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In the dying light walking through a former apple orchard now given over to meadow near the village of Icklesham in East sussex.

Straw all bagged up & the building on the left is an Oast House now used as a rather good B &B.

The Clayton Windmills, known locally as Jack and Jill, stand on the South Downs above the village of Clayton, West Sussex, England. They comprise a post mill and a tower mill, and the roundhouse of a former post mill. All three are Grade II* listed buildings.

 

Jill is a post mill originally built in Dyke Road, Brighton, in 1821. She was known as Lashmar's New Mill and was built to replace Lashmar's Old Mill. In 1830, the Windshaft broke, bringing the sails crashing to the ground. A painting by Nash dated 1839 and an engraving in the Handbook to Brighton (1847) show her to have had a roof mounted Fantail, similar to the arrangement still found on Icklesham windmill. Lashmar's New Mill was the most southerly of the three Dyke Road post mills. In 1852 she was moved to Clayton by a team of horses and oxen. The site is now Belmont—a short street of Grade II-listed villas.

 

The working life of the mills ended in 1906 and in 1908 Jill was damaged in a storm. She lost her fantail and sails over the years until in 1953 restoration was carried out by E Hole and Son, the Burgess Hill millwrights, funded by Cuckfield Rural District Council. In 1978, restoration of Jill to working order was commenced. Jill ground flour again in 1986. During the Great Storm of 1987, the mill's sails were set in motion with the brake on, setting fire to the mill. Some members of the Windmill Society were able to get to the mill and save her.

 

Today, Jill is in working order and open to the public most Sundays between May and September. She produces stoneground wholemeal flour on an occasional basis. The vast majority of her flour is sold to visitors. It is ground from organic wheat, grown locally in Sussex. On the occasions when the wind is blowing and Jill is in operation, a guide is available to explain the process of milling. Jill Windmill is owned by Mid Sussex District Council.

The Ascension Window (East Window).

 

The first light shows St Pancras and St Hugh. The middle three lights are the Ascension. The fifth light shows St John the Baptist and St Benedict.

  

The east window is by J Jacob, 1930 (signed). It includes the figure of Gundrada herself.

 

Jessie Mary Jacob (1890-1933) had a studio at Strand Green in North London and belonged to the Society of Master Glass Painters. Little else is known of her, except that she spent all her life in north east London, for she was born in Edmonton, Middlesex, the daughter of a chemist.

 

Glass: Icklesham (1924); Lewes, - St Anne (1920); - St John the Baptist, Southover (1930): Eton (Eton College, Memorial Chap), Berks (1920); Redhill (United Reform), Surrey (1927).

 

www.stainedglassrecords.org/Ch.asp?ChId=32480

 

test.sussexparishchurches.org/product/lewes-st-john-the-b...

The Ascension Window (East Window).

 

The first light shows St Pancras and St Hugh. The middle three lights are the Ascension. The fifth light shows St John the Baptist and St Benedict.

  

The east window is by J Jacob, 1930 (signed). It includes the figure of Gundrada herself.

 

Jessie Mary Jacob (1890-1933) had a studio at Strand Green in North London and belonged to the Society of Master Glass Painters. Little else is known of her, except that she spent all her life in north east London, for she was born in Edmonton, Middlesex, the daughter of a chemist.

 

Glass: Icklesham (1924); Lewes, - St Anne (1920); - St John the Baptist, Southover (1930): Eton (Eton College, Memorial Chap), Berks (1920); Redhill (United Reform), Surrey (1927).

 

www.stainedglassrecords.org/Ch.asp?ChId=32480

 

test.sussexparishchurches.org/product/lewes-st-john-the-b...

The Ascension Window (East Window).

 

The first light shows St Pancras and St Hugh. The middle three lights are the Ascension. The fifth light shows St John the Baptist and St Benedict.

  

The east window is by J Jacob, 1930 (signed). It includes the figure of Gundrada herself.

 

Jessie Mary Jacob (1890-1933) had a studio at Strand Green in North London and belonged to the Society of Master Glass Painters. Little else is known of her, except that she spent all her life in north east London, for she was born in Edmonton, Middlesex, the daughter of a chemist.

 

Glass: Icklesham (1924); Lewes, - St Anne (1920); - St John the Baptist, Southover (1930): Eton (Eton College, Memorial Chap), Berks (1920); Redhill (United Reform), Surrey (1927).

 

www.stainedglassrecords.org/Ch.asp?ChId=32480

 

test.sussexparishchurches.org/product/lewes-st-john-the-b...

The Ascension Window (East Window).

 

The first light shows St Pancras and St Hugh. The middle three lights are the Ascension. The fifth light shows St John the Baptist and St Benedict.

  

The east window is by J Jacob, 1930 (signed). It includes the figure of Gundrada herself.

 

Jessie Mary Jacob (1890-1933) had a studio at Strand Green in North London and belonged to the Society of Master Glass Painters. Little else is known of her, except that she spent all her life in north east London, for she was born in Edmonton, Middlesex, the daughter of a chemist.

 

Glass: Icklesham (1924); Lewes, - St Anne (1920); - St John the Baptist, Southover (1930): Eton (Eton College, Memorial Chap), Berks (1920); Redhill (United Reform), Surrey (1927).

 

www.stainedglassrecords.org/Ch.asp?ChId=32480

 

test.sussexparishchurches.org/product/lewes-st-john-the-b...

The Ascension Window (East Window).

 

The first light shows St Pancras and St Hugh. The middle three lights are the Ascension. The fifth light shows St John the Baptist and St Benedict.

  

The east window is by J Jacob, 1930 (signed). It includes the figure of Gundrada herself.

 

Jessie Mary Jacob (1890-1933) had a studio at Strand Green in North London and belonged to the Society of Master Glass Painters. Little else is known of her, except that she spent all her life in north east London, for she was born in Edmonton, Middlesex, the daughter of a chemist.

 

Glass: Icklesham (1924); Lewes, - St Anne (1920); - St John the Baptist, Southover (1930): Eton (Eton College, Memorial Chap), Berks (1920); Redhill (United Reform), Surrey (1927).

 

www.stainedglassrecords.org/Ch.asp?ChId=32480

 

test.sussexparishchurches.org/product/lewes-st-john-the-b...

Sunset over Icklesham, East Sussex

We wondered if these strange round farm buildings might formerly have been oast houses.

 

On our 28th wedding anniversary, we left Puddock Farm pine lodges early to birdwatch on Romney Marsh, breakfast and shopping in Rye, more birdwatching on Pett Levels, then through the villages to the Queens Head, Icklesham, Sussex, where we had lunch.

I am guessing that this vehicle is incapable of being towed away now it is so rusty. Surely a towing hook would just pull it apart?

View from the Queens Head. Icklesham through the Brede Valley to Rye.

There is an energy/ley line that runs through here from Guestling Church.

To the right is the beautiful historic town of Winchelsea.

Sunset over the village of Icklesham in East Sussex from Hogs Hill

my old home village icklesham

one of my neighbours Paul McCartneys

windmill on hill

The Clayton Windmills, known locally as Jack and Jill, stand on the South Downs above the village of Clayton, West Sussex, England. They comprise a post mill and a tower mill, and the roundhouse of a former post mill. All three are Grade II listed buildings.

 

The windmills stand atop the scenic South Downs with spectacular views of the Sussex Weald. They are seven miles north of the city of Brighton and Hove. As well as Jack and Jill, the roundhouse of Duncton Mill survives, located a short distance east of Jack.

 

The mills are easily accessible by road at the end of Mill Lane from the A273 road where it crosses the South Downs. There is ample free parking in the car park beside the mills.

 

Jill is a post mill originally built in Dyke Road, Brighton, in 1821. She was known as Lashmar's New Mill and was built to replace Lashmar's Old Mill. In 1830, the Windshaft broke, bringing the sails crashing to the ground. A painting by Nash dated 1839 and an engraving in the Handbook to Brighton (1847) show her to have had a roof mounted Fantail, similar to the arrangement still found on Icklesham windmill.

 

Lashmar's New Mill was the most southerly of the three Dyke Road post mills. In 1852 she was moved to Clayton by a team of horses and oxen. The site is now Belmont, a short street of Grade II-listed villas.

 

The working life of the mills ended in 1906 and in 1908 Jill was damaged in a storm. She lost her fantail and sails over the years until in 1953 restoration was carried out by E Hole and Son, the Burgess Hill millwrights, funded by Cuckfield Rural District Council. In 1978, restoration of Jill to working order was commenced. Jill ground flour again in 1986. During the Great Storm of 1987, the mill's sails were set in motion with the brake on, setting fire to the mill. Some members of the Windmill Society were able to get to the mill and save her.

 

Today, Jill is in working order and open to the public most Sundays between May and September. She produces stoneground wholemeal flour on an occasional basis. The vast majority of her flour is sold to visitors. It is ground from organic wheat, grown locally in Sussex. On the occasions when the wind is blowing and Jill is in operation, a guide is available to explain the process of milling. Jill Windmill is owned by Mid Sussex District Council.

 

Jill is a post mill with a two storey roundhouse. She has four Patent Sails and is winded by a five blade fantail mounted on the tailpole. The windshaft is wooden, with a cast iron poll end dated 1831. Jill has two pairs of millstones, arranged Head and Tail. The compass arm Tail Wheel shows evidence of having been used as a Brake Wheel at some time. The main Post of Jill is made from four separate pieces of timber, a feature seen in some Sussex post mills and only found in this and Argos Hill Mill today.

20 May 2009 - United Kingdom, East Sussex, Winchelsea

Rye Harbour is a village located on the East Sussex coast in southeast England, near the estuary of the River Rother: it is part of the civil parish of Icklesham. Rye Harbour is located some two miles (3.2 km) downstream of the town of Rye.

 

The River Rother from Rye seawards, and including the village of Rye Harbour, is under the control of the Environment Agency.At the village itself there are yacht moorings; a small fishing fleet (coded RX: Rye SusseX); some commercial shipping; and a long-established lifeboat station.There is also a holiday village called Frenchman's Beach alongside the village itself.

 

The Rye Harbour Nature Reserve was established nearby in 1970 and it now offers special wildlife experiences to 200,000 visitors a year. It has national and international designations and is home to more than 150 rare or endangered species. There is a manned information centre 550 yards (500 m) south of the village at Lime Kiln Cottage.

 

The village community has set up a pictorial website, aimed at promoting its history.[5]

 

Rye Harbour is perhaps best known for its fictionalisation as "Westling" in the Romney Marsh children's books of Monica Edwards.

 

History[edit]

 

The village is 200 years old, having been built on an extension of the shingle beaches, progressively deposited by the sea over the last 800 years. These deposits limit access to the original open medieval port of Rye, now two miles (3 km) inland from the sea. The village has one of the chain of Martello Towers constructed during the Napoleonic Wars; it was built on the beachline of the time. The beachline has now advanced a further kilometre southward.

   

Rye Harbour in 1898 by Reginald Aspinwall

The story of Rye Harbour has thus been shaped by its position at a frontier — not only that with the sea but also of the country. The initial establishment was that of a company of dragoons in 1805, followed shortly after by the first fishermen's huts and the building of the Martello Tower (1809/10). As the Napoleonic wars ended so the smuggling trade which had long flourished all along the south coast again increased in scope and intensity, leading to the establishment of the Coast Blockade. A watch house was built about 1825 to provide shelter and support for the blockade detachments and still stands, complete with the flagstaff for signalling to shipping.

 

The harbour is also known for the tragedy of the Mary Stanford lifeboat. At 6:45 am on the morning of 15 November 1928, the Mary Stanford from the Rye Harbour RNLI station responded needlessly to a Latvian steamer in distress. The crew of the Mary Stanford did not know that the vessel had already been rescued by another lifeboat and, in heavy rain and seas, all of the seventeen-man crew of the Mary Stanford were drowned. The reason for this is still somewhat contested. The bodies of all but the Coxswain's son, John Head, were found and buried. A memorial service in honour of the Mary Stanford and its crew takes place every year in the village.

 

On my way home from work today i decided to grab a shot of Icklesham Church for my 3rd photo. The Church and car park were both empty so i went about my way taking shots and wandering around the outside of the Church.

As i prepared to take this shot a little voice behind me said "i wish i had a steady hand to take a photo again" jump out of my skin would be an understatement.!!!! I turned around to be greeted by a lovely little elderly lady. She explained to me that she used to be very good at taking photos when she was "a little younger" Of course it was a 35mm film camera and she only ever shot in Black & White. So i thought it would be nice to post this one in Black & White.

A view to Icklesham Windmill in East Sussex through the fields that were once productive Apple orchards, sadly now long gone, why?..uncommercial or something, nothing seems to be produced in these fields now, a bit of a waste it seems to me!

The 14th century Parish Church of St Thomas the Martyr in the Parish of Icklesham, Winchelsea, Sussex.

The Parish Church of St Thomas the Martyr in the Parish of Icklesham, Winchelsea. View from the north west.

 

This was or was planned to be a cruciform church, but the nave was either never finished or was burned by the French in the C14. The chancel with aisles and the arches and ruins of the transepts remain. Except for the C15 West porch, the whole building is C14 and is the finest Decorated work in Sussex. (Historic England List entry)

Of all the adornments on oast houses that I saw on this wander along the 1066 Country Walk, these are probably the ones I liked the best

Manor Farm, near Icklesham is on the 1066 Country Walk that stretches for 31 miles between Pevensey and Rye.

An attractive and well maintained oast house, that also offers accommodation to weary travellers.

Perfection from any angle.. Royal Blue #1299 , a 1953 Bristol LS6G with an ECW C41F body , heads towards Icklesham during the 2013 Royal Blue South Coast Express Run.

he church of St Laurence was founded in Saxon times, it's towers, pierced with tiny round-headed windows, must have been built after the Norman Conquest.

 

Between the north aisle and the chapel that leads out of it, is an architectural rarity - an ornate Transitional arch - making the transition from Norman to early-English style.

 

Olive Brockwell the most famous of all nannies, who was immortalised as Alice by A.E.Milne (Changing guards at Buckingham Palace, Christopher Robin went down with Alice) was buried in Guestling. An inscription paid for by Christopher Milne (the original Christopher Robin) explains who she was.

 

From the churchyard there are wide-ranging views, south to Fairlight church, and east to the restored smock mill at Icklesham.

 

www.hunnypot.org.uk/guestling/church.html

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