new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged josé+luis+sert

Belem, Berardo Collection, Centro Cultural de Belem, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Material: Indian ink on cardboard

Collection: Berardo Collection

 

BIOGRAPHY

 

Joan Miró, (born April 20, 1893, Barcelona, Spain—died December 25, 1983, Palma, Majorca), Catalan painter who combined abstract art with Surrealist fantasy. His mature style evolved from the tension between his fanciful, poetic impulse and his vision of the harshness of modern life. He worked extensively in lithography and produced numerous murals, tapestries, and sculptures for public spaces.

  

EARLY LIFE AND ARTISTIC TRAINING

 

Miró’s father was a watchmaker and goldsmith. Both his father’s background as an artisan and the austere Catalan landscape would be of great importance to his art. According to his parents’ wishes, he attended a commercial college. He then worked for two years as a clerk in an office until he had a mental and physical breakdown. His parents took him for convalescence to an estate they bought especially for this purpose—Montroig, near Tarragona, Spain—and in 1912 they allowed him to attend an art school in Barcelona. His teacher at this school, Francisco Galí, showed a great understanding of his 18-year-old pupil, advising him to touch the objects he was about to draw, a procedure that strengthened Miró’s feeling for the spatial quality of objects. Galí also introduced his pupil to examples of the latest schools of modern art from Paris as well as to the buildings of Antoni Gaudí, Barcelona’s famous Art Nouveau architect.

 

From 1915 to 1919 Miró worked in Spain—in Barcelona, at Montroig, and on the island of Majorca—painting landscapes, portraits, and nudes in which he focused on the rhythmic interplay of volumes and areas of colour. He experimented with the boldly colourful Fauvist style, but his treatment of form was geometric, influenced by the work of Paul Cézanne and the Cubist artists.

 

From early in his career Miró sought to establish means of metaphorical expression—that is, to discover signs that stand for concepts of nature in a transcendent, poetic sense. He wanted to portray nature as it would be depicted by a primitive person or a child equipped with the intelligence of a 20th-century adult; in this respect, he had much in common with the Surrealists and Dadaists, two schools of modern artists who were striving to achieve similar aims by more intellectual means than those used by Miró.

 

PARIS AND EARLY WORK

 

From 1919 onward Miró lived alternately in Spain and Paris. He was one of the many artists who made their way from abroad to Paris during the first two decades of the 20th century. Most of these foreign artists elected to become French citizens after coming into contact with the exciting French artistic metropolis, but Miró remained attached to his Catalan homeland.

 

In the early 1920s Miró combined meticulously detailed realism with abstraction in landscapes such as the renowned Farm (1921) and The Tilled Field (1923–24). He gradually removed the objects he portrayed from their natural context and reassembled them as if in accordance with a new, mysterious grammar, creating a ghostly, eerie impression.

 

From 1925 to 1928, under the influence of the Dadaists, Surrealists, and Paul Klee, Miró painted “dream pictures” and “imaginary landscapes” in which the linear configurations and patches of colour look almost as though they were set down randomly, as in The Policeman (1925). In paintings such as Dog Barking at the Moon (1926), he rendered figures of animals and humans as indeterminate forms. Miró signed the manifesto of the Surrealist movement in 1924, and the members of the group respected him for the way he portrayed the realm of unconscious experience. The poet André Breton, the chief spokesman of Surrealism, stated that Miró was “the most Surrealist of us all.”

 

After a trip in 1928 to the Netherlands, where he studied the 17th-century Dutch realist painters in the museums, Miró executed a series of works based on Old Master paintings titled Dutch Interiors (1928). In the 1930s Miró became more experimental, working with techniques of collage and sculptural assemblage and creating sets and costumes for ballets. He designed tapestries in 1934, which led to his interest in the monumental and in murals. His paintings began to be exhibited regularly in French and American galleries.

 

At the time of the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s, Miró was living in Paris. Although he typically was not political in his work, the turmoil in his native country inspired him to embrace social criticism. For example, he depicted a peasant revolt in The Reaper, a mural he painted for the pavilion of the Spanish Republic at the Paris World Exhibition of 1937. He also imbued his pictures of this period, such as the nightmarish Head of a Woman (1938), with a demonic expressiveness that mirrored the fears and horrors of those years.

 

MATURE WORK AND INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION

 

During World War II Miró returned to Spain, where he painted Constellations (1941), a series of small works scattered with symbols of the elements and the cosmos, expressing the happy collaboration of everything creative. During the last year of the war (1944), Miró, together with his potter friend José Lloréns Artigas, produced ceramics with a new impetuosity of expression: their vessels were often intentionally misshapen and fragmented.

 

Beginning in 1948, Miró once again divided his time between Spain and Paris. That year he began a series of very poetic works based on the combined themes of woman, bird, and star. In 1949 and 1950 he created some paintings that were wildly spontaneous in character, while executing others with punctilious craftsmanship. He used both approaches in his increasingly large sculptures, amalgamating all of his earlier figurations to form erotic fetishes or signals towering into space.

 

In the years following World War II Miró became internationally famous; his sculptures, drawings, and paintings were exhibited in many countries. He was commissioned to paint a number of murals, notably for the Terrace Hilton Hotel in Cincinnati, Ohio (1947), and for Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts (1950). His ceramic experiments culminated in the two great ceramic walls in the UNESCO building in Paris (1958), for which he received the Great International Prize of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. In 1962 Paris honoured Miró with a major exhibition of his collected works in the National Museum of Modern Art. The Catalan architect José Luis Sert built for him the large studio of which he had dreamed all of his life on Majorca. Among his later works were several monumental sculptures, such as those he executed for the city of Chicago (unveiled 1981) and for the city of Houston (1982).

 

In spite of his fame, however, Miró, a taciturn, introverted man, continued to devote himself exclusively to looking and creating. His art had developed slowly from his first clumsy attempts at expression to the apparently playful masterpieces of his later period. In his late works Miró employed an even greater simplification of figure and background; he sometimes created a composition merely by setting down a dot and a sensitive line on a sea-blue surface, as in Blue II (1961). The whimsical or aggressive irony of his earlier work gave way to a quasi-religious meditation. In 1980, in conjunction with his being awarded Spain’s Gold Medal of Fine Arts, a plaza in Madrid was named in Miró’s honour.

 

Walter Erben

 

The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica

 

SOURCE www.britannica.com/biography/Joan-Miro

Fig. 581 (p. 710) - The Cidade des Motores in Brazil is a design plan by the American immigrant architects Paul Lester Wiener and José Luis Sert, which epitomizes the ideas of squareness in urban development in the second half of the twentieth century.

Docill 98; 12121 Docill102; 12601

Fig. 581 (p. 710) - Bird’s-eye view of a design for the project Cidade dos Motores in Brazil, 1943. Paul Lester Wiener and Jose Luis Sert, architects. Fig. 234 in:

ARONIN, Jeffrey E. (1953). Climate & Architecture. Progressive Architecture Book. Reinhold Publishing Corporation, New York. LCCCN 53-9171

From a different angle, Pl. 1.3 in :

BOYD WHYTE, Iain (2003). Modernism and the Spirit of the City. Routledge, London. ISBN 0-415-25840-5

quadralectics.wordpress.com/4-representation/4-1-form/4-1...

  

Taken and originally posted in 2005.

 

The steel, glass, and concrete -- lots of concrete -- in Harvard's Holyoke Center, designed by architect Jose Luís Sert and finished the year I graduated, 1966. After major renovations, it was re-opened in 2018 as the Smith Campus Center. These doors were on the Mt Auburn Street side. (That shadowy reflection is me.)

Autor:Claes Oldemburg i Coosje van Bruggen

 

Lugar: Parc de la Vall d'Hebró s/n. 08032 Barcelona

 

1992

 

Dimensions: 20,73 x 10,06 x 13,21 m.

  

Statement by the Artists

 

Mistos (Match Cover), 1992 For many years Barcelona has had one of the world's most ambitious urban planning programs, interrelating architecture, parks, plazas, and outdoor works of sculpture. When we visited the city in 1986 in response to an invitation to become part of the program, we toured installations by Eduardo Chillida, Richard Serra, and Ellsworth Kelly. By the time we joined the program, it had been expanded for the 1992 Olympics to include work by an international array of architects, among them Arata Isozaki, Gae Aulenti, Richard Meier, and Frank O. Gehry.

 

Mistos (Match Cover), 1992Most of the new projects were located near the waterfront and the city center, but we were more interested in the residential areas being developed for the Olympic Games that would afterward become new neighborhoods. As our site we chose an open space in the Vall d'Hebron section in the hills overlooking the city. The only other cultural landmark in the vicinity was to be a reconstruction of the pavilion for the Spanish Republic designed by José Luís Sert for the Paris World's Fair of 1937, the building in which Picasso’s Guernica first was shown. Our proposal was a 68-foot-high sculpture based on a matchbook cover. Folded back so that the cover formed a base, the matches were bent, as if by use, with the exception of one erect, flaming match. Loose matches, some "burnt," were scattered over the site.

 

The front view of the Mistos is reminiscent of the facade of Antoni Gaudí's cathedral of the Sagrada Familia, while the base recalls the underpinning of the untitled "Chicago Picasso."

    

Interview Excerpt with the Artists

 

Claes Oldenburg: It was early 1987 and, as usual, we were working on several projects at once, especially on pieces that would become The Haunted House. After Il Corso del Coltello, Coosje had formulated a new approach, using discarded, fragmented objects freely floating in space or brought together by the forces of nature, which she called "flotsam." One of the first sculptures in this direction was a wooden match about half burnt that had been made at Coosje's suggestion for an AIDS benefit at the Leo Castelli Gallery. This had led to a larger, room-scale version, which I was in the process of carving out of Styrofoam in Brooklyn. As a result, there were fragments of matches in various stages of use all over the studio and studies of matches for projects under development in Vail, Colorado, and Middlesbrough, England. Coosje's response to the commission in Barcelona was a field of paper matches torn from a matchbook, some burnt, some not. The concept had an affinity for a sketch made in Madrid the year before of shoes dancing on a stage among dropped fans, which lent support to the image.

 

The composition needed a focus and Coosje proposed placing the remaining match cover -- the source of the scattered matches -- in the center. The profile of a half-opened fan on the Madrid stage suggested the position of the match cover seen from the side.

 

A little model was made out of clay and painted paper in which the small object of a match cover showed itself surprisingly capable of monumental scale. Coosje then set down the mostly unconscious intuitive reasons for our attraction to this image for the site in Barcelona, some of which she included in the lines of a prose poem she wrote on a drawing of the proposal we first presented shortly afterward while participating in a symposium on projects for the city.

 

Coosje van Bruggen: The symbolic subject of fire is concealed within a simple, everyday object in the form of a matchbook, passing from hand to hand and carried around in a pocket, a communal object. Within the small paper packet, rows on rows of matches stuck together, each a slender piece of wood or paper with a red phosphor tip, exude the rigidity of perfection yet contain the potential for momentous chaos leading to both illumination and negation. The individual touch creates infinite variations of form: the user's mood and skill in striking any given match against the rough surface of its cover, through the force of combustion, determines the appearance of what is left of the original. The idea of the individual gesture and explicit style leaving traces of how the disposal of each match took place defines the end result of the Mistos: torn-up, unlit, single matches, bent and crumpled, lie on the ground along with partly burnt ones, scattered over the site in order to humanize the otherwise foreboding scale of the matchbook.

 

Only one match is aflame, like a beacon, its contour transforming into a lance or a fiery pen, recalling the words of Cervantes' Don Quixote of La Mancha: "The lance has never blunted the pen nor the pen the lance." The matchbook, like the typewriter eraser, over the years has become an archetypal object on the verge of disappearance, subject to a telescopic perspective that shifts between the emotive intimate hand-held object and the detached nearly abstracted large project with an architectonic structure and scale.

 

Holyoke Center is the main administrative center for Harvard University. It was designed by José Luis Sert in 1961.

Photo: Pedro Azara 2008

 

José Luis Sert, Chancellery, Northamerican Embassy in Baghdad,

1957 (Current Condition 2008)

 

Holyoke Center is the main administrative center for Harvard University. It was designed by José Luis Sert in 1961.

Autor:Claes Oldemburg i Coosje van Bruggen

 

Lugar: Parc de la Vall d'Hebró s/n. 08032 Barcelona

 

1992

 

Dimensions: 20,73 x 10,06 x 13,21 m.

   

Els Mistos representen una capsa de mistos caiguda a terra, amb alguns d'ells apuntant cap al cel, que arriben a una altura màxima de 20 m. Altres mistos apareixen arrancats i llançats sobre la vorera del davant i alguns d'aquests, ja cremats, es troben al terra al costat de la capsa. Un altre crema amb força en una flama blava. L'escultura es fonamenta en una base de formigó i els mistos són d'acer i pintats de colors forts i primaris (negre, groc, vermell i blau).

 

Els Mistos, és una escultura o "Match Cover" de l'escultor i dissenyador Claes Oldenburg (Estocolm, 1929) i la critica d'art i restairadora Coosje van Bruggen (Groningen, 1942). . Es tracta d'una interessant obra d'aquest artista pop, que el 1987 va rebre l'encàrrec de realitzar una escultura per a un parc urbà de la ciutat de Barcelona, dissenyant aquest agrup escultòric gegant, que parteix d'objectes quotidians i petits, que són reproduïts a gran escala, i en aquest cas les mides de 20 x 9 x 13 metres, així ho demostren. Els colors estan relacionats amb la bandera catalana i la celebre escultura pública monumental de Picasso a Chicago. Va ser inaugurada el gener de 1992.

 

L'obra s'integra en una zona remodelada amb ocasió dels jocs olímpics per recuperar un terreny de creixement desordenat a la dècada dels setanta, sota projecte dels arquitectes Eduard Bru, Enric Sòria i Jordi Garcés, entre d'altres. Justament davant de l'escultura dels Mistos, hi ha la reconstrucció del Pavelló de la Republica espanyola, reconstruit l'any 1992 seguint el model que dissenyà José Luís Sert per l'expossició de Paris de 1937. Aquesta nova zona esportiva i residencial de la Vall d'Hebron donà un nou impuls als barris del peu de la Serra se Collserola.

  

D627_018

15/01/2012 : Marseille, île Ratonneau : port et ZAC du Frioul (Atelier 9, José Luis Sert, 1974)

D627_041

15/01/2012 : Marseille, île de Ratonneau : ZAC du Frioul (Atelier 9, José Luis Sert, 1974)

D627_043

15/01/2012 : Marseille, île de Ratonneau : ZAC du Frioul (Atelier 9, José Luis Sert, 1974)

Roosevelt Island, New York, 'Eastwood Apartments'

by José Luis Sert+Huson Jackson in 1976

D627_042

15/01/2012 : Marseille, île de Ratonneau : ZAC du Frioul (Atelier 9, José Luis Sert, 1974)

D627_044

15/01/2012 : Marseille, île de Ratonneau : ZAC du Frioul (Atelier 9, José Luis Sert, 1974)

Main Street, Roosevelt Island, New York, 'Island House' by Johansen+Bhavnani in 1975 (left), 'Westview Apartments' (background) and 'Eastwood Apartments' by José Luis Sert+Huson Jackson in 1976 (right)

D627_040

15/01/2012 : Marseille, île de Ratonneau : ZAC du Frioul (Atelier 9, José Luis Sert, 1974)

Harvard's Science Center, designed by Jose Luis Sert. It's just outside Harvard Yard.

Steel, glass, and concrete in Harvard's Holyoke Center, designed by architect Jose Luís Sert.

Roosevelt Island, New York, 'Island House' by Johansen+Bhavnani in 1975 (left), 'Eastwood Apartments' by José Luis Sert+Huson Jackson in 1976 (right)

Roosevelt Island, New York, 'Island House' by Johansen+Bhavnani in 1975 (left), 'Eastwood Apartments' by José Luis Sert+Huson Jackson in 1976 (right)

Jose Luis Sert, 19434. PL 1.3. in: BOYD WHYTE, Iain (2003). Modernism and the Spirit of the City. Routledge, London. ISBN 0-415-25840-5

 

Paul Lester Wiener and Jose Luis Sert, architects. Fig. 229 in:

ARONIN, Jeffrey E. (1953). Climate & Architecture. Progressive Architecture Book. Reinhold Publishing Corporation, New York. LCCCN 53-9171

Paul Lester Wiener and Jose Luis sert, architects. Fig. 234 in:

ARONIN, Jeffrey E. (1953). Climate & Architecture. Progressive Architecture Book. Reinhold Publishing Corporation, New York. LCCCN 53-9171

Pavilion of the Spanish Republic, 1937

 

With the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in July 1936, the role of artists who supported the Republican government with propaganda came to a head. One of the most unrivaled projects in promoting the Republican cause abroad was the construction of the Spanish Pavilion at the Exposition Internationale des Arts and Tech­niques dans la vie Moderne (International Exposition Dedicated to Art and Technology in Modern Life), held in Paris in 1937.

 

José Luis Sert y Luis Lacasa.

  

Pavilion of the Spanish Republic, 1937

 

With the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in July 1936, the role of artists who supported the Republican government with propaganda came to a head. One of the most unrivaled projects in promoting the Republican cause abroad was the construction of the Spanish Pavilion at the Exposition Internationale des Arts and Tech­niques dans la vie Moderne (International Exposition Dedicated to Art and Technology in Modern Life), held in Paris in 1937.

 

José Luis Sert y Luis Lacasa.

 

Building designed by Jose Luis Sert.