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Row of historic shophouses along Phee Choon Road - a fine example of the ubiquitous Penang shophouse with its 'five foot way'.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

Please don't use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

  

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London | Architecture | Night Photography

 

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The CTBUH ( Council for Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat) is proud to announce the four regional winners of the 2009 “Best Tall Building” awards. After carefully deliberating over a record number of nominations, the 2009 Awards Committee, chaired by Gordon Gill, has selected: Manitoba Hydro Place, Winnipeg for Americas, Linked Hybrid Building, Beijing for Asia & Australasia, The Broadgate Tower, London for Europe, and Tornado Tower, Doha for the Middle East & Africa. One of these four projects will be recognized as the "2009 Best Tall Building Overall" at the 2009 Awards Dinner to be held on October 22nd.

  

The Broadgate Tower is the first developer-led speculative office tower to be built in the City of London and presents a model for the next phase of development of the City cluster. Its striking structural form, born out of an innovative design response to site constraints, is reflected in the major facades. The Broadgate Tower creates a landmark for the northern gateway to the City. Th e side-mounted cores provide clear and open fl oor plates. They are reached via Destination Hall Call Control double deck elevators—the fi rst such combined installation in Europe.

At ground level, the covered Galleria delivers units for shops and dining, high quality public space and creates a route through from Broadgate to the north and east. The site was created by building a 2.3 acre raft over the existing rail tracks running into Liverpool Street Station. The structure was developed in response to the need to span these tracks, whilst the form is specifically designed to maintain the St. Paul’s View Corridor, which bisects the site.

The Broadgate Tower allows British Land to increase the diversity of tenant space in Broadgate, provide more ground floor space for public use, maximize the potential of a site near a major transportation hub and create a new pedestrian route across the site.

Sustainability was an integral part of the design approach from the inception of this project, which lead to an efficient building without compromising on operational performance. Th e landscaping at The Broadgate Tower provides quality urban spaces and amenities. 23 trees planted inside and outside the Galleria will add to the relaxed atmosphere of this development. Up to 13 meters (43ft ) tall, these trees will sit in special grated pits sunk into the surface of the Galleria and Plaza and there will be a “green” wall at the southwest of the Plaza designed to screen the three-storey wall of Broadwalk House.

 

London Architecture 2009 Best Tall Building Europe

 

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London Architecture

 

The Van Etten lineage: Johannes & Maria Gonsalis Van Etten > John & Cornelia Decker Van Etten > John I & Catherine Kuykendall Van Etten > Daniel Ennis Van Etten (1808-1880) and his wife Lucinda VanGorden (1810-1891).

 

"...On August 22, 1767 John (Jan) Van Etten, Esq. residing in Forks Twp. PA deeded land to Johannes Van Etten, three tracts, containing 68 acres, lying below the Namanock Islands" (Scott, 1950)

 

"Pike County Deed Book 39, p.260, March 18, 1882, records the transfer of 100 acres to John Zimmermann from [Estate of] Daniel Ennis Van Etten. Later purchases of 12, 68, and 22.5 acres are recorded in Book 42, p. 419." NPS Historic structure report .

 

Delaware Water Gap Nat'l Recreation Area

 

"The home was constructed for John Zimmermann, a manufacturer from Brooklyn, probably around 1912. The house combines both the Dutch Colonial Revival and the French Chateau styles to form a unique blend, and also exudes influences from the Richardsonian Romanesque as well as the Arts and Crafts styles. Architectural historians refer to such hybrid building styles as eclectic.

www.nps.gov/dewa/historyculture/upload/cmsstgZIMMR.pdf

 

Marie Zimmermann (1879–1972)

 

Metalsmith Magazine article w/ multiple illustrations of her artwork ~

"The press hailed her as a "master of a dozen crafts...perhaps the most versatile artist in this country" [2] and "the last of the great metal craftsmen...the modern Benvenuto Cellini." [3] But what they could not have realized at the time was that as impressive as her range of skills was, equally important was her ability to create significant works of art within the multiple artistic movements that swept across the United States from the turn of the twentieth century to the rise of Modernism. Her artistic curiosity and central location in New York City exposed her to the latest stylistic influences, and she fully embraced the avant-garde. Zimmermann's body of work contains outstanding examples of the Belle Epoque, the Aesthetic Movement, the Arts and Crafts Movement, Greek and Egyptian Revival, Art Deco, and Modernism.

 

...Today, that home is an historic site, displaying much of the rustic elegance associated with the Arts and Crafts Movement. The house, with its exposed beams, sweeping grand staircase and conical, fieldstone-turret entrance, was eventually filled with Zimmermann's work, including carved wooden tables and sideboards, forged fireplace screens and tools, chandeliers, candelabras, vases, and fountains. The family vacationed there and she relished the outdoors, pursuing her love of hunting, fishing, and riding horses. Naturalistic forms like leaves, berries, vines, and flowers were always significant design motifs in her art, and the time she spent in Pennsylvania was a source of inspiration."

www.ganoksin.com/borisat/nenam/marie-zimmermann.htm

 

www.nps.gov/dewa/historyculture/upload/cmsstgMARIE.pdf

 

NPS Historic structure report

hdl.handle.net/2027/mdp.39015018937964

  

The end of a row of shophouses along Barrack Road. The example above clearly shows the typically narrow frontage of the shophouse relative to its depth.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages, but may extend backwards to great depths, in some cases extending all the way to the rear street. A number of reasons have been given for the narrow widths of these buildings. One reason relates to taxes, i.e. the idea that buildings were historically taxed according to street frontage rather than total area, thereby creating an economic motivation to build narrow and deeply. Another reason is building technology: the timber beams that carried the roof and floor loads of these structures were supported by masonry party walls. The extent of frontage was therefore affected by the structural span of the timber used. While all shophouses appear, visually, to have similarly narrow widths, these are not uniform and minor variations are the rule, especially when comparing buildings built at different times, by different owners and with different materials or technologies.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

Built: 1930s

 

One of the pediments on this row of shophouses is dated 1937.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

    

Site location: Ipoh New Town

 

Three storey corner shophouse.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages, but may extend backwards to great depths, in some cases extending all the way to the rear street. A number of reasons have been given for the narrow widths of these buildings. One reason relates to taxes, i.e. the idea that buildings were historically taxed according to street frontage rather than total area, thereby creating an economic motivation to build narrow and deeply. Another reason is building technology: the timber beams that carried the roof and floor loads of these structures were supported by masonry party walls. The extent of frontage was therefore affected by the structural span of the timber used. While all shophouses appear, visually, to have similarly narrow widths, these are not uniform and minor variations are the rule, especially when comparing buildings built at different times, by different owners and with different materials or technologies.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Extract sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

  

Two storey shophouse.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages, but may extend backwards to great depths, in some cases extending all the way to the rear street. A number of reasons have been given for the narrow widths of these buildings. One reason relates to taxes, i.e. the idea that buildings were historically taxed according to street frontage rather than total area, thereby creating an economic motivation to build narrow and deeply. Another reason is building technology: the timber beams that carried the roof and floor loads of these structures were supported by masonry party walls. The extent of frontage was therefore affected by the structural span of the timber used. While all shophouses appear, visually, to have similarly narrow widths, these are not uniform and minor variations are the rule, especially when comparing buildings built at different times, by different owners and with different materials or technologies.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Extract sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

  

Northern Taiwan rains very often.

This area is full of land mixed-use and hybrid buildings. Because the location is close to the school and great life function, it’s a hot spot for students to rent houses there.

  

Photographer | 喬誠

  

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We are Taiwanese crazy about taking pictures and willing to share it all over the world. You can use this beautiful pics for free! Don’t forget to #TaiwanSceneryGallery to appreciate our photographers. Thank you!

Route 2 arrives at it's first pick-up stop on Melcombe Place, directly outside Marylebone Station.

Architect: Steven Holl

Sculptural buildings in the courtyard contain a Cinema for Chines Films and an Art Gallery. The circular building is a Boutique Hotel, but BC Hotels.

Architect: Steven Holl

Also referred to as the Hybrid Building.

The project consists of a series of 9 towers, 8 have the same square grid format that follows on from the exploration of this expression on Simmods Hall MIT, and the 9th tower is circular hotel. All of the grid towers are linked together with an occupied bridge that houses 'community facilities' including meeting space and a swimming pool. The bridge links act like an elevated street.

There are a number of sculpturally shaped buildings in the courtyard that house a gallery, chinese cinema and the like.

This photo was taken in the evening on June 1st of 2013.

 

On my way to the band event, I have to across this most busiest street in Little India area. On both sides of the street you can see this typical architecture, called Shophouse.

 

* A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high, with a shop on the ground floor for mercantile activity and a residence above the shop. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region. (*This information is from the source in this link. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shophouse)

 

The shophouses can be seen all over some area among Singapore island. They are very colorful yet in style, surely something very pretty and enjoyable to view.

 

Olaus Petri Curch, Parish Hall and Apartments, Stockholm, Sweden

by Peter Celsing in 1955-59

The church is not just connected to the apartment block but also continues

it's shape. This was apparently the outcome of a compromise during the

design phase, but in fact generated a very interesting hybrid building.

Around Sheffield, old and new hybrid building

Always great to find patches of lush green among the shophouses!

 

Shophouses have been a vernacular architectural building type commonly seen in urban Southeast Asia. As the name suggests, each shophouse comprises a shop on the ground floor with a public arcade (also called five-foot-way) and residential accommodation upstairs. Shophouses typically abut each other to form rows with regular façade and shared party walls.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages but great depths. To facilitate better circulation and natural lighting, each shophouse incorporates an internal courtyard. In addition, large windows, often wall to ceiling, dominates the façade of the upper storeys fronting the streets.

 

This hybrid building architecture is commonly found in the historical centers of many towns and cities across Southeast Asia. In Singapore, rapid economic development over the last few decades and the scarcity of land saw many of such shophouses making way for high rise office towers, shopping malls and housing blocks. Today, most of the remaining shophouses in Singapore are gazette under conservation schemes.

 

Located along Main Road, Taiping (Jalan Taming Sari), this beautiful two storey end shophouse is now home to an Indian restaurant (Restoran Sugantha). Foursquare: Restoran Sugantha Indian Restaurant

 

My wife and I had some great food here (loved the roti) and the place was very clean (see image below). I would happily recommend it. Oh, and then you might like to walk down the road to the Ipoh Bakery for a nice yummy fresh pastry/cake... however, be prepared to add an extra couple of notches to your belt. :)

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Five foot way

   

Currently home to Kedai Motor Tat Lee.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

 

Batu Gajah, along with the nearby towns of Gopeng and Papan are situated in the Kinta district of Perak, and were once bustling tin mining towns. In 1881, Batu Gajah was the river port for the nearby Papan tin mines. In 1884, Batu Gajah was selected to become the centre of administration for the Kinta district. Hence, it was home to most of the Government Offices. In the later half of the 1800s, the booming tin mining industry in the Kinta Valley was the catalyst for the influx of large numbers of Chinese workers seeking their fortunes working the mines. Consequently, the period 1879 to 1891 saw the population of the Kinta district increase by approximately 50,000. The district also had rubber plantations.

Two storey Straits Eclectic style shophouse.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages, but may extend backwards to great depths, in some cases extending all the way to the rear street. A number of reasons have been given for the narrow widths of these buildings. One reason relates to taxes, i.e. the idea that buildings were historically taxed according to street frontage rather than total area, thereby creating an economic motivation to build narrow and deeply. Another reason is building technology: the timber beams that carried the roof and floor loads of these structures were supported by masonry party walls. The extent of frontage was therefore affected by the structural span of the timber used. While all shophouses appear, visually, to have similarly narrow widths, these are not uniform and minor variations are the rule, especially when comparing buildings built at different times, by different owners and with different materials or technologies.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

  

Site location: Ipoh Old Town

 

Row of two storey shophouses.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages, but may extend backwards to great depths, in some cases extending all the way to the rear street. A number of reasons have been given for the narrow widths of these buildings. One reason relates to taxes, i.e. the idea that buildings were historically taxed according to street frontage rather than total area, thereby creating an economic motivation to build narrow and deeply. Another reason is building technology: the timber beams that carried the roof and floor loads of these structures were supported by masonry party walls. The extent of frontage was therefore affected by the structural span of the timber used. While all shophouses appear, visually, to have similarly narrow widths, these are not uniform and minor variations are the rule, especially when comparing buildings built at different times, by different owners and with different materials or technologies.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Extract sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

  

Two storey corner shophouse.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages, but may extend backwards to great depths, in some cases extending all the way to the rear street. A number of reasons have been given for the narrow widths of these buildings. One reason relates to taxes, i.e. the idea that buildings were historically taxed according to street frontage rather than total area, thereby creating an economic motivation to build narrow and deeply. Another reason is building technology: the timber beams that carried the roof and floor loads of these structures were supported by masonry party walls. The extent of frontage was therefore affected by the structural span of the timber used. While all shophouses appear, visually, to have similarly narrow widths, these are not uniform and minor variations are the rule, especially when comparing buildings built at different times, by different owners and with different materials or technologies.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

  

This two storey corner shophouse is now home to Lian Thong Restaurant

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages, but may extend backwards to great depths, in some cases extending all the way to the rear street. A number of reasons have been given for the narrow widths of these buildings. One reason relates to taxes, i.e. the idea that buildings were historically taxed according to street frontage rather than total area, thereby creating an economic motivation to build narrow and deeply. Another reason is building technology: the timber beams that carried the roof and floor loads of these structures were supported by masonry party walls. The extent of frontage was therefore affected by the structural span of the timber used. While all shophouses appear, visually, to have similarly narrow widths, these are not uniform and minor variations are the rule, especially when comparing buildings built at different times, by different owners and with different materials or technologies.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

  

Site location: Ipoh New Town

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

     

The pediment at the top right edge of this image is dated: 1937 and there is also a name that looks like it may be 'Sandina or Sandana Vilas'. Can anyone please confirm this? Thank you.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

   

Site location: Ipoh Old Town

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Site location: Ipoh Old Town

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Two storey corner shophouse

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages, but may extend backwards to great depths, in some cases extending all the way to the rear street. A number of reasons have been given for the narrow widths of these buildings. One reason relates to taxes, i.e. the idea that buildings were historically taxed according to street frontage rather than total area, thereby creating an economic motivation to build narrow and deeply. Another reason is building technology: the timber beams that carried the roof and floor loads of these structures were supported by masonry party walls. The extent of frontage was therefore affected by the structural span of the timber used. While all shophouses appear, visually, to have similarly narrow widths, these are not uniform and minor variations are the rule, especially when comparing buildings built at different times, by different owners and with different materials or technologies.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Extract sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

  

This two storey corner shophouse is now home to Bollywood Junction Rest House and Café

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Five foot way

 

A hybrid building on the Aldgate fringe, part HQ, part events venue.

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the region. ...

 

Wikipedia: Shophouse

 

Wikipedia: Five foot way

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the region. ...

 

Wikipedia: Shophouse

 

Wikipedia: Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

Club Street, Singapore

 

Shophouses have been a vernacular architectural building type commonly seen in urban Southeast Asia. As the name suggests, each shophouse comprises a shop on the ground floor with a public arcade (also called five-foot-way) and residential accommodation upstairs. Shophouses typically abut each other to form rows with regular façade and shared party walls.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages but great depths. To facilitate better circulation and natural lighting, each shophouse incorporates an internal courtyard. In addition, large windows, often wall to ceiling, dominates the façade of the upper storeys fronting the streets.

 

This hybrid building architecture is commonly found in the historical centers of many towns and cities across Southeast Asia. In Singapore, rapid economic development over the last few decades and the scarcity of land saw many of such shophouses making way for high rise office towers, shopping malls and housing blocks. Today, most of the remaining shophouses in Singapore are gazette under conservation schemes.

 

Unconventional, provocative combination of building functions within the same envelope: A university on the upper three floors and a Canadian Tire superstore at grade. Gone is the sticky classical image of university as a self contained edifice of class and classicism. On top of a subway station and near to practically everything it makes eminent urban and economic sense.

Shophouses have been a vernacular architectural building type commonly seen in urban Southeast Asia. As the name suggests, each shophouse comprises a shop on the ground floor with a public arcade (also called five-foot-way) and residential accommodation upstairs. Shophouses typically abut each other to form rows with regular façade and shared party walls.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages but great depths. To facilitate better circulation and natural lighting, each shophouse incorporates an internal courtyard. In addition, large windows, often wall to ceiling, dominates the façade of the upper storeys fronting the streets.

 

This hybrid building architecture is commonly found in the historical centers of many towns and cities across Southeast Asia. In Singapore, rapid economic development over the last few decades and the scarcity of land saw many of such shophouses making way for high rise office towers, shopping malls and housing blocks. Today, most of the remaining shophouses in Singapore are gazette under conservation schemes.

 

Two storey corner shophouses.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages, but may extend backwards to great depths, in some cases extending all the way to the rear street. A number of reasons have been given for the narrow widths of these buildings. One reason relates to taxes, i.e. the idea that buildings were historically taxed according to street frontage rather than total area, thereby creating an economic motivation to build narrow and deeply. Another reason is building technology: the timber beams that carried the roof and floor loads of these structures were supported by masonry party walls. The extent of frontage was therefore affected by the structural span of the timber used. While all shophouses appear, visually, to have similarly narrow widths, these are not uniform and minor variations are the rule, especially when comparing buildings built at different times, by different owners and with different materials or technologies.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Extract sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

  

Two storey corner shophouse

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages, but may extend backwards to great depths, in some cases extending all the way to the rear street. A number of reasons have been given for the narrow widths of these buildings. One reason relates to taxes, i.e. the idea that buildings were historically taxed according to street frontage rather than total area, thereby creating an economic motivation to build narrow and deeply. Another reason is building technology: the timber beams that carried the roof and floor loads of these structures were supported by masonry party walls. The extent of frontage was therefore affected by the structural span of the timber used. While all shophouses appear, visually, to have similarly narrow widths, these are not uniform and minor variations are the rule, especially when comparing buildings built at different times, by different owners and with different materials or technologies.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

  

Shophouses have been a vernacular architectural building type commonly seen in urban Southeast Asia. As the name suggests, each shophouse comprises a shop on the ground floor with a public arcade (also called five-foot-way) and residential accommodation upstairs. Shophouses typically abut each other to form rows with regular façade and shared party walls.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages but great depths. To facilitate better circulation and natural lighting, each shophouse incorporates an internal courtyard. In addition, large windows, often wall to ceiling, dominates the façade of the upper storeys fronting the streets.

 

This hybrid building architecture is commonly found in the historical centers of many towns and cities across Southeast Asia. In Singapore, rapid economic development over the last few decades and the scarcity of land saw many of such shophouses making way for high rise office towers, shopping malls and housing blocks. Today, most of the remaining shophouses in Singapore are gazette under conservation schemes.

 

Shophouses have been a vernacular architectural building type commonly seen in urban Southeast Asia. As the name suggests, each shophouse comprises a shop on the ground floor with a public arcade (also called five-foot-way) and residential accommodation upstairs. Shophouses typically abut each other to form rows with regular façade and shared party walls.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages but great depths. To facilitate better circulation and natural lighting, each shophouse incorporates an internal courtyard. In addition, large windows, often wall to ceiling, dominates the façade of the upper storeys fronting the streets.

 

This hybrid building architecture is commonly found in the historical centers of many towns and cities across Southeast Asia. In Singapore, rapid economic development over the last few decades and the scarcity of land saw many of such shophouses making way for high rise office towers, shopping malls and housing blocks. Today, most of the remaining shophouses in Singapore are gazette under conservation schemes.

 

Row of shophouses starting at Harp Hoe Agricultural Hardware.

 

A shophouse is a vernacular architectural building type that is commonly seen in areas such as urban Southeast Asia. Shophouses are mostly two or three stories high. Typically, they consist of a shop on the ground floor, which opens up to a public arcade or ‘five foot way’, with residential accommodation above. This hybrid building form characterises the historical centres of most towns and cities in the Southeast Asia region.

 

Five foot ways are pedestrian walkways indented into the ground floor of a building from the road, so that the overhanging upper floors can provide a cover to shield pedestrians from the sun and rain. This feature can be found in many shophouses (and buildings of similar structural design) all over the world.

 

Information sourced from Wikipedia: Shophouse and Five foot way

 

Although a significant number of shophouses have been demolished during the 20th century, to make way for new development…, many fine examples can still be found in Malaysia’s cities and towns, and also Singapore.

  

Stereotype-bashing. A building that blends the attractive features of a townhouse; the efficiency and affordability of walk-ups;

and the urbanity of an apartment building with concealed parking.

Shophouses have been a vernacular architectural building type commonly seen in urban Southeast Asia. As the name suggests, each shophouse comprises a shop on the ground floor with a public arcade (also called five-foot-way) and residential accommodation upstairs. Shophouses typically abut each other to form rows with regular façade and shared party walls.

 

Shophouses have narrow street frontages but great depths. To facilitate better circulation and natural lighting, each shophouse incorporates an internal courtyard. In addition, large windows, often wall to ceiling, dominates the façade of the upper storeys fronting the streets.

 

This hybrid building architecture is commonly found in the historical centers of many towns and cities across Southeast Asia. In Singapore, rapid economic development over the last few decades and the scarcity of land saw many of such shophouses making way for high rise office towers, shopping malls and housing blocks. Today, most of the remaining shophouses in Singapore are gazette under conservation schemes.

 

The Backyard is an ambitious $250 million self sustaining development project on 60 acres in Bee Cave proposed by IDM. The project will be powered by innovative technology such as Bloom solid oxide fuel cell, Capstone microturbine, geothermal and tri-generation plant to achieve high energy efficiency. Bercy Chen Studio is currently working on master planning the site and designing four state of the art new Class A office buildings, two main office/ garage hybrid buildings, three data centers as well as four central plant structures. Hotel by DCA & amphitheaters by SBV.

Shophouses have been a vernacular architectural building type commonly seen in urban Southeast Asia. As the name suggests, each shophouse comprises a shop on the ground floor with a public arcade (also called five-foot-way) and residential accommodation upstairs. Shophouses typically abut each other to form rows with regular façade and shared party walls.

 

This hybrid building architecture is commonly found in the historical centers of many towns and cities across Southeast Asia. In Singapore, rapid economic development over the last few decades and the scarcity of land saw many of such shophouses making way for high rise office towers, shopping malls and housing blocks. Today, most of the remaining shophouses in Singapore are gazetted under conservation schemes.

 

Hybrid Building: Final Model, Idea Sketches, and Interior Rendering by Kelsey Lee, 2012 Silver Medal

Santiago de Chile Wine Museum 2010. Arquitectum.com Honorable Mention. Team: Marco Sosa and Pierre Berrú

 

Vinyards resemble the patterns found in native Chilean textiles, one of the country’s most important folkloric mildstones. Just as the threads of these textiles weave the country’s identity, vineyards have become the interlacing force that adds a new layer of richness to Chile’s culture.

 

Physically, the vineyards weave and intertwine the natural environment of the valleys and the mountains with the Chilean urban context, since they are located near villages or important cities like Santiago. Symbollically, this merging represents the natural and artificial process of wine making that results in an outstanding harmoniously tasteful product.

 

Therefore, this project seeks the natural intervention of Cerro San Cristóbal into the urban fabric of Santiago, to combine and transform them into a hybrid building that responds positively to the city and the national park. The museum develops with the site’s slope, elevating most of its spaces as floating slabs that leave the ground below intact. They are supported by an exoskeleton that carries louvers that born from the ground and pull the natural environment into the museum, by creating a playful mix of outside-inside walkthroughs that make the visitors feel embraced by both wildlife and the city’s skyline.

 

Along the interweaving, the visitors can have a sensorial experience of wine making as an evolution of indoor spaces and terraces: starting their journey from the sinous wooden louvers that recall the landscape formed by vineyards; passing through the underground and upper exhibition spaces that mimic wine cellars; up to the wine tasting and skybar areas where the promenade ends with the actual finished product of wine.

 

Architect: Steven Holl

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