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Thought I'd give red a try after a friend suggested it.

 

--

 

Head: LeLutka Evolution Nova 2.0

Body: Maitreya Mesh Body - Lara V5.2

Skin (Body): [theSkinnery] Bom Body - FIT toffee

Skin (Head): Not Found - Jiu Skin Toffee (Lelutka)

Hair: MINA - Audrie - All colors

Eyes: .euphoric ~Nirvana Eyes Applier ~[Lelutka]

Eyelashes: [theSkinnery] Lora Lash Collection (LeLutkaEVOLUTION)

Eyebrows: IDTTY FACES - LELUTKA PHOTOSHOOT EYEBROWS

Eyeshadow: Zibska Noir Pack Vol 21 Universal Tattoo Layers

Lipstick: *Booty's Beauty* [Lelutka Evolution] Maiden HD Lips

Nails: EarthStones Sparkle & Shine Mani/Pedi ~ Fatpack - Maitreya

Tattoo: .: Vegas :. Tattoo Applier Rite of Passage

Outfit: [Imaps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Sunny%20Side%20Up/123/44/801

“Why Not” Pose

[Imaps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Liberty%20City/130/102/36

 

My blog for details:

cidnicallidora.wixsite.com/website/post/i-3f-tonja-kinky

THE SIXTH EXTINCTION

 

Exerpts by Niles Eldredge

  

There is little doubt left in the minds of professional biologists that Earth is currently faced with a mounting loss of species that threatens to rival the five great mass extinctions of the geological past. As long ago as 1993, Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson estimated that Earth is currently losing something on the order of 30,000 species per year — which breaks down to the even more daunting statistic of some three species per hour. Some biologists have begun to feel that this biodiversity crisis — this “Sixth Extinction” — is even more severe, and more imminent, than Wilson had supposed.

  

Extinction in the past

 

The major global biotic turnovers were all caused by physical events that lay outside the normal climatic and other physical disturbances which species, and entire ecosystems, experience and survive. What caused them?

 

The previous mass extinctions were due to natural causes.

First major extinction (c. 440 mya): Climate change (relatively severe and sudden global cooling) seems to have been at work at the first of these-the end-Ordovician mass extinction that caused such pronounced change in marine life (little or no life existed on land at that time). 25% of families lost (a family may consist of a few to thousands of species).

 

Second major extinction (c. 370 mya): The next such event, near the end of the Devonian Period, may or may not have been the result of global climate change. 19% of families lost.

 

Third major Extinction (c. 245 mya): Scenarios explaining what happened at the greatest mass extinction event of them all (so far, at least!) at the end of the Permian Period have been complex amalgams of climate change perhaps rooted in plate tectonics movements. Very recently, however, evidence suggests that a bolide impact similar to the end-Cretaceous event may have been the cause. 54% of families lost.

 

Fourth major extinction (c. 210 mya): The event at the end of the Triassic Period, shortly after dinosaurs and mammals had first evolved, also remains difficult to pin down in terms of precise causes. 23% of families lost.

 

Fifth major extinction (c. 65 mya): Most famous, perhaps, was the most recent of these events at the end-Cretaceous. It wiped out the remaining terrestrial dinosaurs and marine ammonites, as well as many other species across the phylogenetic spectrum, in all habitats sampled from the fossil record. Consensus has emerged in the past decade that this event was caused by one (possibly multiple) collisions between Earth and an extraterrestrial bolide (probably cometary). Some geologists, however, point to the great volcanic event that produced the Deccan traps of India as part of the chain of physical events that disrupted ecosystems so severely that many species on land and sea rapidly succumbed to extinction. 17% of families lost.

  

How is The Sixth Extinction different from previous events?

 

The current mass extinction is caused by humans.

 

At first glance, the physically caused extinction events of the past might seem to have little or nothing to tell us about the current Sixth Extinction, which is a patently human-caused event. For there is little doubt that humans are the direct cause of ecosystem stress and species destruction in the modern world through such activities as:

 

-transformation of the landscape

 

-overexploitation of species

 

-pollution

 

-the introduction of alien species

 

And, because Homo sapiens is clearly a species of animal (however behaviorally and ecologically peculiar an animal), the Sixth Extinction would seem to be the first recorded global extinction event that has a biotic, rather than a physical, cause.

 

We are bringing about massive changes in the environment.

 

Yet, upon further reflection, human impact on the planet is a direct analogue of the Cretaceous cometary collision. Sixty-five million years ago that extraterrestrial impact — through its sheer explosive power, followed immediately by its injections of so much debris into the upper reaches of the atmosphere that global temperatures plummeted and, most critically, photosynthesis was severely inhibited — wreaked havoc on the living systems of Earth. That is precisely what human beings are doing to the planet right now: humans are causing vast physical changes on the planet.

  

What is the Sixth Extinction?

 

We can divide the Sixth Extinction into two discrete phases:

 

-Phase One began when the first modern humans began to disperse to different parts of the world about 100,000 years ago.

 

-Phase Two began about 10,000 years ago when humans turned to agriculture.

 

Humans began disrupting the environment as soon as they appeared on Earth.

 

The first phase began shortly after Homo sapiens evolved in Africa and the anatomically modern humans began migrating out of Africa and spreading throughout the world. Humans reached the middle east 90,000 years ago. They were in Europe starting around 40,000 years ago. Neanderthals, who had long lived in Europe, survived our arrival for less than 10,000 years, but then abruptly disappeared — victims, according to many paleoanthropologists, of our arrival through outright warfare or the more subtle, though potentially no less devastating effects, of being on the losing side of ecological competition.

 

Everywhere, shortly after modern humans arrived, many (especially, though by no means exclusively, the larger) native species typically became extinct. Humans were like bulls in a China shop:

 

-They disrupted ecosystems by overhunting game species, which never experienced contact with humans before.

 

-And perhaps they spread microbial disease-causing organisms as well.

 

The fossil record attests to human destruction of ecosystems:

 

-Wherever early humans migrated, other species became extinct.

 

-Humans arrived in large numbers in North America roughly 12,500 years ago-and sites revealing the butchering of mammoths, mastodons and extinct buffalo are well documented throughout the continent. The demise of the bulk of the La Brea tar pit Pleistocene fauna coincided with our arrival.

 

-The Caribbean lost several of its larger species when humans arrived some 8000 years ago.

 

-Extinction struck elements of the Australian megafauna much earlier-when humans arrived some 40,000 years ago. Madagascar-something of an anomaly, as humans only arrived there two thousand years ago-also fits the pattern well: the larger species (elephant birds, a species of hippo, plus larger lemurs) rapidly disappeared soon after humans arrived.

 

Indeed, only in places where earlier hominid species had lived (Africa, of course, but also most of Europe and Asia) did the fauna, already adapted to hominid presence, survive the first wave of the Sixth Extinction pretty much intact. The rest of the world’s species, which had never before encountered hominids in their local ecosystems, were as naively unwary as all but the most recently arrived species (such as Vermilion Flycatchers) of the Galapagos Islands remain to this day.

  

Why does the Sixth Extinction continue?

 

The invention of agriculture accelerated the pace of the Sixth Extinction.

 

Phase two of the Sixth Extinction began around 10,000 years ago with the invention of agriculture-perhaps first in the Natufian culture of the Middle East. Agriculture appears to have been invented several different times in various different places, and has, in the intervening years, spread around the entire globe.

 

Agriculture represents the single most profound ecological change in the entire 3.5 billion-year history of life. With its invention:

 

-Humans did not have to interact with other species for survival, and so could manipulate other species for their own use

 

-Humans did not have to adhere to the ecosystem’s carrying capacity, and so could overpopulate

 

-Humans do not live with nature but outside it.

 

Homo sapiens became the first species to stop living inside local ecosystems. All other species, including our ancestral hominid ancestors, all pre-agricultural humans, and remnant hunter-gatherer societies still extant exist as semi-isolated populations playing specific roles (i.e., have “niches”) in local ecosystems. This is not so with post-agricultural revolution humans, who in effect have stepped outside local ecosystems. Indeed, to develop agriculture is essentially to declare war on ecosystems - converting land to produce one or two food crops, with all other native plant species all now classified as unwanted “weeds” — and all but a few domesticated species of animals now considered as pests.

 

The total number of organisms within a species is limited by many factors-most crucial of which is the “carrying capacity” of the local ecosystem: given the energetic needs and energy-procuring adaptations of a given species, there are only so many squirrels, oak trees and hawks that can inhabit a given stretch of habitat. Agriculture had the effect of removing the natural local-ecosystem upper limit of the size of human populations. Though crops still fail regularly, and famine and disease still stalk the land, there is no doubt that agriculture in the main has had an enormous impact on human population size:

 

-Earth can’t sustain the trend in human population growth. It is reaching its limit in carrying capacity.

 

-Estimates vary, but range between 1 and 10 million people on earth 10,000 years ago.

 

-There are now over 6 billion people.

 

-The numbers continue to increase logarithmically — so that there will be 8 billion by 2020.

 

-There is presumably an upper limit to the carrying capacity of humans on earth — of the numbers that agriculture can support — and that number is usually estimated at between 13-15 billion, though some people think the ultimate numbers might be much higher.

 

This explosion of human population, especially in the post-Industrial Revolution years of the past two centuries, coupled with the unequal distribution and consumption of wealth on the planet, is the underlying cause of the Sixth Extinction. There is a vicious cycle:

 

-Overpopulation, invasive species, and overexploitation are fueling the extinction.

 

-More lands are cleared and more efficient production techniques (most recently engendered largely through genetic engineering) to feed the growing number of humans — and in response, the human population continues to expand.

 

-Higher fossil energy use is helping agriculture spread, further modifying the environment.

 

-Humans continue to fish (12 of the 13 major fisheries on the planet are now considered severely depleted) and harvest timber for building materials and just plain fuel, pollution, and soil erosion from agriculture creates dead zones in fisheries (as in the Gulf of Mexico)

 

-While the human Diaspora has meant the spread, as well, of alien species that more often than not thrive at the detriment of native species. For example, invasive species have contributed to 42% of all threatened and endangered species in the U.S.

  

Can conservation measures stop the Sixth Extinction?

 

Only 10% of the world’s species survived the third mass extinction. Will any survive this one?

 

The world’s ecosystems have been plunged into chaos, with some conservation biologists thinking that no system, not even the vast oceans, remains untouched by human presence. Conservation measures, sustainable development, and, ultimately, stabilization of human population numbers and consumption patterns seem to offer some hope that the Sixth Extinction will not develop to the extent of the third global extinction, some 245 mya, when 90% of the world’s species were lost.

 

Though it is true that life, so incredibly resilient, has always recovered (though after long lags) after major extinction spasms, it is only after whatever has caused the extinction event has dissipated. That cause, in the case of the Sixth Extinction, is ourselves — Homo sapiens. This means we can continue on the path to our own extinction, or, preferably, we modify our behavior toward the global ecosystem of which we are still very much a part. The latter must happen before the Sixth Extinction can be declared over, and life can once again rebound.

  

© 2005, American Institute of Biological Sciences. Educators have permission to reprint articles for classroom use; other users, please contact editor@actionbioscience.org for reprint permission. See reprint policy.

 

Paleontologist Dr. Niles Eldredge is the Curator-in-Chief of the permanent exhibition “Hall of Biodiversity” at the American Museum of Natural History and adjunct professor at the City University of New York. He has devoted his career to examining evolutionary theory through the fossil record, publishing his views in more than 160 scientific articles, reviews, and books. Life in the Balance: Humanity and the Biodiversity Crisisis his most recent book.

 

www.gc.cuny.edu/directories/faculty/E.htm

   

Articles and Resources on The Sixth Extinction

 

Consequences of the Sixth Extinction

The article “How Will Sixth Extinction Affect Evolution of Species?,” on our site, describes how the current loss of biodiversity will affect evolution in the long run.

www.actionbioscience.org/newfrontiers/myers_knoll.html

 

BioScience Article

“Global Conservation of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services.”

Habitat destruction has driven much of the current biodiversity extinction crisis, and it compromises the essential benefits, or ecosystem services that humans derive from functioning ecosystems. Securing both species and ecosystem services might be accomplished with common solutions. Yet it is unknown whether these two major conservation objectives coincide broadly enough worldwide to enable global strategies for both goals to gain synergy. In this November 2007, BioScience article, Will Turner and his colleagues assess the concordance between these two objectives, explore how the concordance varies across different regions, and examine the global potential for safeguarding biodiversity and ecosystem services simultaneously. Read the abstract, or log in to purchase the full article.

caliber.ucpress.net/doi/abs/10.1641/B571009

 

Biodiversity in the next millennium

American Museum of Natural History’s nationwide survey (undated) “reveals biodiversity crisis — the fastest mass extinction in Earth’s history.”

cbc.amnh.org/crisis/mncntnt.html

 

National Geographic

A 2/99 article about the Sixth Extinction, with views from several leading scientists.

www.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/9902/fngm/index.html

 

Extinction through time

Find out about cycles of life and death and extinction patterns through time.

www.carleton.ca/Museum/extinction/tablecont.html

 

Is Humanity Suicidal?

Edward O. Wilson asks us why we stay on the course to our own self-destruction.

www.well.com/user/davidu/suicidal.html

 

A Field Guide to the Sixth Extinction

Niles Eldredge writes in 1999 about a few of the millions of plants and animals that won’t make it to the next millennium. The second link takes you to the site’s main page, entitled “Mass Extinction Underway — The World Wide Web’s most comprehensive source of information on the current mass extinction,” which provides links to numerous other resources.

www.well.com/user/davidu/fieldguide.html

www.well.com/user/davidu/extinction.html

 

Global Environment Outlook 3

The United Nations Environment Programme released this major report in May 2002. The report collated the thoughts of more than 1,000 contributors to assess the environmental impact of the last 30 years and outline policy ideas for the next three decades. It concluded that without action, the world may experience severe environmental problems within 30 years. The entire report can be read online or purchased online.

www.unep.org/geo/geo3/index.htm

 

Test your environmental knowledge

A 1999 survey showed that only one in three adult Americans had a passing understanding of the most pressing environmental issues. How do you measure up? Explanatory answers provided.

www.youthactionnet.org/quizzes/global_environment.cfm

 

World Atlas of Biodiversity — interactive map

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) released the firstWorld Atlas of Biodiversityin August 2002. This link takes you to their online interactive map that helps you search for data about species/land/water loss, extinction over time, and human global development. Click on the “?” for a help page that explains how to interact with this map.

stort.unep-wcmc.org/imaps/gb2002/book/viewer.htm

 

The Sixth Great Extinction: A Status Report

Earth Policy Institute’s 2004 update on the status of loss of biodiversity.

www.earth-policy.org/Updates/Update35.htm

  

Books

 

» The Biodiversity Crisis: Losing What Countsby The American Museum of Natural History (New Press, 2001).

 

» The Sixth Extinction: Patterns of of Life and the Future of Humankindby Richard Leakey and Roger Lewin (Doubleday and Company, 1996).

  

Get Involved

 

The Biodiversity Project

You can choose a way to get involved in protecting biodiversity — from educational resources to community outreach.

www.biodiversityproject.org/html/resources/introduction.htm

 

The Nature Conservancy

Select a state from the menu and find out how you can become an environmental volunteer in that state.

www.nature.org/volunteer/

 

Information for Action

“This website explains the environmental problems & offers solutions to fix them. There are many valuable resources available” including lobbying info, contacts database, & news updates.

www.informaction.org/

 

Harmony

“Harmony Foundation is all about education for the environment. We offer publications and programs… ‘Building Sustainable Societies’ offers innovative training for educators and community group leaders to support local action on important environmental issues.”

www.harmonyfdn.ca

 

Earth Talk: Environmental advocacy for professionals

This discussion community and learning network seeks to contribute to global ecological sustainability by enabling communication connections between those working on behalf of forests, water, and climate.

www.ecoearth.info/

 

* * *

 

Tiger Illustration by Dorothy Lathrop from

"Fierce-Face: The story of a tiger" by Dhan Gopal Mukerji (1936)

The Beck ler Peak stock is considered a satellite stock of the Mount Stuart batholith with aRb-Sr age of 94.2±16 m, y. (Yeats and McLaughlin, 1969; Engels andCrowder, 1971).

 

Ksb

Granodiorite of the Beckler Peak stocks - Biotite granodiorite, hypidiomorphic-granular to xenomorphic with microcline microperthite. Mostly Cl 5-9, but Yeats (1958a, p. 75) reports some rocks with as much as 18 percent magic minerals. Stocks are commonly highly sheared and cataclastic. See Yeats (1958a, p. 74-77 for further description. - pubs.usgs.gov/imap/i1963/skygm.pdf

 

Beckler Peak Stock left of fault on map - www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Paleomagnetism-of-the-Mt-.-...

 

my lichen photos by genus - www.flickr.com/photos/29750062@N06/collections/7215762439...

 

my photos arranged by subject, e.g. mountains - www.flickr.com/photos/29750062@N06/collections

Departamento de Estradas de Rodagem do DF

Operação de Trânsito

Mercedes-Benz 3344 6x4 2014 / Guincho Rebocador IMAP GR 15000

Departamento de Estradas de Rodagem do DF

Operação de Trânsito

Mercedes-Benz 3344 6x4 2014 / Guincho Rebocador IMAP GR 15000

Departamento de Estradas de Rodagem do DF

Operação de Trânsito

Mercedes-Benz 3344 6x4 2014 / Guincho Rebocador IMAP GR 15000

Corpo de Bombeiros Militar do DF

Grupamento de Busca e Salvamento

Iveco Trakker 380T38 2005

IMAP IMK-30.5E (Guindaste a cabo)

 

Edited NASA visualization of the shape of our solar system (where "shape" means the bubble surrounding the sun and immediate objects, like planets). I like the term "deflated croissant" used in the caption...

 

Please note this is not an image taken by a spacecraft but a visualization from a computer program.

 

Image source: www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2020/uncovering-our-solar-sy...

 

Original caption: Scientists have developed a new prediction of the shape of the bubble surrounding our solar system using a model developed with data from NASA missions.

 

All the planets of our solar system are encased in a magnetic bubble, carved out in space by the Sun’s constantly outflowing material, the solar wind. Outside this bubble is the interstellar medium — the ionized gas and magnetic field that fills the space between stellar systems in our galaxy. One question scientists have tried to answer for years is on the shape of this bubble, which travels through space as our Sun orbits the center of our galaxy. Traditionally, scientists have thought of the heliosphere as a comet shape, with a rounded leading edge, called the nose, and a long tail trailing behind.

 

Research published in Nature Astronomy in March and featured on the journal’s cover for July provides an alternative shape that lacks this long tail: the deflated croissant.

 

The shape of the heliosphere is difficult to measure from within. The closest edge of the heliosphere is more than ten billion miles from Earth. Only the two Voyager spacecraft have directly measured this region, leaving us with just two points of ground-truth data on the shape of the heliosphere.

 

From near Earth, we study our boundary to interstellar space by capturing and observing particles flying toward Earth. This includes charged particles that come from distant parts of the galaxy, called galactic cosmic rays, along with those that were already in our solar system, travel out towards the heliopause, and are bounced back towards Earth through a complex series of electromagnetic processes. These are called energetic neutral atoms, and because they are created by interacting with the interstellar medium, they act as a useful proxy for mapping the edge of the heliosphere. This is how NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer, or IBEX, mission studies the heliosphere, making use of these particles as a kind of radar, tracing out our solar system’s boundary to interstellar space.

 

An illustration showing the Sun's bubble of influence, the heliosphere, with a long tail like a comet's

Some research suggests that the heliosphere has a long tail, much like a comet, though a new model points to a shape that lacks this long tail.

Credits: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio/Conceptual Imaging Lab

Download from NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio.

To make sense of this complex data, scientists use computer models to turn this data into a prediction of the heliosphere’s characteristics. Merav Opher, lead author of the new research, heads a NASA- and NSF-funded DRIVE Science Center at Boston University focused on the challenge.

 

This latest iteration of Opher’s model uses data from NASA planetary science missions to characterize the behavior of material in space that fills the bubble of the heliosphere and get another perspective on its borders. NASA’s Cassini mission carried an instrument, designed to study particles trapped in Saturn’s magnetic field, that also made observations of particles bouncing back towards the inner solar system. These measurements are similar to IBEX’s, but provide a distinct perspective on the heliosphere’s boundary.

 

Additionally, NASA’s New Horizons mission has provided measurements of pick-up ions, particles that are ionized out in space and are picked up and move along with the solar wind. Because of their distinct origins from the solar wind particles streaming out from the Sun, pick-up ions are much hotter than other solar wind particles — and it’s this fact that Opher’s work hinges on.

 

“There are two fluids mixed together. You have one component that is very cold and one component that is much hotter, the pick-up ions,” said Opher, a professor of astronomy at Boston University. “If you have some cold fluid and hot fluid, and you put them in space, they won’t mix — they will evolve mostly separately. What we did was separate these two components of the solar wind and model the resulting 3D shape of the heliosphere.”

 

Considering the solar wind’s components separately, combined with Opher’s earlier work using the solar magnetic field as a dominant force in shaping the heliosphere, created a deflated croissant shape, with two jets curling away from the central bulbous part of the heliosphere, and notably lacking the long tail predicted by many scientists.

 

“Because the pick-up ions dominate the thermodynamics, everything is very spherical. But because they leave the system very quickly beyond the termination shock, the whole heliosphere deflates,” said Opher.

 

The shape of the heliosphere is more than a question of academic curiosity: The heliosphere acts our solar system’s shield against the rest of the galaxy.

 

An illustration showing the heliosphere being pelted with cosmic rays from outside our solar system

Our heliosphere blocks many cosmic rays, shown as bright streaks in this animated image, from reaching the planets of our solar system.

Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab

Download from NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio.

Energetic events in other star systems, like supernova, can accelerate particles to nearly the speed of light. These particles rocket out in all directions, including into our solar system. But the heliosphere acts as a shield: It absorbs about three-quarters of these tremendously energetic particles, called galactic cosmic rays, that would make their way into our solar system.

 

Those that do make it through can wreak havoc. We’re protected on Earth by our planet’s magnetic field and atmosphere, but technology and astronauts in space or on other worlds are exposed. Both electronics and human cells can be damaged by the effects of galactic cosmic rays — and because galactic cosmic rays carry so much energy, they’re difficult to block in a way that’s practical for space travel. The heliosphere is spacefarers’ main defense against galactic cosmic rays, so understanding its shape and how that influences the rate of galactic cosmic rays pelting our solar system is a key consideration for planning robotic and human space exploration.

 

The heliosphere’s shape is also part of the puzzle for seeking out life on other worlds. The damaging radiation from galactic cosmic rays can render a world uninhabitable, a fate avoided in our solar system because of our strong celestial shield. As we learn more about how our heliosphere protects our solar system — and how that protection may have changed throughout the solar system’s history — we can look for other star systems that might have similar protection. And part of that is the shape: Are our heliospheric lookalikes long-tailed comet shapes, deflated croissants, or something else entirely?

 

Whatever the heliosphere’s true shape, an upcoming NASA mission will be a boon for unraveling these questions: the Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe, or IMAP.

 

IMAP, slated for launch in 2024, will map the particles streaming back to Earth from the boundaries of the heliosphere. IMAP will build on the techniques and discoveries of the IBEX mission to shed new light on the nature of the heliosphere, interstellar space, and how galactic cosmic rays make their way into our solar system.

 

Opher’s DRIVE Science Center aims to create a testable model of the heliosphere in time for IMAP’s launch. Their predictions of the shape and other characteristics of the heliosphere — and how that would be reflected in the particles streaming back from the boundary — would provide a baseline for scientists to compare with IMAP’s data.

Reregistered C-GNWF 17-Dec-91,

then N89DS 1-Feb-93,

then exported to Germany 16-Feb-93 as D-IMAP then D-ILVW,

reregistered EC-JQI 27-Jun-06,

then OK-TGS 20-Jul-15.

 

My desktop itself is barren - just some scenery pics, and not a single icon. Since I rarely see it in that state, I figured I'd show it as it looks during a typical programming session. It won't win any awards for prettiness, but it's practical (for me, at least).

 

I have a dual-head setup (two screens): a 19" CRT positioned on a stand just above a 17" widescreen Powerbook, such that the only gap between them is just the top-edge of the laptop.

 

I use the top-portion primarily for reference and browsing, and the bottom-portion for coding and terminal access.

 

The bottom rarely changes - just a bunch of small-point text so I can see more code at once. But the top always has a mess of windows depending on what I'm working on. I try to use OS X's "Hide" feature judiciously, but I still end up with way too many overlapping windows. Time to save up for that 30" Cinema display...

 

I'm a heavy user of keyboard shortcuts; the longer I can go without touching the mouse, the better. QuickSilver, QuickKeys, TextPander, and Witch are used constantly.

  

Most Used Apps:

 

- vim - an amazingly powerful (if complicated) text editor, better than any IDE I've tried. All it takes to become proficient is a few years of study. :)

 

- Terminal.app - When I'm not in vim, I'm in the terminal. I've tried a couple of the more feature-filled third-party replacements (iTerm, GLTerm), but keep coming back to the stock for its speed and reliability. And by using the "screen" command-line window manager, I don't miss tabs.

 

- Firefox - how did I ever surf before tabbed-browsing? My list of extensions is huge, but the critical ones are SessionSaver, AdBlock, Filterset.G Updater, del.icio.us, foxylicious, Web Developer, Tab Preview, View Cookies, View Rendered Source Chart, Live HTTP Headers.

 

- QuickSilver - a "command-line" for the GUI. I use this to launch apps, switch between them, view contacts from my address book, switch songs in iTunes, browse the filesystem, send emails, append to text files, and run various scripts I've written (restart Apache, tail a log file, copy or move files, ...)

 

- Thunderbird - I'd actually prefer to use Mail.app since it's better integrated into the system (Address Book and Spotlight), but its IMAP support is atrocious.

 

- NetNewsWire - RSS reader. I have upwards of a hundred feeds, so I prefer a dedicated app for speed reasons.

 

- OmniOutliner - great for managing to-do lists, brainstorming, and other "outlining" tasks.

 

- Adium - all my instant messaging needs in one bundle (except for IRC). I have friends on MSN, AOL, Yahoo, and Jabber, so this is a necessity. Just wish it supported video conferencing and file transfers.

 

- iTunes - I can't work without music (nothing like some thrash metal to get me motivated... :)

 

- OmniGraffle - for making purty diagrams

 

- PathFinder - a much better Finder, although it's not quite as speedy for certain tasks.

 

- VoodooPad - useful for keeping all the miscellaneous notes and junk in one searchable place, although I don't use any of its more advanced features.

  

My "Dashboard" deserves honorable mention:

 

Prior to Tiger, I used Konfabulator and had a few dozen widgets cluttering up the desktop. I've moved all but one of them into the Dashboard now, which is far easier on my eyes. Too many widgets to list, but I have a few that are worth noting:

 

- The "Remind" widget, which taps into the command-line "remind" app for recuring events, birthdays, etc. I do use iCal for day-to-day scheduling, but I find "remind" better for some things (especially using the "append" trick with QuickSilver).

 

- iCal Events - for the aforementioned iCal usage.

 

- Standard weather, system stats, stocks, and other less-useful time wasters.

  

Of course, I could write a book on all of the apps and processes I use. Looking at it now, I think that's what I just did... :)

Edited NASA visualization of the shape of our solar system (where "shape" means the bubble surrounding the sun and immediate objects, like planets). I like the term "deflated croissant" used in the caption... Color/processing variant.

 

Please note this is not an image taken by a spacecraft but a visualization from a computer program.

 

Image source: www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2020/uncovering-our-solar-sy...

 

Original caption: Scientists have developed a new prediction of the shape of the bubble surrounding our solar system using a model developed with data from NASA missions.

 

All the planets of our solar system are encased in a magnetic bubble, carved out in space by the Sun’s constantly outflowing material, the solar wind. Outside this bubble is the interstellar medium — the ionized gas and magnetic field that fills the space between stellar systems in our galaxy. One question scientists have tried to answer for years is on the shape of this bubble, which travels through space as our Sun orbits the center of our galaxy. Traditionally, scientists have thought of the heliosphere as a comet shape, with a rounded leading edge, called the nose, and a long tail trailing behind.

 

Research published in Nature Astronomy in March and featured on the journal’s cover for July provides an alternative shape that lacks this long tail: the deflated croissant.

 

The shape of the heliosphere is difficult to measure from within. The closest edge of the heliosphere is more than ten billion miles from Earth. Only the two Voyager spacecraft have directly measured this region, leaving us with just two points of ground-truth data on the shape of the heliosphere.

 

From near Earth, we study our boundary to interstellar space by capturing and observing particles flying toward Earth. This includes charged particles that come from distant parts of the galaxy, called galactic cosmic rays, along with those that were already in our solar system, travel out towards the heliopause, and are bounced back towards Earth through a complex series of electromagnetic processes. These are called energetic neutral atoms, and because they are created by interacting with the interstellar medium, they act as a useful proxy for mapping the edge of the heliosphere. This is how NASA’s Interstellar Boundary Explorer, or IBEX, mission studies the heliosphere, making use of these particles as a kind of radar, tracing out our solar system’s boundary to interstellar space.

 

An illustration showing the Sun's bubble of influence, the heliosphere, with a long tail like a comet's

Some research suggests that the heliosphere has a long tail, much like a comet, though a new model points to a shape that lacks this long tail.

Credits: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio/Conceptual Imaging Lab

Download from NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio.

To make sense of this complex data, scientists use computer models to turn this data into a prediction of the heliosphere’s characteristics. Merav Opher, lead author of the new research, heads a NASA- and NSF-funded DRIVE Science Center at Boston University focused on the challenge.

 

This latest iteration of Opher’s model uses data from NASA planetary science missions to characterize the behavior of material in space that fills the bubble of the heliosphere and get another perspective on its borders. NASA’s Cassini mission carried an instrument, designed to study particles trapped in Saturn’s magnetic field, that also made observations of particles bouncing back towards the inner solar system. These measurements are similar to IBEX’s, but provide a distinct perspective on the heliosphere’s boundary.

 

Additionally, NASA’s New Horizons mission has provided measurements of pick-up ions, particles that are ionized out in space and are picked up and move along with the solar wind. Because of their distinct origins from the solar wind particles streaming out from the Sun, pick-up ions are much hotter than other solar wind particles — and it’s this fact that Opher’s work hinges on.

 

“There are two fluids mixed together. You have one component that is very cold and one component that is much hotter, the pick-up ions,” said Opher, a professor of astronomy at Boston University. “If you have some cold fluid and hot fluid, and you put them in space, they won’t mix — they will evolve mostly separately. What we did was separate these two components of the solar wind and model the resulting 3D shape of the heliosphere.”

 

Considering the solar wind’s components separately, combined with Opher’s earlier work using the solar magnetic field as a dominant force in shaping the heliosphere, created a deflated croissant shape, with two jets curling away from the central bulbous part of the heliosphere, and notably lacking the long tail predicted by many scientists.

 

“Because the pick-up ions dominate the thermodynamics, everything is very spherical. But because they leave the system very quickly beyond the termination shock, the whole heliosphere deflates,” said Opher.

 

The shape of the heliosphere is more than a question of academic curiosity: The heliosphere acts our solar system’s shield against the rest of the galaxy.

 

An illustration showing the heliosphere being pelted with cosmic rays from outside our solar system

Our heliosphere blocks many cosmic rays, shown as bright streaks in this animated image, from reaching the planets of our solar system.

Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab

Download from NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio.

Energetic events in other star systems, like supernova, can accelerate particles to nearly the speed of light. These particles rocket out in all directions, including into our solar system. But the heliosphere acts as a shield: It absorbs about three-quarters of these tremendously energetic particles, called galactic cosmic rays, that would make their way into our solar system.

 

Those that do make it through can wreak havoc. We’re protected on Earth by our planet’s magnetic field and atmosphere, but technology and astronauts in space or on other worlds are exposed. Both electronics and human cells can be damaged by the effects of galactic cosmic rays — and because galactic cosmic rays carry so much energy, they’re difficult to block in a way that’s practical for space travel. The heliosphere is spacefarers’ main defense against galactic cosmic rays, so understanding its shape and how that influences the rate of galactic cosmic rays pelting our solar system is a key consideration for planning robotic and human space exploration.

 

The heliosphere’s shape is also part of the puzzle for seeking out life on other worlds. The damaging radiation from galactic cosmic rays can render a world uninhabitable, a fate avoided in our solar system because of our strong celestial shield. As we learn more about how our heliosphere protects our solar system — and how that protection may have changed throughout the solar system’s history — we can look for other star systems that might have similar protection. And part of that is the shape: Are our heliospheric lookalikes long-tailed comet shapes, deflated croissants, or something else entirely?

 

Whatever the heliosphere’s true shape, an upcoming NASA mission will be a boon for unraveling these questions: the Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe, or IMAP.

 

IMAP, slated for launch in 2024, will map the particles streaming back to Earth from the boundaries of the heliosphere. IMAP will build on the techniques and discoveries of the IBEX mission to shed new light on the nature of the heliosphere, interstellar space, and how galactic cosmic rays make their way into our solar system.

 

Opher’s DRIVE Science Center aims to create a testable model of the heliosphere in time for IMAP’s launch. Their predictions of the shape and other characteristics of the heliosphere — and how that would be reflected in the particles streaming back from the boundary — would provide a baseline for scientists to compare with IMAP’s data.

I take the bus to Southampton via Fareham a moving journey of about 1h.45 minutes... Strange really as I use to do it on a mountain bike in about 1h.5 mins. Then I didn't stop at housing estates to collect passengers. En route to West Quay.

 

Camera classes with new iPhone 11 are publicly demonstrated and editing live on a huge 6K resolution back wall mounted monitor 8 x 4.5m in size. (27 foot wide)

 

I sit next to a frustrated lady from Bournemouth whilst waiting to have her daughters phone checked out.. She tells me the Apple shop there closed?

 

I apologise to a tech team member for not reading all the pages of info in their FAQ, but I'm reluctant to spend my time reading information I don't need to know. Its all Microsoft's fault he says... When they changed their Imap system. The unwanted email addresses cluttering my contacts list are hidden in the groups menu of contacts...

 

He further leaves a message for the software writers to check why Apple Pay sometimes changes cards on engagement to a device reader. Having checked I had used the default card setting check box.

 

Photoshop

Ctrl A, select all area of picture, Edit menu to Skew and tug on corners to make doors and support pillars upright, sharpen once, add vibrance and grey border.

 

Have a nice day.

“Mariner 9 photo -- H2. This view of the central volcano along the Tharsis Ridge reveals a variety of surface features characteristic of this area. Linear volcanic vents are seen in the shield which slopes away from the summit caldera.

 

Latitude: 3.0 N

Longitude: 111.5 W

Dimensions: 505x390 km (313x242 mi)

Range: 2126 km ( 1324 mi)

Orbit No: 154

Date: Jan. 30, 1972

 

Mariner 9 is the first U.S. spacecraft to orbit another planet. Its mission is to take television pictures of Mars to map more than 70 per cent of the planet’s surface and to study the temperature of the Martian surface and the composition and pressure of its atmosphere. Television pictures also will be taken of Mars’ is planned to be with a high point of 10,700 miles and a low point of 750 miles. It will circle Mars every twelve hours. In all, Mariner is expected to return to Earth more than 15 times the amount of information that previous fly-by spacecraft have reported.”

 

Initially (pre-Mariner 9) referred to as “Middle Spot”.

 

Middle Spot, aka Pavonis Mons - and other Tharsis volcanoes - info/photos:

 

www.lmd.jussieu.fr/~aslmd/pub/REF/2011P_26SS...59..672T.pdf

Credit: Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) website/Elsevier

 

pdfs.semanticscholar.org/a914/305e3e95ed01a8b9ab3e1d9b3b0...

 

planetary.brown.edu/pdfs/3113.pdf

Credit: Brown University Planetary Geosciences Group website

 

www.researchgate.net/figure/THEMIS-mosaic-of-the-Pavonis-...

Credit: ResearchGate website

 

Cool:

 

www.msss.com/http/ps/pavonis.gif

Credit: Malin Space Science Systems website

 

www.lpi.usra.edu/publications/slidesets/mvolcan/slide_7.html

Credit: LPI website

 

pubs.usgs.gov/imap/i2561/i2561.pdf

Credit: USGS website

Nazia's white Nokia E71 next to my shiny new Blackberry Curve 8900. View large

 

The E71 is called Tululu and the BB Curve is called Halle, being a hot black berry ;-)

 

Why's the BlackBerry 8900 Curve Hot?

If your gadget lust has got you going after the BlackBerry Curve 8900 and you're looking for reasons to shell out the extra money over the considerably cheaper Nokia E71 or the slightly less cheap Nokia E75, here's what that extra money will get you:

 

1. Keypad The best tactile QWERTY keypad among the three and probably the best in the market. Check out these blog posts totalling ~1500 words and counting, that I could type without hurting my fingers while taking a rather bumpy cab ride in twilight. Among the Nokias, I rate the E71 keypad higher than that of E75 because the former has contoured keys with good tactile feedback while the latter has flat, spongy keys. When you're thumbing through a long mail, you'd soon realise that a wider keypad is more of a nuisance since you can't reach the middle columns easily unless you have large hands. Still, the last word on the matter would come from you. Do try the keypads out yourself because you know best what works for you in this regard.

 

2. Trackball To quote one of my friends comparing the iPhone to a BlackBerry, it's too much of a hassle moving your fingers all over the screen to get something done. The revolutionary (he's fond of hyperboles, yeah) thing that BlackBerry has done is to converge all of that onto one single point -- the trackball. I won't comment on whether the trackball has what it takes to convert all the iPhone freaks, but it does add a dimension to the way you use the phone, over the Nokia E71 and E75.

 

3. Interface Though the BlackBerry interface has a bit of an identity crisis in that some of it is as slick as in the most stylish smart-phones while under the hood you still have the BlackBerry staple long menus, it's still way ahead of the crummy Nokia interfaces. It would take me a lot of time to write about each of the things I like with the Blackberry interface (and if you're reading this months after it was written, you might find a blog post at the link up there) but in terms of the interface, BlackBerry is miles and miles ahead of the Nokias. A bit of advice: take some time to learn the shortcuts available. Given that the BlackBerry is likely to stay with you for long, it would be a worthwhile investment of your time.

 

4. Camera The camera on the BlackBerry Curve 8900 has exceeded my expectations. It has shortcomings in that it's slow and it's hard to tinker with its (rather limited) settings but I usually run it in full auto (except deciding on whether or not to turn on flash) and the results from the camera are quite good. They do seem to be better than that of E71 (whose screen, BTW, has a nasty blue colour cast). See un-edited photos I've taken with BlackBerry Curve 8900.

 

5. Music Player One of the most surprising and unexpected things about the BlackBerry Curve 8900 for me has been the music player. Adding tracks to the player is as simple as uploading files to the music folder in the SD card and the media player automatically organises the files by album, artist and genre. That's something many other media players do, but the interface looks so slick, it blows you away. You can also create automatic playlists by selecting tracks based on combinations or genre, album or artist, without having to manually select tracks.

 

6. Size and Weight The BlackBerry Curve 8900 is lighter than Nokia E71, which in turn is lighter than the E75. It is also shorter than the E71, which is as tall as the E75. The BlackBerry turns out to be the widest of the three, though. All in all, I find it very convenient to carry in my pocket -- more so than the E71, though less so than the E75.

 

Why would you still want to buy the E71/E75?

 

1. Maps (Update: Though BlackBerry Maps continue to be unavailable in India, Nokia has freed up its maps since this review was written. The new Nokia maps are not as fast anymore so a big chunk of favour now goes to Google Maps and BlackBerry) This has to be the biggest reason to go for the Nokia E71/E75, at least in India. BlackBerry Maps aren't available in India so the only option is to use the free Google Maps application. Google Maps, though, is slower to update position and requires downloading map images all the time. Nokia maps are pre-loaded on the phone. Besides, Google maps are less accurate/correct than Nokia maps, at least for Bangalore. One caveat though, Nokia maps require payment beyond the first 3 months of usage. Once that expires, you could either pay up or go to the free Google Maps application, thereby levelling the field.

 

2. Email out-of-the-box This is a bummer. Nokia email works out-of-the-box with standard POP/IMAP accounts and has additional support for GMail whereas the BlackBerry requires activation of something called "BlackBerry Services" before you can add email accounts. At least with my Airtel connection, this wasn't enabled by default. There is a GMail app available for BlackBerry that handles multiple accounts and new mail notification but it doesn't use any of the BlackBerry emaily goodness.

 

3. Speaker The E71 has a better sounding loudspeaker than the BlackBerry Curve 8900 because the latter's battery cover rattles!

 

www.javatpoint.com/imap-protocol

IMAP stands for Internet Message Access Protocol. It is an application layer protocol that is used to receive the emails from the mail server. It is the most commonly used protocols like POP3 for retrieving the emails.

More of my IoT hacking ;)

 

I'm using a 128x64 OLED $10 display (with u8lib), an arduino and an xbee to listen to 'beacons' that another xbee transmits periodically.

 

One message type is date/time and another is 'unread email count' from a python IMAP mail count fetcher I wrote. That runs on a spare linux box (rasp pi, etc) and it sends out ascii lines over the xbee transport every so often. A third is a volume display for my audio system.

  

New feature: when the preamp volume changes, this device gets an xbee update and changes the icon to a speaker and shows the formated dB (decibel) volume level.

 

There is also an alarm clock icon for when count-down alarms are set (not shown on this photo series).

  

Will have to plan on some cute little box for this, later on.

  

It looks like I finally was able to capture something close to the true color of this 'blue' display. Have to set the EV back quite a bit, of course.

iPhone

The phone that changed the game has 21 exciting colors to choose from. The Boa Fashion Sleeve is less than a millimeter in thickness and removes particles and oils from your phone. Available in 21 Spring colors with more coming this summer.

Features

Soft Seamless finish.

Form-fitting Fat-Free construction.

Ultra-Luxe lining.

Less than 1mm thin.

 

DEFINITION - iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines an iPod, a tablet PC, a digital camera and a cellular phone. The device includes Internet browsing and networking capabilities.

 

See image

 

Watch an iPhone demonstration (video).

 

iPhone is extremely thin (only 11.6 millimeters thick) but wider and longer than many comparable devices. The display area is a 3.5-inch wide screen multi-touch interface with unusually high resolution (160 pixels per inch). Unlike most other smartphones, iPhone does not use a hardware keyboard or a stylus. To navigate, a user uses multiple taps and drags to navigate through a mobile version of Apple's OS X operating system. Like iPod, iPhone synchronizes data with a user's personal computer, using iTunes as a client software and Apple's proprietary USB port. iPhone is compatible with Microsoft's Windows operating systems, including Vista.

 

iPhone's networking features include:

 

* Automatic detection of WiFi networks.

* Support for the 802.11b and 802.11g standards.

* The use of quadband GSM and SIM cards to access cellular networks.

* EDGE support for high-speed data transfer where available.

* Bluetooth connectivity for short range networking with peripherals, other iPhones and PCs.

 

Apple says that iPhone carries 8 hours of life on the internal lithium-ion battery for talk or video, and up to 24 hours for music mode. The device ships with either a 4 or 8 GB hard drive, an Intel CPU and Apple's OS X operating system, modified for mobile use.

 

iPhone comes preloaded with a suite of media management software and communications software, including iTunes, the Safari Web browser and iPhoto. iPhoto may be used in combination with the 2 megapixel camera on the back of the device. Google's search and mapping services are fully integrated, including the ability to initiate phone calls from within Google Maps. Users can also view YouTube videos on the device, along with Microsoft Office documents and most imaging formats, including .JPEG, .GIF and .TIFF. A partnership with Yahoo allows iPhone users to send and receive rich HTML email. Other IMAP or POP3 e-mail services are integrated as well, along with webmail access in the browser.

 

While iPhone was released under an exclusive two-year partnership with AT&T Wireless, it took less than three months for hackers working in concert worldwide to unlock the device for use on any GSM network, though the process involved a level of technical sophistication well beyond the consumer level.

iPhone

The phone that changed the game has 21 exciting colors to choose from. The Boa Fashion Sleeve is less than a millimeter in thickness and removes particles and oils from your phone. Available in 21 Spring colors with more coming this summer.

Features

Soft Seamless finish.

Form-fitting Fat-Free construction.

Ultra-Luxe lining.

Less than 1mm thin.

 

DEFINITION - iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines an iPod, a tablet PC, a digital camera and a cellular phone. The device includes Internet browsing and networking capabilities.

 

See image

 

Watch an iPhone demonstration (video).

 

iPhone is extremely thin (only 11.6 millimeters thick) but wider and longer than many comparable devices. The display area is a 3.5-inch wide screen multi-touch interface with unusually high resolution (160 pixels per inch). Unlike most other smartphones, iPhone does not use a hardware keyboard or a stylus. To navigate, a user uses multiple taps and drags to navigate through a mobile version of Apple's OS X operating system. Like iPod, iPhone synchronizes data with a user's personal computer, using iTunes as a client software and Apple's proprietary USB port. iPhone is compatible with Microsoft's Windows operating systems, including Vista.

 

iPhone's networking features include:

 

* Automatic detection of WiFi networks.

* Support for the 802.11b and 802.11g standards.

* The use of quadband GSM and SIM cards to access cellular networks.

* EDGE support for high-speed data transfer where available.

* Bluetooth connectivity for short range networking with peripherals, other iPhones and PCs.

 

Apple says that iPhone carries 8 hours of life on the internal lithium-ion battery for talk or video, and up to 24 hours for music mode. The device ships with either a 4 or 8 GB hard drive, an Intel CPU and Apple's OS X operating system, modified for mobile use.

 

iPhone comes preloaded with a suite of media management software and communications software, including iTunes, the Safari Web browser and iPhoto. iPhoto may be used in combination with the 2 megapixel camera on the back of the device. Google's search and mapping services are fully integrated, including the ability to initiate phone calls from within Google Maps. Users can also view YouTube videos on the device, along with Microsoft Office documents and most imaging formats, including .JPEG, .GIF and .TIFF. A partnership with Yahoo allows iPhone users to send and receive rich HTML email. Other IMAP or POP3 e-mail services are integrated as well, along with webmail access in the browser.

 

While iPhone was released under an exclusive two-year partnership with AT&T Wireless, it took less than three months for hackers working in concert worldwide to unlock the device for use on any GSM network, though the process involved a level of technical sophistication well beyond the consumer level.

iPhone

The phone that changed the game has 21 exciting colors to choose from. The Boa Fashion Sleeve is less than a millimeter in thickness and removes particles and oils from your phone. Available in 21 Spring colors with more coming this summer.

Features

Soft Seamless finish.

Form-fitting Fat-Free construction.

Ultra-Luxe lining.

Less than 1mm thin.

 

DEFINITION - iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines an iPod, a tablet PC, a digital camera and a cellular phone. The device includes Internet browsing and networking capabilities.

 

See image

 

Watch an iPhone demonstration (video).

 

iPhone is extremely thin (only 11.6 millimeters thick) but wider and longer than many comparable devices. The display area is a 3.5-inch wide screen multi-touch interface with unusually high resolution (160 pixels per inch). Unlike most other smartphones, iPhone does not use a hardware keyboard or a stylus. To navigate, a user uses multiple taps and drags to navigate through a mobile version of Apple's OS X operating system. Like iPod, iPhone synchronizes data with a user's personal computer, using iTunes as a client software and Apple's proprietary USB port. iPhone is compatible with Microsoft's Windows operating systems, including Vista.

 

iPhone's networking features include:

 

* Automatic detection of WiFi networks.

* Support for the 802.11b and 802.11g standards.

* The use of quadband GSM and SIM cards to access cellular networks.

* EDGE support for high-speed data transfer where available.

* Bluetooth connectivity for short range networking with peripherals, other iPhones and PCs.

 

Apple says that iPhone carries 8 hours of life on the internal lithium-ion battery for talk or video, and up to 24 hours for music mode. The device ships with either a 4 or 8 GB hard drive, an Intel CPU and Apple's OS X operating system, modified for mobile use.

 

iPhone comes preloaded with a suite of media management software and communications software, including iTunes, the Safari Web browser and iPhoto. iPhoto may be used in combination with the 2 megapixel camera on the back of the device. Google's search and mapping services are fully integrated, including the ability to initiate phone calls from within Google Maps. Users can also view YouTube videos on the device, along with Microsoft Office documents and most imaging formats, including .JPEG, .GIF and .TIFF. A partnership with Yahoo allows iPhone users to send and receive rich HTML email. Other IMAP or POP3 e-mail services are integrated as well, along with webmail access in the browser.

 

While iPhone was released under an exclusive two-year partnership with AT&T Wireless, it took less than three months for hackers working in concert worldwide to unlock the device for use on any GSM network, though the process involved a level of technical sophistication well beyond the consumer level.

iPhone

The phone that changed the game has 21 exciting colors to choose from. The Boa Fashion Sleeve is less than a millimeter in thickness and removes particles and oils from your phone. Available in 21 Spring colors with more coming this summer.

Features

Soft Seamless finish.

Form-fitting Fat-Free construction.

Ultra-Luxe lining.

Less than 1mm thin.

 

DEFINITION - iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines an iPod, a tablet PC, a digital camera and a cellular phone. The device includes Internet browsing and networking capabilities.

 

See image

 

Watch an iPhone demonstration (video).

 

iPhone is extremely thin (only 11.6 millimeters thick) but wider and longer than many comparable devices. The display area is a 3.5-inch wide screen multi-touch interface with unusually high resolution (160 pixels per inch). Unlike most other smartphones, iPhone does not use a hardware keyboard or a stylus. To navigate, a user uses multiple taps and drags to navigate through a mobile version of Apple's OS X operating system. Like iPod, iPhone synchronizes data with a user's personal computer, using iTunes as a client software and Apple's proprietary USB port. iPhone is compatible with Microsoft's Windows operating systems, including Vista.

 

iPhone's networking features include:

 

* Automatic detection of WiFi networks.

* Support for the 802.11b and 802.11g standards.

* The use of quadband GSM and SIM cards to access cellular networks.

* EDGE support for high-speed data transfer where available.

* Bluetooth connectivity for short range networking with peripherals, other iPhones and PCs.

 

Apple says that iPhone carries 8 hours of life on the internal lithium-ion battery for talk or video, and up to 24 hours for music mode. The device ships with either a 4 or 8 GB hard drive, an Intel CPU and Apple's OS X operating system, modified for mobile use.

 

iPhone comes preloaded with a suite of media management software and communications software, including iTunes, the Safari Web browser and iPhoto. iPhoto may be used in combination with the 2 megapixel camera on the back of the device. Google's search and mapping services are fully integrated, including the ability to initiate phone calls from within Google Maps. Users can also view YouTube videos on the device, along with Microsoft Office documents and most imaging formats, including .JPEG, .GIF and .TIFF. A partnership with Yahoo allows iPhone users to send and receive rich HTML email. Other IMAP or POP3 e-mail services are integrated as well, along with webmail access in the browser.

 

While iPhone was released under an exclusive two-year partnership with AT&T Wireless, it took less than three months for hackers working in concert worldwide to unlock the device for use on any GSM network, though the process involved a level of technical sophistication well beyond the consumer level.

iPhone

The phone that changed the game has 21 exciting colors to choose from. The Boa Fashion Sleeve is less than a millimeter in thickness and removes particles and oils from your phone. Available in 21 Spring colors with more coming this summer.

Features

Soft Seamless finish.

Form-fitting Fat-Free construction.

Ultra-Luxe lining.

Less than 1mm thin.

 

DEFINITION - iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines an iPod, a tablet PC, a digital camera and a cellular phone. The device includes Internet browsing and networking capabilities.

 

See image

 

Watch an iPhone demonstration (video).

 

iPhone is extremely thin (only 11.6 millimeters thick) but wider and longer than many comparable devices. The display area is a 3.5-inch wide screen multi-touch interface with unusually high resolution (160 pixels per inch). Unlike most other smartphones, iPhone does not use a hardware keyboard or a stylus. To navigate, a user uses multiple taps and drags to navigate through a mobile version of Apple's OS X operating system. Like iPod, iPhone synchronizes data with a user's personal computer, using iTunes as a client software and Apple's proprietary USB port. iPhone is compatible with Microsoft's Windows operating systems, including Vista.

 

iPhone's networking features include:

 

* Automatic detection of WiFi networks.

* Support for the 802.11b and 802.11g standards.

* The use of quadband GSM and SIM cards to access cellular networks.

* EDGE support for high-speed data transfer where available.

* Bluetooth connectivity for short range networking with peripherals, other iPhones and PCs.

 

Apple says that iPhone carries 8 hours of life on the internal lithium-ion battery for talk or video, and up to 24 hours for music mode. The device ships with either a 4 or 8 GB hard drive, an Intel CPU and Apple's OS X operating system, modified for mobile use.

 

iPhone comes preloaded with a suite of media management software and communications software, including iTunes, the Safari Web browser and iPhoto. iPhoto may be used in combination with the 2 megapixel camera on the back of the device. Google's search and mapping services are fully integrated, including the ability to initiate phone calls from within Google Maps. Users can also view YouTube videos on the device, along with Microsoft Office documents and most imaging formats, including .JPEG, .GIF and .TIFF. A partnership with Yahoo allows iPhone users to send and receive rich HTML email. Other IMAP or POP3 e-mail services are integrated as well, along with webmail access in the browser.

 

While iPhone was released under an exclusive two-year partnership with AT&T Wireless, it took less than three months for hackers working in concert worldwide to unlock the device for use on any GSM network, though the process involved a level of technical sophistication well beyond the consumer level.

iPhone

The phone that changed the game has 21 exciting colors to choose from. The Boa Fashion Sleeve is less than a millimeter in thickness and removes particles and oils from your phone. Available in 21 Spring colors with more coming this summer.

Features

Soft Seamless finish.

Form-fitting Fat-Free construction.

Ultra-Luxe lining.

Less than 1mm thin.

 

DEFINITION - iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines an iPod, a tablet PC, a digital camera and a cellular phone. The device includes Internet browsing and networking capabilities.

 

See image

 

Watch an iPhone demonstration (video).

 

iPhone is extremely thin (only 11.6 millimeters thick) but wider and longer than many comparable devices. The display area is a 3.5-inch wide screen multi-touch interface with unusually high resolution (160 pixels per inch). Unlike most other smartphones, iPhone does not use a hardware keyboard or a stylus. To navigate, a user uses multiple taps and drags to navigate through a mobile version of Apple's OS X operating system. Like iPod, iPhone synchronizes data with a user's personal computer, using iTunes as a client software and Apple's proprietary USB port. iPhone is compatible with Microsoft's Windows operating systems, including Vista.

 

iPhone's networking features include:

 

* Automatic detection of WiFi networks.

* Support for the 802.11b and 802.11g standards.

* The use of quadband GSM and SIM cards to access cellular networks.

* EDGE support for high-speed data transfer where available.

* Bluetooth connectivity for short range networking with peripherals, other iPhones and PCs.

 

Apple says that iPhone carries 8 hours of life on the internal lithium-ion battery for talk or video, and up to 24 hours for music mode. The device ships with either a 4 or 8 GB hard drive, an Intel CPU and Apple's OS X operating system, modified for mobile use.

 

iPhone comes preloaded with a suite of media management software and communications software, including iTunes, the Safari Web browser and iPhoto. iPhoto may be used in combination with the 2 megapixel camera on the back of the device. Google's search and mapping services are fully integrated, including the ability to initiate phone calls from within Google Maps. Users can also view YouTube videos on the device, along with Microsoft Office documents and most imaging formats, including .JPEG, .GIF and .TIFF. A partnership with Yahoo allows iPhone users to send and receive rich HTML email. Other IMAP or POP3 e-mail services are integrated as well, along with webmail access in the browser.

 

While iPhone was released under an exclusive two-year partnership with AT&T Wireless, it took less than three months for hackers working in concert worldwide to unlock the device for use on any GSM network, though the process involved a level of technical sophistication well beyond the consumer level.

iPhone

The phone that changed the game has 21 exciting colors to choose from. The Boa Fashion Sleeve is less than a millimeter in thickness and removes particles and oils from your phone. Available in 21 Spring colors with more coming this summer.

Features

Soft Seamless finish.

Form-fitting Fat-Free construction.

Ultra-Luxe lining.

Less than 1mm thin.

 

DEFINITION - iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines an iPod, a tablet PC, a digital camera and a cellular phone. The device includes Internet browsing and networking capabilities.

 

See image

 

Watch an iPhone demonstration (video).

 

iPhone is extremely thin (only 11.6 millimeters thick) but wider and longer than many comparable devices. The display area is a 3.5-inch wide screen multi-touch interface with unusually high resolution (160 pixels per inch). Unlike most other smartphones, iPhone does not use a hardware keyboard or a stylus. To navigate, a user uses multiple taps and drags to navigate through a mobile version of Apple's OS X operating system. Like iPod, iPhone synchronizes data with a user's personal computer, using iTunes as a client software and Apple's proprietary USB port. iPhone is compatible with Microsoft's Windows operating systems, including Vista.

 

iPhone's networking features include:

 

* Automatic detection of WiFi networks.

* Support for the 802.11b and 802.11g standards.

* The use of quadband GSM and SIM cards to access cellular networks.

* EDGE support for high-speed data transfer where available.

* Bluetooth connectivity for short range networking with peripherals, other iPhones and PCs.

 

Apple says that iPhone carries 8 hours of life on the internal lithium-ion battery for talk or video, and up to 24 hours for music mode. The device ships with either a 4 or 8 GB hard drive, an Intel CPU and Apple's OS X operating system, modified for mobile use.

 

iPhone comes preloaded with a suite of media management software and communications software, including iTunes, the Safari Web browser and iPhoto. iPhoto may be used in combination with the 2 megapixel camera on the back of the device. Google's search and mapping services are fully integrated, including the ability to initiate phone calls from within Google Maps. Users can also view YouTube videos on the device, along with Microsoft Office documents and most imaging formats, including .JPEG, .GIF and .TIFF. A partnership with Yahoo allows iPhone users to send and receive rich HTML email. Other IMAP or POP3 e-mail services are integrated as well, along with webmail access in the browser.

 

While iPhone was released under an exclusive two-year partnership with AT&T Wireless, it took less than three months for hackers working in concert worldwide to unlock the device for use on any GSM network, though the process involved a level of technical sophistication well beyond the consumer level.

iPhone

The phone that changed the game has 21 exciting colors to choose from. The Boa Fashion Sleeve is less than a millimeter in thickness and removes particles and oils from your phone. Available in 21 Spring colors with more coming this summer.

Features

Soft Seamless finish.

Form-fitting Fat-Free construction.

Ultra-Luxe lining.

Less than 1mm thin.

 

DEFINITION - iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines an iPod, a tablet PC, a digital camera and a cellular phone. The device includes Internet browsing and networking capabilities.

 

See image

 

Watch an iPhone demonstration (video).

 

iPhone is extremely thin (only 11.6 millimeters thick) but wider and longer than many comparable devices. The display area is a 3.5-inch wide screen multi-touch interface with unusually high resolution (160 pixels per inch). Unlike most other smartphones, iPhone does not use a hardware keyboard or a stylus. To navigate, a user uses multiple taps and drags to navigate through a mobile version of Apple's OS X operating system. Like iPod, iPhone synchronizes data with a user's personal computer, using iTunes as a client software and Apple's proprietary USB port. iPhone is compatible with Microsoft's Windows operating systems, including Vista.

 

iPhone's networking features include:

 

* Automatic detection of WiFi networks.

* Support for the 802.11b and 802.11g standards.

* The use of quadband GSM and SIM cards to access cellular networks.

* EDGE support for high-speed data transfer where available.

* Bluetooth connectivity for short range networking with peripherals, other iPhones and PCs.

 

Apple says that iPhone carries 8 hours of life on the internal lithium-ion battery for talk or video, and up to 24 hours for music mode. The device ships with either a 4 or 8 GB hard drive, an Intel CPU and Apple's OS X operating system, modified for mobile use.

 

iPhone comes preloaded with a suite of media management software and communications software, including iTunes, the Safari Web browser and iPhoto. iPhoto may be used in combination with the 2 megapixel camera on the back of the device. Google's search and mapping services are fully integrated, including the ability to initiate phone calls from within Google Maps. Users can also view YouTube videos on the device, along with Microsoft Office documents and most imaging formats, including .JPEG, .GIF and .TIFF. A partnership with Yahoo allows iPhone users to send and receive rich HTML email. Other IMAP or POP3 e-mail services are integrated as well, along with webmail access in the browser.

 

While iPhone was released under an exclusive two-year partnership with AT&T Wireless, it took less than three months for hackers working in concert worldwide to unlock the device for use on any GSM network, though the process involved a level of technical sophistication well beyond the consumer level.

Identifier: northcarolinajou1897gree

Title: North Carolina journal of education

Year: 1897 (1890s)

Authors:

Subjects: Education Education Education

Publisher: Greesnboro, N.C. : [s.n.]

Contributing Library: State Library of North Carolina, Government & Heritage Library

Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

s, Ioptional courses to suit individual needs,and professional courses in law andmedicine. Tuition i: 60 a year; total expenses $200. 508 students, 26 teachers, 40,000 vol-umes, 7 scientific laboratories and muse-ums, gymnasium, athletic grounds, bathrooms (free to all.) Discipline manly, without espionage. Scholarships and loans to the needy. Tuition free to sons of all ministers.candidates for the ministry, publicschool teachers, and persons under isodilyinfirmity. Address, PRESIDENT ALDERMAN, Chapel Hill, N. C. Educational Bureau, RALEIGH, N. C. Secures positions for teachers for rea-sonable charge. Recommends competent teachers toschools and families free of charge. Write for particulars. No harm tolearn of our work. We also have a department of School Furniture and Supplies, and can furnish anything needed in thisline at lowest prices possible. Our exhibit at the recent State Fairwas awarded a medal. Goods and prices guaranteed. Correspondence invited. CHARLES J. PARKER, Manager.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

WANTED AGENTS. The Confederate Soldier in theCivil \Var, contains 500 pages 12x16 inches, andover 1,100 lai-ge Battle Scenes, Portraits, iMaps, etc. The greatest and largestWar Book ever published, and the onlyone that does justice to the Confederatesoldier and the cause he fought for.Agents wanted everywhere to sell thisbook on our new and easy plan. Manyof the lady and gentlemen agents whoare at work are making from .^50 to 8200per month. Veterans, sons and daugh-ters of veterans, and others interestedare Iequested to send for a beautifullyillustrated descriptive circular (free)and terms to agents. Address Courier.louRNAL Job Printing Co., Louisville,Ky. Study Geography and GEOLOGY From Photographs. We have a fine collection of Photo^raplis es-pecially useful for these sturlles, embracing allof Western North Carolina, A descriptive catalogue on application. Pho-tographs for the above stuaies at special prices. Address T. H. LINDSAY, Asheville, N. C. fl. G. BAUER, ARCHITECT, RALiEICH

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

iPhone

The phone that changed the game has 21 exciting colors to choose from. The Boa Fashion Sleeve is less than a millimeter in thickness and removes particles and oils from your phone. Available in 21 Spring colors with more coming this summer.

Features

Soft Seamless finish.

Form-fitting Fat-Free construction.

Ultra-Luxe lining.

Less than 1mm thin.

 

DEFINITION - iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines an iPod, a tablet PC, a digital camera and a cellular phone. The device includes Internet browsing and networking capabilities.

 

See image

 

Watch an iPhone demonstration (video).

 

iPhone is extremely thin (only 11.6 millimeters thick) but wider and longer than many comparable devices. The display area is a 3.5-inch wide screen multi-touch interface with unusually high resolution (160 pixels per inch). Unlike most other smartphones, iPhone does not use a hardware keyboard or a stylus. To navigate, a user uses multiple taps and drags to navigate through a mobile version of Apple's OS X operating system. Like iPod, iPhone synchronizes data with a user's personal computer, using iTunes as a client software and Apple's proprietary USB port. iPhone is compatible with Microsoft's Windows operating systems, including Vista.

 

iPhone's networking features include:

 

* Automatic detection of WiFi networks.

* Support for the 802.11b and 802.11g standards.

* The use of quadband GSM and SIM cards to access cellular networks.

* EDGE support for high-speed data transfer where available.

* Bluetooth connectivity for short range networking with peripherals, other iPhones and PCs.

 

Apple says that iPhone carries 8 hours of life on the internal lithium-ion battery for talk or video, and up to 24 hours for music mode. The device ships with either a 4 or 8 GB hard drive, an Intel CPU and Apple's OS X operating system, modified for mobile use.

 

iPhone comes preloaded with a suite of media management software and communications software, including iTunes, the Safari Web browser and iPhoto. iPhoto may be used in combination with the 2 megapixel camera on the back of the device. Google's search and mapping services are fully integrated, including the ability to initiate phone calls from within Google Maps. Users can also view YouTube videos on the device, along with Microsoft Office documents and most imaging formats, including .JPEG, .GIF and .TIFF. A partnership with Yahoo allows iPhone users to send and receive rich HTML email. Other IMAP or POP3 e-mail services are integrated as well, along with webmail access in the browser.

 

While iPhone was released under an exclusive two-year partnership with AT&T Wireless, it took less than three months for hackers working in concert worldwide to unlock the device for use on any GSM network, though the process involved a level of technical sophistication well beyond the consumer level.

iPhone

The phone that changed the game has 21 exciting colors to choose from. The Boa Fashion Sleeve is less than a millimeter in thickness and removes particles and oils from your phone. Available in 21 Spring colors with more coming this summer.

Features

Soft Seamless finish.

Form-fitting Fat-Free construction.

Ultra-Luxe lining.

Less than 1mm thin.

 

DEFINITION - iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines an iPod, a tablet PC, a digital camera and a cellular phone. The device includes Internet browsing and networking capabilities.

 

See image

 

Watch an iPhone demonstration (video).

 

iPhone is extremely thin (only 11.6 millimeters thick) but wider and longer than many comparable devices. The display area is a 3.5-inch wide screen multi-touch interface with unusually high resolution (160 pixels per inch). Unlike most other smartphones, iPhone does not use a hardware keyboard or a stylus. To navigate, a user uses multiple taps and drags to navigate through a mobile version of Apple's OS X operating system. Like iPod, iPhone synchronizes data with a user's personal computer, using iTunes as a client software and Apple's proprietary USB port. iPhone is compatible with Microsoft's Windows operating systems, including Vista.

 

iPhone's networking features include:

 

* Automatic detection of WiFi networks.

* Support for the 802.11b and 802.11g standards.

* The use of quadband GSM and SIM cards to access cellular networks.

* EDGE support for high-speed data transfer where available.

* Bluetooth connectivity for short range networking with peripherals, other iPhones and PCs.

 

Apple says that iPhone carries 8 hours of life on the internal lithium-ion battery for talk or video, and up to 24 hours for music mode. The device ships with either a 4 or 8 GB hard drive, an Intel CPU and Apple's OS X operating system, modified for mobile use.

 

iPhone comes preloaded with a suite of media management software and communications software, including iTunes, the Safari Web browser and iPhoto. iPhoto may be used in combination with the 2 megapixel camera on the back of the device. Google's search and mapping services are fully integrated, including the ability to initiate phone calls from within Google Maps. Users can also view YouTube videos on the device, along with Microsoft Office documents and most imaging formats, including .JPEG, .GIF and .TIFF. A partnership with Yahoo allows iPhone users to send and receive rich HTML email. Other IMAP or POP3 e-mail services are integrated as well, along with webmail access in the browser.

 

While iPhone was released under an exclusive two-year partnership with AT&T Wireless, it took less than three months for hackers working in concert worldwide to unlock the device for use on any GSM network, though the process involved a level of technical sophistication well beyond the consumer level.

A nationwide campaign to raise awareness of the ‘Move Over Law’ is underway to coincide with national Peace Officers Memorial Day. Peace Officers Memorial Day pays tribute to local, state, and federal law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. Many of them have been killed alongside state roads due a violation of the ‘Move Over Law.’

 

The North Carolina ‘Move Over Law’ requires motorists to move over one lane, if possible, or reduce speed for emergency and construction vehicles with flashing lights on the shoulder of the highway.

 

A campaign awareness event was held today at the Highway Patrol station in Johnston County; where collaborating agencies such as the State Highway Patrol, N.C. Department of Transportation's Incident Management Assistance Patrol (IMAP) program and the Governor’s Highway Safety Program, conducted a saturation patrol, citing drivers who did not adhere to the law.

 

“Violating the law could result in a $250 fine and more importantly it could result in the loss of life of any worker alongside the roadway,” said Captain Joseph Cotton NCSHP, Troop C Commander Johnston County.

 

“This isn’t a gotcha campaign, this is a ‘please spare our lives’ campaign,” said NCDOT Engineer Ronnie Keeter, who manages construction workers and contractors across the department’s Division Four, which encompasses Halifax, Nash, Edgecombe, Wilson, Wayne and Johnston Counties.

 

“First responders and roadway workers are placed in dangerous situations all the time, and drivers increase the risk to responders when they zoom by and ignore the flashing lights—and the law,” said Captain Cotton.

 

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, so far in 2019, there have been 14 law enforcement officers killed in traffic-related crashes nationwide.

 

“These tragedies can be avoided through awareness and compliance with the State’s “Move Over” law, which is why we are here today,” said Keeter.

 

“We need the public to change their driving behaviors by simply driving and following the rules of the road,” said Mark Ezzell, director of the Governor’s Highway Safety Program.

 

In conjunction with the campaign all state message boards will display the reminder message: ‘Move Over. It’s The Law.’

 

When you see flashing lights ahead, transportation officials advise motorists do the following:

 

Pay close attention to signs and work zone flaggers;

Move over one lane;

Turn on your headlights so workers and other motorists can see you;

Obey the posted speed limits;

​Avoid changing radio stations and using cell phones; and

Expect the unexpected: Keep an eye out for workers and their equipment.

The safety campaign was organized by the Governor’s Highway Safety Program, which promotes highway safety awareness through grants and safe driving initiatives like: Click It or Ticket, BikeSafe NC, Watch For Me NC, Speed a Little. Lose a Lot, and North Carolina’s Vision Zero initiative.

 

Please support these efforts by visiting ghsp.nc.gov and following @NCGHSP on Facebook and @NC_GHSP on Twitter and Instagram today.

 

This ran in shorter, more readable form on Seattlest.

 

This is Red Mill Burgers, in Seattle's Interbay neighborhood at 1613 West Dravus.

 

This store opened in 1998. The first store was a bit north in the Phinney Ridge, and opened a few years earlier.

 

The old photo at the Seattle Municipal Archives shows the same building in 1960, with "Interbay Pharmacy" painted on the side. Needless to say there was no Starbucks in the background.

 

Whenever I look at photos taken by government employees, I think "why?" More than 9 times out of 10 there was a good reason to take the photo and then subsequently archive it -- it wasn't a random photo like you or I take. Sometimes you can tell by the file that it's in, or the assession number. Other times it's the story of the building or business that clear it up. It takes a bit of digging to find that.

 

A quick web search shows that Interbay Pharmacy is older than 1960. Google Books has several trade magazines like a 1907 edition of "The Pharmaceutical Era" which mention Interbay Pharmacy. This first mention is worth quoting:

 

"W. S. Pierce, proprietor of the Interbay Pharmacy, Seattle, Wash., was blown by a gas explosion from the rear end of his store almost to the front door the other day. When he opened his store, Pierce started a fire in the gas stove, but he had no sooner applied the match to the jet than he felt himself propelled toward the door. The explosion had driven out the glass, thus making a clear path into the street."

 

A 1916 issue of "The Era Druggist's Directory of the United States..." lists Interbay Pharmacy, but gives a different address: 1500 Grand Boulevard. I've looked at enough engouh old plat maps of Magnolia to know that Dravus used to be known as Grand Boulevard. So the pharmacy used to be over at 15th.

 

But we're still missing the story here. I'm going to switch to tutorial mode to show you how I found out the "why" and at the same time learned an important part of this neighborhood's history.

 

When I'm dealing with a property, after a quick web search the next thing I like to do is open King County's Property Viewer or iMap to check it out. I'll cheat for you. Here's 15th and Dravus. Down in the bottom right, expand "Imagery" and choose "1936 B/W Aerial Photos". After the map refreshes, it shows that 15th Avenue used to look quite a bit different. It was just a small local road like 14th or 16th. 1500 Dravus, which would be the northwest corner, is right in the middle of the blank space. (The square are property, and long lines are roads; blank space is public property, usually streets.)

 

The assessor's report for 1613 Dravus, meanwhile, tells us that the Red Mill building was constructed in 1959.

 

The scenario is beginning to play out... a city employee photographs the new home of Interbay Pharmacy in 1960. The old home at some point became a city street.

 

The next step is to hit the Seattle Times archives and see what it says. These archives are one of the greatest and most frustratingly hidden secrets in local history. 1900-1923 are currently only available through a database called World Newspaper Archive, available locally through the University of Washington. From 1923-1980 are also covered in a database called America's GenealogyBank, which you can get at from home with your library card, click the link here.

 

I narrowed the search to newspapers, in Washington, and just for the kewords "15th widening" in 1952-1960. Result #4, 1959-06-02 page 20, is perfect:

 

"The city began condemnation proceedings in Superior Court... yesterday for widening 15th Avenue West form West Garfield Street to the Ballard Bridge.

"Twenty-two feet will be taken on much of the west side of the avenue. The east side will not be affected.

...

"A six-lane depressed roadway will go beneath Dravus Street, whish will remain at its present grade.

...

"Wilcox said 98 pieces of real estate are involved. He said settlements are being arranged with all but five owners."

 

So there's our story. Interbay Pharmacy, as well as all of the other pioneer businesses at the intersection of 15th and "Grand Boulevard" -- and all of the well-established homes on the main street between Seattle and Ballard -- were destroyed in 1959 to widen 15th to add six lanes of traffic.

 

It's odd that such a big deal is made about Interstate 5 and the other freeways, but no one talks about major widening projects like this. The monorail project which was supposed to be built to Ballard would have run on 15th. I remember an editorial in the Times or PI which railed that 15th was inhospitable to people, it was a car street that wasn't built for mass transit. There were so many editorials arguing that we couldn't afford to transform our city, which was built for car travel. But when you really look back, you find that our city was, of course NOT built for cars, but built for streetcars and people. We spent truckloads of money to rebuild it for cars.

 

Strips like 15th are still recovering from the economic hammer that was dropped.

 

BTW, Red Mill has great burgers. Get some onion rings while you're at it! There's bus service on 15th if you can afford the time and money.

As it turns out, my mobile shot of the apron at Manchester's terminal 2 really wasn't very good, as I think my shivering hands had given me some dodgy camera shake.

 

On to other things then. You might remember the system drive in the house server failing some weeks back. Dave sweated on the rebuild and got us back up very quickly. One thing he didn't do was set up a fetch for email from one of my domains.

 

For reasons of convenience, I elected to route those emails through my google mail account as a temporary measure.

 

I'll just say 'Wow!'. It certainly won't be a temporary measure! Like so many people, I'm plagued by spam. A combination of filters and Mozilla Thunderbird's junk management system kept things fairly well under control and it was manageable.

 

Having routed my email through gmail though, I now don't see spam. At all. My inbox is totally meat free.

 

The gmail service has really grown and expanded, and will now act as a POP server AND an IMAP server, and they still don't want any money from me!

 

What's lovely is that I haven't even needed to use the server functionality. I'm just doing a simple forward and it's trapping the spam and preserving all of the sender information, so it's effectively transparent.

 

The thing is of course that spam detection is never 100% accurate so you need to check it periodically to make sure that nothing has been binned. That was today's job.

 

As you can see, my spam box is currently holding 6,842 emails - that's from the week since 26/12/09. Of those 6,842 messages every single one was Spam. That's a 100% identification rate. Nothing got trapped that shouldn't have, and nothing got released that shouldn't have. I'm astonished.

 

I'm often accused of being a google fanboy, and I still maintain my position. Just like Asda, they don't let me down. If they keep on providing great services - often for free - then I'm happy to soldier on using them!

 

:)

More of my IoT hacking ;)

 

I'm using a 128x64 OLED $10 display (with u8lib), an arduino and an xbee to listen to 'beacons' that another xbee transmits periodically.

 

One message type is date/time and another is 'unread email count' from a python IMAP mail count fetcher I wrote. That runs on a spare linux box (rasp pi, etc) and it sends out ascii lines over the xbee transport every so often.

 

This device listens on that xbee 'channel' and if the count is non-zero, it shows the alternate mailbox icon and the numerical count. This can be seen from across the room (simply look for the white inverse video part on the left and that will tell you if you have mail waiting or not).

 

Will have to plan on some cute little box for this, later on.

 

(Artwork comes from the old unix 'xbiff' app; but with some tweaks on the icon that I did to reduce its size and complexity a bit. Note that while it looks quite pixellated and the lines are a bit jaggy, the device IS very small and this photo is a cropped close-up view. From normal viewing distance the image and fonts actually look quite OK).

This outcrop is next to Split Mountain in Dinosaur National Monument, Utah, through which the Green River has erosionally carved a prominent canyon (off frame, to the left).

 

The reddish-colored rocks are hematite-rich, fine-grained siliciclastics of the Moenkopi Formation (Triassic). Gypsum is common in parts of the Moenkopi.

 

Structurally, this is the southern flank of the Split Mountain Anticline, which strikes east-west and plunges westward. This is also the northern flank of the Jensen Syncline.

 

Stratigraphy: Moenkopi Formation, Lower Triassic

 

Locality: southern flanks of Split Mountain, Dinosaur National Monument, northern Uintah County, northeastern Utah, USA (40° 26' 36.83" North latitude, 109° 14' 59.59" West longitude)

------------

See info. at:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinosaur_National_Monument

------------

Geologic map of Dinosaur National Monument:

pubs.usgs.gov/imap/1407/plate-1.pdf

 

502 Server Error

 

Google

Error

  

Server Error

The server encountered a temporary error and could not complete your request.

 

Please try again in 30 seconds.

     

googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/02/update-on-gmail.html

 

Update on Gmail

2/24/2009 07:29:00 AM

The Gmail outage that affected many consumers and Google Apps users worldwide is now over. Users should find that they’re able to access their email now without any further problems.

 

Before you can access your Gmail, you may be asked to fill in what’s called a ‘CAPTCHA’ which asks you to type in a word or some letters before you can proceed. This is perfectly normal when you repeatedly request access to your email account, so please do go through the extra step – it’s just to verify you are who you say you are.

 

The outage itself lasted approximately two and a half hours from 9.30am GMT. We know that for many of you this disrupted your working day. We’re really sorry about this, and we did do everything to restore access as soon as we could. Our priority was to get you back up and running. Our engineers are still investigating the root cause of the problem.

 

Obviously we’re never happy when outages occur, but we would like to stress that this is an unusual occurrence. We know how important Gmail is to you, and how much people rely on the service.

 

Thanks again for bearing with us.

 

Posted by Acacio Cruz, Gmail Site Reliability Manager

   

googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/02/current-gmail-outage.html

 

Current Gmail outage

2/24/2009 04:28:00 AM

If you’ve tried to access your Gmail account today, you are probably aware by now that we’re having some problems. Shortly after 10 9:30am GMT our monitoring systems alerted us that Gmail consumer and businesses accounts worldwide could not get access to their email.

 

We’re working very hard to solve the problem and we’re really sorry for the inconvenience. Those users in the US and UK who have enabled Gmail offline through Gmail Labs should be able to access their inbox, although they won’t be able to send or receive emails.

 

We’re posting updates to the Gmail Help Centre at mail.google.com/support/ and Google Apps users can visit the Google Apps help centre at www.google.com/support/a.

 

Thanks for bearing with us while we sort this out. We'll report back as we make progress.

 

Posted by Acacio Cruz, Gmail Site Reliability Manager

    

www.zdnet.be/news.cfm?id=98895

 

Nieuws » Internet » Webappsdinsdag 24 februari 2009

  

Wereldwijde problemen met Gmail

Paniek op het internet

 

Andy Stevens

24 februari 2009

Bron: Clickx.be

dit artikel

Gmail, de webmaildienst van Google, is tijdelijk niet beschikbaar. Wie de site probeert te openen, krijgt de volgende foutmelding voorgeschoteld:

 

Server Error. The server encountered a temporary error and could not complete your request.

 

Google Nederland bevestigt dat de problemen met Gmail wereldwijd zijn, maar voegt eraan toe dat de oorzaak nog niet bekend is. Het zou overigens alleen om de webdienst gaan: wie Gmail via POP3/IMAP gebruikt, zou geen problemen ondervinden. Het probleem ontstond iets voor de middag, ondertussen lijkt de maildienst opnieuw te werken.

 

Opvallend is de paniek die bij veel mensen toeslaat omdat ze Gmail niet meer kunnen openen. Op Twitter is de berichtenstroom over het falen van Gmail (intussen al smalend 'Gfail' genoemd) niet bij te houden.

 

Verwacht wordt dat Gmail in de komende uren weer volledig operationeel is.

      

www.news24.com/News24/Technology/News/0,,2-13-1443_247529...

 

Panic: Gmail turns into Gfail

24/02/2009 14:15 - (SA)

 

Birgit Ottermann

 

Cape Town - Users of Google's Gmail are in a flat spin and experiencing a collective nervous breakdown online because they are unable to access their Gmail accounts.

 

According to nervous twittering and numerous blog entries, the problem kicked in at around 12:20 (10:20 GMT) on Tuesday morning.

 

Looking at the tweets and moans posted from all over the world, the problem seems to be global.

 

"Server Error. The server encountered a temporary error and could not complete your request. Please try again in 30 seconds," reads the message to users, who try to access their mail.

 

A Google spokesperson told British gadget news and reviews website Pocket Lint that their engineers are working on it but have no clue why the errors are turning up.

 

The problem seems to be related to the website, as users report that they are still able to access email via their desktop inboxes and phones.

 

In the meantime, Google posted the following message on its Gmail support site:

 

"We're aware of a problem with Gmail affecting a small subset of users. The affected users are unable to access Gmail. We will provide an update by February 24, 2009 6:30 AM PST detailing when we expect to resolve the problem. Please note that this resolution time is an estimate and may change."

 

At the time of publishing this story, Gmail was still not working.

 

- News24

      

www.webuser.co.uk/news/news.php?id=277521

 

News > Surfers hit by Gmail breakdown

   

Surfers hit by Gmail breakdown

February 24, 2009

Web User

 

Some internet users are unable to access their Google Mail account this morning because of a server error.

 

After signing into a Gmail account, a 502 server error message appears which says: "Server Error. The server encountered a temporary error and could not complete your request. Please try again in 30 seconds."

 

>> 15 top tips for Google Mail

 

A 502 server error does not mean that there is anything with your computer, rather the server is experiencing high volumes of traffic and is congested.

 

Google said that the problem is affecting a 'small subset of users' and it will make further announcements detailing the problems with the Gmail servers on its Gmail Discussion page in Google Groups.

 

More than 113 million people use Google mail worldwide, according to comScore.

 

Are you experiencing problems with Google Mail? Let us know on the Web User forums.

        

webwereld.nl/nieuws/55727/google--gmail-storing-onder-con...

   

Gepubliceerd: Dinsdag 24 februari 2009

Auteur: Loek Essers

 

Volgens Google zijn de wereldwijde problemen met Gmail voorbij. De oorzaak is nog onbekend.

 

"Als je geprobeerd hebt om je Gmail account te bereiken ben je erachter gekomen dat we een paar problemen hebben. Kort na 10:30 uur vanochtend wezen onze systemen ons erop dat consumenten en zakelijke klanten wereldwijd niet bij hun Gmail accounts kwamen", aldus Acacio Cruz, Gmail Site Reliability Manager, op het Google Blog.

 

Die problemen hielden in Nederland tot rond half twee aan. De site was volgens Google zelf 2,5 uur niet bereikbaar, en zou dus vanaf 1 uur weer volledig functioneren.

Toegang met Captcha

 

Nu moet de e-mailservice overal ter wereld weer normaal werken. Voordat gebruikers opnieuw kunnen inloggen bij Gmail wordt er gevraagd om een Captcha in te vullen. Volgens Cruz is dit geen beveiligingsmaatregel. "Dit is volstrekt normaal als je vaak achter elkaar probeert in te loggen." De maatregel is ingebouwd om te controleren of het daadwerkelijk om de gebruiker gaat die probeert in te loggen en niet om bijvoorbeeld een computeraanval.

 

"We weten dat deze storing bij veel van jullie een werkdag heeft verstoord. Hiervoor onze excuses. We hebben er alles aan gedaan om iedereen zo snel mogelijk weer in te laten loggen. Onze prioriteit was jullie weer aan de slag te krijgen", gaat Cruz door het stof.

Oorzaak onbekend

 

Over de exacte problemen wil hij echter niets kwijt. "Onze technici onderzoeken nog steeds wat de oorzaak van dit probleem is." Volgens de Reliability Manager bestempelt de storing als 'ongebruikelijk'.

  

"According" "Birgit" "British" "Cape" "Clickx.be" "Discussion" "Error" "February" "Gfail" "Gmail" "Google" "Google's" "Groups" "Internet" "Looking" "Mail" "More" "News" "News24" "Nieuws" "Opvallend" "Ottermann" "POP3/IMAP" "PST" "Paniek" "Please" "Pocket" "Server" "Some" "Stevens" "Surfers" "Tuesday" "Twitter" "Verwacht" "Web" "Wereldwijde" "able" "access" "according" "account" "accounts" "affected" "affecting" "announcements" "anything" "appears" "around" "artikel" "aware" "because" "bekend" "berichtenstroom" "beschikbaar" "bevestigt" "blog" "breakdown" "collective" "comScore" "complete" "computer" "congested" "desktop" "detailing" "email" "encountered" "engineers" "entries" "error" "errors" "estimate" "expect" "experiencing" "falen" "februari" "flat" "following" "forums" "foutmelding" "gadget" "gebruikt" "global" "high" "hit" "inboxes" "internet" "mail" "maildienst" "mean" "meantime" "million" "nervous" "numerous" "oorzaak" "operationeel" "paniek" "people" "phones" "posted" "probleem" "problem" "problemen" "problems" "provide" "publishing" "related" "resolution" "resolve" "reviews" "server" "servers" "site" "spin" "spokesperson" "subset" "support" "temporary" "tijdelijk" "tips" "top" "traffic" "tweets" "twittering" "volledig" "volumes" "voorgeschoteld" "webdienst" "webmaildienst" "website" "wereldwijd" "working" "world" "worldwide"

 

matadornetwork.com/notebook/how-to/how-to-back-up-google-...

 

www.genbeta.com/buscadores/marissa-mayer-habla-sobre-los-...

Comando da Aeronáutica

VI COMAR

Ford Cargo 816S 2012 / IMAP LI 10.000 S GI (Cesta aérea)

I am, paradoxically, posting this desktop both despite and because of the fact that my setup has not changed in any meaningful way for several months now. "Despite," in that I feel bad about not posting more often. Most of my spare time has been annexed by another large creative project, and I miss the unbroken hours of Rainmeter tweaking I used to do. "Because," in that there is still some value in taking stock of this setup: it has proven itself as a highly practical, unobstrusive, and all-around great arrangement. I just love it the way it is, and like all the best designs, it makes me feel like I want to use my notebook, and that it's going to do exactly what I want it to do.

 

For the first time since Lightning Sunset, I'm going to go through my entire arsenal of core applications and detail how they're being used and why.

 

(By the way, there's another reason why I feel like showing off my computer today: I just received a RAM upgrade, from 1 GB to 2 GB. I swear, it's halfway to a brand new computer. Even with all of the stuff below - every single one, running simultaneously - I don't break a 50% memory load. It is geekily glorious.)

 

- - - - - - -

 

Clouds

 

As anyone who follows my desktops knows, I go through wallpapers pretty rapidly, while having a few favorites that I regularly return to. This has become one of them. I love the style of having a single crisp, asymmetrical object surrounded by a simple, subtle gradient. It's a great synthesis of the functional and the aesthetic; fresh and stimulating, without being distracting or gaudy. (Via cain.)

 

- - - - - - -

 

Lakrits

 

I really love this visual style for XP; it's become one of lassekongo83's most popular, and deservedly so. Its most distinguishing feature, one which is inexplicably rare among Windows shell themes, is that it inverts the colors, giving Explorer, Notepad, etc. a dark-gray background against light-gray text. It is wonderfully soft on the eyes, especially late at night.

 

Of equal importance, it also finally makes Windows itself match the light-on-dark theme common to my Rainmeter, Firefox, et al. I think it was nitzua who pointed out that some of the most carefully-crafted desktop themes are shattered the minute you open the start menu. So it's a real pleasure to have a genuinely customized work environment, not just the illusion of one.

 

Aside from those, I'm just enamored of its simple grays. Lakrits is a legitimately minimalist VS, and I'll miss it muchly when I make the jump to Windows 7.

 

- - - - - - -

 

Startups

 

- Start Killer.

- Taskbar Shuffle.

- D-Color.

 

These really haven't changed since the Lightning Sunset days. I wrote an individual paragraph for each of them before I realized that I was just repeating myself from 16 months ago. The common thread here is that they're all tiny apps which enhance the taskbar and the desktop in extremely logical, intuitive, "I can't believe it didn't do this by itself" ways.

 

- - - - - - -

 

Virtual Shell

 

- Autohotkey.

- Launchy. Skin: Enigma.

- Rainmeter. Skins: Enigma 2.6, customized.

 

It's these three apps which really change the way I use my notebook. As you probably know, I use Autohotkey to

 

- Launch core apps, documents and settings with universal hotkeys. (Firefox is Win+F, Thunderbird is Win+T, Notepad is Win+N, Google Wave is Win+W, etc.) In addition, the other two get very prominent hotkeys as befits their status: I can start up Launchy with Win+F11, and Rainmeter with Win+F12.

- Adjust the transparency of the active window and taskbar.

- Minimize, maximize, restore, and Alt+Tab using only the Alt key and the mouse.

- Control iTunes with universal hotkeys.

- Send certain commonly-used phrases when triggered, ala Texter.

 

Launchy, meanwhile, does pretty much everything else. My devout adoration of Launchy has never wavered. Summoning any app, folder, document, control panel module, song, picture, video, theme, log, and search engine in less than ten keystrokes? Win. (And I still use Calcy all the time, too.)

 

Rainmeter, by now, speaks for itself. See the notes for more details. The only thing that deserves specific mention is that Rainmeter no longer requires assistance from a third-party app like Desktop Coral to reserve space at the edge of the screen. You can now redefine the coordinates of Windows' desktop work area in your theme file. Basically, I used to require three apps - Rainmeter, CD Art Display, and Desktop Coral - to achieve this effect. Now I can do it in one.

 

- - - - - - -

 

Yod'm 3D

 

With my new RAM upgrade (and please accept my half-hearted apology for going on about it), it really costs me nothing to keep this light, attractive three-dimensional desktop manager running at all times. It activates when the mouse enters either bottom corner, so the overall perception is one of physically rotating the cube - very intuitive, I've found.

 

- - - - - - -

 

Trillian

 

Trillian, like Launchy, may as well be a startup app. I keep it running all the time, even when playing games or watching movies. I can't stand being out of digital contact; it's like living without a phone. These days, I use Trillian to connect to Skype and Twitter, as well, which only reaffirms its value to me: the more tasks a single app can cover, the more I love it.

 

The reason I can't abide Miranda or Pidgin is that neither (as far as I can tell) is capable storing logs in a plaintext, single-file format. This is a necessity for me, since I'm constantly looking up messages from old conversations, even months or years later, and nothing beats bringing it up in three strokes with Launchy and searching directly in Notepad.

 

- - - - - - -

 

Dropbox

 

I've tried a lot of synchronization and backup services in the past. Before Dropbox, I was a big fan of a Firefox extension (I can't remember the name) which let you upload files directly to your Gmail account space. My desire for this genre can be summed up as "a USB stick in the cloud," and Dropbox is the first one that I've kept and used for over a year. It's perfect, and as the storage capacity increases over time, so does my loyalty.

 

- - - - - - -

 

iTunes & Last.fm

 

I know you all hate iTunes. I don't blame you, I'm just convinced that we're not actually using the same program. I don't know what I'm doing differently, but on my laptop, iTunes and its library (3500+ songs now) load in under 5 seconds, handle just as smoothly as Firefox, and do virtually everything I want a media player to do. I keep trying alternatives - I actually haven't yet uninstalled Songbird after trying the new version last week - but as long as iTunes ain't broken, I have no desire to fix it.

 

Last.fm, on the other hand, is an experiment. I'm simply interested in keeping track of my music listening habits and comparing them with others'. The scrobbler does its thing and never interferes with my work in any way, so for the moment I'm happy to give it a home. It loads automatically with iTunes, too, which is nice - one less thing to worry about.

 

- - - - - - -

 

Thunderbird 2.0

 

I have not upgraded to Thunderbird 3. I kept trying it with each beta release, and then the final version, and I was quite disappointed each time. As it stands, the interface is quite bulky, the folder labels are inexplicably verbose. The "Smart Folders" really bulk up the "unread" view, too, which is pretty ironic, since I've always relied on it to serve as my condensed, consolidated reading list. As if that wasn't enough, it also insists on synchronizing virtually all of my email, including the spam folders - which also appear in the "unread" view. I admit, I'd like to be able to view flash applets without having to open feed items in Firefox, but it's just not enough to beat the cons.

 

So I'm sticking with 2.0 for the time being. Like iTunes, Thunderbird simply meets all my requirements. It is my consummate message center: all five of my email accounts synchronized via IMAP, plus my RSS feeds, all together in one simple view. I use exactly one extension: Minimize to Tray, which lets me keep Thunderbird available at all times without taking up valuable taskbar space.

 

At some point, I do hope to have Thunderbird (email/RSS), Trillian (IM/IRC/Twitter) and Google Wave integrated into a single elegant client. I'm sure the day is coming. But for now, I feel I've brought them together on my system in the most efficient way available to me.

 

- - - - - - -

 

Google Wave Notifier

 

Until Thunderbird or Trillian get a Wave plugin, I can't say no to this lovely little tray app. Like Last.fm, it does its job and minds its own business, and it does both so damn well that it passed my stringent filters with surprising ease.

 

- - - - - - -

 

Firefox

 

My Firefox is still pretty much as seen here: just a box with an address bar. I use keyboard shortcuts to toggle my bookmarks and menubar, and, naturally, back/forward. Additionally, I use keywords to access search engines - for example, to Google "Lifehacker," I just type "g lifehacker". Once you get used to it, it saves an awful lot of time.

 

While I did jump on the Awesome Bar bandwagon for the first few months, I'm now trying to bookmark more aggressively. This is because, when my history and cache are clear, Firefox loads in under one second. It beats Chrome on my system. You just can't beat that.

 

I do want to mention something to users of Lazarus Form Recovery, an extension that I heartily recommend. It's saved me, on numerous occasions, from losing hours and hours of writing. However, 99% of the time, it's something I'd written just minutes prior, and lost due to a crash; I've never needed to recover something days or weeks after the fact. So I strongly recommend clearing your Lazarus cache (which is kept separately from the main Firefox cache) and setting it to purge saved forms if they're older than a week or so. Before I realized this, Firefox sometimes took up to a minute and a half to load, no matter what else I tried to speed it up. Now, as I mentioned, it freaking beats Chrome at its own game.

 

- - - - - - -

 

I am currently running virtually all of these apps. Firefox has a dozen tabs, I've got four conversations in Trillian, and iTunes is playing the score of The Thin Red Line. And I'm clocking in at a whopping 40% memory use. RAM is cool.

 

- - - - - - -

 

Merry Christmas. :)

- 1camada de Base Fortalecedora com óleo de Girassol - Risqué

- 1camadinha de Preto - Imapa para a francesinha

- Flores Brancas: Copo de Leite - Guga

- Flores pretas: Preto - Impala

- 1 camada do Roxinho Colorama p finalizar

 

Achei super fofo, chamou mto a atenção de qm via as minhas unhas e fui elogiada em uma das lojas q fui, no shopping! Adorei e mto provavelmente, repetirei mais vezes!

 

=)

Beijocas e ótima semana...

 

PS.: Pra qm interessar, o anél LEEEENDO foi um achado q a minha qs chará, Marcele indicou! Marido comprou no BRUNA TESSARO, precinho amigo e de ótima qualidade!

Shaded polar stereographic projection map of Mars' south polar region, based on Mariner 6 & 7 imagery, circa 1969.

"We've" come a long way since, eh?

 

The map is part of an August 1970 NASA Mars Chart:

 

planetarymapping.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/usgs_flagsta...

 

For comparison/contrast:

 

pubs.usgs.gov/imap/i2782/i2782_sh1.pdf

Foreword

 

First of all, a deep (and entirely unoriginal) apology for being inactive for so long. Just after last Christmas, I was hit in the face by a huge flaming chunk of Real Life, leaving virtually zero time for my pet projects. I have still been answering emails sent to kaelri+lcd@gmail.com, so if you have a question, or you need help with Enigma, please don't hesitate to send a message. I still can't guarantee a prompt reply, but it's your best bet, and it's always great to hear from people.

 

Since it's been so long, I wanted to reward your patience with a real in-depth post. With screenshots! So read on.

 

Although I've had no opportunity to work on Rainmeter stuff, I've used some of my scattered moments of free time to tweak my Firefox setup, based on experiences with Chrome, Opera, and yes, even Safari 5. The beauty of extensible browsers is that whenever one of them gets a great new feature, someone will make it available for the others in short order. This means that the most extensible, customizable browser gets a huge Darwinian advantage. And in that, Firefox is still the undisputed king.

 

-----------------------

 

Chrome

 

Even though I've made a lot of behind-the-scenes changes, you'll notice that it doesn't look much different from my previous setup from almost two years ago. That's because I can't really simplify it any more than it is. I've even removed the back/forward and menu buttons now, so typically, the only element that's actually visible is the awesomebar on top.

 

Theme: After all this time, NASA Night Launch is still the best, cleanest, smoothest, most professional dark-colored Firefox theme on the planet. If they charged for this theme, I would pay.

 

Search: I really feel that keyword-based search bookmarks are the perfect solution to this issue of combining the search and address bars. I could never get the hang of Chrome's way of doing things - if I type "wiki lifehacker," will I search Wikipedia for "lifehacker," or will I google for "wiki lifehacker"? An action that is so basic to modern Internet living requires a method as habitual and thought-free as possible, and keywords are the answer. All I have to do is prefix whatever I type with the corresponding code:

- g: Google

- w: Wikipedia

- u: YouTube

- d: Dictionary.com

- t: Thesaurus.com

- tr: Google Translate (This will automatically translate the text which follows.)

To set this up for yourself, copy the link location of each search into a bookmark, and type the desired prefix into the "keyword" field. Thanks again to Nabeel for introducing me to this concept.

 

[Screenshot]

 

Menu: You'll notice that there's absolutely no menu bar or button in sight. That's because I'm using a feature of Personal Menu that I've previously overlooked: adding menu items to the toolbar context menu. I can now just right-click on either side of my toolbar to access the menu. I know it sounds awkward, but it's actually very easy to get used to. I use keyboard shortcuts for most things, which allowed me to condense everything I actually use into a remarkably short list.

 

[Screenshot]

 

Status Bar: Gone, obviously, but replaced with the simplest, most perfect extension I've ever seen. It's called Fission, and it does exactly three things. First, it adds a loading bar to the background of the awesomebar, ala Safari. (You can also have it normal-sized on the far-right side, which I do, because otherwise it's wasted space.) Second, it displays the page status, also on the far right side. Third, when you hover over a link, it changes the address in the awesomebar to the location of the link. In other words, it uses the awesomebar to completely replace all the usefulness of the status bar, and it does so in the most elegant way imaginable.

 

[Screenshot]

 

-----------------------

 

Sidebar

 

I think the most dramatic addition is the sidebar, courtesy of All-in-One Sidebar. I gave Opera another try several weeks ago, and while I ultimately switched back to Firefox, I was smitten with the sidebar that Opera uses. I found it easier to use, because it's adjacent to the edge of the screen, so it requires less aiming than the regular (horizontal) toolbars, and it saves vertical space, which, as we all know, is more important on a widescreen laptop. Two hours later, I'd found this, and now, my entire interface, other than the awesomebar, has been moved to it. AiOS is wonderful in several different ways:

 

Hide/Show: I probably would not have kept this extension if there hadn't been an easy way to hide it when I wanted to minimize my interface. Fortunately, it offers not only a grabber on the far left (barely visible, but easy to click, since I only need to flick the mouse left), but a keyboard shortcut: F4.

 

[Screenshot]

 

Flexible Buttons: I only have a few buttons, but as you can see, they're stretched out to fill the full height of the window. This is great, because it gives each button an absolutely gigantic click area.

 

Sidebars: This is actually the point of AiOS. As you know, Firefox can open your Bookmarks (Ctrl-B) and History (Ctrl-H) as sidebar panels. AiOS takes this further: it lets you open Downloads, Addons, Page Info, and other tools as docked, collapsible panels. It feels good to have all of Firefox's most important dialogs in a consistent format, and if you're, say, doing a lot of tweaking in your various extensions' options, it saves a lot of time to have it permanently open.

 

[Screenshot]

 

MultiPanel: AiOS adds one more sidebar of its own, called MultiPanel. This does a couple of different things. The one I love most is that you can open a second page inside the panel. It can even render the page in a mobile format, perfect for sidebar viewing. Menus at the top of the panel also offer quick access to the page source (which can be made to open in the sidebar by default) and the "about:" dialogs, including about:config (same).

 

[Screenshot (Full)]

[Screenshot (Mobile)]

 

-----------------------

 

Fast Dial

 

Still using Fast Dial as both my homepage and new-tab page. I could save on some performance by replacing it with a homemade HTML file, but for the moment, it doesn't bother me, and it's nice for the infrequent times when I do need to move stuff around. I made the thumbnails myself in Photoshop (not that they're anything special; just jumping on the Helvetica bandwagon).

 

As you can probably tell from the contents, I'm still a heavy and devoted user of Google services, especially since I've finally taken the leap to browser-only messaging. Yes, I have given up Thunderbird (except for making IMAP backups, because I'm still paranoid), and am now using Gmail to manage four different email addresses from a single inbox, which, to Gmail's credit, is working flawlessly, thanks to a combination of forwarding, filtering, and a secure send-from-address feature. As for my feeds, I'm using Google Reader with the gorgeous Helvetireader skin, via Greasemonkey. And as they say, I haven't looked back.

 

[Screenshot (Reader)]

[Screenshot (Mail)]

 

-----------------------

 

Bookmarks

 

It took a bit of fiddling, but I was able to add my bookmarks toolbar to the sidebar. Here's the trick: I moved all of my bookmarks into a single, unlabeled folder, so the effect is that it appears as if it's just a button, and therefore takes no horizontal space. The only (nitpicky) downside is that it doesn't really work without the "flexible buttons" option in AiOS; it expands to fill the entire sidebar vertically, which is annoying.

 

One of the things I'm asked about most often is my organization scheme. It's pretty simple, actually. Writer contains the sites where I'm an active member and contributor: forums, wikis, etc. Reader used to contain my daily reading material, before I started using feeds; now it holds my archive of saved posts, news stories and other pages, sorted by tag. (I discovered this completely by accident: Firefox lets you add a tag to any bookmark folder, where it appears as a menu.) Writer is where I save the pages that I don't have time to read. As you can imagine, this grows rapidly, and I have to cull it every few weeks. Resources is a list of useful tools that I may need during the course of the day. (Click the screenshot below to see.) After that, all that's left are a few folders dedicated to each of my currently-active projects. This method has served me well for literally years. I don't know if it qualifies as a "GTD" tactic, but I certainly recommend it.

 

[Screenshot (Reader)]

[Screenshot (Resources)]

 

Readability: This is the newest addition to my browsing suite. After Safari 5 popped up last week - although Safari for Windows is still the trashiest app ever released by a developer of Apple's standing - I was reasonably impressed with the "Reader" feature, and, naturally, I tried to see if anything like it was available for Firefox. Lo and behold, I discovered Readability. It's a bookmarklet which changes the layout of any page you throw at it, stripping all the unnecessary elements and reformatting the text to your preferred reading conditions. It's lovely. (Via Soeren Says.)

 

[Screenshot]

  

-----------------------

 

Gestures

 

The last extension I'll be highlighting is All-in-One Gestures. Like AiOS, I grabbed this after being really pleased with the mouse gestures in Opera. I never really thought I'd like them, but it does save an awful lot of time, and of course, it's customizable, so you can define those gestures that are most intuitive to you. It's now just a quick swipe to go back, forward, to the top or bottom of the page, to refresh, to open a new tab, or load the homepage in the current tab. These are just a few of the functions it can be used to invoke. It even has a command to increment a digit in the current page's URL - in other words, scroll through multi-page articles with a flick of the wrist. I admit, this isn't as seamless as Opera's method, which not only finds the page number automatically, but activates it whenever you use "forward" on a page that's already at the end of your history. But this works. I don't have to think about it, which is the most important thing.

 

This is also a great example of how extensions can be used to enhance each other. One of AiOG's other uses is to open a "favorite bookmark." I added the Readability bookmarklet (above). So now, I can reformat any webpage to my liking with a flick of the wrist. Welcome to the future.

 

-----------------------

 

Other Extensions

 

I won't go in-depth with these, since they're not really relevant to my browser interface like the others are. But for completion's sake, I'm also using:

- Adblock Plus

- Firefox Sync

- Lazarus Form Recovery

- Resurrect Pages

- Shooter

 

-----------------------

 

One More Thing

 

Go to about:config. Find the key called "general.smoothScroll". Change it to true. Instant smooth-scrolling, no extensions needed. Cheers.

Whenever I have the opportunity to combine breaking the law with photography I usually don't think twice. When I say breaking the law I mean trespassing. It seems like most of the best things to take pictures of are on private property. That being said, I also try to avoid two things. Dogs, and pissed off rednecks with guns. Or worse, a pissed off redneck with a gun and his dog. So when I discover what looks like an unused dirt road leading into the woods marked with "Keep Out" signs my curiosity gets the best of me. This time however, I used my own private spy satellite (Google Earth) to see what was down the dirt road before I bumbled into a bad situation. In addition, a quick search of local real estate records showed this land is owned by a developer. I didn't think they would mind me taking pictures since they were just going to tear this down and replace it with more suburan sprawl.

  

This is a local spy satellite for you Raleigh Folks. Select the aerial photography view.

Back from a long string theory of travel.

 

From Graham Spencer (http://gr.ah.am an internet instantiation of will,i,am):

 

Why did the web win?

 

We have 13K Internet protocols. It's like a fossil record. TCPmux is extinct, but still on the list.

 

By 2009, there's a huge loss of diversity.

Back in 93, FTP dominated. The FTP state machine has 185 transitions. Lots of messages and states. Turning into code is complicated. Variation to v2.0 is tough.

IMAP: 153 transitions

NNTP: 362 transitions

Conversational protocols are complicated.

 

http 0.9: few features, but simple.

The state machine has 4 states! An entire http server could fit into one SMS message.

 

Richard Gabriel: worse is better. Implementation simplicity is the highest priority. “Unix and C are the ultimate computer viruses.” Simplicity is the most important adaptation.

 

Other protocols evolve by changing endpoints.

Web evolves by adding intermediaries (proxy, search, social apps).

 

Ecosystem of intermediaries.

 

20 year predictions:

1) web protocols will remain simple. Browser from today will be able to view most websites 20 years from now.

2) The ecosystem of the web will keep getting better.

3) The appstore is anomaly. More devices will speak http

 

Nokia N900 Tech Specs

 

Display•3.5 inch touch-sensitive widescreen display

•800 × 480 pixel resolution

Language supportBritish English, American English, Canadian French, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish, Latin American Spanish, Swedish, Russian

 

Connectivity•3.5mm AV connector

•TV out (PAL/NTSC) with Nokia Video Connectivity Cable

•Micro-USB connector, High-Speed USB 2.0

•Bluetooth v2.1 including support for stereo headsets

•Integrated FM transmitter

•Integrated GPS with A-GPS

BatteryBL-5J 1320mAh

 

Processor and 3D acceleratorTI OMAP 3430: ARM Cortex-A8 600 MHz, PowerVR SGX with OpenGL ES 2.0 support

 

MemoryUp to 1GB of application memory (256 MB RAM, 768 MB virtual memory)

 

Size and weightVolume:Approx 113ccDimensions:110.9 × 59.8 × 18 (19.55 at thickest part) mmWeight:Approx 181gMass memory•32 GB internal storage

•Store up to 7000 MP3 songs or 40 hours of high-quality video

•Up to 16 GB of additional storage with an external microSD card

Keys and input method•Full QWERTY tactile keyboard

•Full QWERTY onscreen keyboard

ColourBlack

 

Operating frequency•Quad-band GSM EDGE 850/900/1800/1900

•WCDMA 900/1700/2100 MHz

Data networkGPRS class A, multislot class 32, maximum speed 107/64.2 kbps (DL/UL) EDGE class A, multislot class 32, maximum speed 296/177.6 kbps (DL/UL) WCDMA 900/1700/2100. Maximum speed PS 384/384 kbps (DL/UL) HSPA 900/1700/2100. Maximum speed PS 10/2 Mbps (DL/UL) WLAN IEEE 802.11b/g

 

Call features•Integrated hands-free stereo speakers

•Call waiting, call hold, call divert

•Call timer

•Logging of dialed, received and missed calls

•Speed dialing via contact widget

•Virbrating alert (internal)

•Side volume keys

•Mute/unmute

•Contacts with images

•Conference calling with up to 3 participants

•Internet calling

Email & Messaging•Supported protocols: Mail for Exchange, IMAP, POP3, SMTP

•Support for email attachments

•Support for rich HTML

•SMS and Instant Messages as conversations

•Support for Nokia Messaging service

•Instant messaging and presence enhanced contacts

•Multiple number, email and Instant Messaging details per contact, contacts with images

•Support for assigning images to contacts

Web browsing•Maemo browser powered by Mozilla technology

•Adobe Flash™ 9.4 support

•Full screen browsing

GPS and navigation•Integrated GPS, Assisted-GPS, and Cell-based receivers

•Pre-loaded Ovi Maps application

•Automatic geotagging

Camera•5 megapixel camera (2584 × 1938 pixels)

•Image formats: JPEG

•CMOS sensor, Carl Zeiss optics, Tessar lens

•3 × digital zoom

•Autofocus with assist light and two-stage capture key

•Dual LED flash

•Full-screen viewfinder

•Photo editor on device

•TV out (PAL/NTSC) with Nokia Video Connectivity Cable (CA-75U, included in box) or WLAN/UPnP

•Landscape (horizontal) orientation

•Capture modes: Automatic, portrait, video, macro, landscape, action

Video•Wide aspect ratio 16:9 (WVGA)

•Video recording file format: .mp4; codec: MPEG-4

•Video recording at up to 848 × 480 pixels (WVGA) and up to 25fps

•Video playback file formats: .mp4, .avi, .wmv, .3gp; codecs: H.264, MPEG-4, Xvid, WMV, H.263

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Structurally tilted sandstones and shales in the Cretaceous of Utah, USA.

 

The yellowish-orangish ridge of rocks at center-left & left is an outcrop of structurally tilted Dakota Sandstone in Dinosaur National Monument, Utah. The beds are steeply dipping to the right. This unit and its correlatives are a widespread package of sandy siliciclastics deposited in the ancient Western Interior Seaway of North America. The Dakota Sandstone dates to the late Early Cretaceous and early Late Cretaceous.

 

The light gray rocks near the middle of the picture are the Mowry Shale, a mid-Cretaceous unit characterized by dark-colored siliceous shales. Upon weathering, the shale usually consists of silvery-gray chips. Fragmentary fish fossils are common in some Mowry Shale outcrops. In Wyoming and Montana, the Mowry is a significant source rock for hydrocarbons. It's been calculated that about 12 billion barrels of oil have been generated by the Mowry in the deep subsurface of those two states (see summary in Bremer, 2016).

 

The brownish-colored rocks at right are part of the Frontier Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous), a coarse-grained, shallow water marine to shoreline unit.

 

Stratigraphy: Frontier Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous) over Mowry Shale (mid-Cretaceous) over Dakota Sandstone (Lower Cretaceous)

 

Locality: view from Swelter Shelter trail, Dinosaur National Monument, northern Uintah County, northeastern Utah, USA

-------------------

Reference cited:

 

Bremer (2016) - Stratigraphy and Sedimentology of the Cretaceous of the Cretaceous Mowry Shale in the Northern Bighorn Basin of Wyoming: Implications for Unconventional Resource Exploration and Development. M.S. thesis. University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska. 55 pp.

-------------------

See info. at:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinosaur_National_Monument

------------

Geologic map of Dinosaur National Monument:

pubs.usgs.gov/imap/1407/plate-1.pdf

 

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