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The dairy at Uppark, Sussex, designed by Humphry Repton. When Sir Harry Fetherstonhaugh passed by one day... he heard the dairymaid's assistant, Mary Ann Bullock, singing. Sir Harry presented himself and asked for her hand in marriage. Mary Ann Bullock, aged twenty-one, was sent to Paris to be educated before being married to Sir Harry in September 1825.

 

Most of my photos are very subtle HDR's. This is much harder than I normally do, but I feel the subject can take it.

Sheffield Park Garden is an informal landscape garden five miles east of Haywards Heath, in East Sussex, England. It was originally laid out in the 18th century by Capability Brown, and further developed in the early years of the 20th century by its then owner, Arthur Gilstrap Soames. It is now owned by the National Trust.

 

The gardens originally formed part of the estate of the adjacent Sheffield Park House, a gothic country house, which is still in private ownership. It was also firstly owned by the West Family and later by the Soames family until in 1925 the estate was sold by Arthur Granville Soames, who had inherited it from his childless uncle, Arthur Gilstrap Soames.

 

Sheffield Park as an estate is mentioned in the Domesday Book. In August 1538, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, entertained Henry VIII here. By 1700, the Deer Park had been partially formalised by Lord De La Warr who planted avenues of trees radiating from the house and cleared areas to establish lawns. In the late 1700s, James Wyatt remodelled the house in the fashionable Gothic style and Capability Brown was commissioned to landscape the garden. The original four lakes form the centrepiece. Humphry Repton followed Brown in 1789–1790. In 1796, the estate was sold to John Holroyd, created Baron Sheffield in 1781. It is particularly noted for its plantings of trees selected for autumn colour, including many Black Tupelos.

 

By 1885, an arboretum was being established, consisting of both exotic and native trees. After Arthur Gilstrap Soames purchased the estate in 1910, he continued large-scale planting. During World War II the house and garden became the headquarters for a Canadian armoured division, and Nissen huts were sited in the garden and woods. The estate was split up and sold in lots in 1953. The National Trust purchased approximately 40 ha in 1954, now up to 80 ha with subsequent additions. It is home to the National Collection of Ghent azaleas.

 

In 1876 the third Earl of Sheffield laid out a cricket pitch. It was used on 12 May 1884 for the first cricket match between England and Australia. The Australian team won by an innings and 6 runs.

        

Sheffield Park is a beautiful 120 acre woodland garden originally designed for the first Earl of Sheffield by Humphry Repton and Capability Brown in the 18th century

Sheffield Park Garden is an informal landscape garden five miles east of Haywards Heath, in East Sussex, England. It was originally laid out in the 18th century by Capability Brown, and further developed in the early years of the 20th century by its then owner, Arthur Gilstrap Soames. It is now owned by the National Trust.

 

The gardens originally formed part of the estate of the adjacent Sheffield Park House, a gothic country house, which is still in private ownership. It was also firstly owned by the West Family and later by the Soames family until in 1925 the estate was sold by Arthur Granville Soames, who had inherited it from his childless uncle, Arthur Gilstrap Soames.

 

Sheffield Park as an estate is mentioned in the Domesday Book. In August 1538, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, entertained Henry VIII here. By 1700, the Deer Park had been partially formalised by Lord De La Warr who planted avenues of trees radiating from the house and cleared areas to establish lawns. In the late 1700s, James Wyatt remodelled the house in the fashionable Gothic style and Capability Brown was commissioned to landscape the garden. The original four lakes form the centrepiece. Humphry Repton followed Brown in 1789–1790. In 1796, the estate was sold to John Holroyd, created Baron Sheffield in 1781. It is particularly noted for its plantings of trees selected for autumn colour, including many Black Tupelos.

 

By 1885, an arboretum was being established, consisting of both exotic and native trees. After Arthur Gilstrap Soames purchased the estate in 1910, he continued large-scale planting. During World War II the house and garden became the headquarters for a Canadian armoured division, and Nissen huts were sited in the garden and woods. The estate was split up and sold in lots in 1953. The National Trust purchased approximately 40 ha in 1954, now up to 80 ha with subsequent additions. It is home to the National Collection of Ghent azaleas.

 

In 1876 the third Earl of Sheffield laid out a cricket pitch. It was used on 12 May 1884 for the first cricket match between England and Australia. The Australian team won by an innings and 6 runs.

 

www.nationaltrust.org.uk/sheffield-park-and-garden

Sheffield Park Garden is an informal landscape garden five miles east of Haywards Heath, in East Sussex, England. It was originally laid out in the 18th century by Capability Brown, and further developed in the early years of the 20th century by its then owner, Arthur Gilstrap Soames. It is now owned by the National Trust.

 

The gardens originally formed part of the estate of the adjacent Sheffield Park House, a gothic country house, which is still in private ownership. It was also firstly owned by the West Family and later by the Soames family until in 1925 the estate was sold by Arthur Granville Soames, who had inherited it from his childless uncle, Arthur Gilstrap Soames.

 

Sheffield Park as an estate is mentioned in the Domesday Book. In August 1538, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, entertained Henry VIII here. By 1700, the Deer Park had been partially formalised by Lord De La Warr who planted avenues of trees radiating from the house and cleared areas to establish lawns. In the late 1700s, James Wyatt remodelled the house in the fashionable Gothic style and Capability Brown was commissioned to landscape the garden. The original four lakes form the centrepiece. Humphry Repton followed Brown in 1789–1790. In 1796, the estate was sold to John Holroyd, created Baron Sheffield in 1781. It is particularly noted for its plantings of trees selected for autumn colour, including many Black Tupelos.

 

By 1885, an arboretum was being established, consisting of both exotic and native trees. After Arthur Gilstrap Soames purchased the estate in 1910, he continued large-scale planting. During World War II the house and garden became the headquarters for a Canadian armoured division, and Nissen huts were sited in the garden and woods. The estate was split up and sold in lots in 1953. The National Trust purchased approximately 40 ha in 1954, now up to 80 ha with subsequent additions. It is home to the National Collection of Ghent azaleas.

 

In 1876 the third Earl of Sheffield laid out a cricket pitch. It was used on 12 May 1884 for the first cricket match between England and Australia. The Australian team won by an innings and 6 runs.

 

www.nationaltrust.org.uk/sheffield-park-and-garden

Sheffield Park Garden is an informal landscape garden five miles east of Haywards Heath, in East Sussex, England. It was originally laid out in the 18th century by Capability Brown, and further developed in the early years of the 20th century by its then owner, Arthur Gilstrap Soames. It is now owned by the National Trust.

 

The gardens originally formed part of the estate of the adjacent Sheffield Park House, a gothic country house, which is still in private ownership. It was also firstly owned by the West Family and later by the Soames family until in 1925 the estate was sold by Arthur Granville Soames, who had inherited it from his childless uncle, Arthur Gilstrap Soames.

 

Sheffield Park as an estate is mentioned in the Domesday Book. In August 1538, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, entertained Henry VIII here. By 1700, the Deer Park had been partially formalised by Lord De La Warr who planted avenues of trees radiating from the house and cleared areas to establish lawns. In the late 1700s, James Wyatt remodelled the house in the fashionable Gothic style and Capability Brown was commissioned to landscape the garden. The original four lakes form the centrepiece. Humphry Repton followed Brown in 1789–1790. In 1796, the estate was sold to John Holroyd, created Baron Sheffield in 1781. It is particularly noted for its plantings of trees selected for autumn colour, including many Black Tupelos.

 

By 1885, an arboretum was being established, consisting of both exotic and native trees. After Arthur Gilstrap Soames purchased the estate in 1910, he continued large-scale planting. During World War II the house and garden became the headquarters for a Canadian armoured division, and Nissen huts were sited in the garden and woods. The estate was split up and sold in lots in 1953. The National Trust purchased approximately 40 ha in 1954, now up to 80 ha with subsequent additions. It is home to the National Collection of Ghent azaleas.

 

In 1876 the third Earl of Sheffield laid out a cricket pitch. It was used on 12 May 1884 for the first cricket match between England and Australia. The Australian team won by an innings and 6 runs.

Sheffield Park Garden is an informal landscape garden five miles east of Haywards Heath, in East Sussex, England. It was originally laid out in the 18th century by Capability Brown, and further developed in the early years of the 20th century by its then owner, Arthur Gilstrap Soames. It is now owned by the National Trust.

 

The gardens originally formed part of the estate of the adjacent Sheffield Park House, a gothic country house, which is still in private ownership. It was also firstly owned by the West Family and later by the Soames family until in 1925 the estate was sold by Arthur Granville Soames, who had inherited it from his childless uncle, Arthur Gilstrap Soames.

 

Sheffield Park as an estate is mentioned in the Domesday Book. In August 1538, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, entertained Henry VIII here. By 1700, the Deer Park had been partially formalised by Lord De La Warr who planted avenues of trees radiating from the house and cleared areas to establish lawns. In the late 1700s, James Wyatt remodelled the house in the fashionable Gothic style and Capability Brown was commissioned to landscape the garden. The original four lakes form the centrepiece. Humphry Repton followed Brown in 1789–1790. In 1796, the estate was sold to John Holroyd, created Baron Sheffield in 1781. It is particularly noted for its plantings of trees selected for autumn colour, including many Black Tupelos.

 

By 1885, an arboretum was being established, consisting of both exotic and native trees. After Arthur Gilstrap Soames purchased the estate in 1910, he continued large-scale planting. During World War II the house and garden became the headquarters for a Canadian armoured division, and Nissen huts were sited in the garden and woods. The estate was split up and sold in lots in 1953. The National Trust purchased approximately 40 ha in 1954, now up to 80 ha with subsequent additions. It is home to the National Collection of Ghent azaleas.

 

In 1876 the third Earl of Sheffield laid out a cricket pitch. It was used on 12 May 1884 for the first cricket match between England and Australia. The Australian team won by an innings and 6 runs.

 

www.nationaltrust.org.uk/sheffield-park-and-garden

Blaise Castle Estate, Bristol

Shots around the gardens of Blickling Hall. On a nice sunny afternoon. A day when planes started flying again, so I noticed a lot of noisey planes flying over head.

 

I had got used to the peace and quite without them.

 

This is the Doric Temple at Blickling Hall.

 

The Doric Temple is Grade II* listed.

 

Garden temple. Early/mid C18, probably by Matthew Brettingham senior, with

later alterations by Humphry or John Adey Repton. Gault brick with stone

and stucco dressings, shallow-pitched sheet copper roof. One storey,

rectangular plan. Steps up to portico on west; Doric distyle in antis.

Frieze with triglyphs and decorated metopes below pediment. Semicircular

arched openings to north and south with stone handrail and balustrade. Coved

portico ceiling on cornice, central flat panel with fret decoration to border.

Central doorway, 2-leaf door with six raised and fielded panels, moulded

architrave, pediment on pulvinated frieze. Two blind niches with semicircular

heads flank doorway. Frieze carried around north and south walls as a plain

band. East wall has three tall sashes with glazing bars, divided by brick

Doric pilasters. Frieze of triglyphs and metopes, the metopes decorated with

alternating ringed bulls and scrolled initials with crown. Interior: west

doorway has pedimented surround matching that on the exterior. Moulded chair

rail. In the north wall, a fireplace with eared and scrolled surround.

Elaborate cornice to ceiling. Ref: "Blickling Hall" The National Trust 1985.

 

Doric Temple, Blickling Hall - Heritage Gateway

 

Arches close up shots.

Sheffield Park is a beautiful 120 acre woodland garden originally designed for the first Earl of Sheffield by Humphry Repton and Capability Brown in the 18th century

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

This baptismal font made of 22 karat gold (the only known gold font made for private use in England) for the third duke of Portland, William Cavendish-Bentinck, in 1797 on the occasion of the birth of his first grandson William Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck (but who died before his father and never became the fifth duke of that name) in 1796. The font was designed by Humphry Repton (primarily a landscape architect and by many considered the successor of Capability Brown). The design was then executed by the goldsmith firm of Paul Storr. The font depicts Faith (the woman with the cross), Hope (the woman with the anchor) and Charity (who can't be seen properly here, but is represented by a woman with three children).

Sheffield Park Garden is an informal landscape garden five miles east of Haywards Heath, in East Sussex, England. It was originally laid out in the 18th century by Capability Brown, and further developed in the early years of the 20th century by its then owner, Arthur Gilstrap Soames. It is now owned by the National Trust.

 

The gardens originally formed part of the estate of the adjacent Sheffield Park House, a gothic country house, which is still in private ownership. It was also firstly owned by the West Family and later by the Soames family until in 1925 the estate was sold by Arthur Granville Soames, who had inherited it from his childless uncle, Arthur Gilstrap Soames.

 

Sheffield Park as an estate is mentioned in the Domesday Book. In August 1538, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, entertained Henry VIII here. By 1700, the Deer Park had been partially formalised by Lord De La Warr who planted avenues of trees radiating from the house and cleared areas to establish lawns. In the late 1700s, James Wyatt remodelled the house in the fashionable Gothic style and Capability Brown was commissioned to landscape the garden. The original four lakes form the centrepiece. Humphry Repton followed Brown in 1789–1790. In 1796, the estate was sold to John Holroyd, created Baron Sheffield in 1781. It is particularly noted for its plantings of trees selected for autumn colour, including many Black Tupelos.

 

By 1885, an arboretum was being established, consisting of both exotic and native trees. After Arthur Gilstrap Soames purchased the estate in 1910, he continued large-scale planting. During World War II the house and garden became the headquarters for a Canadian armoured division, and Nissen huts were sited in the garden and woods. The estate was split up and sold in lots in 1953. The National Trust purchased approximately 40 ha in 1954, now up to 80 ha with subsequent additions. It is home to the National Collection of Ghent azaleas.

 

In 1876 the third Earl of Sheffield laid out a cricket pitch. It was used on 12 May 1884 for the first cricket match between England and Australia. The Australian team won by an innings and 6 runs.

This ancient oak tree was planted to mark the boundry between the parishes of Wroxeter and Atcham in the 1300's

this tree started life in the reign of King Edward ||| (1327-1377)

it stands proudly in the deer park at Attingham Park Estate

a fence has been put round it to protect it against the wildlife.

The tree is named after Humphry Repton who landscaped the park in 1797.

Sheffield Park is a beautiful 120 acre woodland garden originally designed for the first Earl of Sheffield by Humphry Repton and Capability Brown in the 18th century

A look around Warley Woods in Warley, Smethwick, Sandwell. Not far from Bearwood and Lightwoods Park. I headed here to find The Big Sleuth bear that is here.

  

Warley Woods

 

Warley Woods (sometimes known as Warley Park, or Warley Woods Park) is a 100-acre (40 ha) public park in the Warley district of Smethwick, in Sandwell, in the West Midlands of England, originally laid out by Humphry Repton. It has been grade II listed by English Heritage in their Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of special historic interest since September 1994.

  

The park lies approximately 3 miles (5 km) west of the Birmingham City Centre and occupies a small valley north of the A456 road between Birmingham and Halesowen, just outside the city boundary.

 

Approximately one-third of the site is mature woodland. The western part of the park is given over to a nine-hole golf course. The small stream which once ran though the site is now filled in. The park holds a Green Flag Award.

  

The estate which now forms the park was purchased by Samuel Galton, Jr., then living at nearby Great Barr Hall, in the 1790s. At the time, it was in Worcestershire. He commissioned Humphry Repton to landscape the fieldsand ordered the building of a new house to designs by the architect, Robert Lugar, in gothic style. The house was occupied by his son Hubert, in 1819.The land was purchased by Birmingham City Council in 1902 and opened as a park in 1906.

 

Repton first visited the site in 1794. His designs, in the form of a Red Book typical of his work, and submitted in March 1795, are now held by Sandwell Archives. They were largely complied with, albeit some modifications were made.

 

The house, known locally as "Warley Abbey", despite having no religious function, was demolished in 1957.

  

The park is now managed by Warley Woods Community Trust, a voluntary organisation and registered charity which leases the land from Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council, who in turn lease it from Birmingham City Council. At the tine of the Trust's creation it was the only charity in England to have responsibility for an Urban Park. It holds the park on a 99-year lease. The park is governed its own set of byelaws.

 

The trust operates a building, The Pavilion, at the southern end of the park. This houses the trust's offices, a cafe, a public meeting room, toilets, and a golf shop. Another of the park's features is a drinking fountain installed in 1907. This was restored in 2009.

 

The Trust's patrons are the actors Julie Walters and Colin Buchanan, the DJ and Presenter Stuart Maconie and local historian Carl Chinn.

Blaise Castle Estate, Bristol

Sheffield Park is a beautiful 120 acre woodland garden originally designed for the first Earl of Sheffield by Humphry Repton and Capability Brown in the 18th century

A path amidst the avenue of lime trees disappears off some 800m into the distance in Trent Park, Enfield.

 

Trent Park dates back to the 14th century when it was a part of Enfield Chase, one of Henry IV's hunting grounds. It was named Trent Park In 1777 when King George III leased the site to Sir Richard Jebb, his favourite doctor, as a reward for saving the life of the King's younger brother, the then Duke of Gloucester. Jebb chose the name Trent, because it was in Trent, Italy, that the King's brother had been saved.

 

In 1909 the estate was sold to Philip Sassoon (cousin of the poet Siegfried Sassoon), who entertained many notable guests here, including Charlie Chaplin and Winston Churchill. Trent Park House was rebuilt for him by Philip Tilden, beginning in 1923.

 

During WWII, the house was initially an interrogation facility for captured German officers and later became the core of the Cockfosters Cage, a special POW camp for German Generals and staff officers. Bomber Command's attacks on the Peenemunde rocket research facility were based on intelligence initially acquired here when German conversations were captured by hidden microphones.

 

After the war, the House became an educational facility, which eventually became Middlesex University in 1992. It closed in 2012.

 

The 320-acre park opened to the public as a country park in 1973. It includes publicly-accessible countryside, farmland, a golf course and an equestrian centre. Some of the grounds were attractively landscaped by Humphry Repton in the English manner. Features of the original landscaping that can still be seen include the impressive avenue of lime trees (above), an obelisk, ornamental lakes and a water garden (which was renovated in the 1990s).

Sheringham Park on a very fine day (unlike today - hence I'm indoors on PC, not out with the camera!).

A look around Warley Woods in Warley, Smethwick, Sandwell. Not far from Bearwood and Lightwoods Park. I headed here to find The Big Sleuth bear that is here.

  

Warley Woods

 

Warley Woods (sometimes known as Warley Park, or Warley Woods Park) is a 100-acre (40 ha) public park in the Warley district of Smethwick, in Sandwell, in the West Midlands of England, originally laid out by Humphry Repton. It has been grade II listed by English Heritage in their Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of special historic interest since September 1994.

  

The park lies approximately 3 miles (5 km) west of the Birmingham City Centre and occupies a small valley north of the A456 road between Birmingham and Halesowen, just outside the city boundary.

 

Approximately one-third of the site is mature woodland. The western part of the park is given over to a nine-hole golf course. The small stream which once ran though the site is now filled in. The park holds a Green Flag Award.

  

The estate which now forms the park was purchased by Samuel Galton, Jr., then living at nearby Great Barr Hall, in the 1790s. At the time, it was in Worcestershire. He commissioned Humphry Repton to landscape the fieldsand ordered the building of a new house to designs by the architect, Robert Lugar, in gothic style. The house was occupied by his son Hubert, in 1819.The land was purchased by Birmingham City Council in 1902 and opened as a park in 1906.

 

Repton first visited the site in 1794. His designs, in the form of a Red Book typical of his work, and submitted in March 1795, are now held by Sandwell Archives. They were largely complied with, albeit some modifications were made.

 

The house, known locally as "Warley Abbey", despite having no religious function, was demolished in 1957.

  

The park is now managed by Warley Woods Community Trust, a voluntary organisation and registered charity which leases the land from Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council, who in turn lease it from Birmingham City Council. At the tine of the Trust's creation it was the only charity in England to have responsibility for an Urban Park. It holds the park on a 99-year lease. The park is governed its own set of byelaws.

 

The trust operates a building, The Pavilion, at the southern end of the park. This houses the trust's offices, a cafe, a public meeting room, toilets, and a golf shop. Another of the park's features is a drinking fountain installed in 1907. This was restored in 2009.

 

The Trust's patrons are the actors Julie Walters and Colin Buchanan, the DJ and Presenter Stuart Maconie and local historian Carl Chinn.

‘It Was Only a Winters Day’ is the title for this snow scene taken in the grounds of the Woburn Abbey Estate in Bedfordshire.

Woburn Abbey, steeped in vast amounts of history, has been the home of the Dukes of Bedford for nearly 400 years, with many of the previous residents having interesting and colourful pasts.

Woburn Abbey was originally a religious house for a group of Cistercian Monks, dating back to 1145.

Humphry Repton was asked by the 6th Duke of Bedford in 1802, to landscape the park, much as it appears today, with his original plans and sketches still kept at Woburn.

 

‘That Autumn Light, is the title for this picture taken in the grounds of the Woburn Abbey Estate in Bedfordshire.

Woburn Abbey, steeped in vast amounts of history, has been the home of the Dukes of Bedford for nearly 400 years, with many of the previous residents having interesting and colourful pasts.

Woburn Abbey was originally a religious house for a group of Cistercian Monks, dating back to 1145.

Humphry Repton was asked by the 6th Duke of Bedford in 1802, to landscape the park, much as it appears today, with his original plans and sketches still kept at Woburn.

 

Sheffield Park is a beautiful 120 acre woodland garden originally designed for the first Earl of Sheffield by Humphry Repton and Capability Brown in the 18th century

Kenwood House, Hampstead, English Heritage, Art Collection of Edward Guinness, 1st Earl Iveagh (1847-1927)

A slightly unusual Bristol 'then and now' here in the form of paintings from more than 200 years ago. This is the view from Royal Fort House looking over Bristol (see notes for some of the landmarks). Top view comes from 1799. At the bottom is how it was planned to look after landscaping had taken place.

 

Royal Fort House - these days owned by Bristol University - had been built forty years previously. Around 1800 Colonel Thomas Tyndall employed Humphry Repton (1752-1818) to landscape the gardens, which formed a small part of Tyndall’s Park, a large area which extended to Whiteladies Road in the west, Park Row in the south and Cotham Hill to the north. Over the years large parts of the park were sold for housing development. Only a small part of the original area remains, in the form of the modern day Royal Fort Gardens. The siting of drives in the Royal Fort park is still reflected in street plans today.

 

In its heyday, when viewed from Royal Fort House, Repton's design - which adhered to 'English Landscape' techniques - produced the effect of an uninterrupted naturalistic landscape rolling down to the river and away to the distant hills. Public pathways were redirected and hidden below retaining walls, while trees and shrubs were used to soften the view of the city and to screen the 'unsightly rows of houses'.

 

Repton famously produced a 'Red Book' for his prospective customers. This contained his 'before and after' paintings. There would be an illustration depicting the existing scene (upper picture), while the proposed landscape would be superimposed on the same painting when a panel was turned over (lower picture).

The dairy at Uppark, West Sussex, designed by Humphry Repton. When Sir Harry Fetherstonhaugh passed by one day... he heard the dairymaid's assistant, Mary Ann Bullock, singing. Sir Harry presented himself and asked for her hand in marriage. Mary Ann Bullock, aged twenty-one, was sent to Paris to be educated before being married to Sir Harry in September 1825. He left the entire estate to her on his death in 1846

‘Good day until tomorrow’ is the title for this sunset taken on the outskirts of the Woburn Abbey Estate in Bedfordshire.

Woburn Abbey, steeped in vast amounts of history, has been the home of the Dukes of Bedford for nearly 400 years, with many of the previous residents having interesting and colourful pasts.

Woburn Abbey was originally a religious house for a group of Cistercian Monks, dating back to 1145.

Humphry Repton was asked by the 6th Duke of Bedford in 1802, to landscape the park, much as it appears today, with his original plans and sketches still kept at Woburn.

 

Shots around the gardens of Blickling Hall. On a nice sunny afternoon. A day when planes started flying again, so I noticed a lot of noisey planes flying over head.

 

I had got used to the peace and quite without them.

 

This is a green house in an area of Blickling Hall called the Orangery.

 

It was quite hot inside here, well it is a greenhouse! I heard planes flying over, quite loud in here, so went back outside to get shots of the planes with there trails.

 

I'm not sure, but is this meant to be Mary and Jesus?

 

The Orangery is Grade II listed.

  

Orangery, late C18. Probably designed by Humphry Repton. Stuccoed brick

with shallow pitched copper roof. One storey, rectangular plan. South facade

of nine bays, in each end bay an entrance set slightly forward under a

pediment. 2-leaf glazed doors flanked by sidelights, all with glazing bars.

Fluted frieze with paterae over doorheads with consoles below. Segmental

fanlights with fine decorative glazing bars. Coade stone bands with guilloche

moulding to arch imposts. Between the entrances, seven bays of tall sashes

with glazing bars, divided by Doric pilasters. Rear wall of red brick with

four high-level 4-light windows, off-centre doorway. Interior: simple moulded

cornices to ceilings. Statue of Hercules c.1640 by Nicholas Stone, originally

at Oxnead Hall. Ref: "Blickling Hall" The National Trust 1985.

 

The Orangery, Blickling Hall - Heritage Gateway

Shots around the gardens of Blickling Hall. On a nice sunny afternoon. A day when planes started flying again, so I noticed a lot of noisey planes flying over head.

 

I had got used to the peace and quite without them.

 

This is a green house in an area of Blickling Hall called the Orangery.

 

It was quite hot inside here, well it is a greenhouse! I heard planes flying over, quite loud in here, so went back outside to get shots of the planes with there trails.

 

A statue of Hercules inside the Orangery dating from 1640 by Nicholas Stone.

 

The Orangery is Grade II listed.

  

Orangery, late C18. Probably designed by Humphry Repton. Stuccoed brick

with shallow pitched copper roof. One storey, rectangular plan. South facade

of nine bays, in each end bay an entrance set slightly forward under a

pediment. 2-leaf glazed doors flanked by sidelights, all with glazing bars.

Fluted frieze with paterae over doorheads with consoles below. Segmental

fanlights with fine decorative glazing bars. Coade stone bands with guilloche

moulding to arch imposts. Between the entrances, seven bays of tall sashes

with glazing bars, divided by Doric pilasters. Rear wall of red brick with

four high-level 4-light windows, off-centre doorway. Interior: simple moulded

cornices to ceilings. Statue of Hercules c.1640 by Nicholas Stone, originally

at Oxnead Hall. Ref: "Blickling Hall" The National Trust 1985.

 

The Orangery, Blickling Hall - Heritage Gateway

Shots around the gardens of Blickling Hall. On a nice sunny afternoon. A day when planes started flying again, so I noticed a lot of noisey planes flying over head.

 

I had got used to the peace and quite without them.

 

This is a green house in an area of Blickling Hall called the Orangery.

 

It was quite hot inside here, well it is a greenhouse! I heard planes flying over, quite loud in here, so went back outside to get shots of the planes with there trails.

 

Lying down is the statue of Diana the Huntress, minus the head. I didn't realise that it was a statue. It looked to me more like a log of wood. It is damaged.

 

The Orangery is Grade II listed.

  

Orangery, late C18. Probably designed by Humphry Repton. Stuccoed brick

with shallow pitched copper roof. One storey, rectangular plan. South facade

of nine bays, in each end bay an entrance set slightly forward under a

pediment. 2-leaf glazed doors flanked by sidelights, all with glazing bars.

Fluted frieze with paterae over doorheads with consoles below. Segmental

fanlights with fine decorative glazing bars. Coade stone bands with guilloche

moulding to arch imposts. Between the entrances, seven bays of tall sashes

with glazing bars, divided by Doric pilasters. Rear wall of red brick with

four high-level 4-light windows, off-centre doorway. Interior: simple moulded

cornices to ceilings. Statue of Hercules c.1640 by Nicholas Stone, originally

at Oxnead Hall. Ref: "Blickling Hall" The National Trust 1985.

 

The Orangery, Blickling Hall - Heritage Gateway

Shots around the gardens of Blickling Hall. On a nice sunny afternoon. A day when planes started flying again, so I noticed a lot of noisey planes flying over head.

 

I had got used to the peace and quite without them.

 

This is a green house in an area of Blickling Hall called the Orangery.

 

It was quite hot inside here, well it is a greenhouse! I heard planes flying over, quite loud in here, so went back outside to get shots of the planes with there trails.

 

Fruit trees inside the Orangery - including orange, grapefruit, lemon and lime trees.

 

The Orangery is Grade II listed.

  

Orangery, late C18. Probably designed by Humphry Repton. Stuccoed brick

with shallow pitched copper roof. One storey, rectangular plan. South facade

of nine bays, in each end bay an entrance set slightly forward under a

pediment. 2-leaf glazed doors flanked by sidelights, all with glazing bars.

Fluted frieze with paterae over doorheads with consoles below. Segmental

fanlights with fine decorative glazing bars. Coade stone bands with guilloche

moulding to arch imposts. Between the entrances, seven bays of tall sashes

with glazing bars, divided by Doric pilasters. Rear wall of red brick with

four high-level 4-light windows, off-centre doorway. Interior: simple moulded

cornices to ceilings. Statue of Hercules c.1640 by Nicholas Stone, originally

at Oxnead Hall. Ref: "Blickling Hall" The National Trust 1985.

 

The Orangery, Blickling Hall - Heritage Gateway

Shots around the gardens of Blickling Hall. On a nice sunny afternoon. A day when planes started flying again, so I noticed a lot of noisey planes flying over head.

 

I had got used to the peace and quite without them.

 

Took these shots while waiting for these pensioners to move out of the way of the Doric Temple. Once they moved I got my clean shots of the temple.

 

The Doric Temple is Grade II* listed.

 

Garden temple. Early/mid C18, probably by Matthew Brettingham senior, with

later alterations by Humphry or John Adey Repton. Gault brick with stone

and stucco dressings, shallow-pitched sheet copper roof. One storey,

rectangular plan. Steps up to portico on west; Doric distyle in antis.

Frieze with triglyphs and decorated metopes below pediment. Semicircular

arched openings to north and south with stone handrail and balustrade. Coved

portico ceiling on cornice, central flat panel with fret decoration to border.

Central doorway, 2-leaf door with six raised and fielded panels, moulded

architrave, pediment on pulvinated frieze. Two blind niches with semicircular

heads flank doorway. Frieze carried around north and south walls as a plain

band. East wall has three tall sashes with glazing bars, divided by brick

Doric pilasters. Frieze of triglyphs and metopes, the metopes decorated with

alternating ringed bulls and scrolled initials with crown. Interior: west

doorway has pedimented surround matching that on the exterior. Moulded chair

rail. In the north wall, a fireplace with eared and scrolled surround.

Elaborate cornice to ceiling. Ref: "Blickling Hall" The National Trust 1985.

 

Doric Temple, Blickling Hall - Heritage Gateway

Kenwood House, Hampstead, English Heritage, Art Collection of Edward Guinness, 1st Earl Iveagh (1847-1927)

Sheffield Park Garden is an informal landscape garden five miles east of Haywards Heath, in East Sussex, England. It was originally laid out in the 18th century by Capability Brown, and further developed in the early years of the 20th century by its then owner, Arthur Gilstrap Soames. It is now owned by the National Trust.

 

The gardens originally formed part of the estate of the adjacent Sheffield Park House, a gothic country house, which is still in private ownership. It was also firstly owned by the West Family and later by the Soames family until in 1925 the estate was sold by Arthur Granville Soames, who had inherited it from his childless uncle, Arthur Gilstrap Soames.

 

Sheffield Park as an estate is mentioned in the Domesday Book. In August 1538, Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, entertained Henry VIII here. By 1700, the Deer Park had been partially formalised by Lord De La Warr who planted avenues of trees radiating from the house and cleared areas to establish lawns. In the late 1700s, James Wyatt remodelled the house in the fashionable Gothic style and Capability Brown was commissioned to landscape the garden. The original four lakes form the centrepiece. Humphry Repton followed Brown in 1789–1790. In 1796, the estate was sold to John Holroyd, created Baron Sheffield in 1781. It is particularly noted for its plantings of trees selected for autumn colour, including many Black Tupelos.

 

By 1885, an arboretum was being established, consisting of both exotic and native trees. After Arthur Gilstrap Soames purchased the estate in 1910, he continued large-scale planting. During World War II the house and garden became the headquarters for a Canadian armoured division, and Nissen huts were sited in the garden and woods. The estate was split up and sold in lots in 1953. The National Trust purchased approximately 40 ha in 1954, now up to 80 ha with subsequent additions. It is home to the National Collection of Ghent azaleas.

 

In 1876 the third Earl of Sheffield laid out a cricket pitch. It was used on 12 May 1884 for the first cricket match between England and Australia. The Australian team won by an innings and 6 runs.

Shots around the gardens of Blickling Hall. On a nice sunny afternoon. A day when planes started flying again, so I noticed a lot of noisey planes flying over head.

 

I had got used to the peace and quite without them.

 

This is the Doric Temple at Blickling Hall.

 

The Doric Temple is Grade II* listed.

 

Garden temple. Early/mid C18, probably by Matthew Brettingham senior, with

later alterations by Humphry or John Adey Repton. Gault brick with stone

and stucco dressings, shallow-pitched sheet copper roof. One storey,

rectangular plan. Steps up to portico on west; Doric distyle in antis.

Frieze with triglyphs and decorated metopes below pediment. Semicircular

arched openings to north and south with stone handrail and balustrade. Coved

portico ceiling on cornice, central flat panel with fret decoration to border.

Central doorway, 2-leaf door with six raised and fielded panels, moulded

architrave, pediment on pulvinated frieze. Two blind niches with semicircular

heads flank doorway. Frieze carried around north and south walls as a plain

band. East wall has three tall sashes with glazing bars, divided by brick

Doric pilasters. Frieze of triglyphs and metopes, the metopes decorated with

alternating ringed bulls and scrolled initials with crown. Interior: west

doorway has pedimented surround matching that on the exterior. Moulded chair

rail. In the north wall, a fireplace with eared and scrolled surround.

Elaborate cornice to ceiling. Ref: "Blickling Hall" The National Trust 1985.

 

Doric Temple, Blickling Hall - Heritage Gateway

Shots around the gardens of Blickling Hall. On a nice sunny afternoon. A day when planes started flying again, so I noticed a lot of noisey planes flying over head.

 

I had got used to the peace and quite without them.

 

This is the Doric Temple at Blickling Hall.

 

The Doric Temple is Grade II* listed.

 

Garden temple. Early/mid C18, probably by Matthew Brettingham senior, with

later alterations by Humphry or John Adey Repton. Gault brick with stone

and stucco dressings, shallow-pitched sheet copper roof. One storey,

rectangular plan. Steps up to portico on west; Doric distyle in antis.

Frieze with triglyphs and decorated metopes below pediment. Semicircular

arched openings to north and south with stone handrail and balustrade. Coved

portico ceiling on cornice, central flat panel with fret decoration to border.

Central doorway, 2-leaf door with six raised and fielded panels, moulded

architrave, pediment on pulvinated frieze. Two blind niches with semicircular

heads flank doorway. Frieze carried around north and south walls as a plain

band. East wall has three tall sashes with glazing bars, divided by brick

Doric pilasters. Frieze of triglyphs and metopes, the metopes decorated with

alternating ringed bulls and scrolled initials with crown. Interior: west

doorway has pedimented surround matching that on the exterior. Moulded chair

rail. In the north wall, a fireplace with eared and scrolled surround.

Elaborate cornice to ceiling. Ref: "Blickling Hall" The National Trust 1985.

 

Doric Temple, Blickling Hall - Heritage Gateway

Shots around the gardens of Blickling Hall. On a nice sunny afternoon. A day when planes started flying again, so I noticed a lot of noisey planes flying over head.

 

I had got used to the peace and quite without them.

 

This is the Doric Temple at Blickling Hall.

 

The Doric Temple is Grade II* listed.

 

Garden temple. Early/mid C18, probably by Matthew Brettingham senior, with

later alterations by Humphry or John Adey Repton. Gault brick with stone

and stucco dressings, shallow-pitched sheet copper roof. One storey,

rectangular plan. Steps up to portico on west; Doric distyle in antis.

Frieze with triglyphs and decorated metopes below pediment. Semicircular

arched openings to north and south with stone handrail and balustrade. Coved

portico ceiling on cornice, central flat panel with fret decoration to border.

Central doorway, 2-leaf door with six raised and fielded panels, moulded

architrave, pediment on pulvinated frieze. Two blind niches with semicircular

heads flank doorway. Frieze carried around north and south walls as a plain

band. East wall has three tall sashes with glazing bars, divided by brick

Doric pilasters. Frieze of triglyphs and metopes, the metopes decorated with

alternating ringed bulls and scrolled initials with crown. Interior: west

doorway has pedimented surround matching that on the exterior. Moulded chair

rail. In the north wall, a fireplace with eared and scrolled surround.

Elaborate cornice to ceiling. Ref: "Blickling Hall" The National Trust 1985.

 

Doric Temple, Blickling Hall - Heritage Gateway

 

Inside the temple.

Shots around the gardens of Blickling Hall. On a nice sunny afternoon. A day when planes started flying again, so I noticed a lot of noisey planes flying over head.

 

I had got used to the peace and quite without them.

 

This is a green house in an area of Blickling Hall called the Orangery.

 

It was quite hot inside here, well it is a greenhouse! I heard planes flying over, quite loud in here, so went back outside to get shots of the planes with there trails.

 

Full shot of the green house, before we headed right to The Dell.

 

The Orangery is Grade II listed.

  

Orangery, late C18. Probably designed by Humphry Repton. Stuccoed brick

with shallow pitched copper roof. One storey, rectangular plan. South facade

of nine bays, in each end bay an entrance set slightly forward under a

pediment. 2-leaf glazed doors flanked by sidelights, all with glazing bars.

Fluted frieze with paterae over doorheads with consoles below. Segmental

fanlights with fine decorative glazing bars. Coade stone bands with guilloche

moulding to arch imposts. Between the entrances, seven bays of tall sashes

with glazing bars, divided by Doric pilasters. Rear wall of red brick with

four high-level 4-light windows, off-centre doorway. Interior: simple moulded

cornices to ceilings. Statue of Hercules c.1640 by Nicholas Stone, originally

at Oxnead Hall. Ref: "Blickling Hall" The National Trust 1985.

 

The Orangery, Blickling Hall - Heritage Gateway

At the temple on the orange walk at Sheringham Park, looking over at the hall you can't go in. We got sunburn in September. Nice!

Sheringham, Norfolk, UK

  

Kenwood House, Hampstead, English Heritage, Art Collection of Edward Guinness, 1st Earl Iveagh (1847-1927)

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