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Eyes on the Street, a stainless steel sculpture is mounted in a water feature of the central courtyard at Concert Properties Voda development on the southeast corner of False Creek - west of Quebec Street, north of First Avenue on “Pullman Porter Street”. The sculpture was unveiled 21 July 2018.

 

Eyes on the Street, designed by Vancouver artist Marie Khouri in collaboration with Charlotte Wall, comprises two mirrored stainless-steel forms in the shape and context of an eye, reinforcing the notion of residents continuously observing their surroundings, and reflecting on their own lives and their community.

 

The work is inspired by Jane Jacobs’ “eyes on the street” concept, referring to people’s ability to observe and connect with others and their environment when urban design is thoughtful, diverse and accessible to maximize what Jacobs coined as “natural surveillance”.

Jane's Walk takes place in early May to celebrate the life of urban activist and writer - Jane Jacobs. The walks take place in more than 24 urban centres around the world. We chose to see the Botanical Gardens of Silver Springs, one of 44 different Jane's Walks offered in Calgary, Alberta. Our group was made up of 14 adults, one child and two dogs. We all learned a lot about the gardens.

 

When I'm not on a walk the river, you can find me on Twitter

Sunday 18 May 2014. Crowds in the park.

 

View southwards from The Queen's House to The Observatory and General Wolfe statue.

 

Click to view full screen or even larger sizes and observe the "intricate ballet" of a successful public park.

_________________________________

 

§ "Under the seeming disorder of the old city, wherever the old city is working successfully, is a marvelous order for maintaining the safety of the streets and the freedom of the city. It is a complex order. Its essence is intricacy of sidewalk use, bringing with it a constant succession of eyes. This order is all composed of movement and change, and although it is life, not art, we may fancifully call it the art form of the city and liken it to the dance — not to a simple-minded precision dance with everyone kicking up at the same time, twirling in unison and bowing off en masse, but to an intricate ballet in which the individual dancers and ensembles all have distinctive parts which miraculously reinforce each other and compose an orderly whole. The ballet of the good city sidewalk never repeats itself from place to place, and in any one place is always replete with new improvisations.

 

The stretch of Hudson Street where I live is each day the scene of an intricate sidewalk ballet. I make my own first entrance into it a little after eight when I put out my garbage can, surely a prosaic occupation, but I enjoy my part, my little clang, as the junior droves of junior high school students walk by the center of the stage dropping candy wrapper. (How do they eat so much candy so early in the morning?)

 

While I sweep up the wrappers I watch the other rituals of the morning: Mr Halpert unlocking the laundry's handcart from its mooring to a cellar door, Joe Cornacchia's son-in-law stacking out the empty crates from the delicatessen, the barber bringing out his sidewalk folding chair, Mr. Goldstein arranging the coils of wire which proclaim the hardware store is open, the wife of the tenement's superintendent depositing her chunky three-year-old with a toy mandolin on the stoop, the vantage point from which he is learning English his mother cannot speak. Now the primary children, heading for St. Luke's, dribble through the south; the children from St. Veronica's cross, heading to the west, and the children from P.S 41, heading toward the east. Two new entrances are made from the wings: well-dressed and even elegant women and men with brief cases emerge from doorways and side streets. Most of these are heading for the bus and subways, but some hover on the curbs, stopping taxis which have miraculously appeared at the right moment, for the taxis are part of a wider morning ritual: having dropped passengers from midtown in the downtown financial district, they are now bringing downtowners up to midtown. Simultaneously, numbers of women in housedresses have emerged and as they crisscross with one another they pause for quick conversations that sound with laughter or joint indignation, never, it seems, anything in between. It is time for me to hurry to work too, and I exchange my ritual farewell with Mr Lofaro, the short, thick bodied, white-aproned fruit man who stands outside his doorway a little up the street, his arms folded, his feet planted, looking solid as the earth itself. We nod; we each glance quickly up and down the street, then look back at each other and smile. We have done this many a morning for more than ten years, and we both know what it means: all is well.

 

The heart-of-the-day ballet I seldom see, because part of the nature of it is that working people who live there, like me, are mostly gone, filling the roles of strangers on other sidewalks. But from days off, I know enough to know that it becomes more and more intricate. Longshoremen who are not working that day gather at the White Horse or the Ideal or the International for beer and conversation. The executives and business lunchers from the industries just to the west throng the Dorgene restaurant and the Lion's Head coffee house; meat market workers and communication scientists fill the bakery lunchroom. Character dancers come on, a strange old man with strings or old shoes over his shoulders, motor scooter riders with big beards and girl friends who bounce on the back of the scooters and wear their hair long in front of their faces as well as behind, drunks who follow the advice of the Hat Council and are always turned out in hats, but not hats the Council would approve”.

 

Jane Jacobs: The Death and Life of Great American Cities. From Chapter 2 "The uses of sidewalks: Safety." (These extracts are on pages 65 and 67 in my current copy. My earlier copies from the 1960s or later, either fell apart or I gave away.)

 

Her book was first published in 1961 and I assumed its descriptions of New York street life were of several years before. And even then perhaps a little idealised? But even so, it's a classic book. Which I recommend to anyone who loves cities and wants them to be convivial, beautiful, human scale, safe, creative, and successful.

 

______________________

 

§ Wikipedia entry for the Greenwich area in London.

§ Official website: What to see and do in Greenwich Park.

The Lower Manhattan Expressway (LoMEX) was an urban highway proposed by Robert Moses in the early 1960s which would have connected the Holland Tunnel with the Williamsburg and Manhattan bridges. The mostly elevated 8 lane highway would have cut through the heart of the Lower East Side and SoHo neighborhoods. Community activists lead by Jane Jacobs successfully blocked the highway in 1962.

(Found in one of the stores along Bleeker Street, of course.)

 

History (continued)

 

The Village had a cutting-edge cabaret and music scene. The Village Gate, the Village Vanguard and The Blue Note (since 1981), hosted some of the biggest names in jazz on a regular basis. Greenwich Village also played a major role in the development of the folk music scene of the 1960s. Music clubs included Gerde's Folk City, The Bitter End, Cafe Au Go Go, Cafe Wha?, The Gaslight Cafe and the Bottom Line. Three of the four members of The Mamas & the Papas met there. Guitarist and folk singer Dave Van Ronk lived there for many years. Village resident and cultural icon Bob Dylan by the mid-60s became one of the foremost popular songwriters in the world, and often developments in Greenwich Village would influence the simultaneously occurring folk rock movement in San Francisco and elsewhere, and vice versa. Dozens of other cultural and popular icons got their start in the Village's nightclub, theater, and coffeehouse scene during the 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s, notably besides Bob Dylan, there were Jimi Hendrix, Barbra Streisand, Peter, Paul, and Mary, Bette Midler, The Lovin' Spoonful, Simon & Garfunkel, Liza Minnelli, Jackson Browne, James Taylor, Eric Andersen, Joan Baez, The Velvet Underground, The Kingston Trio, Carly Simon, Richie Havens, Maria Muldaur, Tom Paxton, Janis Ian, Phil Ochs, Joni Mitchell, Laura Nyro, and Nina Simone among others. The Greenwich Village of the 1950s and 1960s was at the center of Jane Jacobs's book The Death and Life of Great American Cities, which defended it and similar communities, while critiquing common urban renewal policies of the time.

 

Founded by New York based artist Mercedes Matter and her students the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture is an art school formed in the mid 1960s. The school officially opened September 23, 1964, it is still currently active and it is housed at 8 W. 8th Street, the site of the original Whitney Museum of American Art.

 

Greenwich Village was also home to one of the many safe houses used by the radical anti-war movement known as the Weather Underground. On March 6, 1970, however, their safehouse was destroyed when an explosive they were constructing was accidentally detonated, killing three Weathermen (Ted Gold, Terry Robbins, and Diana Oughton).

 

In recent days, the Village has maintained its role as a center for movements that have challenged the wider American culture, for example, its role in the gay liberation movement. It contains Christopher Street and the Stonewall Inn, important landmarks, as well as the world's oldest gay and lesbian bookstore, Oscar Wilde Bookshop, founded in 1967. The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center – best known as simply "The Center" – has occupied the former Food & Maritime Trades High School at 208 West 13th Street since 1984. In 2006, the Village was the scene of an assault involving seven lesbians and a straight man that sparked appreciable media attention, with strong statements both defending and attacking the parties.

 

Thanks, Wikipedia

Information From:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Village,_Manhattan

 

East Village, Manhattan

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East Village, Manhattan

New York City Neighborhood

 

Location in Lower Manhattan

Named: 1960s[1]

Streets: 2nd Avenue, 1st Avenue, Avenue A, The Bowery, St. Mark's Place

Subway: F, V, 6 and L

Zip code: 10009, 10003 and 10002

Government

Federal: Congressional Districts 8, 12 and 14

State: New York State Assembly Districts 64, 66 and 74, New York State Senate Districts 25 and 29

City: New York City Council District 2

Local Manhattan Community Board 3

 

Neighborhood map

The East Village is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It lies east of Greenwich Village, south of Gramercy and Stuyvesant Town, and north of the Lower East Side. Within the East Village there are several smaller neighborhoods, including Alphabet City and The Bowery.

 

The neighborhood was once considered part of the Lower East Side, but in the 1960s it began to develop its own culture and became known as the East Village. Scores of artists and hippies began to move into the area, attracted by the base of Beatniks that had lived there since the 1950s. It has been the site of counterculture, protests and riots. The neighborhood is known as the birthplace and historical home of many artistic movements, including punk rock[2] and the Nuyorican literary movement.[3]

 

It is still known for a diverse community, vibrant nightlife and artistic sensibility, although in recent decades gentrification has changed the character of the neighborhood

 

History

 

Tompkins Square Park is the recreational and geographic heart of the East Village. It has historically been a part of counterculture, protest and riots.

New York City's Fourth of July fireworks over the neighborhood. The East Village's East River Park is a popular viewing destination.[edit] Formation of the neighborhood

Today's East Village was originally a farm owned by Dutch Governor Wouter van Twiller. Petrus Stuyvesant received the deed to this farm in 1651, and his family held on to the land for over seven generations, until a descendant began selling off parcels of the property in the early 1800s. Wealthy townhouses dotted the dirt roads for a few decades until the great Irish and German immigration of the 1840s and 1850s.

 

Speculative land owners began building multi unit dwellings on lots meant for single family homes, and began renting out rooms and apartments to the growing working class. The "East Village" was formerly known as Klein Deutschland ("Little Germany, Manhattan"); however, Little Germany dissolved after the SS General Slocum burned into the water in New York's East River on June 15, 1904. From the years roughly between the 1850s and the first decade of the 20th century, the "East Village" hosted the largest urban populations of Germans outside of Vienna and Berlin. It was America's first foreign language neighborhood; hundreds of political, social, sports and recreational clubs were set up during this period, some of these buildings still exist.

 

What is now the East Village once ended at the East River where Avenue C is now located. A large portion of the neighborhood was formed by landfill, including World War II debris and rubble from London, which was shipped across the Atlantic to provide foundation for the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive.[5]

 

[edit] The 'East Village' separates from the Lower East Side

Definitions vary, but the boundaries are roughly defined as east of Broadway and the Bowery from 14th Street down to Houston Street.[1]

  

Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village.Until the mid-1960s, this area was simply the northern part of the Lower East Side, with a similar culture of immigrant, working class life. In the 1950s the migration of Beatniks into the neighborhood later attracted hippies, musicians and artists well into 1960s.[1] The area was dubbed the "East Village", to dissociate it from the image of slums evoked by the Lower East Side. According to the New York Times, a 1964 guide called, "Earl Wilson's New York," wrote that "artists, poets and promoters of coffeehouses from Greenwich Village are trying to remelt the neighborhood under the high-sounding name of 'East Village.'"[1]

 

Newcomers and real estate brokers popularized the East Village name, and the term was adopted by the popular media by the mid-1960s.[6][7] In 1966 a psychedelic weekly newspaper, The East Village Other, appeared and The New York Times declared that the neighborhood "had come to be known" as the East Village in the June 5, 1967 edition.[1]

 

[edit] The music scene develops

In 1966 Andy Warhol promoted a series of shows, entitled The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, and featuring the music of the Velvet Underground, in a Polish ballroom on St Marks Place. On June 27, 1967, the Electric Circus opened in the same space with a benefit for the Children's Recreation Foundation (Chairman: Bobby Kennedy). The Grateful Dead, The Chambers Brothers, Sly & the Family Stone, the Allman Brothers were among the many rock bands that performed there before it closed in 1971.

  

Punk rock icon and writer Richard Hell still lives in the same apartment in Alphabet City that he has had since the 1970s.On March 8, 1968 Bill Graham opened the Fillmore East in a Yiddish Theatre on 2nd Avenue. The venue quickly became known as "The Church of Rock and Roll," with two-show concerts several nights a week. While booking many of the same bands that had played the Electric Circus, Graham particularly used the venue – and its West Coast counterpart, to establish new British bands like The Who, Pink Floyd, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Cream, and Led Zeppelin. It, too, closed in 1971.

 

CBGB, the nightclub considered by some to be the birthplace of punk music, was located in the neighborhood, as was the early punk standby A7. No Wave and New York hardcore also emerged in the area’s clubs. Among the many important bands and singers who got their start at these clubs and other venues in downtown Manhattan were: Patti Smith, Arto Lindsay, the Ramones, Blondie, Madonna, Talking Heads, the Plasmatics, Glenn Danzig, Sonic Youth, the Beastie Boys, Anthrax, and The Strokes. From 1983–1993, much of the more radical audio work was preserved as part of the Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine recording project, which was based in the nearby Lower East Side.

 

[edit] Rise in artistic prominence

 

Allen Ginsberg, a long-time resident, with poet Peter Orlovsky.Over the last 100 years, the East Village/Lower East Side neighborhood has been considered one of the strongest contributors to American arts and culture in New York.[8] During the great wave of immigration (Germans, Ukrainians, Polish) in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, countless families found their new homes in this area.

 

The East Village has been the birthplace of cultural icons and movements from the American gangster to the Warhol Superstars, folk music to punk rock, anti-folk to hip-hop, advanced education to organized activism, experimental theater to the Beat Generation and the community of experimental musicians, composers and improvisers now loosely known as the Downtown Scene.

 

Club 57, on St. Mark's Place, was an important incubator for performance art and visual art in the late 1970s and early 1980s; followed by Now Gallery, 8BC and ABC No Rio.

 

During the 1980s the East Village art gallery scene helped to galvanize a new post-modern art in America; showing such artists as Kiki Smith, Peter Halley, Keith Haring, Stephen Lack, Greer Lankton, Joseph Nechvatal, Nan Goldin, Jean-Michel Basquiat, David Wojnarowicz, Rick Prol, and Jeff Koons.[9]

 

[edit] The musical 'Rent'

The East Village is the setting for Jonathan Larson's musical Rent; set in the early 1990s, the story chronicles a group of friends over a year in their struggles against poverty, drug abuse and AIDS.

 

The musical Rent chronicled a period in the neighborhood's history that is bygone. It opened at the New York Theater Workshop in February 1996.[10] It described a New York City devastated by the AIDS epidemic, drugs and high crime, and followed several characters in the backdrop of their effort to make livings as artists.[11]

 

[edit] Decline of the art scene

 

The "Downtown Legends" wall at Mo Pitkins House of Satisfaction featured artists known in the East Village performance scene. A few featured in this photo include the Reverend Jen, Nick Zedd, Allen Ginsberg, Reverend Billy and Murray Hill (pictured).The East Village's performance and art scene has declined since its hey-day of the 1970s and 1980s.[12] One club that had opened to try to resurrect the neighborhood's past artistic prominence was Mo Pitkins' House of Satisfaction, part-owned by Jimmy Fallon of Saturday Night Live. It closed its doors in 2007, and was seen by many as another sign of the continued decline of the East Village performance and art scene, which has mostly moved to Williamsburg, Brooklyn.[13] Rapture Cafe also shut down in April 2008, and the neighborhood lost an important performance space and gathering ground for the gay community. There are still some performance spaces, such as Sidewalk Cafe on Avenue A, where downtown acts find space to exhibit their talent, and the poetry clubs.[14]

 

Punk scene icons stayed in the neighborhood as it changed. Richard Hell lives in the same apartment he has lived in since the 1970s, and Handsome Dick Manitoba of The Dictators owns and reigns over Manitoba's bar on Avenue B.

 

[edit] Internal neighborhoods

The East Village contains several hamlets of vibrant communities within itself.

 

[edit] Alphabet City

Main article: Alphabet City, Manhattan

 

The Nuyorican Poets Cafe has been located off Avenue C and East 3rd Street since its founding in 1973.Alphabet City comprises nearly two-thirds of the East Village. It also once was the archetype of a dangerous New York City neighborhood. Its turn-around was cause for The New York Times to observe in 2005 that Alphabet City went "from a drug-infested no man's land to the epicenter of downtown cool."[15] Its name comes from Avenues A, B, C, and D, the only avenues in Manhattan to have single-letter names. It is bordered by Houston Street to the south and 14th Street to the north where Avenue C ends. Some famous landmarks include Tompkins Square Park, the Nuyorican Poets Cafe and the Stuyvesant Town private residential community.

 

[edit] Loisaida

Main article: Loisaida

 

A Loisaida street fair in the Summer of 2008.Loisaida is a term derived from the Latino (and especially Nuyorican) pronunciation of "Lower East Side", a neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City. The term was originally coined by poet/activist, Bittman "Bimbo" Rivas in his 1974 poem "Loisaida". Loisaida Avenue is now an alternative name for Avenue C in the Alphabet City neighborhood of New York City, whose population has largely been Hispanic (mainly Nuyorican) since the late 1960s.

 

[edit] St. Mark's Place

Main article: St. Mark's Place

 

Artist Jim Power, known as the "Mosaic Man" for his public art tiling the neighborhood[16], at the 2009 St. Mark's Place Block Party.Eighth Street becomes St. Mark's place east of Third Avenue. It once had the cachet of Sutton Place, known as a secluded rich enclave in Manhattan, but which by the 1850s had become a place for boarding houses and a German immigrant community.[17] It is named after St Mark's Church in-the-Bowery, which was built on Stuyvesant Street but is now on 10th Street. St. Mark's Place once began at the intersection of the Bowery and Stuyvesant Street, but today the street runs from Third Avenue to Avenue A. Japanese street culture and a Japanese expatriate scene forms in the noodle shops and bars that line St. Mark's Place, also home to an aged punk culture and CBGB's new store. It is home to one of the only Automats in New York City (it has since closed).[18]

 

St. Mark's is along the “Mosaic Trail”, a trail of 80 mosaic-encrusted lampposts that runs from Broadway down Eighth Street to Avenue A, to Fourth Street and then back to Eighth Street. The project was undertaken by East Village public artist Jim Power, known as the "Mosaic Man".[16]

 

[edit] The Bowery

Main article: The Bowery

 

Once synonymous with 'Bowery Bums', the avenue has become a magnet for luxury condominiums as the neighborhood's rapid gentrification continues.The Bowery, former home to the punk-rock nightclub CBGB, was once known for its many homeless shelters, drug rehabilitation centers and bars. The phrase "On The Bowery", which has since fallen into disuse, was a generic way to say one was down-and-out.[19]

 

The Bow’ry, The Bow’ry!

They say such things,

and they do strange things

on the Bow’ry —From the musical A Trip to Chinatown, 1891

 

Today, the Bowery has become a boulevard of new luxury condominiums. It also is home to the Amato Opera and the Bowery Poetry Club, contributing to the neighborhood's reputation as a place for artistic pursuit. Artists Amiri Baraka and Taylor Mead hold regular readings and performances in the space.

 

The redevelopment of the avenue from flophouses to luxury condominiums has met with resistance from long-term residents, who agree the neighborhood has improved, but that its unique, gritty character is also disappearing.[20]

 

[edit] Parks and green space

[edit] Tompkins Square Park

Main article: Tompkins Square Park

 

The Tompkins Square dog run was the first in New York City, and is a social scene unto itself.[5]Tompkins Square Park is a 10.5 acre (42,000 m²) public park in the Alphabet City section of the East Village neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It is square in shape, and is bounded on the north by East 10th Street, on the east by Avenue B, on the south by East 7th Street, and on the west by Avenue A. St. Marks Place abuts the park to the west.

 

[edit] Tompkins Square Park Police Riot

Main article: Tompkins Square Park Police Riot (1988)

The Tompkins Square Park Police Riot was a defining moment for the neighborhood. In the late hours of August 6 into the morning hours of August 7, 1988 a riot broke out in Alphabet City's Tompkins Square Park. Groups of "drug pushers, homeless people and young people known as 'skinheads'" had largely taken over the East Village park, but the neighborhood was divided about what, if anything, should be done about it.[21] The local governing body, Manhattan Community Board 3, adopted a 1 am curfew for the previously 24-hour park, in an attempt to bring it under control.[22] On July 31, a rally against the curfew resulted in several clashes between protesters and police.[23]

 

[edit] East River Park

Main article: East River Park

 

East River Park below the Williamsburg Bridge.The park is 57 acres (230,000 m2) that runs along the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street.[24] It was designed in the 1930s by Robert Moses, who wanted to ensure there was parkland on the Lower East Side.[24]

 

[edit] Community gardens

There are reportedly over 640 community gardens in New York City—gardens run by local collectives within the neighborhood who are responsible for the gardens' upkeep—and an estimated 10 percent of those are located on the Lower East Side and East Village alone.[25]

 

[edit] Tower of Toys on Avenue B

The Avenue B and 6th Street Community Garden is one of the neighborhood's more notable for a now removed outdoor sculpture, the Tower of Toys, designed by artist and long-time garden gate-keeper, Eddie Boros. Boros died April 27, 2007.[26] The Tower was controversial in the neighborhood; some viewed it as a masterpiece, others as an eyesore.[26][27] The tower appeared in the opening credits for the television show NYPD Blue and also appears in the musical Rent.[26] In May 2008, it was dismantled. According to NYC Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe, the tower was rotting in sections that made it a safety hazard.[28] Its removal was seen as another symbol of the fading past of the neighborhood.[28]

 

[edit] Toyota Children’s Learning Garden

Located at 603 East 11th Street, the Toyota Children's Learning Garden is not technically a community garden, but it also fails to fit in the park category. Designed by landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh, the garden opened in May 2008 as part of the New York Restoration Project and is designed to teach children about plants.[29]

 

[edit] New York City Marble Cemetery

 

A production of John Reed's All the World's a Grave in the Marble Cemetery, which does not contain headstones.The cemetery is actually two, which sit on 2nd Street between 1st Avenue and 2nd Avenue. They are open the fourth Sunday of every month.[30] The first and more prominent is the City cemetery, which is second oldest non-sectarian cemetery in New York City. It sits next to the oldest public cemetery in New York City not affiliated with any religion, the "New York Marble Cemetery."[31] The cemetery was opened in 1831 and at one point contained ex-U.S. President James Monroe.[32]

 

[edit] Culture and events

 

Longtime Mistress of Ceremonies at eatery Lucky Cheng's, Miss Understood stops a bus in front of the restaurant on First Avenue.Other than geography, the East Village's most notable commonalities with Greenwich Village are a colorful history, vibrant social and cultural outlets, and street names that often diverge from the norm.

 

The Bowery is a north-south avenue which also lends its name to the somewhat overlapping neighborhood of the Bowery; St. Mark's Place, a crosstown street well-known for counterculture businesses; and Astor Place/Cooper Square, home of the Public Theater and the Cooper Union. Nearby universities like New York University (NYU), The New School, and The Cooper Union have dormitories in the neighborhood.

 

[edit] Ethnicity and religion

 

Photograph of St. Nicholas with parts of Second Street visible. The church and almost all buildings on the street were demolished in the 1960's and replaced with parking lots.

Former parishioners of St. Mary's Help of Christians pray outside the shuttered church in August 2008.According to 2000 census figures provided by the New York City Department of City Planning, which includes the Lower East Side in its calculation, the neighborhood was 35% Asian, 28% non-Hispanic white, 27% Hispanic and 7% black.[33]

 

On October 9, 1966, A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, founder of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, held the first recorded outdoor chanting session of the Hare Krishna mantra outside of the Indian subcontinent at Tompkins Square Park.[34] This is considered the founding of the Hare Krishna religion in the United States, and the large tree close to the center of the Park is demarcated as a special religious site for Krishna adherents.[34] The late poet Allen Ginsberg, who lived and died in the East Village, attended the ceremony.

 

There are several Roman Catholic churches in the East Village which have fallen victim to financial hardship particularly in the past decade. Unable to maintain their properties, the Roman Catholic Church has shuttered many of them - including St. Mary's Help of Christians on East 12th Street, as well as St. Ann's. There has recently been much controversy over St. Brigid's, the historical parish on Tompkins Square Park.

 

[edit] Ukrainian history

Since the 1890s there has been a large Ukrainian concentration roughly from 10th Street to 5th Street, between 3rd Avenue and Avenue A. The post-World War II diaspora, consisting primarily of Western Ukrainian intelligentsia, also settled down in the area. Several churches, including St. George's Catholic Church; Ukrainian restaurants and butcher shops; The Ukrainian Museum; the Shevchenko Scientific Society; and the Ukrainian Cultural Center are evidence of the impact of this culture on the area.

 

[edit] Gentrification

[edit] New York University, a controversial resident

Residents of the East Village have a love-hate relationship with New York University, which owns and maintains many buildings, particularly in much of downtown Manhattan and in the neighborhoods surrounding its main campus in Greenwich Village (a distinct neighborhood from the East Village).[35]

 

St. Ann's Church, a rusticated-stone structure on East 12th Street with a Romanesque tower that dated to 1847 was sold to the University to make way for a monolithic 26-story, 700 bed dormitory for students. The University did protect and maintain St. Ann's original facade and small plaza immediately fronting the 12th Street sidewalk. The result is a blended, softer abutment of the new dorm building (which does rise dramatically above the facade) up behind the old St. Ann's entry way. New York University has built many dorms, and this one in particular is now the tallest structure in the area. "There are larger changes going on here," said Lynne Brown, vice president of university relations and public affairs. "I fear this tendency to blame any trend residents don't like happening at the doorstep of NYU," said Brown, mentioning that the university has been one of the longest inhabitants of the East Village. But Nancy Cosie, a 20 year resident and former St. Ann's parishioner, does not buy that argument. "Enough is enough," Cosie exclaimed to The Village Voice, "This is not a campus. This is a neighborhood, and this is my home."[35] NYU's destruction or purchasing of many historic buildings (such as the Peter Cooper post office) have made it symbolic of change that many long-time residents fear is destroying what made the neighborhood interesting and attractive.[36] "I live on Avenue B and 9th Street," an NYU student said. "I know I'm part of the problem - gentrification that is. But where am I supposed to live?"[36]

 

NYU has often been at odds with residents of both the East and West Villages, as legendary urban preservationist Jane Jacobs battled the school in the 1960s.[37] "She spoke of how universities and hospitals often had a special kind of hubris reflected in the fact that they often thought it was OK to destroy a neighborhood to suit their needs,” said Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.[38]

 

[edit] Museums, libraries, performance and art spaces

 

The Bowery Poetry Club.

Sherry Vine and Joey Arias during the 2009 HOWL! Festival.New York Public Library Tompkins Square branch [3]

The Fales Library of NYU

East Village Visitors Center - 308 Bowery

The Ukrainian Museum

New Museum of Contemporary Art

Museum of Jewish Heritage

Performance Space 122

Anthology Film Archives

The Stone

Bouwerie Lane Theatre

Amato Opera

Danspace Project

The Ontological-Hysteric Theater

The Pearl Theatre Company [4]

Stomp! (Theatrical show)

Metropolitan Playhouse[5]

Mercury Lounge (live music)

Sidewalk Cafe (performance and live music)

Bowery Ballroom (concerts and shows)

Nuyorican Poets Cafe (music, poetry, readings, slams)

Bowery Poetry Club (music, poetry, readings, slams)

La MaMa E.T.C. (performance theater)

Cooper Union (speeches, presentations, public lectures and readings)

[edit] Neighborhood festivals

Mayday Festival - May 1; yearly.

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival - August; yearly.[6]

HOWL! Festival - September; yearly.[7][8]

East Village Radio Festival - September 6, 2008 [9]

Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade - October; yearly.[10]

East Village Theater Festival - August 3–23, 2009.[11]

FAB! Festival & Block Party - Last weekend in September annually, Sept 25, 2010 [12]

[edit] Media

 

Many film shoots take place in the East Village; here a period movie with antique police cars is filmed on East 4th Street.[edit] Radio

East Village Radio

[edit] Local news

The Village Voice

The Villager

East-Village.com

EastVillageFeed.com

[edit] Cinemas

Anthology Film Archives

Landmark's Sunshine Theater

Village East Cinema

City Cinema Village East

Two Boots Pioneer Theater

[edit] Notable residents past and present

 

Handsome Dick Manitoba of The Dictators.

Madonna lived in the neighborhood when she was just starting out in her career.[39]Handsome Dick Manitoba, who owns Manitoba's bar on Avenue B off Tompkins Square Park.

Darren Aronofsky and his wife, Rachel Weisz

Chris Cain, Bassist for the Indie-Rock band We Are Scientists

Barbara Feinman

John Leguizamo

Daniel Radcliffe

Agim Kaba

Rosario Dawson

Tom Kalin

Vashtie Kola director

W. H. Auden[40]

Greer Lankton, Artist/Doll maker

Ellen Stewart founder of La MaMa, E.T.C. (Experimental Theatre Club) in 1961.

Madonna lived there in the 1980s.

John Lurie,musician, painter, actor, producer.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, graffiti artist

David Bowes, painter

Allen Ginsberg (1926–1997), Beat Generation poet and author of Howl.[41]

Keith Haring, neo-pop artist

Claes Oldenburg (1929-), sculptor, had a studio at 46 East 3rd Street in the late 1950s.[42]

Candy Darling, actress/Warhol superstar

Bill Raymond, actor

Ryan Adams, alt-country musician

David Cross, actor, comedian

Negin Farsad, writer, director, comedian

Nan Goldin, photographer

Stephen Lack, actor, painter

Ronnie Landfield, (1947-), painter, lived on E. 11th street, mid-1960s[43]

Kiki Smith sculptor

John Zorn composer, musician

Richard Hell, musician, author

Abbie Hoffman (1936–1989), 1960s political activist[44]

Ayun Halliday, actress and writer, and wife of playwright Greg Kotis

Greg Kotis, playwright, and husband of actress and writer Ayun Halliday

Jerry Rubin (1938–1994), 1960s political activist - with Hoffman founded the Yippies in a basement apartment at 30 St. Marks Place[44]

Cookie Mueller, actress, model

Paul Krassner (1932-), publisher of The Realist

Walter Bowart (1939–2007), co-founder editor/ of The East Village Other

Allan Katzman, co-founder/editor of The East Village Other

Tuli Kupferberg, (1923-), Beat Generation poet, and one of the original Fugs

Ed Sanders, (1939-), New York School poet and one of the original Fugs

Joseph Nechvatal (1951-) early digital artist and founder of the Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine

Randy Harrison, actor

Joel Resnicoff, artist and fashion illustrator.

Regina Spektor, (1980-) Singer-songwriter and pianist.

Rachel Trachtenburg (1993-) singer and musician

Tom Otterness sculptor

Steven Fishbach, runner-up of Survivor: Tocantins

Chloe Sevigny actress

Conor Oberst musician

Lou Reed, musician

Julian Casablancas, musician

Mark Ronson

Arthur Russell, musician[45]

Jack Smith filmmaker, artist

Iggy Pop, performer, musician

 

Zhang Huan, Pilgrimage, 2001

 

Located outside of the Denver Art Museum is Pilgrimage, a life-size granite sculpture of Chinese performance artist Zhang Huan lying naked and face-down. It is based on Zhang's first performance after moving to the United States in 1998. The performance, Pilgrimage: Wind and Water in New York, was part of the Inside Out: New Chinese Art exhibition at P.S. 1, a contemporary art museum in Queens, New York. For this work, Zhang performed the remarkable feat of lying naked, face-down on a block of ice placed on a traditional Chinese bed for 10 minutes on a public street. The work, Zhang says, is about his experience coming to America and his fear of New York City. Zhang explains "I do like the city, but at the same time I have an unnameable fear. I want to feel it with my body, just as I feel the ice. I try to melt off a reality in the way I try to melt off the ice with the warmth of my body."* Zhang's performance is test of endurance but also a kind of existential meditation. Zhang believes he had to be naked to feel the full severity of the ice against his body and to arrive at a spiritual state of being. When he puts his body in extremely uncomfortable situations, he tries to distance himself from his condition, or as he puts it, "let my mind leave my body." When this happens, he can't feel any pain. Zhang says for him, this is a spiritual experience. A performance artist at heart, Zhang thinks of Pilgrimage as an active and interactive work: "In the winter, the water keeps the form of the body as art, but in the summer, when the water is not frozen, I want people to just have a drink."* Because of the continuous changes the sculpture will endure throughout the seasons, Zhang considers this sculpture to be a longer performance, one that never ends.

 

*Tom Whitten, "Body Politic: The Performance Art of Zhang Huan," Asian Avenue, November 2008, 13.

* Mary Jane Jacob, Zhang Huan, Buddha Mind in Contemporary Art (California: University of California Press, 2004).

 

Porto Rico Importing Co., East Village, NY.

Porto Rico is a fourth-generation family-owned ‪#‎tea‬ and ‪#‎coffee‬ business that was founded in 1907 on Bleecker Street in Greenwich Village. Years ago, the roasting was done on premises, but more recently it has moved to their Williamsburg warehouse. We will be leading a special FREE Store Front:The Disappearing Face of New York 1 hour walking tour of the East Village this Sunday, May 3rd at 1pm for Jane's Walk.

Jane's Walk is a global "movement of free, citizen-led walking tours inspired by Jane Jacobs." The New York City walks are sponsored by the Municipal Arts Society and are free of charge to everyone. We will be visiting Porto Rico and the locations of many other small mom-and-pop storefronts as well as remembering ones that have disappeared. We will be discussing the fact that many of these small businesses are closing in the face of modernization, gentrification, and conformity and that the unique appearance of this vibrant neighborhood suffers in the process.

Our starting point will be in front of St. Mark's Church in the Bowery at 131 East 10th Street at 2nd Avenue at 1 pm.

For more information about our tour please visit : janeswalk.org/…/store-front-disappearing-face-new-y…/

‪#‎masnyc‬ ‪#‎JanesWalkNYC‬ ‪#‎saveNYC‬ ‪#‎storefront‬

Information From:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Village,_Manhattan

 

East Village, Manhattan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

East Village, Manhattan

New York City Neighborhood

 

Location in Lower Manhattan

Named: 1960s[1]

Streets: 2nd Avenue, 1st Avenue, Avenue A, The Bowery, St. Mark's Place

Subway: F, V, 6 and L

Zip code: 10009, 10003 and 10002

Government

Federal: Congressional Districts 8, 12 and 14

State: New York State Assembly Districts 64, 66 and 74, New York State Senate Districts 25 and 29

City: New York City Council District 2

Local Manhattan Community Board 3

 

Neighborhood map

The East Village is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It lies east of Greenwich Village, south of Gramercy and Stuyvesant Town, and north of the Lower East Side. Within the East Village there are several smaller neighborhoods, including Alphabet City and The Bowery.

 

The neighborhood was once considered part of the Lower East Side, but in the 1960s it began to develop its own culture and became known as the East Village. Scores of artists and hippies began to move into the area, attracted by the base of Beatniks that had lived there since the 1950s. It has been the site of counterculture, protests and riots. The neighborhood is known as the birthplace and historical home of many artistic movements, including punk rock[2] and the Nuyorican literary movement.[3]

 

It is still known for a diverse community, vibrant nightlife and artistic sensibility, although in recent decades gentrification has changed the character of the neighborhood

 

History

 

Tompkins Square Park is the recreational and geographic heart of the East Village. It has historically been a part of counterculture, protest and riots.

New York City's Fourth of July fireworks over the neighborhood. The East Village's East River Park is a popular viewing destination.[edit] Formation of the neighborhood

Today's East Village was originally a farm owned by Dutch Governor Wouter van Twiller. Petrus Stuyvesant received the deed to this farm in 1651, and his family held on to the land for over seven generations, until a descendant began selling off parcels of the property in the early 1800s. Wealthy townhouses dotted the dirt roads for a few decades until the great Irish and German immigration of the 1840s and 1850s.

 

Speculative land owners began building multi unit dwellings on lots meant for single family homes, and began renting out rooms and apartments to the growing working class. The "East Village" was formerly known as Klein Deutschland ("Little Germany, Manhattan"); however, Little Germany dissolved after the SS General Slocum burned into the water in New York's East River on June 15, 1904. From the years roughly between the 1850s and the first decade of the 20th century, the "East Village" hosted the largest urban populations of Germans outside of Vienna and Berlin. It was America's first foreign language neighborhood; hundreds of political, social, sports and recreational clubs were set up during this period, some of these buildings still exist.

 

What is now the East Village once ended at the East River where Avenue C is now located. A large portion of the neighborhood was formed by landfill, including World War II debris and rubble from London, which was shipped across the Atlantic to provide foundation for the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive.[5]

 

[edit] The 'East Village' separates from the Lower East Side

Definitions vary, but the boundaries are roughly defined as east of Broadway and the Bowery from 14th Street down to Houston Street.[1]

  

Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village.Until the mid-1960s, this area was simply the northern part of the Lower East Side, with a similar culture of immigrant, working class life. In the 1950s the migration of Beatniks into the neighborhood later attracted hippies, musicians and artists well into 1960s.[1] The area was dubbed the "East Village", to dissociate it from the image of slums evoked by the Lower East Side. According to the New York Times, a 1964 guide called, "Earl Wilson's New York," wrote that "artists, poets and promoters of coffeehouses from Greenwich Village are trying to remelt the neighborhood under the high-sounding name of 'East Village.'"[1]

 

Newcomers and real estate brokers popularized the East Village name, and the term was adopted by the popular media by the mid-1960s.[6][7] In 1966 a psychedelic weekly newspaper, The East Village Other, appeared and The New York Times declared that the neighborhood "had come to be known" as the East Village in the June 5, 1967 edition.[1]

 

[edit] The music scene develops

In 1966 Andy Warhol promoted a series of shows, entitled The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, and featuring the music of the Velvet Underground, in a Polish ballroom on St Marks Place. On June 27, 1967, the Electric Circus opened in the same space with a benefit for the Children's Recreation Foundation (Chairman: Bobby Kennedy). The Grateful Dead, The Chambers Brothers, Sly & the Family Stone, the Allman Brothers were among the many rock bands that performed there before it closed in 1971.

  

Punk rock icon and writer Richard Hell still lives in the same apartment in Alphabet City that he has had since the 1970s.On March 8, 1968 Bill Graham opened the Fillmore East in a Yiddish Theatre on 2nd Avenue. The venue quickly became known as "The Church of Rock and Roll," with two-show concerts several nights a week. While booking many of the same bands that had played the Electric Circus, Graham particularly used the venue – and its West Coast counterpart, to establish new British bands like The Who, Pink Floyd, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Cream, and Led Zeppelin. It, too, closed in 1971.

 

CBGB, the nightclub considered by some to be the birthplace of punk music, was located in the neighborhood, as was the early punk standby A7. No Wave and New York hardcore also emerged in the area’s clubs. Among the many important bands and singers who got their start at these clubs and other venues in downtown Manhattan were: Patti Smith, Arto Lindsay, the Ramones, Blondie, Madonna, Talking Heads, the Plasmatics, Glenn Danzig, Sonic Youth, the Beastie Boys, Anthrax, and The Strokes. From 1983–1993, much of the more radical audio work was preserved as part of the Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine recording project, which was based in the nearby Lower East Side.

 

[edit] Rise in artistic prominence

 

Allen Ginsberg, a long-time resident, with poet Peter Orlovsky.Over the last 100 years, the East Village/Lower East Side neighborhood has been considered one of the strongest contributors to American arts and culture in New York.[8] During the great wave of immigration (Germans, Ukrainians, Polish) in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, countless families found their new homes in this area.

 

The East Village has been the birthplace of cultural icons and movements from the American gangster to the Warhol Superstars, folk music to punk rock, anti-folk to hip-hop, advanced education to organized activism, experimental theater to the Beat Generation and the community of experimental musicians, composers and improvisers now loosely known as the Downtown Scene.

 

Club 57, on St. Mark's Place, was an important incubator for performance art and visual art in the late 1970s and early 1980s; followed by Now Gallery, 8BC and ABC No Rio.

 

During the 1980s the East Village art gallery scene helped to galvanize a new post-modern art in America; showing such artists as Kiki Smith, Peter Halley, Keith Haring, Stephen Lack, Greer Lankton, Joseph Nechvatal, Nan Goldin, Jean-Michel Basquiat, David Wojnarowicz, Rick Prol, and Jeff Koons.[9]

 

[edit] The musical 'Rent'

The East Village is the setting for Jonathan Larson's musical Rent; set in the early 1990s, the story chronicles a group of friends over a year in their struggles against poverty, drug abuse and AIDS.

 

The musical Rent chronicled a period in the neighborhood's history that is bygone. It opened at the New York Theater Workshop in February 1996.[10] It described a New York City devastated by the AIDS epidemic, drugs and high crime, and followed several characters in the backdrop of their effort to make livings as artists.[11]

 

[edit] Decline of the art scene

 

The "Downtown Legends" wall at Mo Pitkins House of Satisfaction featured artists known in the East Village performance scene. A few featured in this photo include the Reverend Jen, Nick Zedd, Allen Ginsberg, Reverend Billy and Murray Hill (pictured).The East Village's performance and art scene has declined since its hey-day of the 1970s and 1980s.[12] One club that had opened to try to resurrect the neighborhood's past artistic prominence was Mo Pitkins' House of Satisfaction, part-owned by Jimmy Fallon of Saturday Night Live. It closed its doors in 2007, and was seen by many as another sign of the continued decline of the East Village performance and art scene, which has mostly moved to Williamsburg, Brooklyn.[13] Rapture Cafe also shut down in April 2008, and the neighborhood lost an important performance space and gathering ground for the gay community. There are still some performance spaces, such as Sidewalk Cafe on Avenue A, where downtown acts find space to exhibit their talent, and the poetry clubs.[14]

 

Punk scene icons stayed in the neighborhood as it changed. Richard Hell lives in the same apartment he has lived in since the 1970s, and Handsome Dick Manitoba of The Dictators owns and reigns over Manitoba's bar on Avenue B.

 

[edit] Internal neighborhoods

The East Village contains several hamlets of vibrant communities within itself.

 

[edit] Alphabet City

Main article: Alphabet City, Manhattan

 

The Nuyorican Poets Cafe has been located off Avenue C and East 3rd Street since its founding in 1973.Alphabet City comprises nearly two-thirds of the East Village. It also once was the archetype of a dangerous New York City neighborhood. Its turn-around was cause for The New York Times to observe in 2005 that Alphabet City went "from a drug-infested no man's land to the epicenter of downtown cool."[15] Its name comes from Avenues A, B, C, and D, the only avenues in Manhattan to have single-letter names. It is bordered by Houston Street to the south and 14th Street to the north where Avenue C ends. Some famous landmarks include Tompkins Square Park, the Nuyorican Poets Cafe and the Stuyvesant Town private residential community.

 

[edit] Loisaida

Main article: Loisaida

 

A Loisaida street fair in the Summer of 2008.Loisaida is a term derived from the Latino (and especially Nuyorican) pronunciation of "Lower East Side", a neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City. The term was originally coined by poet/activist, Bittman "Bimbo" Rivas in his 1974 poem "Loisaida". Loisaida Avenue is now an alternative name for Avenue C in the Alphabet City neighborhood of New York City, whose population has largely been Hispanic (mainly Nuyorican) since the late 1960s.

 

[edit] St. Mark's Place

Main article: St. Mark's Place

 

Artist Jim Power, known as the "Mosaic Man" for his public art tiling the neighborhood[16], at the 2009 St. Mark's Place Block Party.Eighth Street becomes St. Mark's place east of Third Avenue. It once had the cachet of Sutton Place, known as a secluded rich enclave in Manhattan, but which by the 1850s had become a place for boarding houses and a German immigrant community.[17] It is named after St Mark's Church in-the-Bowery, which was built on Stuyvesant Street but is now on 10th Street. St. Mark's Place once began at the intersection of the Bowery and Stuyvesant Street, but today the street runs from Third Avenue to Avenue A. Japanese street culture and a Japanese expatriate scene forms in the noodle shops and bars that line St. Mark's Place, also home to an aged punk culture and CBGB's new store. It is home to one of the only Automats in New York City (it has since closed).[18]

 

St. Mark's is along the “Mosaic Trail”, a trail of 80 mosaic-encrusted lampposts that runs from Broadway down Eighth Street to Avenue A, to Fourth Street and then back to Eighth Street. The project was undertaken by East Village public artist Jim Power, known as the "Mosaic Man".[16]

 

[edit] The Bowery

Main article: The Bowery

 

Once synonymous with 'Bowery Bums', the avenue has become a magnet for luxury condominiums as the neighborhood's rapid gentrification continues.The Bowery, former home to the punk-rock nightclub CBGB, was once known for its many homeless shelters, drug rehabilitation centers and bars. The phrase "On The Bowery", which has since fallen into disuse, was a generic way to say one was down-and-out.[19]

 

The Bow’ry, The Bow’ry!

They say such things,

and they do strange things

on the Bow’ry —From the musical A Trip to Chinatown, 1891

 

Today, the Bowery has become a boulevard of new luxury condominiums. It also is home to the Amato Opera and the Bowery Poetry Club, contributing to the neighborhood's reputation as a place for artistic pursuit. Artists Amiri Baraka and Taylor Mead hold regular readings and performances in the space.

 

The redevelopment of the avenue from flophouses to luxury condominiums has met with resistance from long-term residents, who agree the neighborhood has improved, but that its unique, gritty character is also disappearing.[20]

 

[edit] Parks and green space

[edit] Tompkins Square Park

Main article: Tompkins Square Park

 

The Tompkins Square dog run was the first in New York City, and is a social scene unto itself.[5]Tompkins Square Park is a 10.5 acre (42,000 m²) public park in the Alphabet City section of the East Village neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It is square in shape, and is bounded on the north by East 10th Street, on the east by Avenue B, on the south by East 7th Street, and on the west by Avenue A. St. Marks Place abuts the park to the west.

 

[edit] Tompkins Square Park Police Riot

Main article: Tompkins Square Park Police Riot (1988)

The Tompkins Square Park Police Riot was a defining moment for the neighborhood. In the late hours of August 6 into the morning hours of August 7, 1988 a riot broke out in Alphabet City's Tompkins Square Park. Groups of "drug pushers, homeless people and young people known as 'skinheads'" had largely taken over the East Village park, but the neighborhood was divided about what, if anything, should be done about it.[21] The local governing body, Manhattan Community Board 3, adopted a 1 am curfew for the previously 24-hour park, in an attempt to bring it under control.[22] On July 31, a rally against the curfew resulted in several clashes between protesters and police.[23]

 

[edit] East River Park

Main article: East River Park

 

East River Park below the Williamsburg Bridge.The park is 57 acres (230,000 m2) that runs along the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street.[24] It was designed in the 1930s by Robert Moses, who wanted to ensure there was parkland on the Lower East Side.[24]

 

[edit] Community gardens

There are reportedly over 640 community gardens in New York City—gardens run by local collectives within the neighborhood who are responsible for the gardens' upkeep—and an estimated 10 percent of those are located on the Lower East Side and East Village alone.[25]

 

[edit] Tower of Toys on Avenue B

The Avenue B and 6th Street Community Garden is one of the neighborhood's more notable for a now removed outdoor sculpture, the Tower of Toys, designed by artist and long-time garden gate-keeper, Eddie Boros. Boros died April 27, 2007.[26] The Tower was controversial in the neighborhood; some viewed it as a masterpiece, others as an eyesore.[26][27] The tower appeared in the opening credits for the television show NYPD Blue and also appears in the musical Rent.[26] In May 2008, it was dismantled. According to NYC Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe, the tower was rotting in sections that made it a safety hazard.[28] Its removal was seen as another symbol of the fading past of the neighborhood.[28]

 

[edit] Toyota Children’s Learning Garden

Located at 603 East 11th Street, the Toyota Children's Learning Garden is not technically a community garden, but it also fails to fit in the park category. Designed by landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh, the garden opened in May 2008 as part of the New York Restoration Project and is designed to teach children about plants.[29]

 

[edit] New York City Marble Cemetery

 

A production of John Reed's All the World's a Grave in the Marble Cemetery, which does not contain headstones.The cemetery is actually two, which sit on 2nd Street between 1st Avenue and 2nd Avenue. They are open the fourth Sunday of every month.[30] The first and more prominent is the City cemetery, which is second oldest non-sectarian cemetery in New York City. It sits next to the oldest public cemetery in New York City not affiliated with any religion, the "New York Marble Cemetery."[31] The cemetery was opened in 1831 and at one point contained ex-U.S. President James Monroe.[32]

 

[edit] Culture and events

 

Longtime Mistress of Ceremonies at eatery Lucky Cheng's, Miss Understood stops a bus in front of the restaurant on First Avenue.Other than geography, the East Village's most notable commonalities with Greenwich Village are a colorful history, vibrant social and cultural outlets, and street names that often diverge from the norm.

 

The Bowery is a north-south avenue which also lends its name to the somewhat overlapping neighborhood of the Bowery; St. Mark's Place, a crosstown street well-known for counterculture businesses; and Astor Place/Cooper Square, home of the Public Theater and the Cooper Union. Nearby universities like New York University (NYU), The New School, and The Cooper Union have dormitories in the neighborhood.

 

[edit] Ethnicity and religion

 

Photograph of St. Nicholas with parts of Second Street visible. The church and almost all buildings on the street were demolished in the 1960's and replaced with parking lots.

Former parishioners of St. Mary's Help of Christians pray outside the shuttered church in August 2008.According to 2000 census figures provided by the New York City Department of City Planning, which includes the Lower East Side in its calculation, the neighborhood was 35% Asian, 28% non-Hispanic white, 27% Hispanic and 7% black.[33]

 

On October 9, 1966, A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, founder of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, held the first recorded outdoor chanting session of the Hare Krishna mantra outside of the Indian subcontinent at Tompkins Square Park.[34] This is considered the founding of the Hare Krishna religion in the United States, and the large tree close to the center of the Park is demarcated as a special religious site for Krishna adherents.[34] The late poet Allen Ginsberg, who lived and died in the East Village, attended the ceremony.

 

There are several Roman Catholic churches in the East Village which have fallen victim to financial hardship particularly in the past decade. Unable to maintain their properties, the Roman Catholic Church has shuttered many of them - including St. Mary's Help of Christians on East 12th Street, as well as St. Ann's. There has recently been much controversy over St. Brigid's, the historical parish on Tompkins Square Park.

 

[edit] Ukrainian history

Since the 1890s there has been a large Ukrainian concentration roughly from 10th Street to 5th Street, between 3rd Avenue and Avenue A. The post-World War II diaspora, consisting primarily of Western Ukrainian intelligentsia, also settled down in the area. Several churches, including St. George's Catholic Church; Ukrainian restaurants and butcher shops; The Ukrainian Museum; the Shevchenko Scientific Society; and the Ukrainian Cultural Center are evidence of the impact of this culture on the area.

 

[edit] Gentrification

[edit] New York University, a controversial resident

Residents of the East Village have a love-hate relationship with New York University, which owns and maintains many buildings, particularly in much of downtown Manhattan and in the neighborhoods surrounding its main campus in Greenwich Village (a distinct neighborhood from the East Village).[35]

 

St. Ann's Church, a rusticated-stone structure on East 12th Street with a Romanesque tower that dated to 1847 was sold to the University to make way for a monolithic 26-story, 700 bed dormitory for students. The University did protect and maintain St. Ann's original facade and small plaza immediately fronting the 12th Street sidewalk. The result is a blended, softer abutment of the new dorm building (which does rise dramatically above the facade) up behind the old St. Ann's entry way. New York University has built many dorms, and this one in particular is now the tallest structure in the area. "There are larger changes going on here," said Lynne Brown, vice president of university relations and public affairs. "I fear this tendency to blame any trend residents don't like happening at the doorstep of NYU," said Brown, mentioning that the university has been one of the longest inhabitants of the East Village. But Nancy Cosie, a 20 year resident and former St. Ann's parishioner, does not buy that argument. "Enough is enough," Cosie exclaimed to The Village Voice, "This is not a campus. This is a neighborhood, and this is my home."[35] NYU's destruction or purchasing of many historic buildings (such as the Peter Cooper post office) have made it symbolic of change that many long-time residents fear is destroying what made the neighborhood interesting and attractive.[36] "I live on Avenue B and 9th Street," an NYU student said. "I know I'm part of the problem - gentrification that is. But where am I supposed to live?"[36]

 

NYU has often been at odds with residents of both the East and West Villages, as legendary urban preservationist Jane Jacobs battled the school in the 1960s.[37] "She spoke of how universities and hospitals often had a special kind of hubris reflected in the fact that they often thought it was OK to destroy a neighborhood to suit their needs,” said Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.[38]

 

[edit] Museums, libraries, performance and art spaces

 

The Bowery Poetry Club.

Sherry Vine and Joey Arias during the 2009 HOWL! Festival.New York Public Library Tompkins Square branch [3]

The Fales Library of NYU

East Village Visitors Center - 308 Bowery

The Ukrainian Museum

New Museum of Contemporary Art

Museum of Jewish Heritage

Performance Space 122

Anthology Film Archives

The Stone

Bouwerie Lane Theatre

Amato Opera

Danspace Project

The Ontological-Hysteric Theater

The Pearl Theatre Company [4]

Stomp! (Theatrical show)

Metropolitan Playhouse[5]

Mercury Lounge (live music)

Sidewalk Cafe (performance and live music)

Bowery Ballroom (concerts and shows)

Nuyorican Poets Cafe (music, poetry, readings, slams)

Bowery Poetry Club (music, poetry, readings, slams)

La MaMa E.T.C. (performance theater)

Cooper Union (speeches, presentations, public lectures and readings)

[edit] Neighborhood festivals

Mayday Festival - May 1; yearly.

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival - August; yearly.[6]

HOWL! Festival - September; yearly.[7][8]

East Village Radio Festival - September 6, 2008 [9]

Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade - October; yearly.[10]

East Village Theater Festival - August 3–23, 2009.[11]

FAB! Festival & Block Party - Last weekend in September annually, Sept 25, 2010 [12]

[edit] Media

 

Many film shoots take place in the East Village; here a period movie with antique police cars is filmed on East 4th Street.[edit] Radio

East Village Radio

[edit] Local news

The Village Voice

The Villager

East-Village.com

EastVillageFeed.com

[edit] Cinemas

Anthology Film Archives

Landmark's Sunshine Theater

Village East Cinema

City Cinema Village East

Two Boots Pioneer Theater

[edit] Notable residents past and present

 

Handsome Dick Manitoba of The Dictators.

Madonna lived in the neighborhood when she was just starting out in her career.[39]Handsome Dick Manitoba, who owns Manitoba's bar on Avenue B off Tompkins Square Park.

Darren Aronofsky and his wife, Rachel Weisz

Chris Cain, Bassist for the Indie-Rock band We Are Scientists

Barbara Feinman

John Leguizamo

Daniel Radcliffe

Agim Kaba

Rosario Dawson

Tom Kalin

Vashtie Kola director

W. H. Auden[40]

Greer Lankton, Artist/Doll maker

Ellen Stewart founder of La MaMa, E.T.C. (Experimental Theatre Club) in 1961.

Madonna lived there in the 1980s.

John Lurie,musician, painter, actor, producer.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, graffiti artist

David Bowes, painter

Allen Ginsberg (1926–1997), Beat Generation poet and author of Howl.[41]

Keith Haring, neo-pop artist

Claes Oldenburg (1929-), sculptor, had a studio at 46 East 3rd Street in the late 1950s.[42]

Candy Darling, actress/Warhol superstar

Bill Raymond, actor

Ryan Adams, alt-country musician

David Cross, actor, comedian

Negin Farsad, writer, director, comedian

Nan Goldin, photographer

Stephen Lack, actor, painter

Ronnie Landfield, (1947-), painter, lived on E. 11th street, mid-1960s[43]

Kiki Smith sculptor

John Zorn composer, musician

Richard Hell, musician, author

Abbie Hoffman (1936–1989), 1960s political activist[44]

Ayun Halliday, actress and writer, and wife of playwright Greg Kotis

Greg Kotis, playwright, and husband of actress and writer Ayun Halliday

Jerry Rubin (1938–1994), 1960s political activist - with Hoffman founded the Yippies in a basement apartment at 30 St. Marks Place[44]

Cookie Mueller, actress, model

Paul Krassner (1932-), publisher of The Realist

Walter Bowart (1939–2007), co-founder editor/ of The East Village Other

Allan Katzman, co-founder/editor of The East Village Other

Tuli Kupferberg, (1923-), Beat Generation poet, and one of the original Fugs

Ed Sanders, (1939-), New York School poet and one of the original Fugs

Joseph Nechvatal (1951-) early digital artist and founder of the Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine

Randy Harrison, actor

Joel Resnicoff, artist and fashion illustrator.

Regina Spektor, (1980-) Singer-songwriter and pianist.

Rachel Trachtenburg (1993-) singer and musician

Tom Otterness sculptor

Steven Fishbach, runner-up of Survivor: Tocantins

Chloe Sevigny actress

Conor Oberst musician

Lou Reed, musician

Julian Casablancas, musician

Mark Ronson

Arthur Russell, musician[45]

Jack Smith filmmaker, artist

Iggy Pop, performer, musician

 

Information From:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Village,_Manhattan

 

East Village, Manhattan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

East Village, Manhattan

New York City Neighborhood

 

Location in Lower Manhattan

Named: 1960s[1]

Streets: 2nd Avenue, 1st Avenue, Avenue A, The Bowery, St. Mark's Place

Subway: F, V, 6 and L

Zip code: 10009, 10003 and 10002

Government

Federal: Congressional Districts 8, 12 and 14

State: New York State Assembly Districts 64, 66 and 74, New York State Senate Districts 25 and 29

City: New York City Council District 2

Local Manhattan Community Board 3

 

Neighborhood map

The East Village is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It lies east of Greenwich Village, south of Gramercy and Stuyvesant Town, and north of the Lower East Side. Within the East Village there are several smaller neighborhoods, including Alphabet City and The Bowery.

 

The neighborhood was once considered part of the Lower East Side, but in the 1960s it began to develop its own culture and became known as the East Village. Scores of artists and hippies began to move into the area, attracted by the base of Beatniks that had lived there since the 1950s. It has been the site of counterculture, protests and riots. The neighborhood is known as the birthplace and historical home of many artistic movements, including punk rock[2] and the Nuyorican literary movement.[3]

 

It is still known for a diverse community, vibrant nightlife and artistic sensibility, although in recent decades gentrification has changed the character of the neighborhood

 

History

 

Tompkins Square Park is the recreational and geographic heart of the East Village. It has historically been a part of counterculture, protest and riots.

New York City's Fourth of July fireworks over the neighborhood. The East Village's East River Park is a popular viewing destination.[edit] Formation of the neighborhood

Today's East Village was originally a farm owned by Dutch Governor Wouter van Twiller. Petrus Stuyvesant received the deed to this farm in 1651, and his family held on to the land for over seven generations, until a descendant began selling off parcels of the property in the early 1800s. Wealthy townhouses dotted the dirt roads for a few decades until the great Irish and German immigration of the 1840s and 1850s.

 

Speculative land owners began building multi unit dwellings on lots meant for single family homes, and began renting out rooms and apartments to the growing working class. The "East Village" was formerly known as Klein Deutschland ("Little Germany, Manhattan"); however, Little Germany dissolved after the SS General Slocum burned into the water in New York's East River on June 15, 1904. From the years roughly between the 1850s and the first decade of the 20th century, the "East Village" hosted the largest urban populations of Germans outside of Vienna and Berlin. It was America's first foreign language neighborhood; hundreds of political, social, sports and recreational clubs were set up during this period, some of these buildings still exist.

 

What is now the East Village once ended at the East River where Avenue C is now located. A large portion of the neighborhood was formed by landfill, including World War II debris and rubble from London, which was shipped across the Atlantic to provide foundation for the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive.[5]

 

[edit] The 'East Village' separates from the Lower East Side

Definitions vary, but the boundaries are roughly defined as east of Broadway and the Bowery from 14th Street down to Houston Street.[1]

  

Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village.Until the mid-1960s, this area was simply the northern part of the Lower East Side, with a similar culture of immigrant, working class life. In the 1950s the migration of Beatniks into the neighborhood later attracted hippies, musicians and artists well into 1960s.[1] The area was dubbed the "East Village", to dissociate it from the image of slums evoked by the Lower East Side. According to the New York Times, a 1964 guide called, "Earl Wilson's New York," wrote that "artists, poets and promoters of coffeehouses from Greenwich Village are trying to remelt the neighborhood under the high-sounding name of 'East Village.'"[1]

 

Newcomers and real estate brokers popularized the East Village name, and the term was adopted by the popular media by the mid-1960s.[6][7] In 1966 a psychedelic weekly newspaper, The East Village Other, appeared and The New York Times declared that the neighborhood "had come to be known" as the East Village in the June 5, 1967 edition.[1]

 

[edit] The music scene develops

In 1966 Andy Warhol promoted a series of shows, entitled The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, and featuring the music of the Velvet Underground, in a Polish ballroom on St Marks Place. On June 27, 1967, the Electric Circus opened in the same space with a benefit for the Children's Recreation Foundation (Chairman: Bobby Kennedy). The Grateful Dead, The Chambers Brothers, Sly & the Family Stone, the Allman Brothers were among the many rock bands that performed there before it closed in 1971.

  

Punk rock icon and writer Richard Hell still lives in the same apartment in Alphabet City that he has had since the 1970s.On March 8, 1968 Bill Graham opened the Fillmore East in a Yiddish Theatre on 2nd Avenue. The venue quickly became known as "The Church of Rock and Roll," with two-show concerts several nights a week. While booking many of the same bands that had played the Electric Circus, Graham particularly used the venue – and its West Coast counterpart, to establish new British bands like The Who, Pink Floyd, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Cream, and Led Zeppelin. It, too, closed in 1971.

 

CBGB, the nightclub considered by some to be the birthplace of punk music, was located in the neighborhood, as was the early punk standby A7. No Wave and New York hardcore also emerged in the area’s clubs. Among the many important bands and singers who got their start at these clubs and other venues in downtown Manhattan were: Patti Smith, Arto Lindsay, the Ramones, Blondie, Madonna, Talking Heads, the Plasmatics, Glenn Danzig, Sonic Youth, the Beastie Boys, Anthrax, and The Strokes. From 1983–1993, much of the more radical audio work was preserved as part of the Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine recording project, which was based in the nearby Lower East Side.

 

[edit] Rise in artistic prominence

 

Allen Ginsberg, a long-time resident, with poet Peter Orlovsky.Over the last 100 years, the East Village/Lower East Side neighborhood has been considered one of the strongest contributors to American arts and culture in New York.[8] During the great wave of immigration (Germans, Ukrainians, Polish) in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, countless families found their new homes in this area.

 

The East Village has been the birthplace of cultural icons and movements from the American gangster to the Warhol Superstars, folk music to punk rock, anti-folk to hip-hop, advanced education to organized activism, experimental theater to the Beat Generation and the community of experimental musicians, composers and improvisers now loosely known as the Downtown Scene.

 

Club 57, on St. Mark's Place, was an important incubator for performance art and visual art in the late 1970s and early 1980s; followed by Now Gallery, 8BC and ABC No Rio.

 

During the 1980s the East Village art gallery scene helped to galvanize a new post-modern art in America; showing such artists as Kiki Smith, Peter Halley, Keith Haring, Stephen Lack, Greer Lankton, Joseph Nechvatal, Nan Goldin, Jean-Michel Basquiat, David Wojnarowicz, Rick Prol, and Jeff Koons.[9]

 

[edit] The musical 'Rent'

The East Village is the setting for Jonathan Larson's musical Rent; set in the early 1990s, the story chronicles a group of friends over a year in their struggles against poverty, drug abuse and AIDS.

 

The musical Rent chronicled a period in the neighborhood's history that is bygone. It opened at the New York Theater Workshop in February 1996.[10] It described a New York City devastated by the AIDS epidemic, drugs and high crime, and followed several characters in the backdrop of their effort to make livings as artists.[11]

 

[edit] Decline of the art scene

 

The "Downtown Legends" wall at Mo Pitkins House of Satisfaction featured artists known in the East Village performance scene. A few featured in this photo include the Reverend Jen, Nick Zedd, Allen Ginsberg, Reverend Billy and Murray Hill (pictured).The East Village's performance and art scene has declined since its hey-day of the 1970s and 1980s.[12] One club that had opened to try to resurrect the neighborhood's past artistic prominence was Mo Pitkins' House of Satisfaction, part-owned by Jimmy Fallon of Saturday Night Live. It closed its doors in 2007, and was seen by many as another sign of the continued decline of the East Village performance and art scene, which has mostly moved to Williamsburg, Brooklyn.[13] Rapture Cafe also shut down in April 2008, and the neighborhood lost an important performance space and gathering ground for the gay community. There are still some performance spaces, such as Sidewalk Cafe on Avenue A, where downtown acts find space to exhibit their talent, and the poetry clubs.[14]

 

Punk scene icons stayed in the neighborhood as it changed. Richard Hell lives in the same apartment he has lived in since the 1970s, and Handsome Dick Manitoba of The Dictators owns and reigns over Manitoba's bar on Avenue B.

 

[edit] Internal neighborhoods

The East Village contains several hamlets of vibrant communities within itself.

 

[edit] Alphabet City

Main article: Alphabet City, Manhattan

 

The Nuyorican Poets Cafe has been located off Avenue C and East 3rd Street since its founding in 1973.Alphabet City comprises nearly two-thirds of the East Village. It also once was the archetype of a dangerous New York City neighborhood. Its turn-around was cause for The New York Times to observe in 2005 that Alphabet City went "from a drug-infested no man's land to the epicenter of downtown cool."[15] Its name comes from Avenues A, B, C, and D, the only avenues in Manhattan to have single-letter names. It is bordered by Houston Street to the south and 14th Street to the north where Avenue C ends. Some famous landmarks include Tompkins Square Park, the Nuyorican Poets Cafe and the Stuyvesant Town private residential community.

 

[edit] Loisaida

Main article: Loisaida

 

A Loisaida street fair in the Summer of 2008.Loisaida is a term derived from the Latino (and especially Nuyorican) pronunciation of "Lower East Side", a neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City. The term was originally coined by poet/activist, Bittman "Bimbo" Rivas in his 1974 poem "Loisaida". Loisaida Avenue is now an alternative name for Avenue C in the Alphabet City neighborhood of New York City, whose population has largely been Hispanic (mainly Nuyorican) since the late 1960s.

 

[edit] St. Mark's Place

Main article: St. Mark's Place

 

Artist Jim Power, known as the "Mosaic Man" for his public art tiling the neighborhood[16], at the 2009 St. Mark's Place Block Party.Eighth Street becomes St. Mark's place east of Third Avenue. It once had the cachet of Sutton Place, known as a secluded rich enclave in Manhattan, but which by the 1850s had become a place for boarding houses and a German immigrant community.[17] It is named after St Mark's Church in-the-Bowery, which was built on Stuyvesant Street but is now on 10th Street. St. Mark's Place once began at the intersection of the Bowery and Stuyvesant Street, but today the street runs from Third Avenue to Avenue A. Japanese street culture and a Japanese expatriate scene forms in the noodle shops and bars that line St. Mark's Place, also home to an aged punk culture and CBGB's new store. It is home to one of the only Automats in New York City (it has since closed).[18]

 

St. Mark's is along the “Mosaic Trail”, a trail of 80 mosaic-encrusted lampposts that runs from Broadway down Eighth Street to Avenue A, to Fourth Street and then back to Eighth Street. The project was undertaken by East Village public artist Jim Power, known as the "Mosaic Man".[16]

 

[edit] The Bowery

Main article: The Bowery

 

Once synonymous with 'Bowery Bums', the avenue has become a magnet for luxury condominiums as the neighborhood's rapid gentrification continues.The Bowery, former home to the punk-rock nightclub CBGB, was once known for its many homeless shelters, drug rehabilitation centers and bars. The phrase "On The Bowery", which has since fallen into disuse, was a generic way to say one was down-and-out.[19]

 

The Bow’ry, The Bow’ry!

They say such things,

and they do strange things

on the Bow’ry —From the musical A Trip to Chinatown, 1891

 

Today, the Bowery has become a boulevard of new luxury condominiums. It also is home to the Amato Opera and the Bowery Poetry Club, contributing to the neighborhood's reputation as a place for artistic pursuit. Artists Amiri Baraka and Taylor Mead hold regular readings and performances in the space.

 

The redevelopment of the avenue from flophouses to luxury condominiums has met with resistance from long-term residents, who agree the neighborhood has improved, but that its unique, gritty character is also disappearing.[20]

 

[edit] Parks and green space

[edit] Tompkins Square Park

Main article: Tompkins Square Park

 

The Tompkins Square dog run was the first in New York City, and is a social scene unto itself.[5]Tompkins Square Park is a 10.5 acre (42,000 m²) public park in the Alphabet City section of the East Village neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It is square in shape, and is bounded on the north by East 10th Street, on the east by Avenue B, on the south by East 7th Street, and on the west by Avenue A. St. Marks Place abuts the park to the west.

 

[edit] Tompkins Square Park Police Riot

Main article: Tompkins Square Park Police Riot (1988)

The Tompkins Square Park Police Riot was a defining moment for the neighborhood. In the late hours of August 6 into the morning hours of August 7, 1988 a riot broke out in Alphabet City's Tompkins Square Park. Groups of "drug pushers, homeless people and young people known as 'skinheads'" had largely taken over the East Village park, but the neighborhood was divided about what, if anything, should be done about it.[21] The local governing body, Manhattan Community Board 3, adopted a 1 am curfew for the previously 24-hour park, in an attempt to bring it under control.[22] On July 31, a rally against the curfew resulted in several clashes between protesters and police.[23]

 

[edit] East River Park

Main article: East River Park

 

East River Park below the Williamsburg Bridge.The park is 57 acres (230,000 m2) that runs along the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street.[24] It was designed in the 1930s by Robert Moses, who wanted to ensure there was parkland on the Lower East Side.[24]

 

[edit] Community gardens

There are reportedly over 640 community gardens in New York City—gardens run by local collectives within the neighborhood who are responsible for the gardens' upkeep—and an estimated 10 percent of those are located on the Lower East Side and East Village alone.[25]

 

[edit] Tower of Toys on Avenue B

The Avenue B and 6th Street Community Garden is one of the neighborhood's more notable for a now removed outdoor sculpture, the Tower of Toys, designed by artist and long-time garden gate-keeper, Eddie Boros. Boros died April 27, 2007.[26] The Tower was controversial in the neighborhood; some viewed it as a masterpiece, others as an eyesore.[26][27] The tower appeared in the opening credits for the television show NYPD Blue and also appears in the musical Rent.[26] In May 2008, it was dismantled. According to NYC Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe, the tower was rotting in sections that made it a safety hazard.[28] Its removal was seen as another symbol of the fading past of the neighborhood.[28]

 

[edit] Toyota Children’s Learning Garden

Located at 603 East 11th Street, the Toyota Children's Learning Garden is not technically a community garden, but it also fails to fit in the park category. Designed by landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh, the garden opened in May 2008 as part of the New York Restoration Project and is designed to teach children about plants.[29]

 

[edit] New York City Marble Cemetery

 

A production of John Reed's All the World's a Grave in the Marble Cemetery, which does not contain headstones.The cemetery is actually two, which sit on 2nd Street between 1st Avenue and 2nd Avenue. They are open the fourth Sunday of every month.[30] The first and more prominent is the City cemetery, which is second oldest non-sectarian cemetery in New York City. It sits next to the oldest public cemetery in New York City not affiliated with any religion, the "New York Marble Cemetery."[31] The cemetery was opened in 1831 and at one point contained ex-U.S. President James Monroe.[32]

 

[edit] Culture and events

 

Longtime Mistress of Ceremonies at eatery Lucky Cheng's, Miss Understood stops a bus in front of the restaurant on First Avenue.Other than geography, the East Village's most notable commonalities with Greenwich Village are a colorful history, vibrant social and cultural outlets, and street names that often diverge from the norm.

 

The Bowery is a north-south avenue which also lends its name to the somewhat overlapping neighborhood of the Bowery; St. Mark's Place, a crosstown street well-known for counterculture businesses; and Astor Place/Cooper Square, home of the Public Theater and the Cooper Union. Nearby universities like New York University (NYU), The New School, and The Cooper Union have dormitories in the neighborhood.

 

[edit] Ethnicity and religion

 

Photograph of St. Nicholas with parts of Second Street visible. The church and almost all buildings on the street were demolished in the 1960's and replaced with parking lots.

Former parishioners of St. Mary's Help of Christians pray outside the shuttered church in August 2008.According to 2000 census figures provided by the New York City Department of City Planning, which includes the Lower East Side in its calculation, the neighborhood was 35% Asian, 28% non-Hispanic white, 27% Hispanic and 7% black.[33]

 

On October 9, 1966, A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, founder of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, held the first recorded outdoor chanting session of the Hare Krishna mantra outside of the Indian subcontinent at Tompkins Square Park.[34] This is considered the founding of the Hare Krishna religion in the United States, and the large tree close to the center of the Park is demarcated as a special religious site for Krishna adherents.[34] The late poet Allen Ginsberg, who lived and died in the East Village, attended the ceremony.

 

There are several Roman Catholic churches in the East Village which have fallen victim to financial hardship particularly in the past decade. Unable to maintain their properties, the Roman Catholic Church has shuttered many of them - including St. Mary's Help of Christians on East 12th Street, as well as St. Ann's. There has recently been much controversy over St. Brigid's, the historical parish on Tompkins Square Park.

 

[edit] Ukrainian history

Since the 1890s there has been a large Ukrainian concentration roughly from 10th Street to 5th Street, between 3rd Avenue and Avenue A. The post-World War II diaspora, consisting primarily of Western Ukrainian intelligentsia, also settled down in the area. Several churches, including St. George's Catholic Church; Ukrainian restaurants and butcher shops; The Ukrainian Museum; the Shevchenko Scientific Society; and the Ukrainian Cultural Center are evidence of the impact of this culture on the area.

 

[edit] Gentrification

[edit] New York University, a controversial resident

Residents of the East Village have a love-hate relationship with New York University, which owns and maintains many buildings, particularly in much of downtown Manhattan and in the neighborhoods surrounding its main campus in Greenwich Village (a distinct neighborhood from the East Village).[35]

 

St. Ann's Church, a rusticated-stone structure on East 12th Street with a Romanesque tower that dated to 1847 was sold to the University to make way for a monolithic 26-story, 700 bed dormitory for students. The University did protect and maintain St. Ann's original facade and small plaza immediately fronting the 12th Street sidewalk. The result is a blended, softer abutment of the new dorm building (which does rise dramatically above the facade) up behind the old St. Ann's entry way. New York University has built many dorms, and this one in particular is now the tallest structure in the area. "There are larger changes going on here," said Lynne Brown, vice president of university relations and public affairs. "I fear this tendency to blame any trend residents don't like happening at the doorstep of NYU," said Brown, mentioning that the university has been one of the longest inhabitants of the East Village. But Nancy Cosie, a 20 year resident and former St. Ann's parishioner, does not buy that argument. "Enough is enough," Cosie exclaimed to The Village Voice, "This is not a campus. This is a neighborhood, and this is my home."[35] NYU's destruction or purchasing of many historic buildings (such as the Peter Cooper post office) have made it symbolic of change that many long-time residents fear is destroying what made the neighborhood interesting and attractive.[36] "I live on Avenue B and 9th Street," an NYU student said. "I know I'm part of the problem - gentrification that is. But where am I supposed to live?"[36]

 

NYU has often been at odds with residents of both the East and West Villages, as legendary urban preservationist Jane Jacobs battled the school in the 1960s.[37] "She spoke of how universities and hospitals often had a special kind of hubris reflected in the fact that they often thought it was OK to destroy a neighborhood to suit their needs,” said Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.[38]

 

[edit] Museums, libraries, performance and art spaces

 

The Bowery Poetry Club.

Sherry Vine and Joey Arias during the 2009 HOWL! Festival.New York Public Library Tompkins Square branch [3]

The Fales Library of NYU

East Village Visitors Center - 308 Bowery

The Ukrainian Museum

New Museum of Contemporary Art

Museum of Jewish Heritage

Performance Space 122

Anthology Film Archives

The Stone

Bouwerie Lane Theatre

Amato Opera

Danspace Project

The Ontological-Hysteric Theater

The Pearl Theatre Company [4]

Stomp! (Theatrical show)

Metropolitan Playhouse[5]

Mercury Lounge (live music)

Sidewalk Cafe (performance and live music)

Bowery Ballroom (concerts and shows)

Nuyorican Poets Cafe (music, poetry, readings, slams)

Bowery Poetry Club (music, poetry, readings, slams)

La MaMa E.T.C. (performance theater)

Cooper Union (speeches, presentations, public lectures and readings)

[edit] Neighborhood festivals

Mayday Festival - May 1; yearly.

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival - August; yearly.[6]

HOWL! Festival - September; yearly.[7][8]

East Village Radio Festival - September 6, 2008 [9]

Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade - October; yearly.[10]

East Village Theater Festival - August 3–23, 2009.[11]

FAB! Festival & Block Party - Last weekend in September annually, Sept 25, 2010 [12]

[edit] Media

 

Many film shoots take place in the East Village; here a period movie with antique police cars is filmed on East 4th Street.[edit] Radio

East Village Radio

[edit] Local news

The Village Voice

The Villager

East-Village.com

EastVillageFeed.com

[edit] Cinemas

Anthology Film Archives

Landmark's Sunshine Theater

Village East Cinema

City Cinema Village East

Two Boots Pioneer Theater

[edit] Notable residents past and present

 

Handsome Dick Manitoba of The Dictators.

Madonna lived in the neighborhood when she was just starting out in her career.[39]Handsome Dick Manitoba, who owns Manitoba's bar on Avenue B off Tompkins Square Park.

Darren Aronofsky and his wife, Rachel Weisz

Chris Cain, Bassist for the Indie-Rock band We Are Scientists

Barbara Feinman

John Leguizamo

Daniel Radcliffe

Agim Kaba

Rosario Dawson

Tom Kalin

Vashtie Kola director

W. H. Auden[40]

Greer Lankton, Artist/Doll maker

Ellen Stewart founder of La MaMa, E.T.C. (Experimental Theatre Club) in 1961.

Madonna lived there in the 1980s.

John Lurie,musician, painter, actor, producer.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, graffiti artist

David Bowes, painter

Allen Ginsberg (1926–1997), Beat Generation poet and author of Howl.[41]

Keith Haring, neo-pop artist

Claes Oldenburg (1929-), sculptor, had a studio at 46 East 3rd Street in the late 1950s.[42]

Candy Darling, actress/Warhol superstar

Bill Raymond, actor

Ryan Adams, alt-country musician

David Cross, actor, comedian

Negin Farsad, writer, director, comedian

Nan Goldin, photographer

Stephen Lack, actor, painter

Ronnie Landfield, (1947-), painter, lived on E. 11th street, mid-1960s[43]

Kiki Smith sculptor

John Zorn composer, musician

Richard Hell, musician, author

Abbie Hoffman (1936–1989), 1960s political activist[44]

Ayun Halliday, actress and writer, and wife of playwright Greg Kotis

Greg Kotis, playwright, and husband of actress and writer Ayun Halliday

Jerry Rubin (1938–1994), 1960s political activist - with Hoffman founded the Yippies in a basement apartment at 30 St. Marks Place[44]

Cookie Mueller, actress, model

Paul Krassner (1932-), publisher of The Realist

Walter Bowart (1939–2007), co-founder editor/ of The East Village Other

Allan Katzman, co-founder/editor of The East Village Other

Tuli Kupferberg, (1923-), Beat Generation poet, and one of the original Fugs

Ed Sanders, (1939-), New York School poet and one of the original Fugs

Joseph Nechvatal (1951-) early digital artist and founder of the Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine

Randy Harrison, actor

Joel Resnicoff, artist and fashion illustrator.

Regina Spektor, (1980-) Singer-songwriter and pianist.

Rachel Trachtenburg (1993-) singer and musician

Tom Otterness sculptor

Steven Fishbach, runner-up of Survivor: Tocantins

Chloe Sevigny actress

Conor Oberst musician

Lou Reed, musician

Julian Casablancas, musician

Mark Ronson

Arthur Russell, musician[45]

Jack Smith filmmaker, artist

Iggy Pop, performer, musician

 

When does a narrow lane become an interesting and attractive alleyway? Well maybe when it's called a court or a place.

And probably if it's wide enough for some tables, flower planters, and 'A'-boards outside posh shops. With awnings to shelter from any rain.

Plus refurbished Victorian buildings and some old-fashioned gas-lamp-style street lights. Cheerful brightly coloured flowers in window boxes help too.

 

St Christopher's Place has the huge advantage that it's near a busy and popular part of town with enough money flowing through the businesses to keep everything clean and well maintained.

 

St Christopher's Place leads to Barrett Street - which is pedestrianised - and then to Gee's Court - another alley. The three together offer what Jane Jacobs called the : "intricacy of sidewalk use". And so attracts some of the thousands of passers-by from Oxford Street and Wigmore Street main roads at either end.

 

From one viewpoint it is simply an upmarket shopping & dining mall. Although open to the sky. You can see this more clearly when it widens out into Barrett Street - between Gee's Court and St Christopher's Place. There are even some benches where a few people can rest and watch the world go by. Without paying for a coffee.

But actually there's quite a bit more to it.

 

Ivor Hoole's website

 

An unexpected pleasure and treasure of the internet is coming across websites like Ivor Hoole's A Guide to London’s alleys, courtyards and passages.

  Not all the alleys are still there. But many are and it's interesting to see changes since he compiled his guide. Probably most of his entries were written in the mid 1990s. It seems that Ivor Hoole himself died in 2005.

  Luckily Ivor Hoole's fascinating site was mirrored by Phil Gyford. And by Ian Mansfield who writes his own interesting Ian Visits blog.

 

Octavia Hill

Here's the link to what the short piece Ivor Hoole wrote about St Christopher's Place. Which you may want to read it if you're curious and enjoy exploring new alleyways.

 

Just like many alleys, it leads to somewhere else. In my case to the question of what happened to the residents of what Ivor Hoole described as "In the mid-19th century ... a truly filthy place; a typical uncared for back alley, a repository for waste and rubbish".

Hoole wrote that the housing reformer Octavia Hill came across the Court in 1870 and:

"was so shocked at the state of dilapidation that she bought it in readiness for preparing future plans. Renovation work was put into operation in 1874 and at the beginning of 1877 all the newly refurbished shops were let, and Miss Hill commented that it was 'going so beautifully'."

 

One source suggests an answer to my question. The website "Municipal Dreams" reviewed the book Octavia Hill a life more noble which set out her approach.

 

As well as refurbishing Victorian buildings:

... "she was adamant that her homes should be affordable to the poorest. Writing of Barrett’s Court (which Hill renamed St Christopher’s Place) off Oxford Street, she argued ‘if we had rebuilt, we must have turned [the existing tenants] out in favour of a higher class, thus compelling them to crowd in courts as bad as Barrett’s Court itself was when we bought it’. This had been precisely the deficiency of contemporary model dwelling schemes and would be the fault of the Boundary Estate, the LCC’s first housing scheme. It remained the case that council housing into the interwar period was beyond the reach of many of the lowest paid workers."

 

"... her overall stance would acquire a surprising later resonance. Hill opposed the utilitarian (though ‘model’) tenement schemes of her day, the block dwellings, but also rejected their supposed alternative, working-class suburban cottage estates. In that regard, the unfashionable Octavia Hill comes close to the criticisms made after her death of many later municipal developments. Her support for affordable inner-city living for the poor and the street life in which it rested is a cause which echoes to the present."

___________________________________

 

§ Click on the blue link for another peek into St Christopher's Place with Google Streetview .

§ St Christopher's Place Christmas lighting has become a London attraction in itself. Here's a link to a 2014 photo by Joyce Dela Paz.

Links to two 2009 photos by Eddie Clarke ( 1 ), ( 2 ).

One more by Jonathan Whiteland in 2013

§ A quotation from Jane Jacobs: Death and Life of Great American Cities.

— "Under the seeming disorder of the old city, wherever the old city is working successfully, is a marvellous order for maintaining the safety of the streets and the freedom of the city. It is a complex order. Its essence is intricacy of sidewalk use, bringing with it a constant succession of eyes. This order is all composed of movement and change, and although it is life, not art, we may fancifully call it the art form of the city and liken it to the dance [....] an intricate ballet in which the individual dancers and ensembles all have distinctive parts which miraculously reinforce each other and compose an orderly whole".

 

Alleyway linking Oldfield Road and Stoke Newington Church Street, London N16. Both photos above are looking north towards Stoke Newington Church Street.

 

The alley comes out near the entrance to The Auld Shillelagh pub in Church Street.

 

§ I blurred faces in the photo on the right.

§ Link to Google Maps Street View.

_____________________

 

I like alleys. Show me the entrance to an alleyway and usually I want to explore it. (There are exceptions.)

 

This liking and curiosity may go back to my primary school days. Finding a new route to walk home from school was then part of having more independence. A way to open up and learn our local neighbourhood and enlarge my mental map. Plus saving a few old pennies (the bus fare) to buy something I chose.

 

But - as I learned in my twenties from reading Jane Jacobs - it's far more than that. Going down the same roads, especially long streets without alternative routes, can get monotonous and boring.

 

"... it is fluidity of use, and the mixing of paths, not homogeneity of architecture, that ties together city neighborhoods into pools of city use, whether those neighborhoods are predominately for work or predominately for residence."

 

— (Source: Jane Jacobs - The Death and Life of Great American Cities. Chapter 9 "The need for small blocks". "Most blocks must be short; that is, streets and opportunities to turn corners must be frequent."

___________________________

 

§ SPUR Ideas + Action for a Better City

§ Why We Love Alleys article by Benjamin Grant, 16 May 2013.

Information From:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Village,_Manhattan

 

East Village, Manhattan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

East Village, Manhattan

New York City Neighborhood

 

Location in Lower Manhattan

Named: 1960s[1]

Streets: 2nd Avenue, 1st Avenue, Avenue A, The Bowery, St. Mark's Place

Subway: F, V, 6 and L

Zip code: 10009, 10003 and 10002

Government

Federal: Congressional Districts 8, 12 and 14

State: New York State Assembly Districts 64, 66 and 74, New York State Senate Districts 25 and 29

City: New York City Council District 2

Local Manhattan Community Board 3

 

Neighborhood map

The East Village is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It lies east of Greenwich Village, south of Gramercy and Stuyvesant Town, and north of the Lower East Side. Within the East Village there are several smaller neighborhoods, including Alphabet City and The Bowery.

 

The neighborhood was once considered part of the Lower East Side, but in the 1960s it began to develop its own culture and became known as the East Village. Scores of artists and hippies began to move into the area, attracted by the base of Beatniks that had lived there since the 1950s. It has been the site of counterculture, protests and riots. The neighborhood is known as the birthplace and historical home of many artistic movements, including punk rock[2] and the Nuyorican literary movement.[3]

 

It is still known for a diverse community, vibrant nightlife and artistic sensibility, although in recent decades gentrification has changed the character of the neighborhood

 

History

 

Tompkins Square Park is the recreational and geographic heart of the East Village. It has historically been a part of counterculture, protest and riots.

New York City's Fourth of July fireworks over the neighborhood. The East Village's East River Park is a popular viewing destination.[edit] Formation of the neighborhood

Today's East Village was originally a farm owned by Dutch Governor Wouter van Twiller. Petrus Stuyvesant received the deed to this farm in 1651, and his family held on to the land for over seven generations, until a descendant began selling off parcels of the property in the early 1800s. Wealthy townhouses dotted the dirt roads for a few decades until the great Irish and German immigration of the 1840s and 1850s.

 

Speculative land owners began building multi unit dwellings on lots meant for single family homes, and began renting out rooms and apartments to the growing working class. The "East Village" was formerly known as Klein Deutschland ("Little Germany, Manhattan"); however, Little Germany dissolved after the SS General Slocum burned into the water in New York's East River on June 15, 1904. From the years roughly between the 1850s and the first decade of the 20th century, the "East Village" hosted the largest urban populations of Germans outside of Vienna and Berlin. It was America's first foreign language neighborhood; hundreds of political, social, sports and recreational clubs were set up during this period, some of these buildings still exist.

 

What is now the East Village once ended at the East River where Avenue C is now located. A large portion of the neighborhood was formed by landfill, including World War II debris and rubble from London, which was shipped across the Atlantic to provide foundation for the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive.[5]

 

[edit] The 'East Village' separates from the Lower East Side

Definitions vary, but the boundaries are roughly defined as east of Broadway and the Bowery from 14th Street down to Houston Street.[1]

  

Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village.Until the mid-1960s, this area was simply the northern part of the Lower East Side, with a similar culture of immigrant, working class life. In the 1950s the migration of Beatniks into the neighborhood later attracted hippies, musicians and artists well into 1960s.[1] The area was dubbed the "East Village", to dissociate it from the image of slums evoked by the Lower East Side. According to the New York Times, a 1964 guide called, "Earl Wilson's New York," wrote that "artists, poets and promoters of coffeehouses from Greenwich Village are trying to remelt the neighborhood under the high-sounding name of 'East Village.'"[1]

 

Newcomers and real estate brokers popularized the East Village name, and the term was adopted by the popular media by the mid-1960s.[6][7] In 1966 a psychedelic weekly newspaper, The East Village Other, appeared and The New York Times declared that the neighborhood "had come to be known" as the East Village in the June 5, 1967 edition.[1]

 

[edit] The music scene develops

In 1966 Andy Warhol promoted a series of shows, entitled The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, and featuring the music of the Velvet Underground, in a Polish ballroom on St Marks Place. On June 27, 1967, the Electric Circus opened in the same space with a benefit for the Children's Recreation Foundation (Chairman: Bobby Kennedy). The Grateful Dead, The Chambers Brothers, Sly & the Family Stone, the Allman Brothers were among the many rock bands that performed there before it closed in 1971.

  

Punk rock icon and writer Richard Hell still lives in the same apartment in Alphabet City that he has had since the 1970s.On March 8, 1968 Bill Graham opened the Fillmore East in a Yiddish Theatre on 2nd Avenue. The venue quickly became known as "The Church of Rock and Roll," with two-show concerts several nights a week. While booking many of the same bands that had played the Electric Circus, Graham particularly used the venue – and its West Coast counterpart, to establish new British bands like The Who, Pink Floyd, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Cream, and Led Zeppelin. It, too, closed in 1971.

 

CBGB, the nightclub considered by some to be the birthplace of punk music, was located in the neighborhood, as was the early punk standby A7. No Wave and New York hardcore also emerged in the area’s clubs. Among the many important bands and singers who got their start at these clubs and other venues in downtown Manhattan were: Patti Smith, Arto Lindsay, the Ramones, Blondie, Madonna, Talking Heads, the Plasmatics, Glenn Danzig, Sonic Youth, the Beastie Boys, Anthrax, and The Strokes. From 1983–1993, much of the more radical audio work was preserved as part of the Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine recording project, which was based in the nearby Lower East Side.

 

[edit] Rise in artistic prominence

 

Allen Ginsberg, a long-time resident, with poet Peter Orlovsky.Over the last 100 years, the East Village/Lower East Side neighborhood has been considered one of the strongest contributors to American arts and culture in New York.[8] During the great wave of immigration (Germans, Ukrainians, Polish) in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, countless families found their new homes in this area.

 

The East Village has been the birthplace of cultural icons and movements from the American gangster to the Warhol Superstars, folk music to punk rock, anti-folk to hip-hop, advanced education to organized activism, experimental theater to the Beat Generation and the community of experimental musicians, composers and improvisers now loosely known as the Downtown Scene.

 

Club 57, on St. Mark's Place, was an important incubator for performance art and visual art in the late 1970s and early 1980s; followed by Now Gallery, 8BC and ABC No Rio.

 

During the 1980s the East Village art gallery scene helped to galvanize a new post-modern art in America; showing such artists as Kiki Smith, Peter Halley, Keith Haring, Stephen Lack, Greer Lankton, Joseph Nechvatal, Nan Goldin, Jean-Michel Basquiat, David Wojnarowicz, Rick Prol, and Jeff Koons.[9]

 

[edit] The musical 'Rent'

The East Village is the setting for Jonathan Larson's musical Rent; set in the early 1990s, the story chronicles a group of friends over a year in their struggles against poverty, drug abuse and AIDS.

 

The musical Rent chronicled a period in the neighborhood's history that is bygone. It opened at the New York Theater Workshop in February 1996.[10] It described a New York City devastated by the AIDS epidemic, drugs and high crime, and followed several characters in the backdrop of their effort to make livings as artists.[11]

 

[edit] Decline of the art scene

 

The "Downtown Legends" wall at Mo Pitkins House of Satisfaction featured artists known in the East Village performance scene. A few featured in this photo include the Reverend Jen, Nick Zedd, Allen Ginsberg, Reverend Billy and Murray Hill (pictured).The East Village's performance and art scene has declined since its hey-day of the 1970s and 1980s.[12] One club that had opened to try to resurrect the neighborhood's past artistic prominence was Mo Pitkins' House of Satisfaction, part-owned by Jimmy Fallon of Saturday Night Live. It closed its doors in 2007, and was seen by many as another sign of the continued decline of the East Village performance and art scene, which has mostly moved to Williamsburg, Brooklyn.[13] Rapture Cafe also shut down in April 2008, and the neighborhood lost an important performance space and gathering ground for the gay community. There are still some performance spaces, such as Sidewalk Cafe on Avenue A, where downtown acts find space to exhibit their talent, and the poetry clubs.[14]

 

Punk scene icons stayed in the neighborhood as it changed. Richard Hell lives in the same apartment he has lived in since the 1970s, and Handsome Dick Manitoba of The Dictators owns and reigns over Manitoba's bar on Avenue B.

 

[edit] Internal neighborhoods

The East Village contains several hamlets of vibrant communities within itself.

 

[edit] Alphabet City

Main article: Alphabet City, Manhattan

 

The Nuyorican Poets Cafe has been located off Avenue C and East 3rd Street since its founding in 1973.Alphabet City comprises nearly two-thirds of the East Village. It also once was the archetype of a dangerous New York City neighborhood. Its turn-around was cause for The New York Times to observe in 2005 that Alphabet City went "from a drug-infested no man's land to the epicenter of downtown cool."[15] Its name comes from Avenues A, B, C, and D, the only avenues in Manhattan to have single-letter names. It is bordered by Houston Street to the south and 14th Street to the north where Avenue C ends. Some famous landmarks include Tompkins Square Park, the Nuyorican Poets Cafe and the Stuyvesant Town private residential community.

 

[edit] Loisaida

Main article: Loisaida

 

A Loisaida street fair in the Summer of 2008.Loisaida is a term derived from the Latino (and especially Nuyorican) pronunciation of "Lower East Side", a neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City. The term was originally coined by poet/activist, Bittman "Bimbo" Rivas in his 1974 poem "Loisaida". Loisaida Avenue is now an alternative name for Avenue C in the Alphabet City neighborhood of New York City, whose population has largely been Hispanic (mainly Nuyorican) since the late 1960s.

 

[edit] St. Mark's Place

Main article: St. Mark's Place

 

Artist Jim Power, known as the "Mosaic Man" for his public art tiling the neighborhood[16], at the 2009 St. Mark's Place Block Party.Eighth Street becomes St. Mark's place east of Third Avenue. It once had the cachet of Sutton Place, known as a secluded rich enclave in Manhattan, but which by the 1850s had become a place for boarding houses and a German immigrant community.[17] It is named after St Mark's Church in-the-Bowery, which was built on Stuyvesant Street but is now on 10th Street. St. Mark's Place once began at the intersection of the Bowery and Stuyvesant Street, but today the street runs from Third Avenue to Avenue A. Japanese street culture and a Japanese expatriate scene forms in the noodle shops and bars that line St. Mark's Place, also home to an aged punk culture and CBGB's new store. It is home to one of the only Automats in New York City (it has since closed).[18]

 

St. Mark's is along the “Mosaic Trail”, a trail of 80 mosaic-encrusted lampposts that runs from Broadway down Eighth Street to Avenue A, to Fourth Street and then back to Eighth Street. The project was undertaken by East Village public artist Jim Power, known as the "Mosaic Man".[16]

 

[edit] The Bowery

Main article: The Bowery

 

Once synonymous with 'Bowery Bums', the avenue has become a magnet for luxury condominiums as the neighborhood's rapid gentrification continues.The Bowery, former home to the punk-rock nightclub CBGB, was once known for its many homeless shelters, drug rehabilitation centers and bars. The phrase "On The Bowery", which has since fallen into disuse, was a generic way to say one was down-and-out.[19]

 

The Bow’ry, The Bow’ry!

They say such things,

and they do strange things

on the Bow’ry —From the musical A Trip to Chinatown, 1891

 

Today, the Bowery has become a boulevard of new luxury condominiums. It also is home to the Amato Opera and the Bowery Poetry Club, contributing to the neighborhood's reputation as a place for artistic pursuit. Artists Amiri Baraka and Taylor Mead hold regular readings and performances in the space.

 

The redevelopment of the avenue from flophouses to luxury condominiums has met with resistance from long-term residents, who agree the neighborhood has improved, but that its unique, gritty character is also disappearing.[20]

 

[edit] Parks and green space

[edit] Tompkins Square Park

Main article: Tompkins Square Park

 

The Tompkins Square dog run was the first in New York City, and is a social scene unto itself.[5]Tompkins Square Park is a 10.5 acre (42,000 m²) public park in the Alphabet City section of the East Village neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It is square in shape, and is bounded on the north by East 10th Street, on the east by Avenue B, on the south by East 7th Street, and on the west by Avenue A. St. Marks Place abuts the park to the west.

 

[edit] Tompkins Square Park Police Riot

Main article: Tompkins Square Park Police Riot (1988)

The Tompkins Square Park Police Riot was a defining moment for the neighborhood. In the late hours of August 6 into the morning hours of August 7, 1988 a riot broke out in Alphabet City's Tompkins Square Park. Groups of "drug pushers, homeless people and young people known as 'skinheads'" had largely taken over the East Village park, but the neighborhood was divided about what, if anything, should be done about it.[21] The local governing body, Manhattan Community Board 3, adopted a 1 am curfew for the previously 24-hour park, in an attempt to bring it under control.[22] On July 31, a rally against the curfew resulted in several clashes between protesters and police.[23]

 

[edit] East River Park

Main article: East River Park

 

East River Park below the Williamsburg Bridge.The park is 57 acres (230,000 m2) that runs along the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street.[24] It was designed in the 1930s by Robert Moses, who wanted to ensure there was parkland on the Lower East Side.[24]

 

[edit] Community gardens

There are reportedly over 640 community gardens in New York City—gardens run by local collectives within the neighborhood who are responsible for the gardens' upkeep—and an estimated 10 percent of those are located on the Lower East Side and East Village alone.[25]

 

[edit] Tower of Toys on Avenue B

The Avenue B and 6th Street Community Garden is one of the neighborhood's more notable for a now removed outdoor sculpture, the Tower of Toys, designed by artist and long-time garden gate-keeper, Eddie Boros. Boros died April 27, 2007.[26] The Tower was controversial in the neighborhood; some viewed it as a masterpiece, others as an eyesore.[26][27] The tower appeared in the opening credits for the television show NYPD Blue and also appears in the musical Rent.[26] In May 2008, it was dismantled. According to NYC Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe, the tower was rotting in sections that made it a safety hazard.[28] Its removal was seen as another symbol of the fading past of the neighborhood.[28]

 

[edit] Toyota Children’s Learning Garden

Located at 603 East 11th Street, the Toyota Children's Learning Garden is not technically a community garden, but it also fails to fit in the park category. Designed by landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh, the garden opened in May 2008 as part of the New York Restoration Project and is designed to teach children about plants.[29]

 

[edit] New York City Marble Cemetery

 

A production of John Reed's All the World's a Grave in the Marble Cemetery, which does not contain headstones.The cemetery is actually two, which sit on 2nd Street between 1st Avenue and 2nd Avenue. They are open the fourth Sunday of every month.[30] The first and more prominent is the City cemetery, which is second oldest non-sectarian cemetery in New York City. It sits next to the oldest public cemetery in New York City not affiliated with any religion, the "New York Marble Cemetery."[31] The cemetery was opened in 1831 and at one point contained ex-U.S. President James Monroe.[32]

 

[edit] Culture and events

 

Longtime Mistress of Ceremonies at eatery Lucky Cheng's, Miss Understood stops a bus in front of the restaurant on First Avenue.Other than geography, the East Village's most notable commonalities with Greenwich Village are a colorful history, vibrant social and cultural outlets, and street names that often diverge from the norm.

 

The Bowery is a north-south avenue which also lends its name to the somewhat overlapping neighborhood of the Bowery; St. Mark's Place, a crosstown street well-known for counterculture businesses; and Astor Place/Cooper Square, home of the Public Theater and the Cooper Union. Nearby universities like New York University (NYU), The New School, and The Cooper Union have dormitories in the neighborhood.

 

[edit] Ethnicity and religion

 

Photograph of St. Nicholas with parts of Second Street visible. The church and almost all buildings on the street were demolished in the 1960's and replaced with parking lots.

Former parishioners of St. Mary's Help of Christians pray outside the shuttered church in August 2008.According to 2000 census figures provided by the New York City Department of City Planning, which includes the Lower East Side in its calculation, the neighborhood was 35% Asian, 28% non-Hispanic white, 27% Hispanic and 7% black.[33]

 

On October 9, 1966, A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, founder of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, held the first recorded outdoor chanting session of the Hare Krishna mantra outside of the Indian subcontinent at Tompkins Square Park.[34] This is considered the founding of the Hare Krishna religion in the United States, and the large tree close to the center of the Park is demarcated as a special religious site for Krishna adherents.[34] The late poet Allen Ginsberg, who lived and died in the East Village, attended the ceremony.

 

There are several Roman Catholic churches in the East Village which have fallen victim to financial hardship particularly in the past decade. Unable to maintain their properties, the Roman Catholic Church has shuttered many of them - including St. Mary's Help of Christians on East 12th Street, as well as St. Ann's. There has recently been much controversy over St. Brigid's, the historical parish on Tompkins Square Park.

 

[edit] Ukrainian history

Since the 1890s there has been a large Ukrainian concentration roughly from 10th Street to 5th Street, between 3rd Avenue and Avenue A. The post-World War II diaspora, consisting primarily of Western Ukrainian intelligentsia, also settled down in the area. Several churches, including St. George's Catholic Church; Ukrainian restaurants and butcher shops; The Ukrainian Museum; the Shevchenko Scientific Society; and the Ukrainian Cultural Center are evidence of the impact of this culture on the area.

 

[edit] Gentrification

[edit] New York University, a controversial resident

Residents of the East Village have a love-hate relationship with New York University, which owns and maintains many buildings, particularly in much of downtown Manhattan and in the neighborhoods surrounding its main campus in Greenwich Village (a distinct neighborhood from the East Village).[35]

 

St. Ann's Church, a rusticated-stone structure on East 12th Street with a Romanesque tower that dated to 1847 was sold to the University to make way for a monolithic 26-story, 700 bed dormitory for students. The University did protect and maintain St. Ann's original facade and small plaza immediately fronting the 12th Street sidewalk. The result is a blended, softer abutment of the new dorm building (which does rise dramatically above the facade) up behind the old St. Ann's entry way. New York University has built many dorms, and this one in particular is now the tallest structure in the area. "There are larger changes going on here," said Lynne Brown, vice president of university relations and public affairs. "I fear this tendency to blame any trend residents don't like happening at the doorstep of NYU," said Brown, mentioning that the university has been one of the longest inhabitants of the East Village. But Nancy Cosie, a 20 year resident and former St. Ann's parishioner, does not buy that argument. "Enough is enough," Cosie exclaimed to The Village Voice, "This is not a campus. This is a neighborhood, and this is my home."[35] NYU's destruction or purchasing of many historic buildings (such as the Peter Cooper post office) have made it symbolic of change that many long-time residents fear is destroying what made the neighborhood interesting and attractive.[36] "I live on Avenue B and 9th Street," an NYU student said. "I know I'm part of the problem - gentrification that is. But where am I supposed to live?"[36]

 

NYU has often been at odds with residents of both the East and West Villages, as legendary urban preservationist Jane Jacobs battled the school in the 1960s.[37] "She spoke of how universities and hospitals often had a special kind of hubris reflected in the fact that they often thought it was OK to destroy a neighborhood to suit their needs,” said Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.[38]

 

[edit] Museums, libraries, performance and art spaces

 

The Bowery Poetry Club.

Sherry Vine and Joey Arias during the 2009 HOWL! Festival.New York Public Library Tompkins Square branch [3]

The Fales Library of NYU

East Village Visitors Center - 308 Bowery

The Ukrainian Museum

New Museum of Contemporary Art

Museum of Jewish Heritage

Performance Space 122

Anthology Film Archives

The Stone

Bouwerie Lane Theatre

Amato Opera

Danspace Project

The Ontological-Hysteric Theater

The Pearl Theatre Company [4]

Stomp! (Theatrical show)

Metropolitan Playhouse[5]

Mercury Lounge (live music)

Sidewalk Cafe (performance and live music)

Bowery Ballroom (concerts and shows)

Nuyorican Poets Cafe (music, poetry, readings, slams)

Bowery Poetry Club (music, poetry, readings, slams)

La MaMa E.T.C. (performance theater)

Cooper Union (speeches, presentations, public lectures and readings)

[edit] Neighborhood festivals

Mayday Festival - May 1; yearly.

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival - August; yearly.[6]

HOWL! Festival - September; yearly.[7][8]

East Village Radio Festival - September 6, 2008 [9]

Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade - October; yearly.[10]

East Village Theater Festival - August 3–23, 2009.[11]

FAB! Festival & Block Party - Last weekend in September annually, Sept 25, 2010 [12]

[edit] Media

 

Many film shoots take place in the East Village; here a period movie with antique police cars is filmed on East 4th Street.[edit] Radio

East Village Radio

[edit] Local news

The Village Voice

The Villager

East-Village.com

EastVillageFeed.com

[edit] Cinemas

Anthology Film Archives

Landmark's Sunshine Theater

Village East Cinema

City Cinema Village East

Two Boots Pioneer Theater

[edit] Notable residents past and present

 

Handsome Dick Manitoba of The Dictators.

Madonna lived in the neighborhood when she was just starting out in her career.[39]Handsome Dick Manitoba, who owns Manitoba's bar on Avenue B off Tompkins Square Park.

Darren Aronofsky and his wife, Rachel Weisz

Chris Cain, Bassist for the Indie-Rock band We Are Scientists

Barbara Feinman

John Leguizamo

Daniel Radcliffe

Agim Kaba

Rosario Dawson

Tom Kalin

Vashtie Kola director

W. H. Auden[40]

Greer Lankton, Artist/Doll maker

Ellen Stewart founder of La MaMa, E.T.C. (Experimental Theatre Club) in 1961.

Madonna lived there in the 1980s.

John Lurie,musician, painter, actor, producer.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, graffiti artist

David Bowes, painter

Allen Ginsberg (1926–1997), Beat Generation poet and author of Howl.[41]

Keith Haring, neo-pop artist

Claes Oldenburg (1929-), sculptor, had a studio at 46 East 3rd Street in the late 1950s.[42]

Candy Darling, actress/Warhol superstar

Bill Raymond, actor

Ryan Adams, alt-country musician

David Cross, actor, comedian

Negin Farsad, writer, director, comedian

Nan Goldin, photographer

Stephen Lack, actor, painter

Ronnie Landfield, (1947-), painter, lived on E. 11th street, mid-1960s[43]

Kiki Smith sculptor

John Zorn composer, musician

Richard Hell, musician, author

Abbie Hoffman (1936–1989), 1960s political activist[44]

Ayun Halliday, actress and writer, and wife of playwright Greg Kotis

Greg Kotis, playwright, and husband of actress and writer Ayun Halliday

Jerry Rubin (1938–1994), 1960s political activist - with Hoffman founded the Yippies in a basement apartment at 30 St. Marks Place[44]

Cookie Mueller, actress, model

Paul Krassner (1932-), publisher of The Realist

Walter Bowart (1939–2007), co-founder editor/ of The East Village Other

Allan Katzman, co-founder/editor of The East Village Other

Tuli Kupferberg, (1923-), Beat Generation poet, and one of the original Fugs

Ed Sanders, (1939-), New York School poet and one of the original Fugs

Joseph Nechvatal (1951-) early digital artist and founder of the Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine

Randy Harrison, actor

Joel Resnicoff, artist and fashion illustrator.

Regina Spektor, (1980-) Singer-songwriter and pianist.

Rachel Trachtenburg (1993-) singer and musician

Tom Otterness sculptor

Steven Fishbach, runner-up of Survivor: Tocantins

Chloe Sevigny actress

Conor Oberst musician

Lou Reed, musician

Julian Casablancas, musician

Mark Ronson

Arthur Russell, musician[45]

Jack Smith filmmaker, artist

Iggy Pop, performer, musician

 

An urban planning project takes about ten good years to exist, here in France, there are so many laws and regulations with little vision. I have 30 years of fighting against preconceived ideas by the masters of modernism, so it takes a lot of patience to build a place.

A placemaking project does not happen overnight. Do not be discouraged if things do not go exactly as planned at first, or if progress seems slow.

As with many other types of project, a placemaking project needs a vision to succeed. This vision should not be the grand design of a single person, but the aggregate conception of the entire community.

Placemaking is not just about designing a park of plaza with efficient pedestrian circulation. It involves taking into account the interrelations between surrounding retailers, vendors, amenities provided, and activities taking place in the space, then fine-tuning the space with landscape changes, additions of seating, etc, to make all of those elements mesh. The end result should be a cohesive unit that creates greater value for the community than just the sum of its parts.Triangulation, simply put, is the strategic placement of amenities, such that they encourage social interaction, and are used more frequently. For example "if a children's reading room in a new library is located so that it is next to a children's playground in a park and a food kiosk is added, more activity will occur than if these facilities were located separately."

  

Placemaking is a multi-faceted approach to the planning, design and management of public spaces. Placemaking capitalizes on a local community's assets, inspiration, and potential, with the intention of creating public spaces that promote people's health, happiness, and well being. It is political due to the nature of place identity. Placemaking is both a process and a philosophy.

The concepts behind placemaking originated in the 1960s, when writers like Jane Jacobs and William H. Whyte offered groundbreaking ideas about designing cities that catered to people, not just to cars and shopping centers. Their work focused on the importance of lively neighborhoods and inviting public spaces. Jacobs advocated citizen ownership of streets through the now-famous idea of "eyes on the street." Whyte emphasized essential elements for creating social life in public spaces.

The term came into use in the 1970s by landscape architects, architects and urban planners to describe the process of creating squares, plazas, parks, streets and waterfronts that will attract people because they are pleasurable or interesting. Landscape often plays an important role in the design process. The term encourages disciplines involved in designing the built environment to work together in pursuit of qualities that they each alone are unable to achieve.

Bernard Hunt, of HTA Architects noted that: "We have theories, specialisms, regulations, exhortations, demonstration projects. We have planners. We have highway

engineers. We have mixed use, mixed tenure, architecture, community architecture, urban design, neighbourhood strategy. But what seems to have happened is that we have simply lost the art of placemaking; or, put another way, we have lost the simple art of placemaking. We are good at putting up buildings but we are bad at making places."

Jan Gehl has said "First life, then spaces, then buildings – the other way around never works"; and "In a Society becoming steadily more privatized with private homes, cars, computers, offices and shopping centers, the public component of our lives is disappearing. It is more and more important to make the cities inviting, so we can meet our fellow citizens face to face and experience directly through our senses. Public life in good quality public spaces is an important part of a democratic life and a full life."

The writings of poet Wendell Berry have contributed to an imaginative grasp of place and placemaking, particularly with reference to local ecology and local economy. He writes that, "If what we see and experience, if our country, does not become real in imagination, then it never can become real to us, and we are forever divided from it... Imagination is a particularizing and a local force, native to the ground underfoot."

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Placemaking

I took this photo from the southeast corner window of my apartment, looking down at the corner of Bleecker and West 10th St. in Greenwich Village. It was a flash storm of some kind, and within a few minutes, everyone was off the street. I had just gotten my first 35mm camera, a Yashica something-or-other, and I didn't know anything about photography at the time; but it seemed like such a "natural" scene that I felt should poke my camera out the window and record it...

 

This photo was published in a June 17, 2008 Internet blog article about Washington Square Park, entitled "Last Call, Bohemia. Or, As Jane Jacobs wrote, the benefits of the “strange”." It was also published in an edited Aug 17, 2009 version of the article, titled "Last Call, Bohemia." And it was published in a Sep 17, 2010 blog titled "Stuff You Might Have Missed." It was also published in a Nov 14, 2010 issue of Annie Syed's "Still Sundays" blog. And it was published in an undated (mid-Nov 2010) Digital Camera Product Reviews blog, with the same title and detailed notes as what I had written on this Flickr page.

 

Moving into 2011, the photo was published in a May 11, 2011 "Nice Product Reviews" blog, with the same caption and detailed notes I had written on this Flickr page.

 

Moving into 2015, the photo was published in a Sep 15, 2015 blog titled "Group Shaming in the Internet Age: The 21st Century Bystander Effect."

Joined Jane's Walk on 05.06.17. My first neighborhood walk was around Murray Hill.

 

Jane's Walk, an annual event held the first weekend in May, is a global festival of free, volunteer-led walking conversations inspired by urban activist Jane Jacobs. During Jane’s Walk weekend, the simple act of exploring the city is enhanced with personal observations, local history, and civic engagement.

 

Murray Hill is a neighborhood on the east side of midtown Manhattan, from 40th Street down to roughly 27th Street, and from Fifth Avenue to the East River.

Information From:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Village,_Manhattan

 

East Village, Manhattan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

East Village, Manhattan

New York City Neighborhood

 

Location in Lower Manhattan

Named: 1960s[1]

Streets: 2nd Avenue, 1st Avenue, Avenue A, The Bowery, St. Mark's Place

Subway: F, V, 6 and L

Zip code: 10009, 10003 and 10002

Government

Federal: Congressional Districts 8, 12 and 14

State: New York State Assembly Districts 64, 66 and 74, New York State Senate Districts 25 and 29

City: New York City Council District 2

Local Manhattan Community Board 3

 

Neighborhood map

The East Village is a neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It lies east of Greenwich Village, south of Gramercy and Stuyvesant Town, and north of the Lower East Side. Within the East Village there are several smaller neighborhoods, including Alphabet City and The Bowery.

 

The neighborhood was once considered part of the Lower East Side, but in the 1960s it began to develop its own culture and became known as the East Village. Scores of artists and hippies began to move into the area, attracted by the base of Beatniks that had lived there since the 1950s. It has been the site of counterculture, protests and riots. The neighborhood is known as the birthplace and historical home of many artistic movements, including punk rock[2] and the Nuyorican literary movement.[3]

 

It is still known for a diverse community, vibrant nightlife and artistic sensibility, although in recent decades gentrification has changed the character of the neighborhood

 

History

 

Tompkins Square Park is the recreational and geographic heart of the East Village. It has historically been a part of counterculture, protest and riots.

New York City's Fourth of July fireworks over the neighborhood. The East Village's East River Park is a popular viewing destination.[edit] Formation of the neighborhood

Today's East Village was originally a farm owned by Dutch Governor Wouter van Twiller. Petrus Stuyvesant received the deed to this farm in 1651, and his family held on to the land for over seven generations, until a descendant began selling off parcels of the property in the early 1800s. Wealthy townhouses dotted the dirt roads for a few decades until the great Irish and German immigration of the 1840s and 1850s.

 

Speculative land owners began building multi unit dwellings on lots meant for single family homes, and began renting out rooms and apartments to the growing working class. The "East Village" was formerly known as Klein Deutschland ("Little Germany, Manhattan"); however, Little Germany dissolved after the SS General Slocum burned into the water in New York's East River on June 15, 1904. From the years roughly between the 1850s and the first decade of the 20th century, the "East Village" hosted the largest urban populations of Germans outside of Vienna and Berlin. It was America's first foreign language neighborhood; hundreds of political, social, sports and recreational clubs were set up during this period, some of these buildings still exist.

 

What is now the East Village once ended at the East River where Avenue C is now located. A large portion of the neighborhood was formed by landfill, including World War II debris and rubble from London, which was shipped across the Atlantic to provide foundation for the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive.[5]

 

[edit] The 'East Village' separates from the Lower East Side

Definitions vary, but the boundaries are roughly defined as east of Broadway and the Bowery from 14th Street down to Houston Street.[1]

  

Looking south from 6th Street down Second Avenue, one of the main thoroughfares through the East Village.Until the mid-1960s, this area was simply the northern part of the Lower East Side, with a similar culture of immigrant, working class life. In the 1950s the migration of Beatniks into the neighborhood later attracted hippies, musicians and artists well into 1960s.[1] The area was dubbed the "East Village", to dissociate it from the image of slums evoked by the Lower East Side. According to the New York Times, a 1964 guide called, "Earl Wilson's New York," wrote that "artists, poets and promoters of coffeehouses from Greenwich Village are trying to remelt the neighborhood under the high-sounding name of 'East Village.'"[1]

 

Newcomers and real estate brokers popularized the East Village name, and the term was adopted by the popular media by the mid-1960s.[6][7] In 1966 a psychedelic weekly newspaper, The East Village Other, appeared and The New York Times declared that the neighborhood "had come to be known" as the East Village in the June 5, 1967 edition.[1]

 

[edit] The music scene develops

In 1966 Andy Warhol promoted a series of shows, entitled The Exploding Plastic Inevitable, and featuring the music of the Velvet Underground, in a Polish ballroom on St Marks Place. On June 27, 1967, the Electric Circus opened in the same space with a benefit for the Children's Recreation Foundation (Chairman: Bobby Kennedy). The Grateful Dead, The Chambers Brothers, Sly & the Family Stone, the Allman Brothers were among the many rock bands that performed there before it closed in 1971.

  

Punk rock icon and writer Richard Hell still lives in the same apartment in Alphabet City that he has had since the 1970s.On March 8, 1968 Bill Graham opened the Fillmore East in a Yiddish Theatre on 2nd Avenue. The venue quickly became known as "The Church of Rock and Roll," with two-show concerts several nights a week. While booking many of the same bands that had played the Electric Circus, Graham particularly used the venue – and its West Coast counterpart, to establish new British bands like The Who, Pink Floyd, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Cream, and Led Zeppelin. It, too, closed in 1971.

 

CBGB, the nightclub considered by some to be the birthplace of punk music, was located in the neighborhood, as was the early punk standby A7. No Wave and New York hardcore also emerged in the area’s clubs. Among the many important bands and singers who got their start at these clubs and other venues in downtown Manhattan were: Patti Smith, Arto Lindsay, the Ramones, Blondie, Madonna, Talking Heads, the Plasmatics, Glenn Danzig, Sonic Youth, the Beastie Boys, Anthrax, and The Strokes. From 1983–1993, much of the more radical audio work was preserved as part of the Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine recording project, which was based in the nearby Lower East Side.

 

[edit] Rise in artistic prominence

 

Allen Ginsberg, a long-time resident, with poet Peter Orlovsky.Over the last 100 years, the East Village/Lower East Side neighborhood has been considered one of the strongest contributors to American arts and culture in New York.[8] During the great wave of immigration (Germans, Ukrainians, Polish) in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, countless families found their new homes in this area.

 

The East Village has been the birthplace of cultural icons and movements from the American gangster to the Warhol Superstars, folk music to punk rock, anti-folk to hip-hop, advanced education to organized activism, experimental theater to the Beat Generation and the community of experimental musicians, composers and improvisers now loosely known as the Downtown Scene.

 

Club 57, on St. Mark's Place, was an important incubator for performance art and visual art in the late 1970s and early 1980s; followed by Now Gallery, 8BC and ABC No Rio.

 

During the 1980s the East Village art gallery scene helped to galvanize a new post-modern art in America; showing such artists as Kiki Smith, Peter Halley, Keith Haring, Stephen Lack, Greer Lankton, Joseph Nechvatal, Nan Goldin, Jean-Michel Basquiat, David Wojnarowicz, Rick Prol, and Jeff Koons.[9]

 

[edit] The musical 'Rent'

The East Village is the setting for Jonathan Larson's musical Rent; set in the early 1990s, the story chronicles a group of friends over a year in their struggles against poverty, drug abuse and AIDS.

 

The musical Rent chronicled a period in the neighborhood's history that is bygone. It opened at the New York Theater Workshop in February 1996.[10] It described a New York City devastated by the AIDS epidemic, drugs and high crime, and followed several characters in the backdrop of their effort to make livings as artists.[11]

 

[edit] Decline of the art scene

 

The "Downtown Legends" wall at Mo Pitkins House of Satisfaction featured artists known in the East Village performance scene. A few featured in this photo include the Reverend Jen, Nick Zedd, Allen Ginsberg, Reverend Billy and Murray Hill (pictured).The East Village's performance and art scene has declined since its hey-day of the 1970s and 1980s.[12] One club that had opened to try to resurrect the neighborhood's past artistic prominence was Mo Pitkins' House of Satisfaction, part-owned by Jimmy Fallon of Saturday Night Live. It closed its doors in 2007, and was seen by many as another sign of the continued decline of the East Village performance and art scene, which has mostly moved to Williamsburg, Brooklyn.[13] Rapture Cafe also shut down in April 2008, and the neighborhood lost an important performance space and gathering ground for the gay community. There are still some performance spaces, such as Sidewalk Cafe on Avenue A, where downtown acts find space to exhibit their talent, and the poetry clubs.[14]

 

Punk scene icons stayed in the neighborhood as it changed. Richard Hell lives in the same apartment he has lived in since the 1970s, and Handsome Dick Manitoba of The Dictators owns and reigns over Manitoba's bar on Avenue B.

 

[edit] Internal neighborhoods

The East Village contains several hamlets of vibrant communities within itself.

 

[edit] Alphabet City

Main article: Alphabet City, Manhattan

 

The Nuyorican Poets Cafe has been located off Avenue C and East 3rd Street since its founding in 1973.Alphabet City comprises nearly two-thirds of the East Village. It also once was the archetype of a dangerous New York City neighborhood. Its turn-around was cause for The New York Times to observe in 2005 that Alphabet City went "from a drug-infested no man's land to the epicenter of downtown cool."[15] Its name comes from Avenues A, B, C, and D, the only avenues in Manhattan to have single-letter names. It is bordered by Houston Street to the south and 14th Street to the north where Avenue C ends. Some famous landmarks include Tompkins Square Park, the Nuyorican Poets Cafe and the Stuyvesant Town private residential community.

 

[edit] Loisaida

Main article: Loisaida

 

A Loisaida street fair in the Summer of 2008.Loisaida is a term derived from the Latino (and especially Nuyorican) pronunciation of "Lower East Side", a neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City. The term was originally coined by poet/activist, Bittman "Bimbo" Rivas in his 1974 poem "Loisaida". Loisaida Avenue is now an alternative name for Avenue C in the Alphabet City neighborhood of New York City, whose population has largely been Hispanic (mainly Nuyorican) since the late 1960s.

 

[edit] St. Mark's Place

Main article: St. Mark's Place

 

Artist Jim Power, known as the "Mosaic Man" for his public art tiling the neighborhood[16], at the 2009 St. Mark's Place Block Party.Eighth Street becomes St. Mark's place east of Third Avenue. It once had the cachet of Sutton Place, known as a secluded rich enclave in Manhattan, but which by the 1850s had become a place for boarding houses and a German immigrant community.[17] It is named after St Mark's Church in-the-Bowery, which was built on Stuyvesant Street but is now on 10th Street. St. Mark's Place once began at the intersection of the Bowery and Stuyvesant Street, but today the street runs from Third Avenue to Avenue A. Japanese street culture and a Japanese expatriate scene forms in the noodle shops and bars that line St. Mark's Place, also home to an aged punk culture and CBGB's new store. It is home to one of the only Automats in New York City (it has since closed).[18]

 

St. Mark's is along the “Mosaic Trail”, a trail of 80 mosaic-encrusted lampposts that runs from Broadway down Eighth Street to Avenue A, to Fourth Street and then back to Eighth Street. The project was undertaken by East Village public artist Jim Power, known as the "Mosaic Man".[16]

 

[edit] The Bowery

Main article: The Bowery

 

Once synonymous with 'Bowery Bums', the avenue has become a magnet for luxury condominiums as the neighborhood's rapid gentrification continues.The Bowery, former home to the punk-rock nightclub CBGB, was once known for its many homeless shelters, drug rehabilitation centers and bars. The phrase "On The Bowery", which has since fallen into disuse, was a generic way to say one was down-and-out.[19]

 

The Bow’ry, The Bow’ry!

They say such things,

and they do strange things

on the Bow’ry —From the musical A Trip to Chinatown, 1891

 

Today, the Bowery has become a boulevard of new luxury condominiums. It also is home to the Amato Opera and the Bowery Poetry Club, contributing to the neighborhood's reputation as a place for artistic pursuit. Artists Amiri Baraka and Taylor Mead hold regular readings and performances in the space.

 

The redevelopment of the avenue from flophouses to luxury condominiums has met with resistance from long-term residents, who agree the neighborhood has improved, but that its unique, gritty character is also disappearing.[20]

 

[edit] Parks and green space

[edit] Tompkins Square Park

Main article: Tompkins Square Park

 

The Tompkins Square dog run was the first in New York City, and is a social scene unto itself.[5]Tompkins Square Park is a 10.5 acre (42,000 m²) public park in the Alphabet City section of the East Village neighborhood in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It is square in shape, and is bounded on the north by East 10th Street, on the east by Avenue B, on the south by East 7th Street, and on the west by Avenue A. St. Marks Place abuts the park to the west.

 

[edit] Tompkins Square Park Police Riot

Main article: Tompkins Square Park Police Riot (1988)

The Tompkins Square Park Police Riot was a defining moment for the neighborhood. In the late hours of August 6 into the morning hours of August 7, 1988 a riot broke out in Alphabet City's Tompkins Square Park. Groups of "drug pushers, homeless people and young people known as 'skinheads'" had largely taken over the East Village park, but the neighborhood was divided about what, if anything, should be done about it.[21] The local governing body, Manhattan Community Board 3, adopted a 1 am curfew for the previously 24-hour park, in an attempt to bring it under control.[22] On July 31, a rally against the curfew resulted in several clashes between protesters and police.[23]

 

[edit] East River Park

Main article: East River Park

 

East River Park below the Williamsburg Bridge.The park is 57 acres (230,000 m2) that runs along the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive from Montgomery Street to East 12th Street.[24] It was designed in the 1930s by Robert Moses, who wanted to ensure there was parkland on the Lower East Side.[24]

 

[edit] Community gardens

There are reportedly over 640 community gardens in New York City—gardens run by local collectives within the neighborhood who are responsible for the gardens' upkeep—and an estimated 10 percent of those are located on the Lower East Side and East Village alone.[25]

 

[edit] Tower of Toys on Avenue B

The Avenue B and 6th Street Community Garden is one of the neighborhood's more notable for a now removed outdoor sculpture, the Tower of Toys, designed by artist and long-time garden gate-keeper, Eddie Boros. Boros died April 27, 2007.[26] The Tower was controversial in the neighborhood; some viewed it as a masterpiece, others as an eyesore.[26][27] The tower appeared in the opening credits for the television show NYPD Blue and also appears in the musical Rent.[26] In May 2008, it was dismantled. According to NYC Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe, the tower was rotting in sections that made it a safety hazard.[28] Its removal was seen as another symbol of the fading past of the neighborhood.[28]

 

[edit] Toyota Children’s Learning Garden

Located at 603 East 11th Street, the Toyota Children's Learning Garden is not technically a community garden, but it also fails to fit in the park category. Designed by landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh, the garden opened in May 2008 as part of the New York Restoration Project and is designed to teach children about plants.[29]

 

[edit] New York City Marble Cemetery

 

A production of John Reed's All the World's a Grave in the Marble Cemetery, which does not contain headstones.The cemetery is actually two, which sit on 2nd Street between 1st Avenue and 2nd Avenue. They are open the fourth Sunday of every month.[30] The first and more prominent is the City cemetery, which is second oldest non-sectarian cemetery in New York City. It sits next to the oldest public cemetery in New York City not affiliated with any religion, the "New York Marble Cemetery."[31] The cemetery was opened in 1831 and at one point contained ex-U.S. President James Monroe.[32]

 

[edit] Culture and events

 

Longtime Mistress of Ceremonies at eatery Lucky Cheng's, Miss Understood stops a bus in front of the restaurant on First Avenue.Other than geography, the East Village's most notable commonalities with Greenwich Village are a colorful history, vibrant social and cultural outlets, and street names that often diverge from the norm.

 

The Bowery is a north-south avenue which also lends its name to the somewhat overlapping neighborhood of the Bowery; St. Mark's Place, a crosstown street well-known for counterculture businesses; and Astor Place/Cooper Square, home of the Public Theater and the Cooper Union. Nearby universities like New York University (NYU), The New School, and The Cooper Union have dormitories in the neighborhood.

 

[edit] Ethnicity and religion

 

Photograph of St. Nicholas with parts of Second Street visible. The church and almost all buildings on the street were demolished in the 1960's and replaced with parking lots.

Former parishioners of St. Mary's Help of Christians pray outside the shuttered church in August 2008.According to 2000 census figures provided by the New York City Department of City Planning, which includes the Lower East Side in its calculation, the neighborhood was 35% Asian, 28% non-Hispanic white, 27% Hispanic and 7% black.[33]

 

On October 9, 1966, A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada, founder of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, held the first recorded outdoor chanting session of the Hare Krishna mantra outside of the Indian subcontinent at Tompkins Square Park.[34] This is considered the founding of the Hare Krishna religion in the United States, and the large tree close to the center of the Park is demarcated as a special religious site for Krishna adherents.[34] The late poet Allen Ginsberg, who lived and died in the East Village, attended the ceremony.

 

There are several Roman Catholic churches in the East Village which have fallen victim to financial hardship particularly in the past decade. Unable to maintain their properties, the Roman Catholic Church has shuttered many of them - including St. Mary's Help of Christians on East 12th Street, as well as St. Ann's. There has recently been much controversy over St. Brigid's, the historical parish on Tompkins Square Park.

 

[edit] Ukrainian history

Since the 1890s there has been a large Ukrainian concentration roughly from 10th Street to 5th Street, between 3rd Avenue and Avenue A. The post-World War II diaspora, consisting primarily of Western Ukrainian intelligentsia, also settled down in the area. Several churches, including St. George's Catholic Church; Ukrainian restaurants and butcher shops; The Ukrainian Museum; the Shevchenko Scientific Society; and the Ukrainian Cultural Center are evidence of the impact of this culture on the area.

 

[edit] Gentrification

[edit] New York University, a controversial resident

Residents of the East Village have a love-hate relationship with New York University, which owns and maintains many buildings, particularly in much of downtown Manhattan and in the neighborhoods surrounding its main campus in Greenwich Village (a distinct neighborhood from the East Village).[35]

 

St. Ann's Church, a rusticated-stone structure on East 12th Street with a Romanesque tower that dated to 1847 was sold to the University to make way for a monolithic 26-story, 700 bed dormitory for students. The University did protect and maintain St. Ann's original facade and small plaza immediately fronting the 12th Street sidewalk. The result is a blended, softer abutment of the new dorm building (which does rise dramatically above the facade) up behind the old St. Ann's entry way. New York University has built many dorms, and this one in particular is now the tallest structure in the area. "There are larger changes going on here," said Lynne Brown, vice president of university relations and public affairs. "I fear this tendency to blame any trend residents don't like happening at the doorstep of NYU," said Brown, mentioning that the university has been one of the longest inhabitants of the East Village. But Nancy Cosie, a 20 year resident and former St. Ann's parishioner, does not buy that argument. "Enough is enough," Cosie exclaimed to The Village Voice, "This is not a campus. This is a neighborhood, and this is my home."[35] NYU's destruction or purchasing of many historic buildings (such as the Peter Cooper post office) have made it symbolic of change that many long-time residents fear is destroying what made the neighborhood interesting and attractive.[36] "I live on Avenue B and 9th Street," an NYU student said. "I know I'm part of the problem - gentrification that is. But where am I supposed to live?"[36]

 

NYU has often been at odds with residents of both the East and West Villages, as legendary urban preservationist Jane Jacobs battled the school in the 1960s.[37] "She spoke of how universities and hospitals often had a special kind of hubris reflected in the fact that they often thought it was OK to destroy a neighborhood to suit their needs,” said Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.[38]

 

[edit] Museums, libraries, performance and art spaces

 

The Bowery Poetry Club.

Sherry Vine and Joey Arias during the 2009 HOWL! Festival.New York Public Library Tompkins Square branch [3]

The Fales Library of NYU

East Village Visitors Center - 308 Bowery

The Ukrainian Museum

New Museum of Contemporary Art

Museum of Jewish Heritage

Performance Space 122

Anthology Film Archives

The Stone

Bouwerie Lane Theatre

Amato Opera

Danspace Project

The Ontological-Hysteric Theater

The Pearl Theatre Company [4]

Stomp! (Theatrical show)

Metropolitan Playhouse[5]

Mercury Lounge (live music)

Sidewalk Cafe (performance and live music)

Bowery Ballroom (concerts and shows)

Nuyorican Poets Cafe (music, poetry, readings, slams)

Bowery Poetry Club (music, poetry, readings, slams)

La MaMa E.T.C. (performance theater)

Cooper Union (speeches, presentations, public lectures and readings)

[edit] Neighborhood festivals

Mayday Festival - May 1; yearly.

Charlie Parker Jazz Festival - August; yearly.[6]

HOWL! Festival - September; yearly.[7][8]

East Village Radio Festival - September 6, 2008 [9]

Tompkins Square Halloween Dog Parade - October; yearly.[10]

East Village Theater Festival - August 3–23, 2009.[11]

FAB! Festival & Block Party - Last weekend in September annually, Sept 25, 2010 [12]

[edit] Media

 

Many film shoots take place in the East Village; here a period movie with antique police cars is filmed on East 4th Street.[edit] Radio

East Village Radio

[edit] Local news

The Village Voice

The Villager

East-Village.com

EastVillageFeed.com

[edit] Cinemas

Anthology Film Archives

Landmark's Sunshine Theater

Village East Cinema

City Cinema Village East

Two Boots Pioneer Theater

[edit] Notable residents past and present

 

Handsome Dick Manitoba of The Dictators.

Madonna lived in the neighborhood when she was just starting out in her career.[39]Handsome Dick Manitoba, who owns Manitoba's bar on Avenue B off Tompkins Square Park.

Darren Aronofsky and his wife, Rachel Weisz

Chris Cain, Bassist for the Indie-Rock band We Are Scientists

Barbara Feinman

John Leguizamo

Daniel Radcliffe

Agim Kaba

Rosario Dawson

Tom Kalin

Vashtie Kola director

W. H. Auden[40]

Greer Lankton, Artist/Doll maker

Ellen Stewart founder of La MaMa, E.T.C. (Experimental Theatre Club) in 1961.

Madonna lived there in the 1980s.

John Lurie,musician, painter, actor, producer.

Jean-Michel Basquiat, graffiti artist

David Bowes, painter

Allen Ginsberg (1926–1997), Beat Generation poet and author of Howl.[41]

Keith Haring, neo-pop artist

Claes Oldenburg (1929-), sculptor, had a studio at 46 East 3rd Street in the late 1950s.[42]

Candy Darling, actress/Warhol superstar

Bill Raymond, actor

Ryan Adams, alt-country musician

David Cross, actor, comedian

Negin Farsad, writer, director, comedian

Nan Goldin, photographer

Stephen Lack, actor, painter

Ronnie Landfield, (1947-), painter, lived on E. 11th street, mid-1960s[43]

Kiki Smith sculptor

John Zorn composer, musician

Richard Hell, musician, author

Abbie Hoffman (1936–1989), 1960s political activist[44]

Ayun Halliday, actress and writer, and wife of playwright Greg Kotis

Greg Kotis, playwright, and husband of actress and writer Ayun Halliday

Jerry Rubin (1938–1994), 1960s political activist - with Hoffman founded the Yippies in a basement apartment at 30 St. Marks Place[44]

Cookie Mueller, actress, model

Paul Krassner (1932-), publisher of The Realist

Walter Bowart (1939–2007), co-founder editor/ of The East Village Other

Allan Katzman, co-founder/editor of The East Village Other

Tuli Kupferberg, (1923-), Beat Generation poet, and one of the original Fugs

Ed Sanders, (1939-), New York School poet and one of the original Fugs

Joseph Nechvatal (1951-) early digital artist and founder of the Tellus Audio Cassette Magazine

Randy Harrison, actor

Joel Resnicoff, artist and fashion illustrator.

Regina Spektor, (1980-) Singer-songwriter and pianist.

Rachel Trachtenburg (1993-) singer and musician

Tom Otterness sculptor

Steven Fishbach, runner-up of Survivor: Tocantins

Chloe Sevigny actress

Conor Oberst musician

Lou Reed, musician

Julian Casablancas, musician

Mark Ronson

Arthur Russell, musician[45]

Jack Smith filmmaker, artist

Iggy Pop, performer, musician

 

New York's primarily residential areas are of equal fascination for me as the grand sites ( sights ? ). This is where the city's unique character shows it's human side and lets you know beautifully just where you are in the world. Neighbourhoods are the "soul" of their cities. Jane Jacobs ardently understood this and fought for a higher consciousness of the value of them. She was hugely successful in protecting neighbourhoods from corporate and governmental destruction both here in New York and in Toronto, Canada. Neighbourhoods and their beauty, the other side of New York, was what I really wanted to focus on a lot more on my June 2019 visit.

 

This shot on 51st Street just West of 1st Ave look West, looks back toward 2nd Ave, where we had just come out of the subway, returning home from the Union Square vegetable market. Shot on June 8, 2019.

 

Two untreated Panos in a diptych make up the main body of the image. The longer, horizontal to the left and the smaller vertical on the right. Treated versions of the same main image ( to the left ) form the underlying framing and border overlays.

 

Why Pano ? Why Pano-Sabotage views of really nice places like this ? Harking back to some of the original dialogue around the medium - is it "destructive", that is, breaking up the world into pieces, or could Pano be an artistic metaphor for transformation, transformation in process, a kind of "RE-Construction"? I see it as both.

 

The current world paradigm clearly isn't working with mass shootings becoming commonplace almost every day now, the Pacific ocean choked for miles and miles and miles with floating human garbage, the mind-blowing irresponsibility and corruption of governments, corporate neoliberal capitalism levelling all before it's giant steamrolling juggernaut, climate change and the rise of utter chaos shaking the very pillars of civilization, there is no doubt that the 'old world' is dying.

 

But as Chaos Theory has shown, it's at these precise points that a system in collapse is the most easily malleable. Just the right impetus or push can send a system into a bifurcation either upwards to a higher level, or down into complete destruction. Which will we chose ? Pano-Sabotage then, in my view, puts us crisply at this point of bifurcation. It is very much a reflection of our time. Where will things go, the medium asks ?

__________________________________________________

 

Music Link: "The Only Living Boy in New York" - Simon & Garfunkel, originally from their album "Bridge Over Troubled Water". By light-years my favourite Paul Simon song. I have no idea why but this one just rips my heart right out in the most beautiful way. It plays in my head constantly when I'm in New York as most of the time when I'm there I'm alone. Not a bad thing, it just is. "Here I am"...

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJZfrTiPXAQ

__________________________________________________

 

© 2019, Richard S Warner ( Visionheart ). All rights reserved. This image may not be used in any form here or elsewhere without express, written permission.

 

Old ideas can sometimes use new buildings.

New ideas must use old buildings.

Jane Jacobs

 

DSC_0094

"New ideas often need old buildings." -Jane Jacobs

The influential urban activist, Jane Jacobs once compared the activity on a city block to “a complex and intricate ballet in which the individual dancers and ensembles all have distinctive parts which miraculously reinforce each other and compose an orderly whole.” In taking this image, I was struck by how each person in it is busy going about their own business apparently unaware of what anyone else is doing. Yet I thought also of Jacobs' metaphor and of the underlying connections that link this street scene and the countless others like it to the larger dance of a living, vibrant city,

   

Old ideas can sometimes use new buildings. New ideas must use old buildings.

Jane Jacobs

Nuevas ideas necesitan de viejos edificios.

Jane Jacobs quote.

 

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The retreat is over. It seems as though cities, much like whole nations, are either advancing forward or falling back. All this movement, forward and back, is never neat and clean. It is always messy and often painful. For as long as I can remember Detroit has been in a slow and messy retreat. Amid the debris of the retreat you can see pockets of advancement.

 

This community on the eastside is being targeted for renewal. Not the old fashioned 20th century urban renewal with its cold modern architecture and urban planning creating warehouses for the poor. This renewal gets back to the fundamental question of real estate economics; what is the highest and best use of the land? The city plans to move the few remaining people in this neighborhood into denser, more stable areas of the city. The land then can then be cleared for urban gardens and farms. This feeds into the growing desire for locally owned foods and a greater connection with how our food is grown, processed and marketed. The benefits of this plan are huge and many. The city can distribute services to the citizens more effectively and at a lower cost. The denser neighborhoods will create the market effect discussed by Jane Jacobs and a new industry will grow within the city borders- the first time that has happened since the turn of the last century when Henry Ford rode his Quadracyle down the street.

 

This reimagining of the city will be messy and come with a great deal of pain. Even in these neighborhoods with astonishing amounts of abandonment you will find most of the remaining residents are proud and tough. It is not unusual to drive down a street to see a row of abandoned houses with a lovingly maintained home right in the middle of the burnt and wrecked relics. For many of these folks moving and leaving behind their homes will hurt. It may cut right to their heart. But it is time for the city to advance and their pride, hard work and love will be in greatly needed by their new neighbors as they continue to advance and restore the city. In the coming decades folks will come to Detroit not to bear witness to the post- industrial apocalypse, but rather to marvel at the new modern city, an exciting blend of urban and rural.

 

 

«By its nature, the metropolis provides what otherwise could be given only by traveling; namely, the strange» – Jane Jacobs

 

Kabukicho disctrict. Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan. Michele Marcolin © 2018. K1 + Summilux-R 50mm f1.4 (HDR)

“Under the seeming disorder of the old city, wherever the old city is working successfully, is a marvelous order for maintaining the safety of the streets and the freedom of the city. It is a complex order. Its essence is intricacy of sidewalk use, bringing with it a constant succession of eyes. This order is all composed of movement and change, and although it is life, not art, we may fancifully call it the art form of the city and liken it to the dance — not to a simple-minded precision dance with everyone kicking up at the same time, twirling in unison and bowing off en masse, but to an intricate ballet in which the individual dancers and ensembles all have distinctive parts which miraculously reinforce each other and compose an orderly whole. The ballet of the good city sidewalk never repeats itself from place to place, and in any once place is always replete with new improvisations.”

 

― Jane Jacobs, THE DEATH AND LIFE OF GREAT AMERICAN CITIES

Lewiston, New York. Can you imagine someone naming a power plant after Jane Jacobs?

B&H Kosher Dairy in the East Village was founded in 1938 by Jewish immigrants as a “dairy” #luncheonette because in Jewish dietary laws, a #kosher restaurant serves either milk or meat, not both. To see and hear more about this #momandpop restaurant @bandhdairy please join us this Sunday, May 6th for a FREE Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York walking tour of the East Village. We will be leading this free tour as part of The Municipal Art Society of New York's Jane's Walk”, a movement of free, citizen-led walking tours inspired by Jane Jacobs. The walks get people to tell stories about their communities, explore their cities, and connect with neighbors. The East Village Community Coalition @evcc and @evimanyc are also supporting this tour. To join our free #storefront walking tour meet us at 1pm on Sunday, May 6th in front of St. Mark's Church on the Bowery 131 East 10th St at 2nd Ave. The free #eastvillage walking tour will last approx. 1 hour. #JaneJacobs #JanesWalk #seeyourcity #signgeeks #typography #typevstime #signcollective #signsunited #ig_nycity #JanesWalkNYC B&H Dairy Kosher Restaurant

We will be leading this free tour as part of The Municipal Art Society of New York's Jane's Walk”, a movement of free, citizen-led walking tours inspired by Jane Jacobs. The walks get people to tell stories about their communities, explore their cities, and connect with neighbors. The East Village Community Coalition @evcc and EVIMA are also supporting this tour.

To join our free #storefront walking tour meet us at 1pm today in front of St. Mark's Church on the Bowery 131 East 10th St at 2nd Ave. The free #eastvillage walking tour will last approx. 1 hour. The Municipal Art Society of New York

Rittenhouse Square is one of the five original open-space parks planned by William Penn and his surveyor Thomas Holme during the late 17th century in central Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The park cuts off 19th Street at Walnut Street and also at a half block above Manning Street. Its boundaries are 18th Street to the East, Walnut St. to the north, Rittenhouse Square West (a north-south boundary street), and Rittenhouse Square South (an east-west boundary street), making the park approximately two short blocks on each side. Originally called Southwest Square, Rittenhouse Square was renamed in 1825 after David Rittenhouse, a descendant of the first paper-maker in Philadelphia, the German immigrant William Rittenhouse. William Rittenhouse's original paper-mill site is known as Rittenhousetown, located in the rural setting of Fairmount Park along Paper Mill Run. David Rittenhouse was a clockmaker and friend of the American Revolution, as well as a noted astronomer; a lunar crater is named after him.

In the early nineteenth century, as the city grew steadily from the Delaware River to the Schuylkill River, it became obvious that Rittenhouse Square would become a highly desirable address. James Harper, a merchant and brick manufacturer who had recently retired from the United States Congress, was the first person to build on the square, buying most of the north frontage, erecting a stately townhouse for himself at 1811 Walnut Street (c. 1840). Having thus set the patrician residential tone that would subsequently define the Square, he divided the rest of the land into generously proportioned building lots and sold them. Sold after the congressman's death, the Harper house became the home of the exclusive Rittenhouse Club, which added the present facade in c. 1901.

Today, the tree-filled park is surrounded by high rise residences, luxury apartments, popular restaurants, a Barnes & Noble bookstore, a Barneys Co-Op, and two hotels, including a five-star. Its green grasses and dozens of benches are popular lunch-time destinations for residents and workers in Philadelphia's Center City neighborhood, while its lion and goat statues are popular gathering spots for small children and their parents. The park is a popular dog walking destination for area residents, as was shown in the fictional film In Her Shoes. The Square was discussed in a favorable light by Jane Jacobs in her seminal work, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. copied from MapQuest 2016

while i do like marc jacobs (at times), i think maybe veering toward the jane jacobs side of things would be a healthy move overall.

Chinatown. Toronto, Ontario

 

One of my favourite intersections in the city. Luckily Spadina didn't become another soulless freeway. Thank you Jane Jacobs.

  

I saw a wonderful documentary called "Citizen Jane," about the great urban activist Jane Jacobs. What a hero!

decluttr

 

I just had to do a street scene for my penultimate shot-- couldn't close this out without one more candid, B&W glimpse of life as we know it here in New York. I have often been this woman meditating in the center of Broadway, communing with the metropolis.

 

I can promise a good bit of ridiculousness and some pretty big news tomorrow...

Stay tuned!

 

***

"A city street equipped to handle strangers, and to make a safety asset, in itself, our of the presence of strangers, as the streets of successful city neighborhoods always do, must have three main qualities:

 

First, there must be a clear demarcation between what is public space and what is private space. Public and private spaces cannot ooze into each other as they do typically in suburban settings or in projects.

 

Second, there must be eyes upon the street, eyes belonging to those we might call the natural proprietors of the street. The buildings on a street equipped to handle strangers and to insure the safety of both residents and strangers, must be oriented to the street. They cannot turn their backs or blank sides on it and leave it blind.

 

And third, the sidewalk must have users on it fairly continuously, both to add to the number of effective eyes on the street and to induce the people in buildings along the street to watch the sidewalks in sufficient numbers. Nobody enjoys sitting on a stoop or looking out a window at an empty street. Almost nobody does such a thing. Large numbers of people entertain themselves, off and on, by watching street activity."

— Jane Jacobs (The Death and Life of Great American Cities)

Excerpted from Jane Jacobs' The Death and Life of Great American Cities:

 

"The two sorts of ecosystems-one created by nature, the other by human beings-have fundamental principles in common. For instance, both types of ecosystems-assuming they are not barren-require much diversity to sustain themselves. In both cases, the diversity develops organically over time, and the varied components are interdependent in complex ways. The more niches for diversity of life and livelihoods in either kind of ecosystem, the greater its carrying capacity for life. In both types of ecosystems, many small and obscure components-easily overlooked by superficial observation can be vital to the whole, far out of proportion to their own tininess of scale or aggregate quantities. In natural ecosystems, gene pools are fundamental treasures. In city ecosystems, kinds of work are fundamental treasures; furthermore, forms of work not only reproduce themselves in newly created proliferating organizations, they also hybridize, and even mutate into unprecedented kinds of work. And because of their complex interdependencies of components, both kinds of ecosystems are vulnerable and fragile, easily disrupted or destroyed."

 

What an amazing woman, especially considering the era she succeeded in. I got the chance to hear her speak in Portland in a sardine-packed lecture room with throngs of people relegated to the hallways trying to listen to her meager, aged voice. She died about a year later in 2006. But her principles live on in many ways, in many people. Her signature book, The Death and Life... remains a vital read after almost 50 years.

The City Beautiful Movement was a reform philosophy of North American architecture and urban planning that flourished during the 1890s and 1900s with the intent of introducing beautification and monumental grandeur in cities. The movement, which was originally associated mainly with Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, and Washington, D.C. promoted beauty not only for its own sake, but also to create moral and civic virtue among urban populations. Advocates of the philosophy believed that such beautification could thus promote a harmonious social order that would increase the quality of life, while critics would complain that the movement was overly concerned with aesthetics at the expense of social reform; Jane Jacobs referred to the movement as an "architectural design cult".

  

Wikipedia

 

"Neighborhoods built up all at once change little physically over the years as a rule...[Residents] regret that the neighborhood has changed. Yet the fact is, physically it has changed remarkably little. People's feelings about it, rather, have changed. The neighborhood shows a strange inability to update itself, enliven itself, repair itself, or to be sought after, out of choice, by a new generation. It is dead. Actually it was dead from birth, but nobody noticed this much until the corpse began to smell."

— Jane Jacobs (The Death and Life of Great American Cities)

 

I love living in a place that is not static; this city always seems to be a perpetual state of renovation or innovation.

Urbanists need to regain control. The traffic engineer and landscape architect have had their way with the civic realm of our cities and towns for too long. The public spaces of any master plan are in fact the most valuable aspect of the design. Care should be given toward their creation and they should not be turned over entirely to any one specialized discipline.

The conception of a great civic realm, anchored by wonderfully, local public spaces, should be the principle goal of any urban design. Beauty will last the ages. If we are to truly build resilient settlements their public spaces must endure for generations. We do not have the luxury to waste on failed endeavors. The founding, or renewal, of a public space is critical to the success of any urban place. The square gives a neighborhood its identity. With success in mind, Urbanists must utilize all the characteristics of a successful public space —particularly the required management and diverse funding that allow for them to endure. As the New Urbanists increasingly look to retrofit suburbia, a similar eye must be put upon the many lost, miss-used or forgotten spaces that exist within our built environment. All land must not be underutilized. Perhaps our society does not yet understand the benefits that non-traditional American public spaces provide? In other parts of the world, a “shared space” is a cultural foundation. They are the streets and plazas that allow city life to exist. Traffic engineers had no hand in the creation of Rome’s piazze. We must learn from these cultures, and as American’s understanding of public space evolves we should not be timid about introducing these ancient forms into our plans. Today no one is looking after the whole of the civic realm. Our professional culture has specialized out of existence the generalist. And it is the generalist that understands what is required to grow a beautiful public space. As Urbanists, we understand the whole system. As Urbanists, we can conduct the symphony required to produce authentic beauty throughout our civic realm.

“Today nobody is concerned with city planning as an art — only as a technical problem. When, as a result, the artistic effect in no way lives up to our expectations, we are left bewildered and helpless; nevertheless, in dealing with the next project it is again treated wholly from the technical point of view, as if it were the layout of a railroad in which artistic questions are not involved.” (Sitte, p.223) In 1889, Camillo Sitte published “City Planning According to Artistic Principles.” One hundred and twenty years later little has changed in the practice of city building. The value of artistically created space has still not found a voice in the modern world. Why?

Shaping the public spaces of our settlements to support an enduring way of life is essential to both the economic development of a place and its overall resiliency. For decades, the artistic expression of our public spaces has not been the driving force behind the projects that shape our built environments’ identities. Beauty, comfort and the higher ideals of a place must be resurrected as the organizing force for city builders. We are still trapped by the statistics of the engineer and dull line of the drafting ruler when it comes to how we create our built environment. A Living Urbanism requires a sophisticated civic realm.

Anatomy of our Civic Realm

The civic realm can actively be identified as our publicly celebrated structures. However, our libraries, churches and governmental building are only a small, but visible, piece of our civic realm. A mature civic realm can be conceived of as the entire system of public spaces both contained by these civic buildings and connecting them. Contrary to other classification systems, I would like to propose that the civic realm is made up of only two categories of public space. In the most complex of conditions Shared Space and Landscaped Space, supported by quality public and private buildings, can provide the full range of conditions required for a meaningful civic realm to exist.

 

A Shared Space can be characterized as a piazza, piazzetta, plaza and, most importantly, streets and thoroughfares. I find these spaces fall under the guideline that urbanism enjoys complexity. These are “mixed-use” spaces in true form. Surprising is that within the best urbanism these spaces make no special consideration for the car. Properly programmed, multi-modal and effectively scaled the street is the most abundant of all shared public spaces. Yet we dilute the street down to a traffic tool in all American conditions. Why? When there are so many precedents for how a street can support all modes of transport equally. Few, if any, engineers will stamp drawings for the construction of a true piazza, piazzetta or plaza effectively removing these timeless forms from the urbanist’s palette. Our struggles for reducing the width of streets has taken too long. The ability to develop a true piazza needs to be possible. We must resurrect Shared Space as a possible modern urban form.

Landscape Spaces exist to connect urban dwellers to nature and to support the emotional experience of the pedestrian. Landscape Spaces create the contemplative places within a village, town or city. They are formed by having a strong connection with nature. The quay running along the river Siene in Paris, the great lawn in New York’s Central Park and the tree lined promenades of Villa Borghese in Rome are all stunning examples of how a Landscape Space gives emotion and soul to a city. Care must be given toward balancing the scale, orientation and natural features of our greens, squares, gardens and parks to ensure they offer the urban dweller relief in any form they wish to find.

Physical Characteristics of Public Space

Is a boulevard really a successful public space if it does not provide a pleasing escape for the pedestrian? Is a small plaza really a successful public space if it does not allow for the cafe to swell in the evening filling ever available square foot with patrons? As we contort the forms of our civic realm to support the modern demands placed upon them by public process and the science of traffic “engineering” (Jacobs, p. 72) we lose the characteristic that allow these spaces to be the foundation for a vibrant and living urbanism.

“The design standards imposed by the highway engineering profession, for instance, are particularly damaging to community as they ensure the dominance of the motor vehicle over the pedestrian, even within the neighborhood. If I may say so, your profession [architects] could be of great help with this challenge of converting the planning and engineering professions, as surely you have noticed that the well-proportioned neighborhoods of the Georgian and Victorian era hold their value far better than the monocultural housing estates of the past 50 years.” (HRH Prince of Wales, 2009)

As Urbanists, we must take up the Prince’s challenge. By giving modern meaning to the characteristics of a quality public space we can allow a boulevard to be a boulevard and plaza to be a plaza. We should no longer support the hybrid, or false, forms being forced upon our citizens.

Balancing the form of a public space is essential. It is most successful when all three dimensions of the space, as well as the surface treatments and sculpture, are considered in concert. It is understood that the containment of a public space is critical. Establishing the constraints of the outdoor room is also linked to the width and length of a public space. As mentioned earlier, we struggle to create narrow streets. I would also like to propose that our squares, and if we could build them, plazas and piazze are much too large.

“In former times all the arrangements and building forms we have enumerated were joined naturally in a unified arrangement that enclosed that plaza. In contrast to this, one tries in modern times to lay the plaza open. What this implies should be clear form what has been said above. It is equivalent to destroying the old plazas. Wherever such a disastrous undertaking has been carried out, the spatial effect is lost forever.” (Sitte, p. 176)

Christopher Alexander has also developed several patterns which I find often over-looked in contemporary practice.

“Pattern 61 – Make a public square much smaller then you would at first imagine; usually no more than 45 to 60 feet across, never more than 70 feet across. This applies only to its width in the short direction. In the long direction it can certainly be longer.” (Alexander, p. 313)

“Pattern 123 – For public squares, courts, pedestrian streets, any place where crowds are drawn together, estimate the mean number of people in the place at any given moment (P), and make the area of the place between 150P and 300P square feet.” (Alexander, p. 598)

Do modern planners or landscape architects consider the population of a public space when considering its most effective size? It is time to reexamine the size and proportions of the public spaces we design and ensure that they are appropriate to the activities, surrounding architecture and number of users. Size does matter.

Layers exist within all great public spaces. Picture the Piazza del Campo. The image of Siene’s Palazzo Pubblico, with its great tower, might come to mind, or the comfortable slope of its fan shaped form. But, with further scrutiny one can begin to see the layers of this space more clearly. The cafés, with their deep sienna brown awnings, situated on the ground floors of the surrounding buildings establish the outside layer and give the piazza its essential active edge. Just as important as engaging uses at the ground level is the composition, slightly varying fenestration and harmonious cornice line of the surrounding buildings. The tower pierces the perceived ceiling of the piazza completing the required characteristic that a public space be engaging in all dimensions. The tower can quickly be established as this spaces center, but with more investigation one will find that the square in fact has many centers. The portico of the Palazzo, opposite the portico is the Fonte Gaia, typically the square as several vendors dotted along its inner edge, the ring road between the cafés for strolling the circumference of the space and the sloping red brick floor with its many groups of seated onlookers all provide a difference experience. The addition of each of these layers enriches the composition giving the public space more significance.

Significance for public space can mean many things. Great spaces possess significant gravity. Several blocks away one should be able to sense, as if it is pulling you in, the nearing public space. This energy emitted from a significant public space attracts more than just pedestrians. At times this can create a gradient of taller builds, more intense ground floor users and increase in the number of intersections and streets. This gravity can also give a neighborhood its identity. “I live just off Washington Square Park” not only uses the significance of the square to orient location, but demonstrates how the gravity of the public space imposes identity on the surrounding blocks as well. The gravity created between the constellations of public spaces present throughout a civic realm give additional vibrancy to the traffic that flows throughout the city. This pulse of mobility gives life to not only the centers of activity but the various arms connecting them.

There are additional spaces that surround and lead into the primary place. They are the foyers for publics space during large events, the quieter plaza filled with cafés just outside the busy market square or the commercial nodes just outside the gates of the public garden providing refreshments to the scene. A healthy civic realm has a constellation of iconic public spaces. Each of these individual spaces possesses a constellation of supporting space. They might provide relief during extreme conditions or give space for services to support the active edge of the square. A single public space is better when it is part of a series of spaces. This fractal relationship gives vibrancy and depth to a living urbanism.

 

Public spaces are living. They breathe, sleep, require maintenance and enjoy company. As urbanism ages it continues to grow, change and adapt to the conditions of the time. This is true of the public spaces within that urbanism as well. Over designed and ridged alignment to uses significantly hinder the successful aging of a public space. These spaces must possess a certain amount of flexibility. This is even true within the span of one year. The best public space can support its citizens throughout the year. There is no “session.” The life of the city should not halt in winter. Prague does not close its squares due to cold weather. The many groups, clubs and organizations that a loved public space establishes will further extend the life of these places. These groups will give guidance to the space and provide resources as it ages. Quality public spaces are living infrastructure.

 

Beauty is Essential

A timeless public space is beautiful. This perhaps is the essential characteristic. Beauty is of course in the eye of the beholder. However, on average the dull, rigid and sterile places that mid-century planners conceived of as beautiful public space have failed. Beauty to the masses, not to a small group of intellectual designers, is essential for a public space to be successful. This beauty ensures the long term enjoyment of a space is certain. Fashion changes too frequently. To let it guide the creation of public space is a mistake. Beautiful squares, plazas, parks and gardens are multigenerational investments. Their form must be timeless for the required investment to be worth its value to a society. Beauty is more likely to be loved, and loved public spaces are more likely to spawn the groups required to maintain and care for it as the life of urbanism surrounding it unfolds. A loved public space endures.

Cycle of Involvement

What does the civic realm really mean to the city? Inevitably cultures and societies evolve. The civic realm provides the platform for this evolution. The civic realm is both the glue that holds a society together and a mirror that allows it to see its failures. This question is not correct; the civic realm means different things to different people. The meanings are not important, but the fact that the civic realm is present in one’s life is. We are just now becoming aware of what the lack of a civic realm can do to a culture and a society.

The civic realm engages the memory. It provides a physical history of a place either through the preservation of its best historic structures or through the generational interaction and story telling that gives rise to the myths of a place. The public spaces of living urbanism should persist within one’s memory. The mind should hold on to their image long since created. The most literal representation of the civic realms memory is those monuments and memorials erected to celebrate our past and the people who made life possible. Either in the squares of Savannah or under Napoleon’s Arc de Triomphe the physical memory is real. It is these memories, provide in large part through the civic realm, that serve to give a place its soul.

One comes to respect both one’s place and oneself more in the presence of the past’s greatest accomplishments. This respect, carried by the citizens’ sense of a place, resists filth, counteracts vandalism and elevates the spirit of said place. Given respect, by way of the connections to previous accomplishments, a successful civic realm’s public spaces will be cherished.

The cycle of a person’s involvement with the public spaces of their civic realm will come to teach them how to care. It will give them pride for their locale and its continued success. Pride will lead to ownership. The city will become one’s own and in time this ownership brings one further comfort in its spaces – a comfort that makes the city a home. Through a populations life cycle of experience within a civic realm, many stories will be crafted which, over time, will enrich the memories of a living urbanism.

Stewardship

A market square is more then just the physical space of the market square. Public space is a platform for the life of a city to unfold. However, a play needs its actors, script and time of performance to bring an audience. Successful public spaces require users. The best of these places provide activities for their users. The smallest parking court can be elevated to a public space when planted with a fruit tree. The cycle of caring for the tree, picking its fruit, smelling its flowers and enjoying its shade can create public space out of the simplest of utility areas. The activities in larger public spaces are produced. There are stewards of the space that initiate the production of the activities required to seed the cycle of involvement that leads to the long term enjoyment of a vibrant civic realm.

 

Just as important as the physical characteristics of a space are the activities carried out within, surrounding or through it. We have discussed the importance of the edge activities. But, often these need to be support and enticed by the activities available in the space proper. Just as the civic realm is divided into shared and landscaped space, activities can be passive and active. There is a strong correlation between landscaped spaces and passive activities. However, a quiet piazzette, with several café tables can be the loveliest of places to rest. Fred Kent, president of Project for Public Spaces, states that the best of public spaces are programmed by “zealous nuts.” It is these groups of nuts that knit together a square or park to improve its gravity, give opportunity for the creation of memories, and fundamentally provide for the enjoyment of future generations in the space.

At the center of a large publics space’s groups must be a “Friends of Great Kennedy Plaza” or a “Central Park Conservancy.” These organizations manage, fund and govern the ongoing operations of the space. They ensure its characteristics remain in place or improve. It is unfortunate, but modern urbanism requires successful large public spaces to be run like businesses.

Did Rome require Friends of the Forum? What kept the “geomorphic” spaces of unplanned cities running? (Kostof, p.43) We currently have no living tradition for the stewardship of our public space. During the last century, Americans learned that the stewardship of our native landscapes was worth the effort. During this century, we will learn that the stewardship of our village, town and city public spaces will be worth the effort as well. We must learn from Olmsted’s dual understanding for both the natural importance of Yellowstone’s preservation for the country and the complex details that would lead to Central Park’s success for New York. Both are of equal importance. Both required stewardship.

Local Economy

It is yet to be seen what type of global economy will be left, but being the optimist it is likely that global markets will still exist. The interesting thing about being competitive in a global market has a lot to do with the strength of your local market. For cities to be competitive globally they will need to differentiate themselves locally. Leveraging the advantages of the local arts, culture, landscape and vernacular building tradition is the foundation for cultivating a unique place in a global market. And we learned that a beautiful civic realm supports all of these items.

A resilient civic realm sets up so many factors that encourage innovation. In time of recession, people take to the streets with market stalls and push carts. These local economies would not be possible without established public space. Random encounters can lead to innovative interaction. The streets, square, plazas and parks are the places for locals to interact and improve their craft or practice.

 

What significant arts movement has been cultivated and supported by a suburban location? Movements, the type that inspire generations, begin in the cafés and piazze of our cities. The physical space of a city should be painted. Its beauty should be sketched, photographed and act as a well spring of creativity for future movements. A resilient civic realm captures the creativity of the group. The arts are perhaps the most radical of economies, but their practice is essential to pollinating the garden of innovation required for local economies to be successful. Fundamentally, a movement, either business or cultural, needs to be inspired. A living urbanism’s civic realm must provide this inspiration.

Civic and cultural institutions further enhance a local economy. Good public space gives visibility to these institutions and provides the essential link between the “Res publica” and “res privata”. These institutions are not only captured in the physical form of a museum or cathedral. Conservation can begin with a discussion in the square. Romance can ignite with a stroll through the garden. Just as a public space can give identity to a neighborhood, a resilient civic realm can help establish an attractive local culture. The institution of a romantic city can be a powerful enabler of the local economy.

Local economies are even more fine grain. The arrangement of public space gives identity to a district. The power of a good space provides the name to a neighborhood. These names can endure long past the time of their original conception. The economic power of a great civic realm can be demonstrated in the suburban shopping center habit of adorning placeless destinations with names traditionally assigned to the best public spaces.

A healthy social interaction, one that supports local economies, takes place in the public spaces of a living urbanism — commerce, or trade, originated in public space. That tradition is still present. I witnessed a chance encounter between two businessmen aboard a San Francisco trolley. One man hopped on, struck up a conversation with the man seated next to him and the next thing I knew they were getting off at the next stop heading toward the coffee shop to discuss a possible new venture. This is just one example of how a comfortable civic realm, not to mention public transit surrounding such areas, can support economic innovation. And if you believe Jane Jacobs, it is this type of innovation that keeps places alive.

 

Foundation for a Resilient Place

As Urbanists, we are responsible for helping to craft the foundations for a resilient place. A living urbanism is the best example of such a place. As we’ve discussed the creation, stewardship and enjoyment of a beautiful civic realm can have a profound effect on the successful passing of time. Celebrations and ceremonies are conducted within their enclosure, demonstrations are held in times of unease and direction given in times of crisis. The public spaces of our settlements are critical to their long term sustainability. These spaces are the constant throughout the lives of the citizens. Great care must be given to their creation and renewal. A beautiful public space can offer both a joyful reminder of the past and inspiring insight to the future.

As urbanists, we must realize that complexity is resilient. Natural ecosystems enjoy complexity as an essential piece of their endurance. Can a complex collections of public space help a local economy support itself during recession? Will these same public spaces improve themselves during booms? Many options are always more enjoyable than fewer and it seems as if contemporary planners, and even new Urbanists, are limiting the complexity possible in our built environment. A city or town should have a diverse selection of public spaces, each giving different types of citizens enjoyment. The stimulation of an elegantly complex civic realm keeps a culture renewed.

A living urbanism begins with community and space. It is the act of shaping this space that gives life to a place. Pleasing public space is the insurance that greater things are possible in a place. The quality of the civic realm is completely related to the comfortable level of density that the private spaces of a village, town or city can support.

A sophisticated civic realm allows for a compact population to exist. This population in turn improves the entire civic realm. It is essential for our projects to push this correlation. Achieving greater density is a significant piece of the puzzle that allows for transit, cultural institutions, local economies and an active street life to exist. It is this interdependence that makes the understanding and implementation of great public spaces so essential to our mission. As urbanists, we possess the skills necessary to lead the coming age of urban stewardship. It is time Urbanists regained control of our civic realm.

Works Cited

 

“Camillo Sitte: The Birth of Modern City Planning: With a translation of the 1889 Austrian edition of his City Planning According to Artistic Principles”

“The City Shaped: Urban Patterns and Meanings Through History”

“Dark Age Ahead”

“A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction“

 

livingurbanism.wordpress.com/tag/camillo-sitte/

In the Shadow of the Bridge

 

At the end of my Sunday Williamsburg waterfront exploration I walked the length of Bedford Street from Greenpoint back to the bridge. As I witnessed this grand melting pot of people from all walks of life I was reminded of the words of Jane Jacobs “Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.”

 

I had a great time walking and talking with the residents of Williamsburg. Photographing one street mural after another I saw young professional families with strollers on their way to supporting the growing restaurant trade of Bedford Street. I talked with long term residents who complained about being pushed out by increasing rents, met with some the famous “Williamsburg Hipsters” and heard stories of “The new Williamsburg.” There were sidewalks filled with art vendors who claimed to be doing well and impoverished residents trying to sell things they found in the garbage but not drawing any customers. Trucks that offered every kind of food, from tacos to organic ice cream, new art galleries, old hardware stores, decades old Irish taverns and new wave watering holes, Williamsburg seemed a bit more alive than most neighborhoods.

 

One of my final views before getting back in my car and going back to the Bronx for dinner and “60 Minutes” was this lone skateboarder in the late afternoon.

Two very sweet girls heading to a sisters Quinceañera.

 

Maria Hernandez park, and the surrounding area, is one of my favorite places in New York City.

 

I read Jane Jacobs "The Death and Life of American Cities" many years ago, but this park seems like a prime example of what she saw as a working park.

   

A joint narrow gauge project by John & Jane Jacobs (GB) and Henk Wust and Derk Huisman (NL). Each one of them put their skills in specific areas to create a typical British scene arround a corn mill.

I just got my Tom Bihn medium cafe bag (here's a better view of the small version, in the colors I got) as recommended by stefnet on AskMe. Seemed like a good opportunity for a What's In Your Bag photo.

A joint narrow gauge project by John & Jane Jacobs (GB) and Henk Wust and Derk Huisman (NL). Each one of them put their skills in specific areas to create a typical British scene arround a corn mill.

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