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Alley Spring flows out from the bottom of a limestone bluff. Dissolved limestone in the water makes the water turn a wonderful blue color.

Joy riding Shasta (Arabian Mare) in the Jacksfork River while on vacation at the CCTR at Eminence, Mo.

The following information was taken from www.nps.gov/ozar/historyculture/alley-mill.htm as it appeared on September 14, 2013.

  

"Grand Setting... Alley Spring

 

by Cindy Von Halle

  

The Alley Community... A Gathering Place

Alley was home, farm, and school for people who lived here a century ago. Dances, baseball games, and roller skating were all part of Alley’s busier days. John Knotts purchased the 80 acre site in 1902 and diversified the enterprises to include a well-stocked store and blacksmith shop.

A mill was vital to community life, where grain was ground to provide the daily bread. The present building was constructed during 1893-1894 by George Washington McCaskill as a merchant mill. It was larger than most mills in the Jacks Fork area and replaced an earlier mill on this same site that was built by 1868. Originally unpainted, it was first painted white with green trim, then later the famous red color associated with Alley Mill today.

  

FROM WHEAT TO FLOUR.....

The process of converting wheat into flour was lengthy and time-consuming. The farmer brought his grain, either wheat or corn, to the miller who made an agreement to either buy the grain or make a trade. Often he would take a “toll” or percentage of the grain in exchange for grinding. Since the water supply of Alley Spring was constant, it seemed to be an ideal place for a mill. Free water power provided energy for the machines; however, recurring floods made the operation only marginally successful. The Alley roller mill was designed to process wheat flour in an area where corn was the main crop. This marketing error presented another setback for mill owners.

  

A TOUR OF THE MILL

The Back Porch

Located under the back porch is the turbine pit. In it sat a thirty five inch Leffel turbine. Belts from the turbine brought power into the basement. A control wheel on the porch allowed the miller to control how much water entered the turbine and thereby control its speed. This ability to control the speed was one of the innovations that made turbines preferable to the old water wheels.

Basement

This is where all power was transmitted to the machinery. Elevators and belts operated from a driveshaft running the length of the building. This section of the mill is not open for public visits.

First Floor

Whole grain (corn or wheat) entered the mill here. The grain was put into bins, then elevated to chutes that were connected to milling machines. These are the large iron and wood machines near the back of the room. Here the grain was ground, picked up in another elevator, taken back up and dropped down into the next machine. This process allowed the grain to be ground repeatedly to a fine flour suitable for baking. Bins for storage were also located on this floor, as well as the miller's office.

Second Floor

Sifting was the main activity here. The large cube shaped machine was called a swing sifter. It shook the ground grain through a series of sieves to achieve a uniform consistency. The rectangular machines were an earlier way to do the same thing. In these machines, flour was filtered or sifted through silk.

The Attic

Belts that operated the second floor machines were located here. The attic is not restored and is not open for public visits. Alley Mill is an example of over 100 historic structures found within Ozark National Riverways. By protecting this landmark, we are preserving the heritage of all Americans. Please help by respecting all historic and archeological artifacts in the park. It is illegal to remove artifacts, including arrowheads, from Park Service or other Federal lands. It is also disrespectful to the memories of those who went before us. Please leave them for the next person to enjoy."

Dog enjoying the water at Jack's Fork in Howell County, MO

Ginger and I were invited to join Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie on a float trip down Jacks Fork. We'd planned on a couple of hours float back to our campsite, but our planned put in point was overwhelmed with people, so Tom took us further up river, and we had a much longer trip.

 

29 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

My first red-cyan anaglyth created with StereoPhoto Maker. If Michael Crichton can do it...

 

Memorial weekend 2010 camp-out at Blue Spring Campsite, on the Ozark National Scenic Riverway, with Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie.

 

Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie left Sunday morning, and we stayed on until mid day Monday. Dash and Leslie had their tent in this spot when we arrived. We moved over here for some better shade.

 

31 May 2010 | Get out the red-cyan 3D glasses | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

The following information was taken from www.nps.gov/ozar/historyculture/alley-mill.htm as it appeared on September 14, 2013.

  

"Grand Setting... Alley Spring

 

by Cindy Von Halle

  

The Alley Community... A Gathering Place

Alley was home, farm, and school for people who lived here a century ago. Dances, baseball games, and roller skating were all part of Alley’s busier days. John Knotts purchased the 80 acre site in 1902 and diversified the enterprises to include a well-stocked store and blacksmith shop.

A mill was vital to community life, where grain was ground to provide the daily bread. The present building was constructed during 1893-1894 by George Washington McCaskill as a merchant mill. It was larger than most mills in the Jacks Fork area and replaced an earlier mill on this same site that was built by 1868. Originally unpainted, it was first painted white with green trim, then later the famous red color associated with Alley Mill today.

  

FROM WHEAT TO FLOUR.....

The process of converting wheat into flour was lengthy and time-consuming. The farmer brought his grain, either wheat or corn, to the miller who made an agreement to either buy the grain or make a trade. Often he would take a “toll” or percentage of the grain in exchange for grinding. Since the water supply of Alley Spring was constant, it seemed to be an ideal place for a mill. Free water power provided energy for the machines; however, recurring floods made the operation only marginally successful. The Alley roller mill was designed to process wheat flour in an area where corn was the main crop. This marketing error presented another setback for mill owners.

  

A TOUR OF THE MILL

The Back Porch

Located under the back porch is the turbine pit. In it sat a thirty five inch Leffel turbine. Belts from the turbine brought power into the basement. A control wheel on the porch allowed the miller to control how much water entered the turbine and thereby control its speed. This ability to control the speed was one of the innovations that made turbines preferable to the old water wheels.

Basement

This is where all power was transmitted to the machinery. Elevators and belts operated from a driveshaft running the length of the building. This section of the mill is not open for public visits.

First Floor

Whole grain (corn or wheat) entered the mill here. The grain was put into bins, then elevated to chutes that were connected to milling machines. These are the large iron and wood machines near the back of the room. Here the grain was ground, picked up in another elevator, taken back up and dropped down into the next machine. This process allowed the grain to be ground repeatedly to a fine flour suitable for baking. Bins for storage were also located on this floor, as well as the miller's office.

Second Floor

Sifting was the main activity here. The large cube shaped machine was called a swing sifter. It shook the ground grain through a series of sieves to achieve a uniform consistency. The rectangular machines were an earlier way to do the same thing. In these machines, flour was filtered or sifted through silk.

The Attic

Belts that operated the second floor machines were located here. The attic is not restored and is not open for public visits. Alley Mill is an example of over 100 historic structures found within Ozark National Riverways. By protecting this landmark, we are preserving the heritage of all Americans. Please help by respecting all historic and archeological artifacts in the park. It is illegal to remove artifacts, including arrowheads, from Park Service or other Federal lands. It is also disrespectful to the memories of those who went before us. Please leave them for the next person to enjoy."

View along Jacks Fork to the West, from the gravel bar.

 

31 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Old Ally Springs Mill In fall

Jack's Fork River near Eminence Missouri

Along the Jacks Fork River, Southern Missouri.

Abbey Mill in the Ozarks near Eminence, MO. October 2004.

Small beach with private access to our campsite. Ginger read her book while I went fishing from the gravel bar mid-stream.

 

31 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Ginger and I were invited to join Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie on a float trip down Jacks Fork. We'd planned on a couple of hours float back to our campsite, but our planned put in point was overwhelmed with people, so Tom took us further up river, and we had a much longer trip.

 

29 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

The following information was taken from www.nps.gov/ozar/historyculture/alley-mill.htm as it appeared on September 14, 2013.

  

"Grand Setting... Alley Spring

 

by Cindy Von Halle

  

The Alley Community... A Gathering Place

Alley was home, farm, and school for people who lived here a century ago. Dances, baseball games, and roller skating were all part of Alley’s busier days. John Knotts purchased the 80 acre site in 1902 and diversified the enterprises to include a well-stocked store and blacksmith shop.

A mill was vital to community life, where grain was ground to provide the daily bread. The present building was constructed during 1893-1894 by George Washington McCaskill as a merchant mill. It was larger than most mills in the Jacks Fork area and replaced an earlier mill on this same site that was built by 1868. Originally unpainted, it was first painted white with green trim, then later the famous red color associated with Alley Mill today.

  

FROM WHEAT TO FLOUR.....

The process of converting wheat into flour was lengthy and time-consuming. The farmer brought his grain, either wheat or corn, to the miller who made an agreement to either buy the grain or make a trade. Often he would take a “toll” or percentage of the grain in exchange for grinding. Since the water supply of Alley Spring was constant, it seemed to be an ideal place for a mill. Free water power provided energy for the machines; however, recurring floods made the operation only marginally successful. The Alley roller mill was designed to process wheat flour in an area where corn was the main crop. This marketing error presented another setback for mill owners.

  

A TOUR OF THE MILL

The Back Porch

Located under the back porch is the turbine pit. In it sat a thirty five inch Leffel turbine. Belts from the turbine brought power into the basement. A control wheel on the porch allowed the miller to control how much water entered the turbine and thereby control its speed. This ability to control the speed was one of the innovations that made turbines preferable to the old water wheels.

Basement

This is where all power was transmitted to the machinery. Elevators and belts operated from a driveshaft running the length of the building. This section of the mill is not open for public visits.

First Floor

Whole grain (corn or wheat) entered the mill here. The grain was put into bins, then elevated to chutes that were connected to milling machines. These are the large iron and wood machines near the back of the room. Here the grain was ground, picked up in another elevator, taken back up and dropped down into the next machine. This process allowed the grain to be ground repeatedly to a fine flour suitable for baking. Bins for storage were also located on this floor, as well as the miller's office.

Second Floor

Sifting was the main activity here. The large cube shaped machine was called a swing sifter. It shook the ground grain through a series of sieves to achieve a uniform consistency. The rectangular machines were an earlier way to do the same thing. In these machines, flour was filtered or sifted through silk.

The Attic

Belts that operated the second floor machines were located here. The attic is not restored and is not open for public visits. Alley Mill is an example of over 100 historic structures found within Ozark National Riverways. By protecting this landmark, we are preserving the heritage of all Americans. Please help by respecting all historic and archeological artifacts in the park. It is illegal to remove artifacts, including arrowheads, from Park Service or other Federal lands. It is also disrespectful to the memories of those who went before us. Please leave them for the next person to enjoy."

Swimming hole and bluff at the Blue Spring Campsite on the Ozark National Scenic Riverway.

 

31 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Swimming hole and bluff at the Blue Spring Campsite on the Ozark National Scenic Riverway.

 

31 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Swimming hole and bluff at the Blue Spring Campsite on the Ozark National Scenic Riverway.

 

31 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Some sort of hotel that was over hanging the small bluff. For some reason they felt the need to warn people not to climb on the rocks there. This is the place where the wind blew my laminated map out of the boat. The water was so clear we could see it at the bottom almost 30 feet away and about 10 feet deep. Chad decided to swim out and get it. The water was freezing, be my guest.

Ginger and I were invited to join Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie on a float trip down Jacks Fork. We'd planned on a couple of hours float back to our campsite, but our planned put in point was overwhelmed with people, so Tom took us further up river, and we had a much longer trip.

 

29 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Another view of Blue Spring as we were walking up the trail from the river that shows how clear the water is. The spring is about a quarter of a mile from the Current river.

Swimming hole and bluff at the Blue Spring Campsite on the Ozark National Scenic Riverway. View from the river bank towards a gravel bar where attempted fishing took place.

 

31 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

These bluffs were nothing like the bluffs of the Buffalo in Arkansas but there were a few.

Ginger and I were invited to join Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie on a float trip down Jacks Fork. We'd planned on a couple of hours float back to our campsite, but our planned put in point was overwhelmed with people, so Tom took us further up river, and we had a much longer trip.

 

29 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Bluff along the Jacks Fork downstream from Eminence

Memorial weekend 2010 camp-out at Blue Spring Campsite, on the Ozark National Scenic Riverway, with Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie.

 

Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie left Sunday morning, and we stayed on until mid day Monday. Dash and Leslie had their tent in this spot when we arrived. We moved over here for some better shade.

 

31 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Swimming hole and bluff at the Blue Spring Campsite on the Ozark National Scenic Riverway.

 

31 May 2010 |

  

Copyright © 2012 Ozarks Walkabout All Rights Reserved.

  

Ginger and I were invited to join Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie on a float trip down Jacks Fork. We'd planned on a couple of hours float back to our campsite, but our planned put in point was overwhelmed with people, so Tom took us further up river, and we had a much longer trip.

 

29 May 2010 | Blogged | Ozark National Scenic Riverway | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Ginger and I were invited to join Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie on a float trip down Jacks Fork. We'd planned on a couple of hours float back to our campsite, but our planned put in point was overwhelmed with people, so Tom took us further up river, and we had a much longer trip.

 

29 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Swimming hole and bluff at the Blue Spring Campsite on the Ozark National Scenic Riverway.

 

31 May 2010 | Copyright © 2010 Gary Allman

Ginger and I were invited to join Tom, Rebbie, Dash and Leslie on a float trip down Jacks Fork. We'd planned on a couple of hours float back to our campsite, but our planned put in point was overwhelmed with people, so Tom took us further up river, and we had a much longer trip.

 

29 May 2010 |

Copyright © 2012 Ozarks Walkabout All Rights Reserved.

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