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Star Trails over the Haslingdon Halo artwork above the Lancashire town.

 

Halo - A Panopticon artwork in Haslingden, Rossendale, Lancashire.

 

Designed by John Kennedy of LandLab, 'Halo' is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. The steelwork has a natural silver appearance, which will temper to matt as the galvanised finish weathers. A unique feature of this Panopticon is that it is lit after dark and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. The lighting, using low-energy LEDs and powered by an adjacent wind turbine, is designed to minimise light pollution and avoid any disruption to wildlife.

 

'Halo', positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Pennine Lancashire, is one of a small number of iconic artworks to have received funding from the Northern Way as part of its Welcome to the North programme – a unique scheme to install public artworks at key gateways across the North to enhance the image of the region, improve its quality of place and increase tourism and economic growth.

 

Info from the Halo website

'Panopticons' is an arts and regeneration project of the East Lancashire Environmental Arts Network managed by Mid Pennine Arts. It involved the construction of series of 21st-century landmarks, or Panopticons (structures providing a comprehensive view), across East Lancashire, England, as symbols of the renaissance of the area. Four large-scale sculptures were commissioned, designed and constructed over a six year period for the districts of Blackburn, Burnley, Pendle and Rossendale. The Halo in Haslingden (Rossendale) was the last sculpture in the series to be erected in 2007.

 

Haslingden Halo

The Halo is an artwork set on the expended landfill site (or top 'o' slate) overlooking the town of Haslingden in Rossendale, positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Lancashire. It was the fourth and final Panopticon to be constructed in Lancashire and was launched in September 2007.

 

The Halo is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. It is lit after dark using low-energy LEDs powered by an adjacent wind turbine and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. It was designed by John Kennedy of LandLab.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panopticons

'Panopticons' is an arts and regeneration project of the East Lancashire Environmental Arts Network managed by Mid Pennine Arts. It involved the construction of series of 21st-century landmarks, or Panopticons (structures providing a comprehensive view), across East Lancashire, England, as symbols of the renaissance of the area. Four large-scale sculptures were commissioned, designed and constructed over a six year period for the districts of Blackburn, Burnley, Pendle and Rossendale. The Halo in Haslingden (Rossendale) was the last sculpture in the series to be erected in 2007.

 

Haslingden Halo

The Halo is an artwork set on the expended landfill site (or top 'o' slate) overlooking the town of Haslingden in Rossendale, positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Lancashire. It was the fourth and final Panopticon to be constructed in Lancashire and was launched in September 2007.

 

The Halo is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. It is lit after dark using low-energy LEDs powered by an adjacent wind turbine and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. It was designed by John Kennedy of LandLab.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panopticons

Top o'Slate above Haslingden.

 

Design by John Kennedy, LandLab.

 

Rossendale's Panopticon, 'Halo', is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. From its position on Top o' Slate, an old quarry and former landfill site situated in the hills above Haslingden in the Rossendale Valley, it is clearly visible for miles around.

  

Lane, Top O' Slate, Haslingden

Situated in the hills above Haslingden in the Rossendale Valley, this remote structure comes alive with light at dusk. Viewed from the town in the valley below, it has the appearance of a blue disc hovering mysteriously in the sky. A prime spot for alien abductions, if you ask me! The man about to undertake a cosmic trip in this image is Wayne Shipley, aka Canonshot Mole. I have worked a little Photoshop magic here but the colours are true to life - the sky turned blood red as darkness fell, and the Halo casts a great pale blue glow on the ground.

 

Apparently Haslingden actually has played host to UFO sightings, according to old files recently released by the Ministry of Defence. There's a wonderfully skeptical postscript to the Haslingden sighting in the M.O.D. file, written in typically dry British style by a squadron leader, who commented that the civilian reporting the disc was a “regular correspondent”.

Graduate Photojournalism Fellow Essay; 2014-2015: Melissa Riggs

Halo - Panopticon by John Kennedy and LandLab, Top o' Slate, Rossendale

Halo - A Panopticon in Haslingden, Rossendale, Lancashire.

 

Designed by John Kennedy of LandLab, 'Halo' is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. The steelwork has a natural silver appearance, which will temper to matt as the galvanised finish weathers. A unique feature of this Panopticon is that it is lit after dark and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town.

Many Thanks to haslingdenhalo.com/

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE. AT NIGHT THE HALO PANOPTICON IS ILLUMINATED WITH BLUE LIGHTS SO THAT IT CAN BE SEEN FOR MILES AROUND.

THE HALO IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME.

 

'Panopticons' is an arts and regeneration project of the East Lancashire Environmental Arts Network managed by Mid Pennine Arts. It involved the construction of series of 21st-century landmarks, or Panopticons (structures providing a comprehensive view), across East Lancashire, England, as symbols of the renaissance of the area. Four large-scale sculptures were commissioned, designed and constructed over a six year period for the districts of Blackburn, Burnley, Pendle and Rossendale. The Halo in Haslingden (Rossendale) was the last sculpture in the series to be erected in 2007.

 

Haslingden Halo

The Halo is an artwork set on the expended landfill site (or top 'o' slate) overlooking the town of Haslingden in Rossendale, positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Lancashire. It was the fourth and final Panopticon to be constructed in Lancashire and was launched in September 2007.

 

The Halo is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. It is lit after dark using low-energy LEDs powered by an adjacent wind turbine and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. It was designed by John Kennedy of LandLab.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panopticons

'Panopticons' is an arts and regeneration project of the East Lancashire Environmental Arts Network managed by Mid Pennine Arts. It involved the construction of series of 21st-century landmarks, or Panopticons (structures providing a comprehensive view), across East Lancashire, England, as symbols of the renaissance of the area. Four large-scale sculptures were commissioned, designed and constructed over a six year period for the districts of Blackburn, Burnley, Pendle and Rossendale. The Halo in Haslingden (Rossendale) was the last sculpture in the series to be erected in 2007.

 

Haslingden Halo

The Halo is an artwork set on the expended landfill site (or top 'o' slate) overlooking the town of Haslingden in Rossendale, positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Lancashire. It was the fourth and final Panopticon to be constructed in Lancashire and was launched in September 2007.

 

The Halo is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. It is lit after dark using low-energy LEDs powered by an adjacent wind turbine and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. It was designed by John Kennedy of LandLab.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panopticons

Halo - A Panopticon artwork in Haslingden, Rossendale, Lancashire.

  

Designed by John Kennedy of LandLab, 'Halo' is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. The steelwork has a natural silver appearance, which will temper to matt as the galvanised finish weathers. A unique feature of this Panopticon is that it is lit after dark and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. The lighting, using low-energy LEDs and powered by an adjacent wind turbine, is designed to minimise light pollution and avoid any disruption to wildlife.

 

'Halo', positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Pennine Lancashire, is one of a small number of iconic artworks to have received funding from the Northern Way as part of its Welcome to the North programme – a unique scheme to install public artworks at key gateways across the North to enhance the image of the region, improve its quality of place and increase tourism and economic growth.

 

'Halo' is the centrepiece of a wider partnership scheme, led by the REMADE in Lancashire programme, Groundwork and Rossendale Council, which has reclaimed and returned to public use 33 hectares of land including the former landfill site of Top o' Slate and the adjacent Duckworth Clough. REMADE was set up by Lancashire County Council in partnership with the Northwest Regional Development Agency to recover neglected land for uses such as landscaped open space, play areas, new planting, nature reserves, footpaths, cycleways and bridleways.

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE. AT NIGHT THE HALO PANOPTICON IS ILLUMINATED WITH BLUE LIGHTS SO THAT IT CAN BE SEEN FOR MILES AROUND.

THE HALO IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME.

 

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE. AT NIGHT THE HALO PANOPTICON IS ILLUMINATED WITH BLUE LIGHTS SO THAT IT CAN BE SEEN FOR MILES AROUND.

THE HALO IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME.

 

Another trip to the Halo in Haslingden, earlier this month. I was incredibly lucky with the sky: it was hazy all day and at sunset the horizon just lit up.

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE. AT NIGHT THE HALO PANOPTICON IS ILLUMINATED WITH BLUE LIGHTS SO THAT IT CAN BE SEEN FOR MILES AROUND.

THE HALO IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME.

 

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE. AT NIGHT THE HALO PANOPTICON IS ILLUMINATED WITH BLUE LIGHTS SO THAT IT CAN BE SEEN FOR MILES AROUND.

THE HALO IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME.

 

New years resolution was to visit more photo locations this year, and this location has been on the cards for a while.. So the boys and I went to visit. Admittedly I did sell it to the youngest as we were going to visit a real UFO, so they were rather excited about the trip.

 

As we were driving there, the sky was really flat and boring, and when we got up to the halo itself it started changing into a variety of colours, I was rather excited. I do love a nice pink sky.

 

A pleasant day out, but my word its rather high up there for a girl from the fens.

 

Haslingden Halo

The Halo is an artwork set on the expended landfill site (or top 'o' slate) overlooking the town of Haslingden in Rossendale, positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Lancashire. It is located at grid reference SD791236. The Halo was the fourth and final Panopticon to be constructed in Lancashire and was launched in September 2007.

 

The Halo is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. It is lit after dark using low-energy LEDs powered by an adjacent wind turbine and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. It was designed by John Kennedy of LandLab.

The steel lattice artwork set above Haslingden, Rossendale, UK. Artist - John Kennedy of Landlab.

The Panopticons are a series of sculptures scattered throughout the Pennine mountain fringes of Lancashire. Each one is situated on a remote peak with distant and atmospheric views for miles around.

Rossendale's Panopticon is called 'Halo', and it is impossible to avoid comparisons with UFOs when you're up there at sunset. The 18m-diameter circular lattice structure sits on a steel tripod crowning an old quarry and former landfill site known as "Top o' Slate". This shot depicts me and fellow Flickr aficionado Wayne posing underneath the disc as the sun had just passed beyond the horizon.

 

sculpture by John Kennedy and LandLab

HaloThe Halo is an artwork set on the expended landfill site (or top 'o' slate) overlooking the town of Haslingden in Rossendale, positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Lancashire. It is located at grid reference SD791236. The Halo was the fourth and final Panopticon to be constructed in Lancashire and was launched in September 2007.

 

The Halo is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. It is lit after dark using low-energy LEDs powered by an adjacent wind turbine and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. It was designed by John Kennedy of LandLab.

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE. AT NIGHT THE HALO PANOPTICON IS ILLUMINATED WITH BLUE LIGHTS SO THAT IT CAN BE SEEN FOR MILES AROUND.

THE HALO IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME.

 

The Halo, Haslingden, Lancashire. Sitting on an exposed hillside that was once a landfill site, this artwork is part of a series of landmarks called Panopticons, that are dotted around East Lancashire. This sculpture was designed by John Kennedy of LandLab, and is lit by hundreds of tiny LEDs that are powered by a nearby windmill generator. The Halo has an extraterrestrial feel to it and appears to hover above the town after dark.

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE. AT NIGHT THE HALO PANOPTICON IS ILLUMINATED WITH BLUE LIGHTS SO THAT IT CAN BE SEEN FOR MILES AROUND.

THE HALO IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME.

 

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE, IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME

 

The Halo is an artwork set on the expended landfill site (or top 'o' slate) overlooking the town of Haslingden in Rossendale, positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Lancashire. The Halo was the fourth and final Panopticon to be constructed in Lancashire and was launched in September 2007.

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE. AT NIGHT THE HALO PANOPTICON IS ILLUMINATED WITH BLUE LIGHTS SO THAT IT CAN BE SEEN FOR MILES AROUND.

THE HALO IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME.

 

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE. AT NIGHT THE HALO PANOPTICON IS ILLUMINATED WITH BLUE LIGHTS SO THAT IT CAN BE SEEN FOR MILES AROUND.

THE HALO IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME.

 

The only sounds to be heard on this remote peak are the moorland winds and a small turbine in the vicinity which is reponsible for powering the Halo. There is a constant breeze on these hilltops which is captured to run the LED bulbs and convert the wind into light.

Halo, Rossendale

Design by John Kennedy, LandLab.

 

Rossendale's Panopticon, 'Halo', is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. From its position on Top o' Slate, an old quarry and former landfill site situated in the hills above Haslingden in the Rossendale Valley, it is clearly visible for miles around.

 

'Halo' is lit at night using the latest LED technology and after dark glows a sky-blue colour, appearing to hover above the town. This dramatic gateway piece overlooks the A56, welcoming visitors to Pennine Lancashire.

 

'Halo' is the centrepiece of a wider scheme, led by the REMADE in Lancashire programme, Groundwork Pennine Lancashire and Rossendale Borough Council, which has reclaimed and returned to public use 33 hectares of land including Top o' Slate and the adjacent Duckworth Clough. New tree and shrub planting has taken place and picnic tables, seating and interpretation features have been introduced, together with improved footpaths.

 

From the attractively re-landscaped site there are dramatic views overlooking the Rossendale Valley, and on the horizon can be seen both Darwen Tower and Peel Tower. To the south the visitor can see Bury and Manchester and, in the distance beyond, the Derbyshire Pennines.

 

Panopticans was devised and managed by Mid Pennine Arts with a network of partners across Pennine Lancashire.

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE, IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME

 

Halo Panoptican, Haslingden Lancashire.

 

Design by John Kennedy, LandLab.

 

Rossendale's Panopticon, 'Halo', is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. From its position on Top o' Slate, an old quarry and former landfill site situated in the hills above Haslingden in the Rossendale Valley, it is clearly visible for miles around.

 

'Halo' is lit at night using the latest LED technology and after dark glows a sky-blue colour, appearing to hover above the town. This dramatic gateway piece overlooks the A56, welcoming visitors to Pennine Lancashire.

  

Halo - A Panopticon in Haslingden, Rossendale, Lancashire.

 

Designed by John Kennedy of LandLab, 'Halo' is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. The steelwork has a natural silver appearance, which will temper to matt as the galvanised finish weathers. A unique feature of this Panopticon is that it is lit after dark and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. The lighting, using low-energy LEDs and powered by an adjacent wind turbine, is designed to minimise light pollution and avoid any disruption to wildlife.

 

Halo - A Panopticon in Haslingden, Rossendale, Lancashire.

 

Designed by John Kennedy of LandLab, 'Halo' is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. The steelwork has a natural silver appearance, which will temper to matt as the galvanised finish weathers. A unique feature of this Panopticon is that it is lit after dark and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. The lighting, using low-energy LEDs and powered by an adjacent wind turbine, is designed to minimise light pollution and avoid any disruption to wildlife.

 

'Halo', positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Pennine Lancashire, is one of a small number of iconic artworks to have received funding from the Northern Way as part of its Welcome to the North programme – a unique scheme to install public artworks at key gateways across the North to enhance the image of the region, improve its quality of place and increase tourism and economic growth.

 

'Halo' is the centrepiece of a wider partnership scheme, led by the REMADE in Lancashire programme, Groundwork and Rossendale Council, which has reclaimed and returned to public use 33 hectares of land including the former landfill site of Top o' Slate and the adjacent Duckworth Clough. REMADE was set up by Lancashire County Council in partnership with the Northwest Regional Development Agency to recover neglected land for uses such as landscaped open space, play areas, new planting, nature reserves, footpaths, cycleways and bridleways.

Designed by John Kennedy of LandLab, 'Halo' is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. The steelwork has a natural silver appearance, which will temper to matt as the galvanised finish weathers. A unique feature of this Panopticon is that it is lit after dark and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. The lighting, using low-energy LEDs and powered by an adjacent wind turbine, is designed to minimise light pollution and avoid any disruption to wildlife.

 

'Halo', positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Pennine Lancashire, is one of a small number of iconic artworks to have received funding from the Northern Way as part of its Welcome to the North programme – a unique scheme to install public artworks at key gateways across the North to enhance the image of the region, improve its quality of place and increase tourism and economic growth.

 

If you have nowt else to do it's worth a visit. But by gum, it was cold up there today!

The Halo is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. It is lit after dark using low-energy LEDs powered by an adjacent wind turbine and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. It was designed by John Kennedy of LandLab. Sadly, vandals have managed to rip off about 3/4 of the LED lights. Here I've used a flashgun to light the upper section. The light in the sky is the moon and I've added a texture overlay to the sky to enhance the other-worldly appearance.

On March 13, 2015, a group of graduate students accompanied Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Dr. Sarah Davis and Research Scientist, Kimberley Miller to harvest Miscanthus x giganteus at the Ohio University Land Lab as part of research to examine the benefits of this species as a superior feedstock alternative for biofuel production. Research has shown that Miscanthus x giganteus has greater ecological benefits than conventional feedstock options due to being a perennial C4 plant with nitrogen fixing properties.

Halo - A Panopticon in Haslingden, Rossendale, Lancashire.

 

Designed by John Kennedy of LandLab, 'Halo' is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. The core is open at the top, framing views of the sky. The steelwork has a natural silver appearance, which will temper to matt as the galvanised finish weathers. A unique feature of this Panopticon is that it is lit after dark and glows a sky-blue colour, giving the effect of hovering above the town. The lighting, using low-energy LEDs and powered by an adjacent wind turbine, is designed to minimise light pollution and avoid any disruption to wildlife.

 

'Halo', positioned to be clearly visible from the M66 and A56 approach to Pennine Lancashire, is one of a small number of iconic artworks to have received funding from the Northern Way as part of its Welcome to the North programme – a unique scheme to install public artworks at key gateways across the North to enhance the image of the region, improve its quality of place and increase tourism and economic growth.

 

'Halo' is the centrepiece of a wider partnership scheme, led by the REMADE in Lancashire programme, Groundwork and Rossendale Council, which has reclaimed and returned to public use 33 hectares of land including the former landfill site of Top o' Slate and the adjacent Duckworth Clough. REMADE was set up by Lancashire County Council in partnership with the Northwest Regional Development Agency to recover neglected land for uses such as landscaped open space, play areas, new planting, nature reserves, footpaths, cycleways and bridleways.

Halo, Rossendale

Design by John Kennedy, LandLab.

 

Rossendale's Panopticon, 'Halo', is an 18m-diameter steel lattice structure supported on a tripod five metres above the ground. From its position on Top o' Slate, an old quarry and former landfill site situated in the hills above Haslingden in the Rossendale Valley, it is clearly visible for miles around.

 

'Halo' is lit at night using the latest LED technology and after dark glows a sky-blue colour, appearing to hover above the town. This dramatic gateway piece overlooks the A56, welcoming visitors to Pennine Lancashire.

 

'Halo' is the centrepiece of a wider scheme, led by the REMADE in Lancashire programme, Groundwork Pennine Lancashire and Rossendale Borough Council, which has reclaimed and returned to public use 33 hectares of land including Top o' Slate and the adjacent Duckworth Clough. New tree and shrub planting has taken place and picnic tables, seating and interpretation features have been introduced, together with improved footpaths.

 

From the attractively re-landscaped site there are dramatic views overlooking the Rossendale Valley, and on the horizon can be seen both Darwen Tower and Peel Tower. To the south the visitor can see Bury and Manchester and, in the distance beyond, the Derbyshire Pennines.

 

Panopticans was devised and managed by Mid Pennine Arts with a network of partners across Pennine Lancashire.

I've posted a lot of Halo pictures and almost left this one out, but couldn't quite bring myself to omit the shot as it was a lot of fun to create. The camera was set up on a tripod and took a single exposure 30 seconds in length - during that time we two photographers bounced around underneath the disc's light to create a series of ghostly shapes. Anyone watching from a distance would probably have thought we were absolute nutters ;-) The LED lights have been tweaked in Photoshop, but the semi-invisible figures being beamed up all come from the same exposure. View it in original size to see the detail!

DESIGNED BY JOHN KENNEDY OF LANDLAB, 'HALO' IS AN 18M-DIAMETER STEEL LATTICE STRUCTURE SUPPORTED ON A TRIPOD FIVE METRES ABOVE THE GROUND. THE CORE IS OPEN AT THE TOP, FRAMING VIEWS OF THE SKY.

'HALO', POSITIONED TO BE CLEARLY VISIBLE FROM THE M66 AND A56 APPROACH TO PENNINE LANCASHIRE, IS ONE OF A SMALL NUMBER OF ICONIC ARTWORKS TO HAVE RECEIVED FUNDING FROM THE NORTHERN WAY AS PART OF ITS WELCOME TO THE NORTH PROGRAMME

 

These windswept peaks are the among the highest parts of the Forest of Rossendale. They undulate above the steep-sided valleys of the River Irwell and its tributaries, which flow from the Pennines southwards to Manchester and cut through the moorland which is characteristic of the area. These peaks were hunting territory in medieval times...I'm not sure what the inhabitants of that era would make of The Halo if they ran across it back then!

The sculpture is clearly visible from the A56, being designed to welcome visitors to Pennine Lancashire. It must raise a few eyebrows amongst alien believers on dark nights! Me and Wayne got a little delayed photographing another panopticon sculpture nearby, which resulted in a speedy drive then a sprint up the hill to catch the sun as it twinkled out of view over the horizon.

The Halo panopticon is located at Top o’Slate, to the west of Cribden Hill (“Hill Of Stags”) in Rossendale (“Valley In The Moors”), Lancashire. It overlooks the town of Haslingden (“Valley Where Hazel Trees Grow”) and was positioned here so that it would be clearly visible on the main approach routes to Rossendale from the north or the south. The structure was designed by John Kennedy of LandLab and won the international panopticon competition in 2003. The steel lattice structure has a diameter of 18m and is held 5m above the ground by a truncated steel tripod. The concentric rings of the halo are illuminated by over 500 blue LED lamps that are powered by the adjacent wind turbine.

 

A walker’s route called “The Shoe Trail” (www.flickr.com/photos/67668518@N08/8288743059/in/photostr...) leads up to the panopticon from the terminus of the heritage East Lancashire Railway in the nearby town of Rawtenstall (“Farmstead On Rough Ground”). The trail celebrates the once famous shoe industry of Rossendale and is waymarked by a series of shoe sculptures that have been fashioned out of clay. In total there are twenty-eight such sculptures along the length of the trail.

 

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