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Explore #186 8th April 2009 .... Thank you so much everyone:-))) Thank you to Trinimusic2008 & Dysartian for letting me know:-)

Bought this cute little plant a few weeks ago.

appserver1.kwantlen.ca/apps/plantid/plantid.nsf/lookup/82...

 

Sorry, I won't be able to comment on your photos 'til tonight. Lots to do today.

Hope everyone's having a great day:-)))

  

During my time in Vancouver in the fall of 2011, I stumbled across this intersection on West Georgia street whilst heading out to dinner one evening. The colours of the trees in this area were amazing, living up to my expectations of the Canadian autumn. I was playing around with wide angle architecture shots at the time. I was late to dinner, but I'm glad I was, waiting for those few minutes after sunset was completely worth it here.

 

I would like to thank everybody for any comments you have to offfer, good or bad. I read every single comment left, and I check out the photostream of every single person who adds me as a contact. I might not add you back, but I will certainly review and comment on a few of your shots!

 

First Nations (wikipedia):

First Nations is a term that collectively refers to various Aboriginal peoples in Canada who are neither Inuit nor Métis.[2] There are currently over 630[3] recognised First Nations governments or bands spread across Canada, roughly half of which are in the provinces of Ontario and British Columbia.[4] The total population is nearly 700,000 people. Under the Employment Equity Act, First Nations are a "designated group", along with women, visible minorities, and persons with physical or mental disabilities.[5] They are not defined as a visible minority under the Act or by the criteria of Statistics Canada.[6]

The term First Nations (most often used in the plural) has come into general use for the indigenous peoples of the Americas located in what is now Canada, except for the Arctic-situated Inuit, and peoples of mixed European-First Nations ancestry called Métis. The singular, commonly used on culturally politicised reserves, is the term First Nations person (when gender-specific, First Nations man or First Nations woman). A more recent trend is for members of various nations to refer to themselves by their tribal or national identity only, e.g., "I'm Haida," or "We're Kwantlens," in recognition of the distinctiveness of First Nations ethnicities.[7]

North American indigenous peoples have cultures spanning thousands of years. Some of their oral traditions accurately describe historical events, such as the Cascadia Earthquake of 1700. Written records began with the arrival of European explorers and colonists during the Age of Discovery, beginning in the late 15th century.[8][9] European accounts by trappers, traders, explorers, and missionaries give important evidence of early contact culture.[10] In addition, archeological and anthropological research, as well as linguistics, have helped scholars piece together understanding of ancient cultures and historic peoples.

Although not without conflict or slavery, Euro-Canadians' early interactions with First Nations, Metis and Inuit populations were relatively non-combative (although the Battle of Seven Oaks is one obvious contrary event where Metis killed 20 settlers[11]) compared to the often violent battles between colonists and native peoples in the United States. Combined with later economic development, this relatively non-combative history has allowed First Nations peoples to have a strong influence on the national culture, while preserving their own identities.[12]

The tiny Church of the Holy Redeemer (built 1897 - 1902) on Kwantlen First Nations land on McMillan Island, Fort Langley, BC. The cottonwood fuzz is flying so I had to remove 200+ white dots from the shot. Thank god for the Spot Healing Tool.

Vaheguru ji ka khalsa, Vaheguru ji ki fatheh!

 

June 2nd to June 8th, 2008 is INTERNATIONAL 1984 MEMORIAL WEEK.

 

There are special events happening ALL WEEK.

 

If you feel "enough" is not done in our community to reach out, to make our issues known, to commemorate our history, to celebrate Gurbani - this week will have a range of events covering all of these topics.

 

PLEASE ATTEND AS MANY EVENTS AS YOU CAN, AND BRING YOUR FAMILY & FRIENDS.

 

It is *EXTREMELY* important that we come out in large numbers on Saturday, June 7th, to commemorate the 24th anniversary of the June 1984 Massacre of Sikhs in Punjab and the November 1984 Massacre of Sikhs in Delhi.

 

Still, 24 years after this horrendous attack, the perpetrators roam free and have NEVER BEEN SENTENCED by the faulty and corrupt criminal justice system of India, which claims to be the world's largest democracy but is instead one of the world's largest human rights abusers and has one of the highest rates of child poverty worldwide.

 

The Sikh youth in BC have been working with local intellectuals, politicians, community leaders, business people, activists, and have invited esteemed guests from out of country for this WEEK-LONG MEMORIAL, including acclaimed author and professor at the University of Notre Dame, Dr. Cynthia Mahmood; Director of the Sikh Research Institute, Harinder Singh; Advocate for 1984 Victims in India, Harvinder Singh Phoolka; Program Associate at Ensaaf, Jasmine Marwaha; Professor of Sociology at Langara College, Indira Prahst; Communications & Gender Development student Kamal Arora; and many others.

 

LET'S JOIN HANDS TOGETHER TO GIVE A VOICE TO THE VICTIMS OF INDIA'S HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES.

 

Let's stand up for justice for victims of oppression everywhere.

 

Let's gather as a whole community to recognize the sacrifices of human rights defenders around the world.

 

PLEASE JOIN US FOR THESE EVENTS THIS WEEK:

 

* 1984 OPEN COMMUNITY FORUM / DISCUSSION With Dr. Mahmood & H.S. Phoolka

Tuesday, June 3 at 6:00pm at SFU Surrey Campus

www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=14830067431

 

* 1984 REMEMBRANCE KEERTAN DARBAR

Wednesday, June 4 at 6:00pm at Gurdwara Sahib Sukh Sagar

www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=13806259319

 

* SIKH WOMEN IN 1984 - Discussion / Q&A with Dr. Cynthia Mahmood

Thursday, June 5 at 6:00pm at Guru Nanak Academy

www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=23153317246

 

* HUMAN RIGHTS IN INDIA - FORUM (Tickets By Invitation Only)

Friday, June 6 at 6:00pm at Kwantlen University College

www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=15273083443

 

* CAMPAIGN FOR HUMAN RIGHTS CANDLE LIGHT VIGIL MEMORIAL :: Lest We Forget :: 1984

Saturday, June 7 at 6:00pm at Vancouver Art Gallery

www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=15197493201

 

Vaheguru ji ka khalsa, Vaheguru ji ki fatheh!

---------

 

IF YOU ARE READING THIS AND YOU'RE IN WASHINGTON OR ANYWHERE IN BC - PLEASE DEFINITELY ATTEND THE EVENTS. IF YOU ARE IN OREGON, CALIFORNIA, ALBERTA - PLEASE ATTEND IF YOU CAN OR HOST SIMILAR EVENTS IN YOUR COMMUNITY. ALL LOWER MAINLAND SANGAT - THERE WILL BE BUSSES TO THE VIGIL ON JUNE 7th FROM LOCAL GURDWARAS

 

Posed portrait. Matt works out of Winnipeg and specializes in hooks... see #366hooks

I made a blog post related to this photo:

"They will know we are Christians by our love for one another"

 

(From SFU C4C Leadership retreat)

Bible study and other student leaders in Campus for Christ at SFU.

British Columbia, Canada

 

Fort Langley is a village community with a population of 3,400 and forms part of the Township of Langley. It is the home of Fort Langley National Historic Site, a former fur trade post of the Hudson's Bay Company. Lying on the Fraser River, Fort Langley is at the northern edge of the Township of Langley.

 

The Bedford Channel is a small side channel of the Fraser River near the north end of the Township of Langley, on the south side of McMillan Island.[1] The pair of islands--Brae Island and McMillan Island that protect the riverfront of Fort Langley, British Columbia are reached by the bridge that crosses the Bedford Channel on the way to the now-closed Albion Ferry terminal and the main reserve community of the Kwantlen First Nation on McMillan Island. The Bedford name has been used in the name of a new housing development in the town of Fort Langley.

 

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  

Thank-you for all you views, faves and comments!

  

Camera: Diana F+

Film: Efke 100R

Camera: Konica C-35

Film: Kodak Gold 200 (expired Dec 1989)

Camera: Polaroid 635CL

Film: Impossible Project 600PX

//This is a Getty Licensed image//

 

A fashion shoot for Theodora Lee's Collection.

 

She's a graduating fashion student at Kwantlen University in B.C. and is also the recipient of LG Denim DIY's Western Canadian semifinals top prize winner for innovative jean designs.

 

www.chairmanting.com

Olympus OM-D E-M5 | Olympus M.Zuiko 12-40mm f2.8

Another take on the great hall at Kwantlen Richmond.

Camera: Kodak Brownie Hawkeye

Film: Lomography 100

Camera: Pentax Espio Mini

Film: unbranded "official evidence film"

Fort Langley, BC Canada

 

Fort Langley Canoe Club is a non-profit group of people who enjoy paddling competitively and recreationally in four main classes of boats – Canoe & Kayak, Dragonboat, Voyageur and Outrigger canoe.

 

They paddle on the Bedford Channel with staging areas from the Paddlesport Dock (kayaks, racing canoes and voyageur canoes), Riverside Dock (outrigger canoes) and the Canoe Dock, east of the bridge, (dragonboats).

 

The Bedford Channel is a small side channel of the Fraser River near the north end of the Township of Langley, on the south side of McMillan Island. The pair of islands--Brae Island and McMillan Island that protect the riverfront of Fort Langley, British Columbia are reached by the bridge that crosses the Bedford Channel on the way to the now-closed Albion Ferry terminal and the main reserve community of the Kwantlen First Nation on McMillan Island. The Bedford name has been used in the name of a new housing development in the town of Fort Langley.

 

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  

www.fortlangleycanoeclub.ca/about-flcc

   

Fort Langley, BC

 

An iconic sight in Fort Langley is the Church of the Holy Redeemer situated across the Bedford Channel on McMillan Island. Most visitors to Fort Langley have seen the picturesque white church sitting eloquently alone across the river on the land of the Kwantlen First Nations. Many, however, haven’t seen the inside of this beautifully historic building, and it’s a shame. I was fortunate enough to have been invited on a tour last week, and have to say that the inside is even more wonderful than the striking facade. Built between 1897 and 1902 by the Kwantlen First Nations under the supervision of the Oblate Fathers from St. Mary’s Mission in Mission, the historic church continues to provide occasional services and is the location of many small marriage ceremonies

 

www.langleyexplorer.com/historic-places-mcmillan-islands-...

My third photography assignment involved the appropriation of a concept or technique used by a contemporary photography. I chose Lynne Cohen and the concept of "evacuated space".

 

Shot with a Yashica FR and Ilford Delta 100 black and white film. Processed, developed and printed by yours truly.

Our photography club photographed a blacksmith convention in Surrey last week. I learned a lot.

Quantum Leap Donors Award

Presented by British Columbia Transmission Corporation

 

Recipient Large Organization: Kwantlen University and unions BCGEU and FPSE Local 5

 

Kwantlen University, BCGEU and FPSE Local 5 are another great example of what union/management teamwork can accomplish. Their collaboration had a significant effect on the campaign which grew by 163 donors.

 

Among the activities, senior management and union representatives co-hosted leadership luncheons at all three campuses. Kwantlen’s commitment to lend a faculty member to the United Way Loaned Rep program along with their participation in the union counseling program speaks passionately their commitment to our community.

 

www.uwlm.ca/default.htm

 

Camera: Canon A-1

Film: Kodak Ektachrome 100VS

 

Jacob Haldi Bridge is a Heritage bridge that spans the Bedford Channel of the Fraser River, connecting Fort Langley ( National Historic Site ) with McMillan Island.

McMillan Island ( located behind me ) is the home of the Kwantlen First Nation.

The red and yellow building to the right is an observation tower.

In Kwantlen Polytechnic University's Fine Arts 3270 Advanced Digital Photography course, we had to produce a portfolio of work that illustrated our competency with editing photographs digitally.

 

For this print, I digitally altered the light and the atmosphere using a number of Tiffen DFX Photoshop CS6 plugin filters.

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