-state surrounded by Rome, Italy, is the headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church. It's home to the Pope and a trove of iconic art and architecture. Its Vatican Museums house ancient Roman sculptures such as the famed “Laocoön and His Sons” as well as Renaissance frescoes in the Raphael Rooms and the Sistine Chapel, famous for Michelangelo’s ceiling.

The Laocoon group. Marble. 1st century A.D.

 

Familia: Saturniidae

 

© Marcos Cesar Campis

Leia meu perfil (readme my profile):

www.flickr.com/people/mcampis/

Familia: Saturniidae

 

Identificado por: Dr. Carlos G C Mielke

 

© Marcos Cesar Campis

Leia meu perfil (readme my profile):

www.flickr.com/people/mcampis/

This 7 week old caterpillar is growing very slowing on Garden Privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium). It is 60mm long and in its 4th instar (stage). The final instar is said to be spectacular and involves a major colour change! The Citheronia laocoon moth is a member of the Saturniidae family and found from the Guianas south to northern Argentina.

 

Thanks for your visit… Any comment you make on my photographs is greatly appreciated and encouraging! But please do not use this image without permission.

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