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The Cohune palms have these enormous leaves, giving them sort of a pre-historic appearance. It's name comes from Cohune Ridge.

built in the Early Classic period from about 250 to 600 AD

Costa Maya, Mexico. Kohunlich, a large Mayan archaeology site, an elaborately planned city. Among the notable buildings built 500-600AD, the best known is the Temple of the Masks.

Costa Maya is a small tourist region in the municipality of Othón P. Blanco in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico, the only state bounded by the Caribbean Sea to its east. This municipality is close to Chetumal (capital of the state) on the border with Belize. The area was generally undeveloped but has been growing rapidly since construction of a large pier to accommodate cruise ships. Costa Maya is also the name of a subdivision near the village of Mahahual. The beach extends from Xcalak in the south to the southern border of Sian Ka'an in the north, a distance of approximately 100 kilometers (62 mi).

 

Xcalak is approximately 60 kilometers (37 mi) south of the Costa Maya cruise port, and the fishing village of Mahahual is only about 3 kilometers (1.9 mi) away. Cruise ships can easily be seen from the village. Mahahual has soft sand beaches, grass thatched palapas, and a coral reef a short distance off-shore called Banco Chinchorro, as well as several bars, restaurants, and shops. A new development called New Mahahual is being created directly inland from the port. When ships are in port, the village is busy with cruise passengers.

 

Costa Maya's port has a new and modern tourist shopping mall. The center has a central plaza with saltwater pools and 'swim-up' style bars. There are several jewellery stores and many small shops selling ubiquitous souvenir items. It is generally open only to cruise ship passengers.

 

Costa Maya is the closest port of access to many of the lesser-known Mayan ruins in the Yucatan including Chacchoben and Kohunlich. These sites are substantially less excavated than the better-known pyramids of Tulum and Coba to the north; Chichen Itza and Uxmal in Yucatan.

 

Around 6500 BC the Native Americans started agricultural activities. The agriculture was of the slash and burn type. Around 3500 BC the agricultural skill had developed as such that they formed permanent villages in the center of Mexico. The Maya are not the first culture to appear in Mexico; they were preceded by the Olmecs near the Gulf coast. The first Maya like culture appeared around 200 BC in the south of Mexico (Chiapas).

 

The Maya were predominant in three areas: the northern area which is the Yucatán Peninsula, the central area which is the Petén area and the western area which are the lowlands bordering to Belize. The Costa Maya falls under the western lowlands. The agricultural skills evolved between 200 BC and 900 AD to the extent that workers could be made available to build the beautiful cities as we know them today. In the area around the Costa Maya the building styles called Rio Bec and Chennes are found. The Mayan culture weakened during the period of 900 AD to 1200 AD. Other cultures influenced the building styles in that period (an example of this is Tulum).

The Río Bec and Chennes sites are some of the most recent found in Mexico. Most of the sites were found by rubber farmers scouting the forest in search of rubber trees.

 

Credit for the data above is given to the following website:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Costa_Maya

  

Kohunlich, Quintana Roo, México.

 

Templo de los Mascarones, cubierto de grandes figuras con atributos del dios sol Kinich Ahau. (300 a.C. -250 d.C.)

"...Se desconoce el nombre original del asentamiento. El nombre de Kohunlich proviene del inglés cohoon ridge (lomerío de corozos), que se refiere a la existencia de palmas de corozo, especie característica del área del Petén. En 1912, el sitio fue visitado por primera vez por el arqueólogo norteamericano Raymond Merwin, cuando el lugar era conocido con el nombre de Clarksville, en alusión al campamento maderero que se encontraba tres kilómetros al norte del área monumental de Kohunlich."

 

Temple of the Masks with huge stucco masks (6 ft. tall) with attributes of the mayan solar deity (300 AD. -250 AD).

 

www.inah.gob.mx/es/zonas/103-zona-arqueologica-kohunlich

www.elmundomaya.com/arqueologia/kohunlich.html

 

This image is from a 35 mm. slide shot from a Canon T60 with a 35-70 mm zoom lens, scanned by an ICE PF3650 Pro3 and restored by multiple photo editors

Mayan Classic, ca. 500–700 AC with later additions.

 

The elaborate reliefs would originally have been open to the sky; the thatch roof was installed recently to protect the painting. Mayan temples were often continuously expanded, encasing earlier, worn phases with freshly carved and painted exteriors. The excellent preservation here is due to a later phase that encased and protected this phase—and which was removed during excavations.

Temple of the stelae, Mayan site at Kohunlich - Quintana Roo, Mexico

El imponente señor del Sol. kinich Ahau, Templo de los Mascarones, Zona Arqueológica Kohunlich, Quintana Roo. 🇲🇽México.

Temple of the King, Mayan site at Kohunlich - Quintana Roo, Mexico

Kohunlich, Quintana Roo, México.

 

Templo de los Mascarones, cubierto de grandes figuras con atributos del dios sol. (300 a.C. -250 d.C.)

"...Se desconoce el nombre original del asentamiento. El nombre de Kohunlich proviene del inglés cohoon ridge (lomerío de corozos), que se refiere a la existencia de palmas de corozo, especie característica del área del Petén. En 1912, el sitio fue visitado por primera vez por el arqueólogo norteamericano Raymond Merwin, cuando el lugar era conocido con el nombre de Clarksville, en alusión al campamento maderero que se encontraba tres kilómetros al norte del área monumental de Kohunlich."

 

Temple of the Masks with huge stucco masks (6 ft. tall) with attributes of the mayan solar deity (300 AD. -250 AD).

  

www.inah.gob.mx/es/zonas/103-zona-arqueologica-kohunlich

www.elmundomaya.com/arqueologia/kohunlich.html

 

This image is from a 35 mm. slide shot from a Canon T60 with a 35-70 mm zoom lens, scanned by an ICE PF3650 Pro3 and restored by multiple photo editors

Kohunlich, Quintana Roo, México.

 

Templo de los Mascarones, cubierto de grandes figuras con atributos del dios sol Kinich Ahau. (300 a.C. -250 d.C.)

"...Se desconoce el nombre original del asentamiento. El nombre de Kohunlich proviene del inglés cohoon ridge (lomerío de corozos), que se refiere a la existencia de palmas de corozo, especie característica del área del Petén. En 1912, el sitio fue visitado por primera vez por el arqueólogo norteamericano Raymond Merwin, cuando el lugar era conocido con el nombre de Clarksville, en alusión al campamento maderero que se encontraba tres kilómetros al norte del área monumental de Kohunlich."

 

Temple of the Masks with huge stucco masks (6 ft. tall) with attributes of the mayan solar deity (300 AD. -250 AD).

 

www.inah.gob.mx/es/zonas/103-zona-arqueologica-kohunlich

www.elmundomaya.com/arqueologia/kohunlich.html

 

This image is from a 35 mm. slide shot from a Canon T60 with a 35-70 mm zoom lens, scanned by an ICE PF3650 Pro3 and restored by multiple photo editors

The third stop on our Regent Seven Seas Explorer Caribbean cruise was Costa Maya, Mexico.

 

Costa Maya is the closest port of access to many of the lesser-known Mayan ruins in the Yucatan including Chacchoben and Kohunlich.

 

These sites are substantially less excavated than the better-known pyramids of Tulum and Coba to the north or Chichen Itza and Uxmal in Yucatan.

Kohunlich Quintana Roo Mexico Mayan Masks Kohunlich comes the name “Cohune Ridge”. Cohune is a species of fruiting palm common to the area. The site is best known for its Temple of the Masks, an Early Classic pyramid whose central stairway is flanked by huge humanized stucco masks. Built around 500 A.D., this is one of the oldest constructions at the site. After 700 A.D., this temple was covered over with a Terminal Classic construction, this protected the masks and allowed for the masks to remain in excellent shape with some of the original colors.

Kohunlich Quintana Roo Mexico Mayan Masks Kohunlich comes the name “Cohune Ridge”. Cohune is a species of fruiting palm common to the area. The site is best known for its Temple of the Masks, an Early Classic pyramid whose central stairway is flanked by huge humanized stucco masks. Built around 500 A.D., this is one of the oldest constructions at the site. After 700 A.D., this temple was covered over with a Terminal Classic construction, this protected the masks and allowed for the masks to remain in excellent shape with some of the original colors.

The huge palapa (palm thatch) has been erected over the temple to protect the 8 ft stone masks. Pics to follow in due course

Elevación natural sirvió cómo base a un gran complejo residencial (600-1200 d.C.) La calidad, elegancia el arreglo interior de sus construcciones y la espléndida vista hace pensar que allí habitaron personajes del más alto nivel jerárquico. Zona Arqueológica Kohunlich caribe mexicano, Quintana Roo. 🇲🇽México.

Kohunlich, Mexico

Kohunlich Archaeological Zone, Quintana Roo, Mexico

Annulariidae Henderson & Bartsch, 1920

Tudorinae Watters, 2006

Halotudora Watters, 2006

 

Halotudora gaigei

(Bequaert & Clench, 1931)

 

Synonyms:

Choanopoma gaigei Bequaert & Clench, 1931: 425 –426; Bequaert & Clench, 1933: 540 –542, text fig. 26, pl. 68, figs. 8–11; Goodrich & van der Schalie, 1937: 12, 15, 22, 32; Harry, 1950: 7, 26– 28; Branson & McCoy, 1963: 104; Thompson, 1966: 27, 28; Thompson, 1967: 225, 227; Watters, 2006: 269.

Choanopoma (Choanopomops) gaigei Bequaert & Clench, 1931.

......]

 

Mexico.Quintana Roo region

West Chetumal

Kohunlich Ruins, under stones rocks

VIII-2007

 

G. THOMAS WATTERS

Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University, 1315 Kinnear Road, Columbus, Ohio 43212

USA. E-mail: watters.1@osu.edu

www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2014/f/z03878p350f.pdf

 

Photo: Claude and Amandine EVANNO, 2018

Kohunlich Archaeological Ruins, Southern Quintana Roo,

On The Yucatán Peninsula, México.

 

Kohunlich (X-làabch'e'en in Modern Mayan) is a large archaeological site of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization, located on the Yucatán Peninsula about 25 km east of the Rio Bec region, and about 65 km west of Chetumal on Highway 186, and 9 km south of the road. The Spanish name does not actually derive from Mayan but from the English Cohune Ridge where cohune palm grew.

  

It's the little things, y'all.

Don't ya?

 

(2nd photo in comments)

  

Here is a little information about the Mayan Ruins site, Kohunlich.

 

Pinning down the fruit (1/3)

The results of brief encounter with a wary Keel-billed Toucan at the archaeological site of Kohunlich. The site is largely empty of visitors, although it is very popular among tropical birds.

Dissecting the fruit (2/3)

We encountered this small herd of cattle coming towards us. Not a sign of any farmer or cowherd to be seen. I guess they know their own way home.

A yawning Collared Aracari, showing off brushy tongue

Residential and administrative quarter of the city. These buildings date from around 500 AD. Here would have lived and worked the city's nobles aside from the actual KIng and family and the officials who took care of the day to day running of the city. The buildings date from around 500 AD though the city itself was founded 700 years before.

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