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Abbas Kiarostami, Sleepers

 

On the Krka River near Skradinski Buk waterfalls.

 

Week 10 will cover Art work and Reflections.

 

Identify the Artist XII will return to this photo stream and begin on Sunday, September 29, 2019 and as usual run 10 weeks to the middle of December. There will be a two week hiatus at the end of November for the Thanksgiving holiday. Calendrical links are provided below.

 

Identify the Artist XII:

 

Week 1 Bridges (1001 – 1005)09/29 – 10/3/2019

Week 2 Dogs (2) (1006 – 1010)10/06 – 10/10/2019

Week 3 Farming (1011 – 1015)10/13 – 10/17/2019

Week 4 Musical Interlude (3) (1016 – 1020)10/20 – 10/24/2019

Week 5 Portraits of Painters (2) (1021 – 1025)10/27 – 10/31/2019

Week 6 The Conversation (1026 -1030)11/03 – 11/17/2019

Week 7 FUR (1031 – 1035) 11/10 – 11/14/2019

Week 8 Ham & Eggs (1036 – 1040)11/17 – 11/21/2019

Two Week Hiatus Thanksgiving Holidays

Week 9 Open – Odds & Ends (1041-1045)12/08 – 12/12/2019

Week 10 Reflections (1046 – 1050) 12/15 – 12/19/2019

 

Please think about joining in…it’s been a lot of fun over the years.

  

Prize for the 1st and 2nd place contestants is a DVD. From the Criterion Collection:

  

Abbas Kiarostami

24 Frames

For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging the two art forms to which he had dedicated his life. Setting out to reconstruct the moments immediately before and after a photograph is taken, Kiarostami selected twenty-four still images—most of them stark landscapes inhabited only by foraging birds and other wildlife—and digitally animated each one into its own subtly evolving four-and-a-half-minute vignette, creating a series of poignant studies in movement, perception, and time. A sustained meditation on the process of image making, 24 Frames is a graceful and elegiac farewell from one of the giants of world cinema.

  

I've often noticed that we are not able to look at what we have in front of us, unless it's inside a frame.

- Abbas Kiarostami

I was egoistic and Googled my own name just to see what was out there in cyberspace. It's interesting what you can find. One of the things I found was that someone had used one of my pictures that was uploaded (by me) a long time (7 years) ago to a site called "Nuages.com", which displays only clouds It was used (with proper identification of owner) to illustrate a poem, in French. Since it's about 45 years since I had my last French lesson, I unfortunately can't understand the poem, but I know that some of my flickr friends can, and if someone could give me a hint what it's about, I would really appreciate it. Here is the poem

 

LE VENT NOUS EMPORTERA

  

Dans ma nuit, si brève, hélas

Le vent a rendez-vous avec les feuilles.

Ma nuit si brève est remplie de l'angoisse dévastatrice

Ecoute! Entends-tu le souffle des ténèbres?

De ce bonheur, je me sens étranger.

Au désespoir je suis accoutumée.

Ecoute! Entends-tu le souffle des ténèbres?

Là, dans la nuit, quelque chose se passe

La lune est rouge et angoissée.

Et accrochés à ce toit

Qui risque de s'effondrer à tout moment,

Les nuages, comme une foule de pleureuses,

Attendent l'accouchement de la pluie,

Un instant, et puis rien.

Derrière cette fenêtre,

C'est la nuit qui tremble

Et c'est la terre qui s'arrête de tourner.

Derrière cette fenêtre, un inconnu s'inquiète

pour moi et toi.

Toi, toute verdoyante,

Pose tes mains - ces souvenirs ardents -

Sur mes mains amoureuses

Et confie tes lèvres, repues de la chaleur de la vie,

Aux caresses de mes lèvres amoureuses

Le vent nous emportera!

Le vent nous emportera!

  

Forough Farrokhzad,

Poème extrait du film Le Vent nous emportera,

d'Abbas Kiarostami

  

Here is a translation thanks to

*Laurence Garçon* (Please visit her photo stream to see fantastic pictures from Paris)

Thank you Laurance!

 

THE WIND WILL CARRY US

In my night, so sadly short,

The wind has a date with the leaves.

My night, so short, is filled with destructive anxiety

Listen! Do you hear the breath of blackness?

To this happiness, I feel foreign.

To despair I am accustomed.

Listen! Do you hear the breath of blackness?

There, in the night, something is happening

The moon is red and anxious.

And hung on this roof

Which risks collapsing any time,

Clouds, as a crowd of grumblers,

Wait for the delivery of the rain,

An instant, and then nothing.

Behind this window,

It is the night that trembles

And it is the earth which stops to turn.

Behind this window, the unknown gets worried

for me and you.

You, very green,

Put down your hands - these burning memories-

On my loving hands

And entrust your lips, fed on the warmth of life,

In the caresses of my loving lips

The wind will take us!

The wind will take us!

    

Technical note; This a picture taken very early with my first digital camera, a Leica (made by Fuji). The resolution was not very good, but it was fun to try something digital.

The original was saved on a Zip 100 disc, which has since deteriorated and is now unreadable. A lesson learned that our digital media will not last as long as my grandparent's b/w photos.

« Iran: year 38 » ( 38 years of Iranian photographs)

It is not a coincidence that Iran has so many photographers. When today’s Iranians want to express themselves, they use the tools given to them by history. The modern version of poetry is photography, of course. Images, photojournalism, documentary or art are visual poetry, if you will. With this exhibition, we want to introduce those who are shaping the image of Iran today. A very diverse mix of photographers, artists and filmmakers portraying a country still caught up in revolution and war, but also fast-changing beyond recognition. Iran is both a young and an old country at the same time. Thousands of years of history have come before the 1979 Islamic revolution. We start counting again from that year.

Iran: year 38, is to be an exhibition celebrating the culture of visual poetry embraced by Iranians.

66 iranian photographers

Meead Akhi, Azadeh Akhlaghi, Ali & Ramyar, Saba Alizadeh, Hoda Amin, Hawar Amini, Abbas Attar, Fatemeh Baigmoradi, Dadbeh Bassir, Erfan Dadkhah, Solmaz Daryani, Gohar Dashti, Alireza Fani, Hamed Farhangi, Arash Fayez, Shadi Ghadirian, Jassem Ghazbanpour, Azin Haghighi, Ghazaleh Hedayat, Bahman Jalali, Rana Javadi, Poolad Javaher Haghighi, Alborz Kazemi, Babak Kazemi, Kaveh Kazemi, Mehregan Kazemi, Arash Khamooshi, Danial Khodaie, Abbas Kiarostami, Gelareh Kiazand, Abbas Kowsari, Yalda Moaiery, Sasan Moayyedi, Mehran Mohajer, Mehdi Monem, Amir Mousavi, Sahar Mokhtari, Tahmineh Monzavi, Mehran Naghshbandi, Azin Nafarhaghighi, Mehrdad Naraghi, Morteza Niknahad & Behnam Zakeri, Ebrahim Noroozi, Mohsen Rastani, Ghazaleh Rezaei, Behnam Sadighi, Majid Saeedi, Omid Salehi, Hasan Sarbakhshian, Jalal Sepehr, Bahram Shabani, Noushin Shafiei, Hashem Shakeri, Jalal Shams Azaran, Sina Shiri, Arya Tabandehpoor, Nazanin Tabatabaee Yazdi, Maryam Takhtkeshian, Newsha Tavakolian, Sadegh Tirafkan, Mehdi Vosoughnia, Mohsen Yazdipour, Hasti Zahiri, Maryam Zandi

 

Venetian Street Vendor’s Wares

.

 

ONE WEEK FROM TODAY (9/22/2019), ON 9/29/2019 IDENTIFY THE ARTIST XII WILL BEGIN AT 8:00 PM EASTERN TIME.

identifying Artists…after a 17 month delay, Identify the Artist XII will return to this photo stream and begin on Sunday, September 29, 2019 and as usual run 10 weeks to the middle of December. There will be a two week hiatus at the end of November for the Thanksgiving holiday. Calendrical links are provided below.

 

Identify the Artist XII:

 

Week 1 Bridges (1001 – 1005)09/29 – 10/3/2019

Week 2 Dogs (2) (1006 – 1010)10/06 – 10/10/2019

Week 3 Farming (1011 – 1015)10/13 – 10/17/2019

Week 4 Musical Interlude (3) (1016 – 1020)10/20 – 10/24/2019

Week 5 Portraits of Painters (2) (1021 – 1025)10/27 – 10/31/2019

Week 6 The Conversation (1026 -1030)11/03 – 11/17/2019

Week 7 FUR (1031 – 1035) 11/10 – 11/14/2019

Week 8 Ham & Eggs (1036 – 1040)11/17 – 11/21/2019

Two Week Hiatus Thanksgiving Holidays

Week 9 Open – Odds & Ends (1041-1045)12/08 – 12/12/2019

Week 10 Reflections (1046 – 1050) 12/15 – 12/19/2019

 

Please think about joining in…it’s been a lot of fun over the years.

  

Prize for the 1st and 2nd place contestants is a DVD. From the Criterion Collection:

  

Abbas Kiarostami

24 Frames

For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging the two art forms to which he had dedicated his life. Setting out to reconstruct the moments immediately before and after a photograph is taken, Kiarostami selected twenty-four still images—most of them stark landscapes inhabited only by foraging birds and other wildlife—and digitally animated each one into its own subtly evolving four-and-a-half-minute vignette, creating a series of poignant studies in movement, perception, and time. A sustained meditation on the process of image making, 24 Frames is a graceful and elegiac farewell from one of the giants of world cinema.

 

Week 1 Bridges starts tomorrow at 8:00 PM Eastern Time, Sunday 9/29/2019. Above… we have been wandering through the back streets and alleys of Venice and finally approach the Rialto Bridge.

 

Identify the Artist XII:

 

Week 1 Bridges (1001 – 1005)09/29 – 10/3/2019

Week 2 Dogs (2) (1006 – 1010)10/06 – 10/10/2019

Week 3 Farming (1011 – 1015)10/13 – 10/17/2019

Week 4 Musical Interlude (3) (1016 – 1020)10/20 – 10/24/2019

Week 5 Portraits of Painters (2) (1021 – 1025)10/27 – 10/31/2019

Week 6 The Conversation (1026 -1030)11/03 – 11/17/2019

Week 7 FUR (1031 – 1035) 11/10 – 11/14/2019

Week 8 Ham & Eggs (1036 – 1040)11/17 – 11/21/2019

Two Week Hiatus Thanksgiving Holidays

Week 9 Open – Odds & Ends (1041-1045)12/08 – 12/12/2019

Week 10 Reflections (1046 – 1050) 12/15 – 12/19/2019

 

Top 10 contestants will receive an Art Postcard.

Prize for the 1st and 2nd place contestants is a DVD. From the Criterion Collection:

 

Abbas Kiarostami

24 Frames

For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging the two art forms to which he had dedicated his life. Setting out to reconstruct the moments immediately before and after a photograph is taken, Kiarostami selected twenty-four still images—most of them stark landscapes inhabited only by foraging birds and other wildlife—and digitally animated each one into its own subtly evolving four-and-a-half-minute vignette, creating a series of poignant studies in movement, perception, and time. A sustained meditation on the process of image making, 24 Frames is a graceful and elegiac farewell from one of the giants of world cinema.

 

The Rules of the Game:

 

Posting of a detail fragment of a work of art will take place sometime after 8:00 PM EST, five days a week (Sunday; Monday; Tuesday; Wednesday; Thursday. There are no IDs on Friday or Saturday)

Correct answers are allotted points in the following manner:

First correct respondent receives 6 points

Second: 5 points

third: 4 points

fourth: 3 points

fifth: 2 points

Each respondent after that receives 1 point, whether the artist named is correct or not.. 2 points will be awarded if there were not 5 awards.

Incorrect responses will be awarded at least one point (there is no penalty for guessing...actually encouraged). The opportunity to accrue points can only happen within a maximum of 24 hours. Once the full photograph of the work of Art is elevated and the artist identified, no additional scoring (for that work can occur). (In other words, regardless of pleas, points will not be awarded for a comment/ID made days after the posting). In addition, 15 guesses does not generate 15 points...only 1 point.

A favorite of the photograph will also garnish 1 point (only if nothing else is ventured by the participant,…1 point is not added to any other points awarded).

A summary of scores for the top five positions will be published each Sunday, at the beginning of each set of five photographs.

Caveats / Understanding:

Postings may be held up due to circumstances beyond my control.

Delays in posting may occur each evening. (sorry, no guarantee on 8:00 EST; however, through the years a certain consistency has been attained)

 

When posted, included with the fragment is the date of the artwork; the gender of the artist; the nationality of the artist; the location where the photograph was taken; and a link to the museum or location.

In addition, as most of you are aware, part of the clues for each identity is a “presence/absence” notation about whether the artist has been in a prior Identity Set. Because flickr’s new format doesn’t facilitate the reading of a long list of names in a “Set’s” overview/description, those lists are also available on request. If you send me an email address that can receive attachments, I will transmit an Windows based Excel sheet with the names of the artists and the number of their paintings/objects. Be sure to specify which format you would like: xlsx; xls; csv; txt – tab delimited – if you don’t specify the default is xlsx MS Office-10). ( non-windows participants should request txt).

 

Also, sorry for the bias the timing provides those in the Americas but no matter how I thought about it… I couldn’t come up with a plan to assist Europe; Africa; Asia and Australia

 

As you may well assume, this is “open book.” In addition use of phone apps such as Magnus; Shazam for Art; Smartify; Google Lens; etc.. is permitted if they actually help?

 

The Red and the Black… Mannequin in the window Downtown Corfu Town (Kerkyra) Corfu Greece.

 

Identify the Artist XII will return to this photo stream and begin on Sunday, September 29, 2019 and as usual run 10 weeks to the middle of December. There will be a two week hiatus at the end of November for the Thanksgiving holiday. Calendrical links are provided below.

 

Identify the Artist XII:

 

Week 1 Bridges (1001 – 1005) 09/29 – 10/3/2019

Week 2 Dogs (2) (1006 – 1010) 10/06 – 10/10/2019

Week 3 Farming (1011 – 1015) 10/13 – 10/17/2019

Week 4 Musical Interlude (3) (1016 – 1020) 10/20 – 10/24/2019

Week 5 Portraits of Painters (2) (1021 – 1025) 10/27 – 10/31/2019

Week 6 The Conversation (1026 -1030) 11/03 – 11/17/2019

Week 7 FUR (1031 – 1035) 11/10 – 11/14/2019

Week 8 Ham & Eggs (1036 – 1040) 11/17 – 11/21/2019

Two Week Hiatus Thanksgiving Holidays

Week 9 Open – Odds & Ends (1041-1045) 12/08 – 12/12/2019

Week 10 Reflections (1046 – 1050) 12/15 – 12/19/2019

 

Top 10 contestants will receive an Art Postcard.

Prize for the 1st and 2nd place contestants is a DVD. From the Criterion Collection:

 

Abbas Kiarostami

24 Frames

For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging the two art forms to which he had dedicated his life. Setting out to reconstruct the moments immediately before and after a photograph is taken, Kiarostami selected twenty-four still images—most of them stark landscapes inhabited only by foraging birds and other wildlife—and digitally animated each one into its own subtly evolving four-and-a-half-minute vignette, creating a series of poignant studies in movement, perception, and time. A sustained meditation on the process of image making, 24 Frames is a graceful and elegiac farewell from one of the giants of world cinema.

  

Identify the Artist XII will return to this photo stream and begin on Sunday, September 29, 2019 and as usual run 10 weeks to the middle of December. There will be a two week hiatus at the end of November for the Thanksgiving holiday. Calendrical links are provided below.

 

Identify the Artist XII:

 

Week 1 Bridges (1001 – 1005)09/29 – 10/3/2019

Week 2 Dogs (2) (1006 – 1010)10/06 – 10/10/2019

Week 3 Farming (1011 – 1015)10/13 – 10/17/2019

Week 4 Musical Interlude (3) (1016 – 1020)10/20 – 10/24/2019

Week 5 Portraits of Painters (2) (1021 – 1025)10/27 – 10/31/2019

Week 6 The Conversation (1026 -1030)11/03 – 11/17/2019

Week 7 FUR (1031 – 1035) 11/10 – 11/14/2019

Week 8 Ham & Eggs (1036 – 1040)11/17 – 11/21/2019

Two Week Hiatus Thanksgiving Holidays

Week 9 Open – Odds & Ends (1041-1045)12/08 – 12/12/2019

Week 10 Reflections (1046 – 1050) 12/15 – 12/19/2019

 

Rules and Prizes of this contest will be posted shortly…

Please think about joining in…it’s been a lot of fun over the years.

  

Prize for the 1st and 2nd place contestants is a DVD. From the Criterion Collection:

  

Abbas Kiarostami

24 Frames

 

In addition, the top 10 contestants will receive an Art Postcard (my selection).

 

(special thanks to contact Trish Mayo for contributing several of these cards in the photograph - Art postcards are always welcome)

  

Forest Without Leaves, by Abbas Kiarostami, who believes that we have lost the ability to look at nature in natural surroundings and that it is only when an item is 'framed' and placed in an artificial environment that we observe it with care and in detail.

 

An installation at Victoria and Albert Museum.

No matter how you look at it, we’re quickly descending these stairs and are very close to the ground floor:

 

Identify the Artist XII will return to this photo stream and begin on Sunday, September 29, 2019 (details of art photos being posted at 8:00 PM Eastern Time), ONLY two days from now. The game will run 10 weeks to the middle of December. There will be a two week hiatus at the end of November for the Thanksgiving holiday. Calendrical links are provided below.

.

It’s been fun over the years. Please consider joining in…

.

 

Identify the Artist XII:

 

Week 1 Bridges (1001 – 1005)09/29 – 10/3/2019

Week 2 Dogs (2) (1006 – 1010)10/06 – 10/10/2019

Week 3 Farming (1011 – 1015)10/13 – 10/17/2019

Week 4 Musical Interlude (3) (1016 – 1020)10/20 – 10/24/2019

Week 5 Portraits of Painters (2) (1021 – 1025)10/27 – 10/31/2019

Week 6 The Conversation (1026 -1030)11/03 – 11/17/2019

Week 7 FUR (1031 – 1035) 11/10 – 11/14/2019

Week 8 Ham & Eggs (1036 – 1040)11/17 – 11/21/2019

Two Week Hiatus Thanksgiving Holidays

Week 9 Open – Odds & Ends (1041-1045)12/08 – 12/12/2019

Week 10 Reflections (1046 – 1050) 12/15 – 12/19/2019

 

Top 10 contestants will receive an Art Postcard.

Prize for the 1st and 2nd place contestants is a DVD. From the Criterion Collection:

 

Abbas Kiarostami

24 Frames

For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging the two art forms to which he had dedicated his life. Setting out to reconstruct the moments immediately before and after a photograph is taken, Kiarostami selected twenty-four still images—most of them stark landscapes inhabited only by foraging birds and other wildlife—and digitally animated each one into its own subtly evolving four-and-a-half-minute vignette, creating a series of poignant studies in movement, perception, and time. A sustained meditation on the process of image making, 24 Frames is a graceful and elegiac farewell from one of the giants of world cinema.

 

The Rules of the Game:

 

Posting of a detail fragment of a work of art will take place sometime after 8:00 PM EST, five days a week (Sunday; Monday; Tuesday; Wednesday; Thursday. There are no IDs on Friday or Saturday)

Correct answers are allotted points in the following manner:

First correct respondent receives 6 points

Second: 5 points

third: 4 points

fourth: 3 points

fifth: 2 points

Each respondent after that receives 1 point, whether the artist named is correct or not.. 2 points will be awarded if there were not 5 awards.

Incorrect responses will be awarded at least one point (there is no penalty for guessing...actually encouraged). The opportunity to accrue points can only happen within a maximum of 24 hours. Once the full photograph of the work of Art is elevated and the artist identified, no additional scoring (for that work can occur). (In other words, regardless of pleas, points will not be awarded for a comment/ID made days after the posting). In addition, 15 guesses does not generate 15 points...only 1 point.

A favorite of the photograph will also garnish 1 point (only if nothing else is ventured by the participant,…1 point is not added to any other points awarded).

A summary of scores for the top five positions will be published each Sunday, at the beginning of each set of five photographs.

Caveats / Understanding:

Postings may be held up due to circumstances beyond my control.

Delays in posting may occur each evening. (sorry, no guarantee on 8:00 EST; however, through the years a certain consistency has been attained)

 

When posted, included with the fragment is the date of the artwork; the gender of the artist; the nationality of the artist; the location where the photograph was taken; and a link to the museum or location.

In addition, as most of you are aware, part of the clues for each identity is a “presence/absence” notation about whether the artist has been in a prior Identity Set. Because flickr’s new format doesn’t facilitate the reading of a long list of names in a “Set’s” overview/description, those lists are also available on request. If you send me an email address that can receive attachments, I will transmit an Windows based Excel sheet with the names of the artists and the number of their paintings/objects. Be sure to specify which format you would like: xlsx; xls; csv; txt – tab delimited – if you don’t specify the default is xlsx MS Office-10). ( non-windows participants should request txt).

 

Also, sorry for the bias the timing provides those in the Americas but no matter how I thought about it… I couldn’t come up with a plan to assist Europe; Africa; Asia and Australia

 

As you may well assume, this is “open book.” In addition use of phone apps such as Magnus; Shazam for Art; Smartify; Google Lens; etc.. is permitted if they actually help?

   

identifying Artists…after a 17 month delay, Identify the Artist XII will return to this photo stream and begin on Sunday, September 29, 2019 and as usual run 10 weeks to the middle of December. There will be a two week hiatus at the end of November for the Thanksgiving holiday. Calendrical links are provided below.

 

Identify the Artist XII:

 

Week 1 Bridges (1001 – 1005) 09/29 – 10/3/2019

Week 2 Dogs (2) (1006 – 1010) 10/06 – 10/10/2019

Week 3 Farming (1011 – 1015) 10/13 – 10/17/2019

Week 4 Musical Interlude (3) (1016 – 1020) 10/20 – 10/24/2019

Week 5 Portraits of Painters (2) (1021 – 1025) 10/27 – 10/31/2019

Week 6 The Conversation (1026 -1030) 11/03 – 11/17/2019

Week 7 FUR (1031 – 1035) 11/10 – 11/14/2019

Week 8 Ham & Eggs (1036 – 1040) 11/17 – 11/21/2019

Two Week Hiatus Thanksgiving Holidays

Week 9 Open – Odds & Ends (1041-1045) 12/08 – 12/12/2019

Week 10 Reflections (1046 – 1050) 12/15 – 12/19/2019

 

Rules of this contest will be posted shortly…

Please think about joining in…it’s been a lot of fun over the years.

 

The top ten (10) contestants will receive an art Postcard. Choice is mine...examples above. ( Was top 5 in the past, now top 10) In addition:

The Prize for the 1st and 2nd place contestants is a DVD. From the Criterion Collection:

 

Abbas Kiarostami

24 Frames

For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging the two art forms to which he had dedicated his life. Setting out to reconstruct the moments immediately before and after a photograph is taken, Kiarostami selected twenty-four still images—most of them stark landscapes inhabited only by foraging birds and other wildlife—and digitally animated each one into its own subtly evolving four-and-a-half-minute vignette, creating a series of poignant studies in movement, perception, and time. A sustained meditation on the process of image making, 24 Frames is a graceful and elegiac farewell from one of the giants of world cinema.

www.criterion.com/films/29399-24-frames

www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGUaTih2quw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=FNSlQ9mmJ4M

I've been tagged by kkzyk. so I try to tell 16 things...

  

[ 1 ] when I was a child, I was always drawing something and playing with LEGO and animal or monster figures etc. I didn't like dolls.

[ 2 ] ... and I was crying at midnight often, because I was afraid of "sleeping".

[ 3 ] I was in a band a few years ago. my hair was blond. I play the guitar and I love making various noises with effecters.

[ 4 ] I love 80's music. especially british new wave.

[ 5 ] I'm still in love with "trip-hop". I love massive attack and portishead.

[ 6 ] my favorite film directors are David Lynch, Mamoru Oshii, Patrice Leconte, Michel Ocelot, Abbas Kiarostami.

[ 7 ] my favorite actors are Ian McKellen, Peter Cushing, Harvey Keitel, Hideyo Amamoto, Chloe Sevigny.

[ 8 ] my favorite writers are M.Z.Bradley, J.R.R.Tolkien, Jonathan Carroll, Kobo Abe, Jean-Philippe Toussaint.

[ 9 ] I'm a graphic designer. I'm working at home. I love my job.

[ 10 ] I have 2 sisters. both of them are illustrators.

[ 11 ] I'm single. no children, of course.

[ 12 ] I like cigarettes. but I don't smoke too much.

[ 13 ] I love cooking. I always stock various spices(over 30).

[ 14 ] I don't eat meat because of my health.

[ 15 ] my current hobby is watching old b-movies... sci-fi, monster, horror etc. my santa claus gave me over 100 movies.

[ 16 ] I LOVE flickr and my flickr friends. thanks!

Swiss postcard by News Productions, Baulmes, no. 55126. Photo: Bettina Rheims / Musée de l'Elysée, Lausanne, Switzerland. Caption: Juliette Binoche au bas filé (Juliette Binoche at the bottom spun), Garches, 1988.

 

Last Saturday, 7 December 2019, French actress Juliette Binoche (1964) was honoured with the European Achievement in World Cinema award. Binoche has appeared in nearly 70 international films. She won numerous international awards, and has appeared on stage across the world. André Téchiné made her a star in France with the leading role in his drama Rendez-vous (1985). Her sensual performance in The Unbearable Lightness of Being (Philip Kaufman, 1988) launched her international career. Other career highlights are her roles in Three Colors: Blue (Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1993), The English Patient (Anthony Minghella, 1996), for which she won an Oscar, and Caché (Michael Haneke, 2005).

 

Juliette Binoche was born in Paris, in 1964. She was the daughter of Jean-Marie Binoche, a director, actor, and sculptor, and Monique Yvette Stalens, a teacher, director, and actress. She is the sister of actress/photographer Marion Stalens. Her parents divorced when she was four, so she grew up living between each parent and a Catholic boarding school. In her teenage years Juliette began acting at school in stage-productions. At 17 she directed and starred in a student production of the Eugène Ionesco play, Exit the King. She studied acting at the Conservatoire National Supérieur d'Art Dramatique (CNSAD), but quit after a short time as she disliked the curriculum. In the early 1980s, she found an agent through a friend and joined a theatre troupe, touring France, Belgium and Switzerland under the pseudonym Juliette Adrienne. After performing in several stage productions and a few TV productions, Binoche secured her first feature-film appearance with a minor role in the drama Liberty Belle (Pascal Kané, 1983). Her role required just two days on–set, but was enough to inspire Binoche to pursue a career in film. In 1983, she auditioned for the female lead in Jean-Luc Godard's' controversial Je vous salue, Marie/Hail Mary (1985), a modern retelling of the Virgin birth. She spent six months on the set of the film in Geneva, although her role in the final cut only contained a few scenes. She gained more significant exposure in Jacques Doillon's critically acclaimed La Vie de Famille/Family Life (1985), cast as the volatile teenage step-daughter of Sami Frey's central character. Director André Téchiné made her a star in France with the leading role in his provocative erotic drama Rendez-vous (1985). The film, co-starring Lambert Wilson and Jean-Louis Trintignant, premiered at the 1985 Cannes Film Festival, winning Best Director. Rendez-vous was a sensation and Binoche became the darling of the festival. In 1986, Binoche was nominated for her first César for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her performance. She starred opposite Michel Piccoli in the avant-garde thriller Mauvais Sang/Bad Blood (Leos Carax, 1986). Binoche plays Anna the vastly younger lover of Marc (Piccoli) who falls in love with Alex (Denis Lavant), a young thief. Mauvais Sang was a critical and commercial success, leading to Binoche's second César nomination. She gave a sensual performance opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in The Unbearable Lightness of Being (Philip Kaufman, 1988), the adaptation of Milan Kundera's novel. It was Binoche's first English language role and was a worldwide success with critics and audiences alike. In the summer of 1988, Binoche returned to the stage in an acclaimed production of Anton Chekhov's The Seagull directed by Russian director Andrei Konchalovsky at Théâtre De L'odéon in Paris. Later that year she began work on Léos Carax's Les Amants du Pont-Neuf. The film was beset by problems and took three years to complete, requiring investment from three producers and funds from the French government. When finally released in 1991, Les Amants du Pont-Neuf was a critical success. Binoche won a European Film Award and her third César nomination for her performance.

 

Juliette Binoche chose to pursue an international career outside France. Binoche relocated to London for the Emily Bronte adaptation Wuthering Heights (Peter Kosminsky, 1992) with Ralph Fiennes as Heathcliff, and Damage (Louis Malle, 1992) with Jeremy Irons, both enhanced her international reputation. For her performance in Damage, Binoche received her fourth César nomination. She sparked the interest of Steven Spielberg, who offered her roles in three films: Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), Jurassic Park (1993), and Schindler's List (1993). which she declined. Instead, she chose for Trois couleurs : Bleu/Three Colors: Blue (Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1993), for which she won the Venice Film Festival Award for Best Actress and a César. The first film in a trilogy inspired by the ideals of the French republic and the colors of its flag, Three Colors: Blue is the story of a young woman who loses her composer husband and daughter in a car accident. Though devastated she learns to cope by rejecting her previous life by rejecting all people, belongings and emotions. Binoche made cameo appearances in the other two films in Kieślowski's trilogy, Trois couleurs : Blanc/Three Colors: White (1994) and Three Colors: Red/ Trois couleurs : Rouge (1994). Binoche took a short sabbatical during which she gave birth to her son Raphaël in September 1993. In 1995, she returned to the screen in a big-budget adaptation of Jean Giono's Le hussard sur le toit/The Horseman on the Roof (Jean-Paul Rappeneau, 1995) with Olivier Martinez. At the time, it was the most expensive film in the history of French cinema. The film was a box-office success around the world and Binoche was again nominated for a César for Best Actress. She gained further acclaim in The English Patient (Anthony Minghella, 1996), for which she was awarded an Academy Award and a BAFTA for Best Supporting Actress in addition to the Best Actress Award at the 1997 Berlin International Film Festival. Juliette Binoche was reunited with director André Téchiné for Alice et Martin (1998), the story of a relationship between an emotionally damaged Parisian musician and her younger lover who hides a dark family secret. Binoche appeared on stage in a 1998 London production of Luigi Pirandello's Clothe the Naked retitled Naked and in a 2000 production of Harold Pinter's Betrayal on Broadway for which she was nominated for a Tony Award. Between 1995 and 2000, she was also the advertising face of the Lancôme perfume Poème.

 

Juliette Binoche was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance opposite Johnny Depp in the romantic comedy Chocolat (Lasse Hallström, 2000). Another hit was the period drama La Veuve de Saint-Pierre (Patrice Leconte, 2000), for which she was nominated for a César for Best Actress. Opposite Daniel Auteuil she played the role of a woman who attempts to save a condemned man from the guillotine. The film won favourable reviews, and was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film. Next she appeared in Code Unknown (Michael Haneke, 2000), a film which was made following Binoche's approach to the Austrian director. Her critically acclaimed role was a welcome change from playing the romantic heroine in a series of costume dramas. During the following decade, she maintained a successful career, alternating between French and English language roles in both mainstream and art-house productions. "La Binoche" appeared in such films as Jet Lag (Daniele Thompson, 2002) opposite Jean Reno, Caché (Michael Haneke, 2005), Breaking and Entering (Anthony Minghella, 2006) with Jude Law, and Flight of the Red Balloon (Hou Hsiao-Hsien, 2007). Paying homage to Albert Lamorisse's 1957 short The Red Balloon, Hou's film tells the story of a woman's efforts to juggle her responsibilities as a single mother with her commitment to her career as a voice artist. Shot on location in Paris, the film was entirely improvised by the cast. In 2008 Binoche began a world tour with a modern dance production titled in-i, co-created in collaboration with Akram Khan. In 2010, she won the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival for her role in Abbas Kiarostami's Certified Copy making her the first actress to win the European ‘Best Actress Triple Crown’ for winning best actress award at the Berlin, Cannes and Venice film festivals. Later films include Cosmopolis (David Cronenberg, 2011) with Robert Pattinson, Camille Claudel 1915 (Bruno Dumont, 2013) and Clouds of Sils Maria (Olivier Assayas, 2014). In 2015, Binoche starred on stage in a new English language translation of Antigone, directed by Ivo van Hove. Recently, she appeared in the Sc-Fi-film High Life (Claire Denis, 2018) with Robert Pattinson, in Celle que vous croyez/Who You Think I Am (Safy Nebbou, 2019) and played the daughter of Catherine Deneuve in La vérité/The Truth (Hirokazu Koreeda, 2019). Binoche has two children: a son Raphaël (1993), whose father is André Halle, a professional scuba diver, and a daughter Hana (1999), whose father is actor Benoît Magimel, with whom Binoche starred in Les Enfants du Siècle/Children of the Century (Diane Kurys, 1999).

 

Sources: Wikipedia, and IMDb.

 

And, please check out our blog European Film Star Postcards.

In visual arts, music, and other mediums, minimalism is an art movement that began in post–World War II Western art, most strongly with American visual arts in the 1960s and early 1970s. Prominent artists associated with minimalism include Donald Judd, John McCracken, Agnes Martin, Dan Flavin, Robert Morris, Anne Truitt, and Frank Stella.[1][2] It derives from the reductive aspects of modernism and is often interpreted as a reaction against abstract expressionism and a bridge to postminimal art practices.

 

Minimalism in music often features repetition and gradual variation, such as the works of La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich, Philip Glass, Julius Eastman, and John Adams. The term minimalist often colloquially refers to anything that is spare or stripped to its essentials. It has accordingly been used to describe the plays and novels of Samuel Beckett, the films of Robert Bresson, the stories of Raymond Carver, and the automobile designs of Colin Chapman.

  

Contents

1Minimal art, minimalism in visual art

2Minimalist design and architecture

3Minimalist architecture and space

3.1Concepts and design elements

3.2Influences from Japanese tradition

3.3Minimalist architects and their works

4Literary minimalism

5Minimal music

6Minimalism in film

7Lifestyle

8See also

9Footnotes

10References

11External links

Minimal art, minimalism in visual art[edit]

Main article: Minimalism (visual arts)

 

Kazimir Malevich, Black Square, 1915, oil on canvas, 79.5 x 79.5 cm, Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Minimalism in visual art, generally referred to as "minimal art", "literalist art"[3] and "ABC Art"[4] emerged in New York in the early 1960s as new and older artists moved toward geometric abstraction; exploring via painting in the cases of Frank Stella, Kenneth Noland, Al Held, Ellsworth Kelly, Robert Ryman and others; and sculpture in the works of various artists including David Smith, Anthony Caro, Tony Smith, Sol LeWitt, Carl Andre, Dan Flavin, Donald Judd and others. Judd's sculpture was showcased in 1964 at Green Gallery in Manhattan, as were Flavin's first fluorescent light works, while other leading Manhattan galleries like Leo Castelli Gallery and Pace Gallery also began to showcase artists focused on geometric abstraction. In addition there were two seminal and influential museum exhibitions: Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculpture shown from April 27 – June 12, 1966 at the Jewish Museum in New York, organized by the museum's Curator of Painting and Sculpture, Kynaston McShine[5][6] and Systemic Painting, at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum curated by Lawrence Alloway also in 1966 that showcased Geometric abstraction in the American art world via Shaped canvas, Color Field, and Hard-edge painting.[7][8] In the wake of those exhibitions and a few others the art movement called minimal art emerged.

 

In a more broad and general sense, one finds European roots of minimalism in the geometric abstractions of painters associated with the Bauhaus, in the works of Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian and other artists associated with the De Stijl movement, and the Russian Constructivist movement, and in the work of the Romanian sculptor Constantin Brâncuși.[9][10]

  

Tony Smith, Free Ride, 1962, 6'8 x 6'8 x 6'8

In France between 1947 and 1948,[11] Yves Klein conceived his Monotone Symphony (1949, formally The Monotone-Silence Symphony) that consisted of a single 20-minute sustained chord followed by a 20-minute silence[12][13] – a precedent to both La Monte Young's drone music and John Cage's 4′33″. Klein had painted monochromes as early as 1949, and held the first private exhibition of this work in 1950—but his first public showing was the publication of the Artist's book Yves: Peintures in November 1954.[14][15]

 

Minimal art is also inspired in part by the paintings of Barnett Newman, Ad Reinhardt, Josef Albers, and the works of artists as diverse as Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Giorgio Morandi, and others. Minimalism was also a reaction against the painterly subjectivity of Abstract Expressionism that had been dominant in the New York School during the 1940s and 1950s.[16]

 

Artist and critic Thomas Lawson noted in his 1981 Artforum essay Last Exit: Painting, minimalism did not reject Clement Greenberg's claims about modernist painting's[17] reduction to surface and materials so much as take his claims literally. According to Lawson, minimalism was the result, even though the term "minimalism" was not generally embraced by the artists associated with it, and many practitioners of art designated minimalist by critics did not identify it as a movement as such. Also taking exception to this claim was Clement Greenberg himself; in his 1978 postscript to his essay Modernist Painting he disavowed this interpretation of what he said, writing:

 

There have been some further constructions of what I wrote that go over into preposterousness: That I regard flatness and the inclosing of flatness not just as the limiting conditions of pictorial art, but as criteria of aesthetic quality in pictorial art; that the further a work advances the self-definition of an art, the better that work is bound to be. The philosopher or art historian who can envision me—or anyone at all—arriving at aesthetic judgments in this way reads shockingly more into himself or herself than into my article.[17]

 

In contrast to the previous decade's more subjective Abstract Expressionists, with the exceptions of Barnett Newman and Ad Reinhardt; minimalists were also influenced by composers John Cage and LaMonte Young, poet William Carlos Williams, and the landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. They very explicitly stated that their art was not about self-expression, and unlike the previous decade's more subjective philosophy about art making theirs was 'objective'. In general, minimalism's features included geometric, often cubic forms purged of much metaphor, equality of parts, repetition, neutral surfaces, and industrial materials.

 

Robert Morris, a theorist and artist, wrote a three part essay, "Notes on Sculpture 1–3", originally published across three issues of Artforum in 1966. In these essays, Morris attempted to define a conceptual framework and formal elements for himself and one that would embrace the practices of his contemporaries. These essays paid great attention to the idea of the gestalt – "parts... bound together in such a way that they create a maximum resistance to perceptual separation." Morris later described an art represented by a "marked lateral spread and no regularized units or symmetrical intervals..." in "Notes on Sculpture 4: Beyond Objects", originally published in Artforum, 1969, continuing on to say that "indeterminacy of arrangement of parts is a literal aspect of the physical existence of the thing." The general shift in theory of which this essay is an expression suggests the transition into what would later be referred to as postminimalism.

 

One of the first artists specifically associated with minimalism was the painter Frank Stella, four of whose early "black paintings" were included in the 1959 show, 16 Americans, organized by Dorothy Miller at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The width of the stripes in Frank Stellas's black paintings were often determined by the dimensions of the lumber he used for stretchers to support the canvas, visible against the canvas as the depth of the painting when viewed from the side. Stella's decisions about structures on the front surface of the canvas were therefore not entirely subjective, but pre-conditioned by a "given" feature of the physical construction of the support. In the show catalog, Carl Andre noted, "Art excludes the unnecessary. Frank Stella has found it necessary to paint stripes. There is nothing else in his painting." These reductive works were in sharp contrast to the energy-filled and apparently highly subjective and emotionally charged paintings of Willem de Kooning or Franz Kline and, in terms of precedent among the previous generation of abstract expressionists, leaned more toward the less gestural, often somber, color field paintings of Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko. Stella received immediate attention from the MoMA show, but other artists—including Kenneth Noland, Gene Davis, Robert Motherwell, and Robert Ryman—had also begun to explore stripes, monochromatic and Hard-edge formats from the late 50s through the 1960s.[18]

 

Because of a tendency in minimal art to exclude the pictorial, illusionistic and fictive in favor of the literal, there was a movement away from painterly and toward sculptural concerns. Donald Judd had started as a painter, and ended as a creator of objects. His seminal essay, "Specific Objects" (published in Arts Yearbook 8, 1965), was a touchstone of theory for the formation of minimalist aesthetics. In this essay, Judd found a starting point for a new territory for American art, and a simultaneous rejection of residual inherited European artistic values. He pointed to evidence of this development in the works of an array of artists active in New York at the time, including Jasper Johns, Dan Flavin and Lee Bontecou. Of "preliminary" importance for Judd was the work of George Earl Ortman,[19] who had concretized and distilled painting's forms into blunt, tough, philosophically charged geometries. These Specific Objects inhabited a space not then comfortably classifiable as either painting or sculpture. That the categorical identity of such objects was itself in question, and that they avoided easy association with well-worn and over-familiar conventions, was a part of their value for Judd.

 

This movement was criticized by modernist formalist art critics and historians. Some critics thought minimal art represented a misunderstanding of the modern dialectic of painting and sculpture as defined by critic Clement Greenberg, arguably the dominant American critic of painting in the period leading up to the 1960s. The most notable critique of minimalism was produced by Michael Fried, a formalist critic, who objected to the work on the basis of its "theatricality". In Art and Objecthood (published in Artforum in June 1967) he declared that the minimal work of art, particularly minimal sculpture, was based on an engagement with the physicality of the spectator. He argued that work like Robert Morris's transformed the act of viewing into a type of spectacle, in which the artifice of the act observation and the viewer's participation in the work were unveiled. Fried saw this displacement of the viewer's experience from an aesthetic engagement within, to an event outside of the artwork as a failure of minimal art. Fried's essay was immediately challenged by postminimalist and earth artist Robert Smithson in a letter to the editor in the October issue of Artforum. Smithson stated the following: "What Fried fears most is the consciousness of what he is doing—namely being himself theatrical."

 

In addition to the already mentioned Robert Morris, Frank Stella, Carl Andre, Robert Ryman and Donald Judd other minimal artists include: Robert Mangold, Larry Bell, Dan Flavin, Sol LeWitt, Charles Hinman, Ronald Bladen, Paul Mogensen, Ronald Davis, David Novros, Brice Marden, Blinky Palermo, Agnes Martin, Jo Baer, John McCracken, Ad Reinhardt, Fred Sandback, Richard Serra, Tony Smith, Patricia Johanson, and Anne Truitt.

 

Ad Reinhardt, actually an artist of the Abstract Expressionist generation, but one whose reductive nearly all-black paintings seemed to anticipate minimalism, had this to say about the value of a reductive approach to art:

 

The more stuff in it, the busier the work of art, the worse it is. More is less. Less is more. The eye is a menace to clear sight. The laying bare of oneself is obscene. Art begins with the getting rid of nature.[20]

 

Reinhardt's remark directly addresses and contradicts Hans Hofmann's regard for nature as the source of his own abstract expressionist paintings. In a famous exchange between Hofmann and Jackson Pollock as told by Lee Krasner in an interview with Dorothy Strickler[21] (1964-11-02) for the Smithsonian Institution Archives of American Art.[22] In Krasner's words:

 

When I brought Hofmann up to meet Pollock and see his work which was before we moved here, Hofmann’s reaction was—one of the questions he asked Jackson was, "Do you work from nature?" There were no still lifes around or models around and Jackson’s answer was, "I am nature." And Hofmann’s reply was, "Ah, but if you work by heart, you will repeat yourself." To which Jackson did not reply at all. The meeting between Pollock and Hofmann took place in 1942.[22]

 

Minimalist design and architecture[edit]

 

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The reconstruction of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe's German Pavilion in Barcelona

The term minimalism is also used to describe a trend in design and architecture, wherein the subject is reduced to its necessary elements.[citation needed] Minimalist architectural designers focus on the connection between two perfect planes, elegant lighting, and the void spaces left by the removal of three-dimensional shapes in an architectural design.[according to whom?][citation needed]

 

Minimalistic design has been highly influenced by Japanese traditional design and architecture.[citation needed] The works of De Stijl artists are a major reference: De Stijl expanded the ideas of expression by meticulously organizing basic elements such as lines and planes.[citation needed] With regard to home design, more attractive "minimalistic" designs are not truly minimalistic because they are larger, and use more expensive building materials and finishes.[citation needed]

 

There are observers who describe the emergence of minimalism as a response to the brashness and chaos of urban life. In Japan, for example, minimalist architecture began to gain traction in the 1980s when its cities experienced rapid expansion and booming population. The design was considered an antidote to the "overpowering presence of traffic, advertising, jumbled building scales, and imposing roadways."[23] The chaotic environment was not only driven by urbanization, industrialization, and technology but also the Japanese experience of constantly having to demolish structures on account of the destruction wrought by World War II and the earthquakes, including the calamities it entails such as fire. The minimalist design philosophy did not arrive in Japan by way of another country as it was already part of the Japanese culture rooted on the Zen philosophy. There are those who specifically attribute the design movement to Japan's spirituality and view of nature.[24]

 

Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886–1969) adopted the motto "Less is more" to describe his aesthetic.[25] His tactic was one of arranging the necessary components of a building to create an impression of extreme simplicity—he enlisted every element and detail to serve multiple visual and functional purposes; for example, designing a floor to also serve as the radiator, or a massive fireplace to also house the bathroom. Designer Buckminster Fuller (1895–1983) adopted the engineer's goal of "Doing more with less", but his concerns were oriented toward technology and engineering rather than aesthetics.[26]

 

Luis Barragán is an exemplary modern minimalist designer.[according to whom?][citation needed] Other contemporary minimalist architects include Kazuyo Sejima, John Pawson, Eduardo Souto de Moura, Álvaro Siza Vieira, Tadao Ando, Alberto Campo Baeza, Yoshio Taniguchi, Peter Zumthor, Hugh Newell Jacobsen, Vincent Van Duysen, Claudio Silvestrin, Michael Gabellini, and Richard Gluckman.[27][page needed][verification needed]

 

Minimalist architecture and space[edit]

Minimalist architecture became popular in the late 1980s in London and New York,[28] where architects and fashion designers worked together in the boutiques to achieve simplicity, using white elements, cold lighting, large space with minimum objects and furniture.

 

Concepts and design elements[edit]

The concept of minimalist architecture is to strip everything down to its essential quality and achieve simplicity.[29] The idea is not completely without ornamentation,[30] but that all parts, details, and joinery are considered as reduced to a stage where no one can remove anything further to improve the design.[31]

 

The considerations for ‘essences’ are light, form, detail of material, space, place, and human condition.[32] Minimalist architects not only consider the physical qualities of the building. They consider the spiritual dimension and the invisible, by listening to the figure and paying attention to details, people, space, nature, and materials.,[33] believing this reveals the abstract quality of something that is invisible and aids the search for the essence of those invisible qualities—such as natural light, sky, earth, and air. In addition, they "open a dialogue" with the surrounding environment to decide the most essential materials for the construction and create relationships between buildings and sites.[30]

 

In minimalist architecture, design elements strive to convey the message of simplicity. The basic geometric forms, elements without decoration, simple materials and the repetitions of structures represent a sense of order and essential quality.[34] The movement of natural light in buildings reveals simple and clean spaces.[32] In the late 19th century as the arts and crafts movement became popular in Britain, people valued the attitude of ‘truth to materials’ with respect to the profound and innate characteristics of materials.[35] Minimalist architects humbly 'listen to figure,' seeking essence and simplicity by rediscovering the valuable qualities in simple and common materials.[33]

 

Influences from Japanese tradition[edit]

See also: Japanese architecture

 

Ryōan-ji dry garden.The clay wall, which is stained by age with subtle brown and orange tones, reflects "wabi" and the rock garden "sabi", together reflecting the Japanese worldview or aesthetic of "wabi-sabi".[36]

The idea of simplicity appears in many cultures, especially the Japanese traditional culture of Zen Philosophy. Japanese manipulate the Zen culture into aesthetic and design elements for their buildings.[37] This idea of architecture has influenced Western Society, especially in America since the mid 18th century.[38] Moreover, it inspired the minimalist architecture in the 19th century.[31]

 

Zen concepts of simplicity transmit the ideas of freedom and essence of living.[31] Simplicity is not only aesthetic value, it has a moral perception that looks into the nature of truth and reveals the inner qualities and essence of materials and objects.[39] For example, the sand garden in Ryoanji temple demonstrates the concepts of simplicity and the essentiality from the considered setting of a few stones and a huge empty space.[40]

 

The Japanese aesthetic principle of Ma refers to empty or open space. It removes all the unnecessary internal walls and opens up the space. The emptiness of spatial arrangement reduces everything down to the most essential quality.[41]

 

The Japanese aesthetic of Wabi-sabi values the quality of simple and plain objects.[42] It appreciates the absence of unnecessary features, treasures a life in quietness and aims to reveal the innate character of materials.[43] For example, the Japanese floral art, also known as Ikebana, has the central principle of letting the flower express itself. People cut off the branches, leaves and blossoms from the plants and only retain the essential part of the plant. This conveys the idea of essential quality and innate character in nature.[44]

 

However, far from being just a spatial concept, Ma is ever-present in all aspects of Japanese daily life, as it applies to time as well as to daily tasks.[45]

 

Minimalist architects and their works[edit]

The Japanese minimalist architect, Tadao Ando conveys the Japanese traditional spirit and his own perception of nature in his works. His design concepts are materials, pure geometry and nature. He normally uses concrete or natural wood and basic structural form to achieve austerity and rays of light in space. He also sets up dialogue between the site and nature to create relationship and order with the buildings.[46] Ando's works and the translation of Japanese aesthetic principles are highly influential on Japanese architecture.[47]

 

Another Japanese minimalist architect, Kazuyo Sejima, works on her own and in conjunction with Ryue Nishizawa, as SANAA, producing iconic Japanese Minimalist buildings. Credited with creating and influencing a particular genre of Japanese Minimalism,[48] Sejimas delicate, intelligent designs may use white color, thin construction sections and transparent elements to create the phenomenal building type often associated with minimalism. Works include New Museum(2010) New York City, Small House (2000) Tokyo, House surrounded By Plum Trees (2003) Tokyo.

 

In Vitra Conference Pavilion, Weil am Rhein, 1993, the concepts are to bring together the relationships between building, human movement, site and nature. Which as one main point of minimalism ideology that establish dialogue between the building and site. The building uses the simple forms of circle and rectangle to contrast the filled and void space of the interior and nature. In the foyer, there is a large landscape window that looks out to the exterior. This achieves the simple and silence of architecture and enhances the light, wind, time and nature in space.[49]

 

John Pawson is a British minimalist architect; his design concepts are soul, light, and order. He believes that though reduced clutter and simplification of the interior to a point that gets beyond the idea of essential quality, there is a sense of clarity and richness of simplicity instead of emptiness. The materials in his design reveal the perception toward space, surface, and volume. Moreover, he likes to use natural materials because of their aliveness, sense of depth and quality of an individual. He is also attracted by the important influences from Japanese Zen Philosophy.[50]

 

Calvin Klein Madison Avenue, New York, 1995–96, is a boutique that conveys Calvin Klein's ideas of fashion. John Pawson's interior design concepts for this project are to create simple, peaceful and orderly spatial arrangements. He used stone floors and white walls to achieve simplicity and harmony for space. He also emphasises reduction and eliminates the visual distortions, such as the air conditioning and lamps to achieve a sense of purity for interior.[51]

 

Alberto Campo Baeza is a Spanish architect and describes his work as essential architecture. He values the concepts of light, idea and space. Light is essential and achieves the relationship between inhabitants and the building. Ideas are to meet the function and context of space, forms, and construction. Space is shaped by the minimal geometric forms to avoid decoration that is not essential.[52]

 

Gasper House, Zahora, 1992 is a residence that the client wanted to be independent. High walls create the enclosed space and the stone floors used in house and courtyard show the continuality of interior and exterior. The white colour of the walls reveals the simplicity and unity of the building. The feature of the structure make lines to form the continuously horizontal house, therefore natural light projects horizontally through the building.[53]

 

Literary minimalism[edit]

See also: Concision

Literary minimalism is characterized by an economy with words and a focus on surface description. Minimalist writers eschew adverbs and prefer allowing context to dictate meaning. Readers are expected to take an active role in creating the story, to "choose sides" based on oblique hints and innuendo, rather than react to directions from the writer.

 

Some 1940s-era crime fiction of writers such as James M. Cain and Jim Thompson adopted a stripped-down, matter-of-fact prose style to considerable effect; some classify this prose style as minimalism.[weasel words]

 

Another strand of literary minimalism arose in response to the metafiction trend of the 1960s and early 1970s (John Barth, Robert Coover, and William H. Gass). These writers were also spare with prose and kept a psychological distance from their subject matter.[citation needed]

 

Minimalist writers, or those who are identified with minimalism during certain periods of their writing careers, include the following: Raymond Carver, Ann Beattie, Bret Easton Ellis, Charles Bukowski, Ernest Hemingway, K. J. Stevens, Amy Hempel, Bobbie Ann Mason, Tobias Wolff, Grace Paley, Sandra Cisneros, Mary Robison, Frederick Barthelme, Richard Ford, Patrick Holland, Cormac McCarthy, and Alicia Erian.[citation needed]

 

American poets such as Stephen Crane, William Carlos Williams, early Ezra Pound, Robert Creeley, Robert Grenier, and Aram Saroyan are sometimes identified with their minimalist style. The term "minimalism" is also sometimes associated with the briefest of poetic genres, haiku, which originated in Japan, but has been domesticated in English literature by poets such as Nick Virgilio, Raymond Roseliep, and George Swede.[citation needed]

 

The Irish writer Samuel Beckett is well known for his minimalist plays and prose, as is the Norwegian writer Jon Fosse.[54]

 

In his novel The Easy Chain, Evan Dara includes a 60-page section written in the style of musical minimalism, in particular inspired by composer Steve Reich. Intending to represent the psychological state (agitation) of the novel's main character, the section's successive lines of text are built on repetitive and developing phrases.[citation needed]

 

Minimal music[edit]

Main article: Minimal music

The term "minimal music" was derived around 1970 by Michael Nyman from the concept of minimalism, which was earlier applied to the visual arts.[55][56] More precisely, it was in a 1968 review in The Spectator that Nyman first used the term, to describe a ten-minute piano composition by the Danish composer Henning Christiansen, along with several other unnamed pieces played by Charlotte Moorman and Nam June Paik at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London.[57]

 

Minimalism in film[edit]

The term usually is associated with filmmakers such as Robert Bresson, Carl Theodor Dreyer and Yasujirō Ozu. Their films typically tell a simple story with straight forward camera usage and minimal use of score. Paul Schrader named their kind of cinema: "transcendental cinema".[58] Abbas Kiarostami is also considered a creator of minimalistic films.

 

Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus directed and produced a movie called Minimalism: A Documentary.[59] that showcased the idea of minimal living in the modern world.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minimalism

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).

 

January

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian television actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3

Don Francks, Canadian actor, musician and singer (b. 1932)

Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress, author, and philanthropist (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress, cabaret performer, underground cartoonist, and activist (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

Rod Temperton, English songwriter, record producer and musician (b. 1949)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi

New English words[edit]

utility token[56]

See also[edit]

List of international years

References[edit]

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^ "2016 to be the International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU)". Archived from the original on January 5, 2016. Retrieved January 7, 2016.

^ AFP news agency [@AFP] (January 3, 2016). "#BREAKING Saudi Arabia severs ties with Iran, foreign minister says" (Tweet) – via Twitter.

^ "'El Chapo': Sean Penn interviewed Guzman before recapture". BBC News. January 10, 2016. Archived from the original on January 10, 2016. Retrieved January 10, 2016.

^ "Iran nuclear deal: 'New chapter' for Tehran as sanctions end". BBC. January 17, 2016. Archived from the original on January 17, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016.

^ "Shih Ming-te fails to meet threshold, ends candidacy". taipeitimes.com.

^ Botelho, Greg (January 28, 2016). "Zika virus spreading explosively". CNN. Archived from the original on January 28, 2016. Retrieved January 28, 2016.

^ "North Korea fires long-range rocket despite warnings". BBC News. February 7, 2016. Archived from the original on February 10, 2016. Retrieved February 12, 2016.

^ "Unity call as Pope Francis holds historic talks with Russian Orthodox Patriarch". BBC. February 13, 2016. Archived from the original on February 12, 2016. Retrieved February 14, 2016.

^ "ESA - Robotic Exploration of Mars: ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO)". Retrieved February 15, 2015.

^ Bowcott, Owen (March 21, 2016). "Congo politician guilty in first ICC trial to focus on rape as a war crime". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on March 25, 2016. Retrieved March 26, 2016.

^ "The Last Time an American President Visited Cuba". ABC News. March 22, 2016. Archived from the original on July 3, 2017. Retrieved June 24, 2017.

^ "Radovan Karadzic jailed for Bosnia war Srebrenica genocide". BBC News. March 24, 2016. Archived from the original on March 24, 2016. Retrieved March 24, 2016.

^ "Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict Situation Report No. 1 (as of 03 Apr 2016)". ReliefWeb. April 3, 2016. Archived from the original on April 4, 2016. Retrieved April 4, 2016.

^ Vasilyeva, Natalya; Anderson, Mae (April 3, 2016). "News Group Claims Huge Trove of Data on Offshore Accounts". The New York Times. Associated Press. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 4, 2016.

^ "EgyptAir flight MS804 from Paris to Cairo crashed - Hollande". BBC News. May 19, 2016. Archived from the original on May 19, 2016. Retrieved May 19, 2016.

^ "Taiwan gets first female President as DPP sweeps election". Channel NewsAsia. Retrieved January 16, 2016.

^ Maclean, Ruth (May 30, 2016). "Chad's Hissène Habré found guilty of crimes against humanity". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on May 31, 2016. Retrieved May 31, 2016.

^ "Gotthard tunnel: World's longest and deepest rail tunnel opens in Switzerland". BBC News. June 1, 2016. Archived from the original on June 1, 2016. Retrieved June 1, 2016.

^ "Euro 2016 Begins". The Independent. June 10, 2016. Retrieved June 4, 2018.

^ "USA TODAY". USA TODAY. Retrieved June 15, 2018.

^ Erlanger, Steven (June 23, 2016). "Britain Votes to Leave the European Union". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved June 24, 2016.

^ "Istanbul Ataturk airport attack: 41 dead and more than 230 hurt". BBC News. June 29, 2016. Archived from the original on May 18, 2017. Retrieved May 1, 2017.

^ "Latvia's accession to the OECD". OECD. July 1, 2016. Archived from the original on July 21, 2016. Retrieved July 22, 2016.

^ "Election 2016: LNP retains Capricornia, gives Coalition 76-seat majority government". ABC News. Australia. July 11, 2016.

^ "2016 Federal Election". Archived from the original on February 26, 2018.

^ Amos, Jonathan (July 5, 2016). "Juno probe enters into orbit around Jupiter". BBC News. Archived from the original on July 5, 2016. Retrieved July 5, 2016.

^ Swatman, Rachel (August 10, 2016). "Pokémon Go catches five new world records". Archived from the original on August 18, 2016. Retrieved January 19, 2018.

^ Phillips, Tom; Holmes, Oliver; Bowcott, Owen (July 12, 2016). "Beijing rejects tribunal's ruling in South China Sea case". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on July 12, 2016. Retrieved July 13, 2016.

^ Perlez, Jane (July 12, 2016). "Tribunal Rejects Beijing's Claims in South China Sea". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on July 12, 2016. Retrieved July 13, 2016.

^ Wesel, Barbara (July 3, 2017). "France remembers Nice terror attack victims but questions remain". DW. Archived from the original on January 20, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018.

^ "Turkey's failed coup attempt: All you need to know". Al Jazeera. July 15, 2017. Archived from the original on August 16, 2017.

^ Overly, Steven (July 22, 2016). "The VCR is officially dead. Yes, it was still alive". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on October 17, 2016. Retrieved September 25, 2016.

^ "Solar Impulse completes historic round-the-world trip". BBC News. July 26, 2016. Archived from the original on July 26, 2016. Retrieved July 26, 2016.

^ "Rio 2016 Olympic Games". Archived from the original on February 24, 2015. Retrieved February 25, 2015.

^ "Brazil impeachment: Key questions". BBC News. August 31, 2016. Archived from the original on August 31, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016.

^ "Paris climate deal: US and China announce ratification". BBC News. September 3, 2016. Archived from the original on September 3, 2016. Retrieved September 3, 2016.

^ "NASA's OSIRIS-REx Speeds Toward Asteroid Rendezvous". NASA. September 8, 2016. Archived from the original on September 9, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016.

^ Amos, Jonathan (September 9, 2016). "Asteroid probe begins seven-year quest". BBC News. Archived from the original on September 9, 2016.

^ Hunt, Katie; Kwon, K.J.; Hanna, Jason (September 9, 2016). "North Korea claims successful test of nuclear warhead". CNN. Archived from the original on September 9, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016.

^ "JIT: Flight MH17 was shot down by a BUK missile from a farmland near Pervomaiskyi". Openbaar Ministerie. September 28, 2016. Archived from the original on October 14, 2016. Retrieved October 13, 2016.

^ Kahn, Brian (September 28, 2016). "The world passes 400ppm carbon dioxide threshold. Permanently". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on October 23, 2016. Retrieved October 31, 2016.

^ "Greenhouse gas level highest in two million years, NOAA reports". Phys.org. May 10, 2013. Archived from the original on November 4, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2016.

^ "Van Gogh paintings stolen from Amsterdam found in Italy". BBC News. September 30, 2016. Archived from the original on July 7, 2017. Retrieved May 1, 2017.

^ "The Maldives decides to leave the Commonwealth; commits to continue with its international engagement". Maldivian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. October 13, 2016. Archived from the original on October 14, 2016.

^ McGrath, Matt (October 15, 2016). "Climate change: 'Monumental' deal to cut HFCs, fastest growing greenhouse gases". BBC News. Archived from the original on October 15, 2016. Retrieved October 15, 2016.

^ "Cubs End 108-Year Wait for World Series Title, After a Little More Torment". The New York Times. November 3, 2016. Archived from the original on October 7, 2017. Retrieved October 24, 2017.

^ Flegenheimer, Matt; Barbaro, Michael (November 9, 2016). "Donald Trump Is Elected President in Stunning Repudiation of the Establishment". N.Y. Times. Archived from the original on January 21, 2017. Retrieved October 13, 2017.

^ "Protesters take to streets to denounce Marcos 'Libingan' burial".

^ "AFP: We only followed Marcoses' wish to keep burial secret".

^ "Colombia signs new peace deal with Farc". BBC News. November 24, 2016. Archived from the original on December 28, 2016. Retrieved January 15, 2017.

^ "Russian ambassador to Turkey Andrei Karlov shot dead in Ankara". BBC news. December 19, 2016. Archived from the original on December 21, 2016.

^ Berlinger, Joshua (December 23, 2016). "Ebola vaccine gives 100% protection, study finds". CNN. Archived from the original on December 27, 2016. Retrieved January 2, 2017.

^ "Israeli settlements: UN Security Council calls for an end". BBC News. December 23, 2016. Archived from the original on December 26, 2016. Retrieved December 27, 2016.

^ "Russian military plane crashes in Black Sea near Sochi". BBC News. December 25, 2016. Retrieved June 9, 2019.

^ "Time Traveler by Merriam-Webster: Words from 2016". merriam-webster.com. Archived from the original on May 4, 2018.

No matter how you look at it, we’re quickly descending these stairs and are very close to the ground floor:

 

Identify the Artist XII will return to this photo stream and begin on Sunday, September 29, 2019 (details of art photos being posted at 8:00 PM Eastern Time), ONLY two days from now. The game will run 10 weeks to the middle of December. There will be a two week hiatus at the end of November for the Thanksgiving holiday. Calendrical links are provided below.

.

It’s been fun over the years. Please consider joining in…

.

 

Identify the Artist XII:

 

Week 1 Bridges (1001 – 1005)09/29 – 10/3/2019

Week 2 Dogs (2) (1006 – 1010)10/06 – 10/10/2019

Week 3 Farming (1011 – 1015)10/13 – 10/17/2019

Week 4 Musical Interlude (3) (1016 – 1020)10/20 – 10/24/2019

Week 5 Portraits of Painters (2) (1021 – 1025)10/27 – 10/31/2019

Week 6 The Conversation (1026 -1030)11/03 – 11/17/2019

Week 7 FUR (1031 – 1035) 11/10 – 11/14/2019

Week 8 Ham & Eggs (1036 – 1040)11/17 – 11/21/2019

Two Week Hiatus Thanksgiving Holidays

Week 9 Open – Odds & Ends (1041-1045)12/08 – 12/12/2019

Week 10 Reflections (1046 – 1050) 12/15 – 12/19/2019

 

Top 10 contestants will receive an Art Postcard.

Prize for the 1st and 2nd place contestants is a DVD. From the Criterion Collection:

 

Abbas Kiarostami

24 Frames

For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging the two art forms to which he had dedicated his life. Setting out to reconstruct the moments immediately before and after a photograph is taken, Kiarostami selected twenty-four still images—most of them stark landscapes inhabited only by foraging birds and other wildlife—and digitally animated each one into its own subtly evolving four-and-a-half-minute vignette, creating a series of poignant studies in movement, perception, and time. A sustained meditation on the process of image making, 24 Frames is a graceful and elegiac farewell from one of the giants of world cinema.

 

The Rules of the Game:

 

Posting of a detail fragment of a work of art will take place sometime after 8:00 PM EST, five days a week (Sunday; Monday; Tuesday; Wednesday; Thursday. There are no IDs on Friday or Saturday)

Correct answers are allotted points in the following manner:

First correct respondent receives 6 points

Second: 5 points

third: 4 points

fourth: 3 points

fifth: 2 points

Each respondent after that receives 1 point, whether the artist named is correct or not.. 2 points will be awarded if there were not 5 awards.

Incorrect responses will be awarded at least one point (there is no penalty for guessing...actually encouraged). The opportunity to accrue points can only happen within a maximum of 24 hours. Once the full photograph of the work of Art is elevated and the artist identified, no additional scoring (for that work can occur). (In other words, regardless of pleas, points will not be awarded for a comment/ID made days after the posting). In addition, 15 guesses does not generate 15 points...only 1 point.

A favorite of the photograph will also garnish 1 point (only if nothing else is ventured by the participant,…1 point is not added to any other points awarded).

A summary of scores for the top five positions will be published each Sunday, at the beginning of each set of five photographs.

Caveats / Understanding:

Postings may be held up due to circumstances beyond my control.

Delays in posting may occur each evening. (sorry, no guarantee on 8:00 EST; however, through the years a certain consistency has been attained)

 

When posted, included with the fragment is the date of the artwork; the gender of the artist; the nationality of the artist; the location where the photograph was taken; and a link to the museum or location.

In addition, as most of you are aware, part of the clues for each identity is a “presence/absence” notation about whether the artist has been in a prior Identity Set. Because flickr’s new format doesn’t facilitate the reading of a long list of names in a “Set’s” overview/description, those lists are also available on request. If you send me an email address that can receive attachments, I will transmit an Windows based Excel sheet with the names of the artists and the number of their paintings/objects. Be sure to specify which format you would like: xlsx; xls; csv; txt – tab delimited – if you don’t specify the default is xlsx MS Office-10). ( non-windows participants should request txt).

 

Also, sorry for the bias the timing provides those in the Americas but no matter how I thought about it… I couldn’t come up with a plan to assist Europe; Africa; Asia and Australia

 

As you may well assume, this is “open book.” In addition use of phone apps such as Magnus; Shazam for Art; Smartify; Google Lens; etc.. is permitted if they actually help?

   

identifying Artists…after a 17 month delay, Identify the Artist XII will return to this photo stream on Sunday, September 29, 2019 and as usual run 10 weeks to the middle of December. There will be a two week hiatus at the end of November for the Thanksgiving holiday. Calendrical links are provided below.

 

Identify the Artist XII:

 

Week 1 Bridges (1001 – 1005) 09/29 – 10/3/2019

Week 2 Dogs (2) (1006 – 1010) 10/06 – 10/10/2019

Week 3 Farming (1011 – 1015) 10/13 – 10/17/2019

Week 4 Musical Interlude (3) (1016 – 1020) 10/20 – 10/24/2019

Week 5 Portraits of Painters (2) (1021 – 1025) 10/27 – 10/31/2019

Week 6 The Conversation (1026 -1030) 11/03 – 11/17/2019

Week 7 FUR (1031 – 1035) 11/10 – 11/14/2019

Week 8 Ham & Eggs (1036 – 1040) 11/17 – 11/21/2019

Two Week Hiatus Thanksgiving Holidays

Week 9 Open – Odds & Ends (1041-1045) 12/08 – 12/12/2019

Week 10 Reflections (1046 – 1050) 12/15 – 12/19/2019

 

Rules and Prizes of this contest will be posted shortly…

 

Please think about joining in…it’s been a lot of fun over the years.

.

The top ten contestants will receive an art Postcard. In addition:

 

The Prize for the 1st and 2nd place contestants is a DVD. From the Criterion Collection:

 

Abbas Kiarostami

 

24 Frames

.

For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging the two art forms to which he had dedicated his life. Setting out to reconstruct the moments immediately before and after a photograph is taken, Kiarostami selected twenty-four still images—most of them stark landscapes inhabited only by foraging birds and other wildlife—and digitally animated each one into its own subtly evolving four-and-a-half-minute vignette, creating a series of poignant studies in movement, perception, and time. A sustained meditation on the process of image making, 24 Frames is a graceful and elegiac farewell from one of the giants of world cinema.

 

.

www.criterion.com/films/29399-24-frames

www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGUaTih2quw

www.youtube.com/watch?v=FNSlQ9mmJ4M

No matter how you look at it, we’re quickly descending these stairs and are very close to the ground floor:

 

Identify the Artist XII will return to this photo stream and begin on Sunday, September 29, 2019 (details of art photos being posted at 8:00 PM Eastern Time), ONLY two days from now. The game will run 10 weeks to the middle of December. There will be a two week hiatus at the end of November for the Thanksgiving holiday. Calendrical links are provided below.

.

It’s been fun over the years. Please consider joining in…

.

 

Identify the Artist XII:

 

Week 1 Bridges (1001 – 1005)09/29 – 10/3/2019

Week 2 Dogs (2) (1006 – 1010)10/06 – 10/10/2019

Week 3 Farming (1011 – 1015)10/13 – 10/17/2019

Week 4 Musical Interlude (3) (1016 – 1020)10/20 – 10/24/2019

Week 5 Portraits of Painters (2) (1021 – 1025)10/27 – 10/31/2019

Week 6 The Conversation (1026 -1030)11/03 – 11/17/2019

Week 7 FUR (1031 – 1035) 11/10 – 11/14/2019

Week 8 Ham & Eggs (1036 – 1040)11/17 – 11/21/2019

Two Week Hiatus Thanksgiving Holidays

Week 9 Open – Odds & Ends (1041-1045)12/08 – 12/12/2019

Week 10 Reflections (1046 – 1050) 12/15 – 12/19/2019

 

Top 10 contestants will receive an Art Postcard.

Prize for the 1st and 2nd place contestants is a DVD. From the Criterion Collection:

 

Abbas Kiarostami

24 Frames

For what would prove to be his final film, Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami gave himself a challenge: to create a dialogue between his work as a filmmaker and his work as a photographer, bridging the two art forms to which he had dedicated his life. Setting out to reconstruct the moments immediately before and after a photograph is taken, Kiarostami selected twenty-four still images—most of them stark landscapes inhabited only by foraging birds and other wildlife—and digitally animated each one into its own subtly evolving four-and-a-half-minute vignette, creating a series of poignant studies in movement, perception, and time. A sustained meditation on the process of image making, 24 Frames is a graceful and elegiac farewell from one of the giants of world cinema.

 

The Rules of the Game:

 

Posting of a detail fragment of a work of art will take place sometime after 8:00 PM EST, five days a week (Sunday; Monday; Tuesday; Wednesday; Thursday. There are no IDs on Friday or Saturday)

Correct answers are allotted points in the following manner:

First correct respondent receives 6 points

Second: 5 points

third: 4 points

fourth: 3 points

fifth: 2 points

Each respondent after that receives 1 point, whether the artist named is correct or not.. 2 points will be awarded if there were not 5 awards.

Incorrect responses will be awarded at least one point (there is no penalty for guessing...actually encouraged). The opportunity to accrue points can only happen within a maximum of 24 hours. Once the full photograph of the work of Art is elevated and the artist identified, no additional scoring (for that work can occur). (In other words, regardless of pleas, points will not be awarded for a comment/ID made days after the posting). In addition, 15 guesses does not generate 15 points...only 1 point.

A favorite of the photograph will also garnish 1 point (only if nothing else is ventured by the participant,…1 point is not added to any other points awarded).

A summary of scores for the top five positions will be published each Sunday, at the beginning of each set of five photographs.

Caveats / Understanding:

Postings may be held up due to circumstances beyond my control.

Delays in posting may occur each evening. (sorry, no guarantee on 8:00 EST; however, through the years a certain consistency has been attained)

 

When posted, included with the fragment is the date of the artwork; the gender of the artist; the nationality of the artist; the location where the photograph was taken; and a link to the museum or location.

In addition, as most of you are aware, part of the clues for each identity is a “presence/absence” notation about whether the artist has been in a prior Identity Set. Because flickr’s new format doesn’t facilitate the reading of a long list of names in a “Set’s” overview/description, those lists are also available on request. If you send me an email address that can receive attachments, I will transmit an Windows based Excel sheet with the names of the artists and the number of their paintings/objects. Be sure to specify which format you would like: xlsx; xls; csv; txt – tab delimited – if you don’t specify the default is xlsx MS Office-10). ( non-windows participants should request txt).

 

Also, sorry for the bias the timing provides those in the Americas but no matter how I thought about it… I couldn’t come up with a plan to assist Europe; Africa; Asia and Australia

 

As you may well assume, this is “open book.” In addition use of phone apps such as Magnus; Shazam for Art; Smartify; Google Lens; etc.. is permitted if they actually help?

   

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.[1]

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).[2]

 

Contents

1Events

2Births

3Deaths

4Nobel Prizes

5New English words

6See also

7References

 

Events[edit]

January[edit]

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.[3]

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.[4]

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3 – Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.[1]

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).[2]

 

Contents

1Events

2Births

3Deaths

4Nobel Prizes

5New English words

6See also

7References

 

Events[edit]

January[edit]

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.[3]

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.[4]

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3 – Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi

 

atelier ying, nyc.

 

Ozu has inspired the quality of silence in at least one film director, Abbas Kiarostami.

 

I can understand. Ozu's themes of the transience of this world,

its disappointments, the dissolution of the family, the deep sadness and bliss of impermanence, these embody the concerns of Ozu's oeuvre.

 

Above all of this paradoxical despair, Ozu weaves in form, order, the nostalgic quality of the music and of the traditional settings to lift his films into transcendence. He employs a minimal approach everywhere to add power and depth.

 

The footprints of his characters seem small almost ordinary. His films are constructed of so little. Yet precision and restriction became an important part of his method, influencing every facet of the films, even his unique method of rehearsal.

 

The architectural parti is best, in my own opinion, if it is simple. A line added, an inversion, a single change. This makes all the difference. Like a poem, one thought expressed in a spare tight sentence or fragment can immediately create a space in the mind.

 

Hejduk was right in pointing the direction of melding poetry with architecture. I don't recall the exact words but he may have said something to the effect that reading a book is an act of architecture.

 

A strategy of choosing only a few things as building blocks to create a design has power. 2 or 3 could be the minimum.

 

A camera is a box, so is a building. Ozu's films have a tiny footprint, with a simple strong foundation.

 

If we as artists were to be made of only one material, it would be the material called work, this is close to Ozu's belief. There was only his work, which was his center, and at this center was transience transfixed onto films (a paradox for sure) with few parts very precisely woven together.

 

When you take apart a camera you will find a mass of tiny parts. But when you use it, there is so little to operate.

 

Forgetting digital for a moment and looking at an analogue camera as an example, there are still very few levers and buttons to toggle. So order and restriction is instilled.

 

When you take a street photo your eye must make many decisions. So the camera is the only mediator between a technical mass of parts and our infinite mind.

 

The camera is a twin of the photographer's eye. Both are camera obscura and both have lens.

 

Projection is an inescapable fact of obscura. The box is not the real issue here, only the ability to project.

 

If you've allowed your mind to wander this far, you'll be pleased to see some forms:

 

Giving up to the disappointment of life, it's passing and transient nature, is more peaceful if we just let it be, resign ourselves to impermanence and live in the present moment.

 

The camera I present in this design resembles a simple building. A facade with one window and one door. The idea of a miniature opera house, an old-fashioned photo studio and the photo booth all inspire this design. The footprint of the camera as building (or vice versa) is exceedingly small. Actually this is a fragment of an actual building on Doyer St here, it appeared in many films, one by Woody Allen. I sketched it over dim sum at the historic Nom Wah restaurant, equally famous and in films. My father used to bring me here as a child 40 years ago.

 

This camera building's single occupant is irrelevant though it is dedicated to Ozu.

 

This pinhole camera's overall dimensions are 1.0 foot in height (not including antenna), 5 inches in width, and 6 inches deep.

 

The open window suggests that the photo studio on the upper floor is always working and its occupant is happy while there is work. The single plant follows the seasons with new life and renewed life. The tiny Feng shui mirror is a pinhole lens for a slide film back. Downstairs the interior is a cyclorama, onto which slides are projected from the back of the building. An alligator clip holds unmounted slides and illumination is by any light source. The b&w pinhole image transparencies will be further distorted by the cyclorama and by its own pinhole vignetting, all pointing to the rapid dissolution of the image.

 

Users are free to copy their own images onto iPhone (a virtual camera obscura) from the back wall using a simple magnetic attachment (tape) and the clip can be manipulated by a rod (toothpick) to make images and tiny videos by virtue of their own hand skill (actually, very little is more focused in the present moment as the act of taking a photograph). If we could develop the technical aspects further the door acts as a lock. You can adjust the plastic cyclorama form by pushing and rocking the facade canopy from the outside. When you are done, the door is opened to lock in the adjustment. We could also have the old-fashioned antenna rotate to open and close the lens cover. I prefer simpler ways though.

 

The Presentation box comes with a door wind-chime, simulated oil-soaked paper and sash cloth to cover over the window & door glass and a stick of gum for making a lens cover (chewed and pinched to size).

 

This design drawing is dedicated to my friend and photographer Hitoshi Toyoda, who shoots only slide film and who gave me the projection idea used here.

 

Design, text and drawing are copyright 2013 by David Lo.

 

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.[1]

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).[2]

 

Contents

1Events

2Births

3Deaths

4Nobel Prizes

5New English words

6See also

7References

 

Events[edit]

January[edit]

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.[3]

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.[4]

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3 – Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.[1]

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).[2]

 

Contents

1Events

2Births

3Deaths

4Nobel Prizes

5New English words

6See also

7References

 

Events[edit]

January[edit]

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.[3]

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.[4]

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3 – Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi

Cinema Paradiso / Dulce Pontes & Ennio Morricone

 

El gran extasis del escultor de madera Steiner / Die Große Ekstase des Bildschnitzers Steiner ( doc by Werner Herzog Sub en castellano )

 

subtl. in english

 

on son els limits? on la frontera dels somnis? Werner Herzog es mou com peix en l´aigua plantejant la pregunta i buceja mostrant-nos totes les maravelles,tots els perills del fons mari,l´aventura de lo huma possible i la recerca de l´extasi d´un escultor de fusta i saltador d´esqui olimpic..

Atenció als minuts 6´40´´ fins el 9´,imatges en camera lenta on la poesia i la tragedia ballen una dança inquietant,amb un fons musical perfecte.Aixo tambe es la magia del cinema,encara que en aquest cas es tracti d´un documental

 

donde están los límites? donde la frontera de los sueños? Werner Herzog se mueve como pez en el agua planteando la pregunta y bucea mostrándonos todas las maravillas, todos los peligros de este particular fondo marino, la aventura de lo humano posible y la búsqueda del éxtasis de un escultor de madera y saltador de esqui olimpico.

Atención a los minutos 6'40''hasta el 9 ', imágenes en cámara lenta donde la poesía y la tragedia bailan una danza inquietante, con un fondo musical perfecto.Esto es tambien la magia del cine, aunque en este caso se trate de un documental.

 

where are the limits? where the border of dreams? Werner Herzog moves like a fish in water asking the question and showing us all the wonders, all the dangers of this particular seabed , the human adventure possible and the search for ecstasy in a wood sculptor and Olympic ski jumper.

Attention to the minutes 6'40''hasta the 9 ', slow motion where the poetry and tragedy are together in a dance disturbing with a perfect musical background .This is also the magic of cinema, but in this case it is a documentary.

 

Breakfast at tiffany´s / Audrey Hepburn sing Moon river

 

Laberinto de pasiones / Pedro Almodovar

 

Con faldas y a lo loco / Some like it hot

 

Pierrot le fou / Jean-Luc Godard

 

Bienvenido Mr Marshall / Luis Garcia Berlanga

 

Jules et Jim / François Truffaut

 

copia certificada / Abbas Kiarostami

Danish postcard by Go Card, no. 2194, 1996. Photo: Camera Film. Publicity still for Le hussard sur le toit/The Horseman on the Roof (Jean-Paul Rappeneau, 1995).

 

French actress Juliette Binoche (1964) has appeared in more than 60 international films. She won numerous international awards, and has appeared on stage across the world. André Téchiné made her a star in France with the leading role in his drama Rendez-vous (1985). Her sensual performance in The Unbearable Lightness of Being (Philip Kaufman, 1988) launched her international career. Other career highlights are her roles in Three Colors: Blue (Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1993), The English Patient (Anthony Minghella, 1996), for which she won an Oscar, and Caché (Michael Haneke, 2005).

 

Juliette Binoche was born in Paris, in 1964. She was the daughter of Jean-Marie Binoche, a director, actor, and sculptor, and Monique Yvette Stalens, a teacher, director, and actress. She is the sister of actress/photographer Marion Stalens. Her parents divorced when she was four, so she grew up living between each parent and a Catholic boarding school. In her teenage years Juliette began acting at school in stage-productions. At 17 she directed and starred in a student production of the Eugène Ionesco play, Exit the King. She studied acting at the Conservatoire National Supérieur d'Art Dramatique (CNSAD), but quit after a short time as she disliked the curriculum. In the early 1980s, she found an agent through a friend and joined a theatre troupe, touring France, Belgium and Switzerland under the pseudonym Juliette Adrienne. After performing in several stage productions and a few TV productions, Binoche secured her first feature-film appearance with a minor role in the drama Liberty Belle (Pascal Kané, 1983). Her role required just two days on–set, but was enough to inspire Binoche to pursue a career in film. In 1983, she auditioned for the female lead in Jean-Luc Godard's' controversial Je vous salue, Marie/Hail Mary (1985), a modern retelling of the Virgin birth. She spent six months on the set of the film in Geneva, although her role in the final cut only contained a few scenes. She gained more significant exposure in Jacques Doillon's critically acclaimed La Vie de Famille/Family Life (1985), cast as the volatile teenage step-daughter of Sami Frey's central character. Director André Téchiné made her a star in France with the leading role in his provocative erotic drama Rendez-vous (1985). The film, co-starring Lambert Wilson and Jean-Louis Trintignant, premiered at the 1985 Cannes Film Festival, winning Best Director. Rendez-vous was a sensation and Binoche became the darling of the festival. In 1986, Binoche was nominated for her first César for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her performance. She starred opposite Michel Piccoli in the avant-garde thriller Mauvais Sang/Bad Blood (Leos Carax, 1986). Binoche plays Anna the vastly younger lover of Marc (Piccoli) who falls in love with Alex (Denis Lavant), a young thief. Mauvais Sang was a critical and commercial success, leading to Binoche's second César nomination. She gave a sensual performance opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in The Unbearable Lightness of Being (Philip Kaufman, 1988), the adaptation of Milan Kundera's novel. It was Binoche's first English language role and was a worldwide success with critics and audiences alike. In the summer of 1988, Binoche returned to the stage in an acclaimed production of Anton Chekhov's The Seagull directed by Russian director Andrei Konchalovsky at Théâtre De L'odéon in Paris. Later that year she began work on Léos Carax's Les Amants du Pont-Neuf. The film was beset by problems and took three years to complete, requiring investment from three producers and funds from the French government. When finally released in 1991, Les Amants du Pont-Neuf was a critical success. Binoche won a European Film Award and her third César nomination for her performance.

 

Juliette Binoche chose to pursue an international career outside France. Binoche relocated to London for the Emily Bronte adaptation Wuthering Heights (Peter Kosminsky, 1992) with Ralph Fiennes as Heathcliff, and Damage (Louis Malle, 1992) with Jeremy Irons, both enhanced her international reputation. For her performance in Damage, Binoche received her fourth César nomination. She sparked the interest of Steven Spielberg, who offered her roles in three films: Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), Jurassic Park (1993), and Schindler's List (1993). which she declined. Instead, she chose for Trois couleurs : Bleu/Three Colors: Blue (Krzysztof Kieślowski, 1993), for which she won the Venice Film Festival Award for Best Actress and a César. The first film in a trilogy inspired by the ideals of the French republic and the colors of its flag, Three Colors: Blue is the story of a young woman who loses her composer husband and daughter in a car accident. Though devastated she learns to cope by rejecting her previous life by rejecting all people, belongings and emotions. Binoche made cameo appearances in the other two films in Kieślowski's trilogy, Trois couleurs : Blanc/Three Colors: White (1994) and Three Colors: Red/ Trois couleurs : Rouge (1994). Binoche took a short sabbatical during which she gave birth to her son Raphaël in September 1993. In 1995, she returned to the screen in a big-budget adaptation of Jean Giono's Le hussard sur le toit/The Horseman on the Roof (Jean-Paul Rappeneau, 1995) with Olivier Martinez. At the time, it was the most expensive film in the history of French cinema. The film was a box-office success around the world and Binoche was again nominated for a César for Best Actress. She gained further acclaim in The English Patient (Anthony Minghella, 1996), for which she was awarded an Academy Award and a BAFTA for Best Supporting Actress in addition to the Best Actress Award at the 1997 Berlin International Film Festival. Juliette Binoche was reunited with director André Téchiné for Alice et Martin (1998), the story of a relationship between an emotionally damaged Parisian musician and her younger lover who hides a dark family secret. Binoche appeared on stage in a 1998 London production of Luigi Pirandello's Clothe the Naked retitled Naked and in a 2000 production of Harold Pinter's Betrayal on Broadway for which she was nominated for a Tony Award. Between 1995 and 2000, she was also the advertising face of the Lancôme perfume Poème.

 

Juliette Binoche was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance opposite Johnny Depp in the romantic comedy Chocolat (Lasse Hallström, 2000). Another hit was the period drama La Veuve de Saint-Pierre (Patrice Leconte, 2000), for which she was nominated for a César for Best Actress. Opposite Daniel Auteuil she played the role of a woman who attempts to save a condemned man from the guillotine. The film won favourable reviews, and was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film. Next she appeared in Code Unknown (Michael Haneke, 2000), a film which was made following Binoche's approach to the Austrian director. Her critically acclaimed role was a welcome change from playing the romantic heroine in a series of costume dramas. During the following decade, she maintained a successful career, alternating between French and English language roles in both mainstream and art-house productions. "La Binoche" appeared in such films as Jet Lag (Daniele Thompson, 2002) opposite Jean Reno, Caché (Michael Haneke, 2005), Breaking and Entering (Anthony Minghella, 2006) with Jude Law, and Flight of the Red Balloon (Hou Hsiao-Hsien, 2007). Paying homage to Albert Lamorisse's 1957 short The Red Balloon, Hou's film tells the story of a woman's efforts to juggle her responsibilities as a single mother with her commitment to her career as a voice artist. Shot on location in Paris, the film was entirely improvised by the cast. In 2008 Binoche began a world tour with a modern dance production titled in-i, co-created in collaboration with Akram Khan. In 2010, she won the Best Actress Award at the Cannes Film Festival for her role in Abbas Kiarostami's Certified Copy making her the first actress to win the European ‘Best Actress Triple Crown’ for winning best actress award at the Berlin, Cannes and Venice film festivals. Later films include Cosmopolis (David Cronenberg, 2011) with Robert Pattinson, Camille Claudel 1915 (Bruno Dumont, 2013) and Clouds of Sils Maria (Olivier Assayas, 2014). In 2015, Binoche starred on stage in a new English language translation of Antigone.directed by Ivo van Hove. Binoche has two children: a son Raphaël (1993), whose father is André Halle, a professional scuba diver, and a daughter Hana (1999), whose father is actor Benoît Magimel, with whom Binoche starred in Les Enfants du Siècle/Children of the Century (Diane Kurys, 1999).

 

Sources: Wikipedia, and IMDb.

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.[1]

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).[2]

 

Contents

1Events

2Births

3Deaths

4Nobel Prizes

5New English words

6See also

7References

 

Events[edit]

January[edit]

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.[3]

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.[4]

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3 – Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 192