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The Valley Lake is about a few hundred metre east of the Blue Lake in the Crater Lakes area within the Kanawinka Geopark at Mount Gambier, South Australia. Here speed boats are drawing circles on the mirror like, turquoise green lake surface.

 

The colour of the lake water does not manifest the pronounced seasonal colour changes as the famous Blue Lake, probably it does not share the the same underground water system.

The Red Rock Volcanic Complex features a cluster of over 40 eruption points concentrated in a 4x3 km area just south of Alvie in Victoria, Australia, and several smaller eruption points just north of the town. The massive eruptions, which created the well-preserved formations of maars, tuff rings and scoria cones at Red Rock, is believed to have taken place some 6,000-12,000 years ago. The presence of iron gives Red Rock its distinctive colour.

 

The eruption history of Red Rock comprises two main phases. The first involved explosive interactions between magma (molten rock) and groundwater that formed wide craters called maars, such as the two seen mid-right in the shot above. During eruptions, fine-grained volcanic ash was blasted from multiple vents (openings) within the maar to form its rim (called the tuff ring). In the second phase, there was an initial short period of fire-fountaining, when the magma was ejected from the vent as a fluid lava fountain. Then gases within the magma expanded, fragmenting the magma and producing violent eruptions of scoria (volcanic rocks with vesicles) onto the surface, creating hills called scoria cones which occur throughout the Red Rock Reserve and overlay the maars from earlier eruptions. Before white settlement, the scoria cones were covered in predominantly Casuarina open woodland.

 

There are nine complete craters up to 75m deep, some of which were filled with water, forming lakes such as Lake Purdiguluc, Lake Werowrap, Lake Gnalingurk and Lake Coragulac. Lake Purdiguluc has been formed by at least five coalescing eruption points. The Red Rock lakes have been dry since 1999, which may be a cyclic event or due to over-extraction of groundwater. The critically endangered Corangamite Water Skink can be found around the lakes.

 

The volcanoes at Red Rock form a contrasting landscape to the otherwise flat countryside formed by earlier lava flows, which gave the western district its rich fertile soils of immense agricultural value (see www.flickr.com/photos/67307569@N00/5217959803, taken from the same place, looking north instead of west).

 

Similar explosive vulcanism occurred in many other areas of western Victoria and eastern South Australia, with the last eruption occurring 4,500 years ago at Mt. Gambier. Other maars produced during this time include Lake Purrumbete south-east of Camperdown, the lake at Tower Hill near Warrnambool and the Blue Lakes at Mt Gambier. Scoria cones include Mt Shadwell at Mortlake, Mt Leura at Camperdown and Mt Elephant at Derrinallum.

 

The Red Rock Volcanic Complex is a small part of the Kanawinka Global Geopark extends from the south-western part of Victoria to south-eastern part of South Australia and was established as Australia's first National Geopark and the first Australian UNESCO Global Geopark on 22 June 2008. Kanawinka means the Land of Tomorrow in the language of the indigenous Buandik people.

 

The sweeping plains and spectacular mountains in the Kanawinka Global Geopark are largely the result of volcanic activity. Between 4.5 and 2 million years ago, lava from nearly 400 individual volcanic eruption points flowed over an area known as the Newer Volcanics Province which covers 23,000 square km, extending to the north of Ballarat and reappearing in a small section of south-eastern South Australia. The flowing lava spread evenly across existing plains, followed valleys, flowed under water and in some cases forced upwards into rough, stony hills called tumuli or steeper scoria cones. Many of the eruptions were witnessed by indigenous people who have inhabited this region for up to 45,000 years. The volcanic stones were used both by the aboriginal people and later by European settlers in the 1870-80s for construction purposes.

 

- Notes taken from altonabeauty.blogspot.co.uk/2011/05/red-rock-volcanic-res...

This is a big big drawing I made a few years ago when thinking about my visit to Mt Noorat in 2003.

 

dukaduka.blogspot.com/2008/01/on-subject-of-volcanos.html

the natural bridge, an uncollapsed section of lava tunnel

 

budj bim - mount eccles national park, western victoria, australia

inside harmans 1 - a lava tunnel and one of the largest publicly-accessible examples of its kind in australia

 

mount napier state park, western victoria, australia

'petrified forest' walking trail, with turbines of the cape bridgewater section of pacific hydro's portland wind energy project at rear

 

this is a section of the great south-west walk

 

discovery bay coastal park, south-western victoria, australia

Panorama shot overlooking Tower Hill volcano complex

strolling through a collapsed lava tunnel near the natural bridge

 

budj bim - mount eccles national park, western victoria, australia

'petrified forest' walking trail, with turbines of the cape bridgewater section of pacific hydro's portland wind energy project at rear

 

this is a section of the great south-west walk

 

discovery bay coastal park, south-western victoria, australia

Eugene von Geurard painting of Tower Hill

An important wetland water-bird habitat, Lake Beeac is a State Wildlife Reserve and is also part of the Ramsar Lakes which have international protection for migratory waterbirds. Despite the lake being hyper-saline, brine shrimps provide a food source for flocks of the banded stilt and red-necked avocet. Some birds fly from the northern hemisphere to feed on Lake Beeac's shrimp. The lake covers 560ha.

  

(From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

Mount Elephant is a 240 m high conical breached scoria cone from a dormant volcano, located 1 km from the town of Derrinallum in southwestern Victoria, Australia. It is a prominent local landmark.

The volcano is thought to have last erupted between 5,000 and 20,000 years ago. During early European settlement, the mountain was known as Swagmans Lighthouse. The mountain was privately owned until 2000, when it was purchased by Trust for Nature and the local community. The aim is to revegetate the area and promote local tourism.

Mt. Elephant forms the eastern gateway to the Kanawinka Geopark from the Hamilton Highway at Derrinallum.

37.961°S 143.198°E

a collapsed lava tunnel, which run for several kilometres across the national park

 

budj bim - mount eccles national park, western victoria, australia

'petrified forest' walking trail, with turbines of the cape bridgewater section of pacific hydro's portland wind energy project at rear

 

this is a section of the great south-west walk

 

discovery bay coastal park, south-western victoria, australia

lake surprise - mount eccles' volcanic lake

 

budj bim - mount eccles national park, western victoria, australia

the freshwater springs walking trail, a section of the great south-west walk

 

at rear turbines of the cape bridgewater section of pacific hydro's portland wind energy project can be seen

 

discovery bay coastal park, south-western victoria, australia

Lava flow from Mt Napier, in the Harman Valley, just south of Byaduk North.

 

Part of the Kanawinka Geopark. Australia's first UNESCO-assisted Geopark.

Byaduk.

Victoria.

 

Link : www.kanawinkageopark.com/web_images/mountnapier.pdf

This is from my first trip to Mt Elephant in 2001. It's all nice and green before the drought set in.

Oil on linen, 45.5 x 38 cms (F8) 2004.

 

Mount Elephant , an extinct volcano, depicted during the drought in 2003. From here you can look across the western plains of Victoria, Australia.

 

dukaduka.blogspot.com/2008/01/inside-elephant-spooky-coin...

'petrified forest' walking trail, with turbines of the cape bridgewater section of pacific hydro's portland wind energy project at rear

 

this is a section of the great south-west walk

 

discovery bay coastal park, south-western victoria, australia

Mt Eccles Crater - Lake Suprise.

 

Mt Eccles National Park is part of the Kanawinka Global Geopark. Australia's first UNESCO-assisted Geopark.

Byaduk.

Victoria.

 

Link : www.kanawinkageopark.com/web_images/mountnapier.pdf

 

Budj-Bim is the Gunditjmara name for Mount Eccles, and means High Head. The rocks around the mountain were called Tungat or teeth.

vegetation on the volcanic rim of lake surprise

 

budj bim - mount eccles national park, western victoria, australia

looking back to the entrance of the harman no. 1 cave, a relatively recent lava tube that formed after an eruption that took place only 8000 years ago

 

byaduk caves, mount napier state park, victoria, australia

inside harmans 1 - a lava tunnel and one of the largest publicly-accessible examples of its kind in australia

 

mount napier state park, western victoria, australia

The Blue Lake and crater.

Mt Gambier.

South Australia.

 

Each year in November, the water mysteriously starts its colour change to the unbelievable turquoise blue. From March each year it gradually makes the change back to its more sombre winter blue which is still a magnificent sight.

 

The Kanawinka Geopark was declared the 57th Member of the Global Network of National Geoparks assisted by UNESCO on June 22, 2008.

  

Link : www.kanawinkageopark.com/web_images/mountnapier.pdf

 

The massive volcanic activity which created the formations at Red Rock is believed to taken place between 6000 and 12,000 years ago.

  

Sketched on a cold windy day in December 2001.

Lake Corangamite's eastern shores are covered in algae and thickly dried salt scum, which gets washed up by the prevailing westerlies. In the background lies Mt Porndon, 20km away, one of several volcanic peaks in the region.

one of the locals - an echidna, or spiny anteater (Tachyglossus aculeatus)

 

budj bim - mount eccles national park, western victoria, australia

Looking up at the entrance to Natural Bridge.

 

Mt Eccles National Park.

Near Macarthur.

Victoria.

 

Part of the Kanawinka Geopark. Australia's first UNESCO-assisted Geopark.

Byaduk.

Victoria.

 

Link : www.kanawinkageopark.com/web_images/mountnapier.pdf

Farm at the base of Mt Eccles. The scoria quarry on its side is clearly visable.

 

Mt Eccles National Park is part of the Kanawinka Geopark. Australia's first UNESCO-assisted Geopark.

Byaduk.

Victoria.

 

Link : www.kanawinkageopark.com/web_images/mountnapier.pdf

 

Budj-Bim is the Gunditjmara name for Mount Eccles, and means High Head. The rocks around the mountain were called Tungat or teeth.

About 40 separate eruption sites have been identified in the Red Rock Volcanic Complex near Colac in western Victoria.

the freshwater springs form pools on hard volcanic rock platforms, as seen from the great south-west walk

 

discovery bay coastal park, south-western victoria, australia

The lake provides a habitat for about 75 bird species, which feed on its fish and shrimp, and it is one of the most important water-bird habitats in Victoria. At the southern end of Lake Corangamite is Vaughan Island, one of the few pelican breeding colonies in Victoria.

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