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The season finale of This Is Us is a mashup of How I Met Your Mother and Scenes from a Marriage. Save for a few scenes near the conclusion, the episode is devoted to Jack and Rebecca, flashing back to the days just before they met and then to the night of Rebecca’s first... digitalmajority.com/news-feed/latest-news/this-is-us-seas...

I'll do the whole gang from How I met your mother :)

I was sad yesterday. Had an absolutely awful day at work.

 

Today I pulled out all my awesome and absolutely smashed my work. This quote from "how I met your mother" absolutely summed up how I feel today.

 

I only had 10mins at lunch to get a shot, this was at martineauplace in the steps down from pizza hut. Colour tweak in lightroom

 

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Mark of Falworth trudged up to the Councilor's chambers in the Royal Palace of Dalmanutha. His meeting with his uncle the Prince hadn't ended well, to say the least. Mark was filled with a dread and fear like none he had ever experienced before. Always, he could count on the support of Jarius and now everything he had at home was, to him, threatened. All this was weighing heavily upon the knight of falworth as he ascended the stairs to where dozens of important knights and nobles were waiting.

No sooner had he reached the last step then exclamations broke forth from nearly all present. Instantly, he was surrounded by his many friends and connections, many of whom he had not seen in years.

After many hearty handshakes and hellos, Mark felt especially glad to see two longtime friends. Sir Didrik Hansson, once Mark's squire, now a fully fledged knight of the realm, and Lord Taurinus Radenos, Mark's uncle on his mother's side.

With these two Mark felt he could share his raw feelings on the subject of succession...

 

"Gentlemen, the sight of you does my heart good! At this time, any cheer is welcome." The glum tone in Mark's voice evidenced his low mood.

 

"How now? Is my nephew distressed, after such a happy return?" Lord Taurinus' mustache twitched with confusion.

 

"Yes, explain this, Mark - what ails thee?" Didrik frowned.

 

"Indeed, I am distressed, for I met with mine uncle the prince yesterday, and though initially all was well, we parted on bad terms."

 

The faces of his friends were seared with shock. "Jarius and thee, in discord?! May the saints preserve us!" Didrik gulped.

"Such a thing is unheard of! What is the nature of your differences? Surely there is a solution..." Taurinus lifted a hand in placation.

 

"Many months have passed since I entered this great city, and since then Jarius has married, and started a family! I must say, he's been busy." Mark scoffed slightly. "And since I was presumed dead for a great while, it must seem natural to him to name his newborn son his heir and successor." Mark's face darkened. "However, the throne is rightfully mine, I am of age to rule, and Jarius is prince only due to my graciousness in allowing him to finish his reign well."

 

Both his comrades took a step back, as if struck.

"This is grave news. Please go on, Mark." Didrik's eyes were wide.

 

"On this subject, we parted, without coming to any sort of agreement as to the outcome. It is my last wish to dislodge my uncle, but I will never surrender my birthright." Mark squared his shoulders with determination. "I hope I can count upon my dearest friends if things come to worst."

 

After a second's hesitation, both men clapped their hands on his shoulders. "Of course we are with you to the end, wherever that may lead."

 

To be Continued!

 

My entry to the Loreos LC.

 

New Camera! Yeesss! :D

   

Credits: almostcinematic.fashion.blog/2017/05/04/why-i-relay/?prev...

 

It might be hard to believe, but none of my immediate family on one side has never had cancer. That side of my family I never met and so I knew my grandparents died of a hearth malfunction and old age.

 

But on the other side my Grandmother had Breast Cancer that was the cause of her death, and my Grandfather had a tumor in his brain. I Was too young to really remember my grandmother on that side, she didn’t speak English and I didn’t speak her native tongue, what I knew was she made wonderful pastry, she loved to watch Xena and she used a lot of garlic in her cooking. My grandfather was another story he lasted longer and was actually murdered – the cancer tumor in his brain would have killed him, but no the care taker who thought he had a lot of money did. I knew my grandfather until I was thirteen. Around that age two years before I had been diagnosed with a deadly disease and a disability. I was told at a very young age that at 15 I was going to die.

 

By the way I didn’t. When forced with mortality in such a young age, it really alters your idea of life and death I never felt bad for my grandparents dying of cancer, and the term cancer in my own life grew to be very synonymous with my own disease. I wasn’t afraid anymore nor in Canada at least I didn’t pity anyone who had cancer. Cancer patients had a chance. I was just told I was going to die and I didn’t have a choice. I won’t tell anyone what I have but Death the chance of just not waking up one day is still very real.

 

My own mother went into Microbiology to study cancer and I grew up trying to oppose it. I was an academic rebel I didn’t want to do anything typical for a long time probably because death just is my best friend these days.

 

I’ve actually become a successful (not like money successful in anyway HAH!) successful Environmental Scientist. My supervisor calls my program “Soil Organic engineering.” we could call ourselves engineers some days. But we’re not anything like engineers, and the only thing we will save is lives before they get Cancer. I tried to go to medical school as my mother wanted me to. I did for 2 years I was in an intensive program and I found I wasn’t interested in the live body, and not recently dead bodies either. I quit and I moved on to the arts kid, and I didn’t do well there. And then I took up some environmental Sciences.

 

I know how hard it is to be a researcher every day. It’s not sunshine and roses and it’s hard to get funding and companies want to get in on your work if you will have their opinion in the paper. People pay you off sometimes. OR your institution makes conditionals (I lived through this one recently). All in all I will not be curing Cancer.

 

What I can do is to support it, and perhaps it’s harsh that I’m not attempting to cure cancer because someone in my family died and mostly for scientific process, but we all have our own ways of doing things. Sometimes I think it’d be easier if I just suffered through anatomy, but I didn’t and it’d make much more sense in donating money to Relay than going back and wasting 40k to 80k trying to get my doctorate in medicine, only 1/8th of that usually goes to research (fun facts).

 

Maybe what I study will benefit cancer sometime I mean it could be. But I’m not wired to solve cancer. I’m wired to protect and rejuvenate soil from conventional farming.

 

That is why I relay.

 

Sun setting over Elitch Gardens... took out the 55-250mm lens and had some cloud fun...

 

Much Better Large On Black

 

________________________

Ted: She wants casual... OK. I'll be casual, I'm gonna be a mushroom cloud of casual!

--"How I Met Your Mother" (CBS)

This photograph is of my mum in her bed and finally getting some sleep after days of insomnia. I took it as I lay on a makeshift bed on the floor that I'd put together next to her so that I could watch over her at night. It was taken on the morning of the day that my sister and I would take her for a month's emergency respite at a nearby care home.

 

Nearly five weeks previously mum's condition had taken a turn for the worse, primarily her psychological condition. All of a sudden she was aware of her Alzheimer's and its effects upon her (it's now thought she had a minor stroke that only affected her mentally), and that realisation devastated her, she became exceedingly anxious, even frightened on occasion – one night she said to me, "I know what I want to do but I just don't know how to do it!". The consequence of this was that she virtually stopped sleeping, which then made her more anxious, more confused and so a vicious circle started. Over a period of a month the situation became very serious with my sister and I struggling to cope; Sue with exhaustion from caring for mum during the day and me with sleep deprivation as I cared for her through the constant sleepless nights. It eventually all came to a head as mine and Sue's health deteriorated dramatically and mum's condition continued to worsen even with medication, so with the help of her doctor and social services we found a care home nearby that would give mum a place for a month of emergency respite. The home is fantastic, with excellent staff and facilities, and after a week there mum is finally sleeping properly and with the help of the right medication is coping better with her acute anxiety, she's actually smiling again and seems at peace to some degree. The staff said they've never met anyone with such a strong will, they were amazed by her ability to stay awake even though she could barely stand – we're not surprised, mum was the force of nature that our family was built on and held together with. Also, Sue and I are at last getting quality sleep and putting back on all the weight we lost during that month due to the stress and the emotional torture of watching someone going through hell and not being able to do anything about it.

 

There's much I could write about what happened during those five weeks but it's all too raw at the moment, I'd cry if I tried to type it down. We're still trying to process what happened during that time but especially with the emotional trauma of leaving mum on her own at the care home and, even though we are visiting her, dealing with the sense of loss. We both hope that mum will be able to come home at the end of the respite period but realistically we don't think she will, so the photograph above is probably a record of the last time mum slept in her own bed, and probably the last time that I was able to wake mum up and wish her good morning. Watching someone succumb to Alzheimer's is like watching someone turn into a ghost, fading bit by bit, day by day. I never thought the human heart could be broken so painfully and so deeply, I didn't know tears could hurt so much, I didn't know how profoundly you could love someone, but I do now.

I was tagged by Nikita and i haven't done one of these in a while, so i thought...eh, whats the harm.

 

Favorite bands:

-Coldplay, Boyce Avenue, Green Day. I'm sure there is more but i just can't think at the moment.

 

Favorite artists:

-I cant choose, everyone!

 

Favorite place(s) to be:

-Right now...Anywhere with rain. I'm sick and tired of the sun!

 

Favorite beverage:

-Any fizzy drink

 

Favorite movie?

-Arghh, i have no clue.

 

Favorite memory?

-These questions are too difficult... -.-

 

Favorite store?

-Pull&Bear

 

Favorite show?

-Vampire diaries, glee,how i met your mother.

 

Favorite recipe?

-I can't cook to save my life.

 

I miss you all so much!

 

Kiara, i miss you soooooooooooooooooooo much. I just saw the testimonial. I can never thank you enough. I am so grateful i met you. <3

"Whenever I am sad, I just stop being sad and be awesome instead. True story."

~ Barney Stinson (How I met your mother).

 

Did this for my photography class. We had to shoot food/products in natural light.

 

Day 199 : 365

See I believe in everything

But sometimes life don't work that way

All the love, and all the waiting

I don't want to wait no more

I don't want to wait no more

 

Hello flickr! I hope you guys are swell. I have been doing well myself, and I'm so excited for the leaves to change. I'm going to go camera crazy :) I'm pretty satisfied with my life right now. I'm back into my school routine and I'm living life. Plus, season 9 of How I Met Your Mother is on Netflix.

 

Goodnight<3

   

I've been staring at this little box for a while now, thinking of what to say.

 

The 365 project was something I wanted to do since I was about 15 but everyday I made excuses like "I have a lot of homework. Or, I'm about to start year 12". It feels very strange to say that this is my last photo for the 365 challenge.

Day 365/365.

It feels so odd to type, and I don't even know what to think - mainly disbelief because I didn't think I was going to make it this far. I remember on day 9 I was just going to call it quits and be like, "I gave it a shot, so I guess a pat on the back for the effort." Even though I didn't necessary take photos strictly everyday I still managed to finish this - and all my life I have never achieved anything like this before.

 

In 2013, I watched myself change and my perspective of things change. I remember the time I dropped a flower crown I made on a pebbled path during golden hour, and I noticed that as the sun met the horizon, the rays of light danced around on the pebbles and sparkled like glitter. And suddenly from that day I began noticing things. Thing which I would just usually look at, but not really see. I began to notice all the little things - like flowers dotted along the footpath on my way home, and how crisp and fresh the air in Autumn was on cold mornings and the beauty of golden hour.

Even though I've finally finished this project, I will still take photos. Taking photos is my way of sharing what I see in this world, and it kind of calms me. I love chasing the light in the morning and in the evenings, and I will keep taking photos - I simply can't stop. This is what I love doing. I want to experiment with different types of photography, I want to work with film and I want to shoot with models and continue capturing the beauty of nature.

And I would like to say thank you. Thank you to you all. Thank you to my family for always being so supportive of me. Thank you to my friends on Flickr (you know who you are!) and in "real life" who have been so patient, kind and willing to model for me or to drive me places far away, just so I can take photos (I remember that time we went to Kuitpo forest at the crack of dawn and I think I'll forever remember how dark and freaked out (though that may have only been me mainly) we were in the car. Thank you to mother nature for blessing our world with four seasons and wild life, and for showing us that life has its seasons, change which are all natural.

And thank you for the sun for always rising and setting each day, even though no one ever tells you.

 

And I want to say thank you for everyone who has ever left a comment, favourited a photo, or just viewed a photo of mine. And thank you to the people who have been with me on this journey since day one, or somewhere in the middle or on the very last day.

 

And also!!!!!!!!!! I am really happy because I will never have to upload a photo that I don't like ever again.

 

Ps. if you read all of this, you're awesome.

 

www.yayitscarolyn.blogspot.com

www.instagram.com/yayitscarolyn

I could run on forever about why I’ve been M.I.A lately but I have a better idea…

Seven Truths

- I’ve learned there’s a much bigger difference between religion and faith than I ever understood. I tried so hard to be perfect by prohibiting myself from everything that was ‘of the world’. I pretty much just cold turkey-ed my old life completely. It all exploded on me and I just couldn’t speak about something that I couldn’t bring myself to follow through.

- I never gave up my pride. I fear I never can. Or at least…I just don’t know how.

- I stopped taking pictures altogether for the last little bit. I started sleeping more. I got sick. Really sick. I busted up both my knees. It’s funny how the enemy kicks you when you’re down yet we try and find every other excuse to sit and explain it all. It’s like we’re giving him a get out of jail free card for hurting us.

- At Church last Sunday the message was for me. It screamed at me. It wanted my attention. But my eyes would start to water the very second I even tried to face God. I kept saying I wasn’t ready. I wasn’t ready. I’ll never be ready. But that doesn’t mean I shouldn’t just take the step anyway. I don’t think I’ve ever felt the cold heaviness turn my heart numb as strongly as it did that day when I completely rejected God.

-It’s not that I didn’t try. Every day I sat at my computer and started typing. I tried writing. I tried thinking of what was bothering me that day. But I never went to my bible. I never went to God. If he’s not in this…if my heart isn’t in him. I can’t expect to be able to speak the truth.

- If I’m being honest, on multiple occasions I’ve wanted to a bitch a bunch of people out on flickr. I’ve wanted to be nasty. I wanted to be opinionated and rude. I wanted to say things like “I respected you enough to write this on MY own description. You think you could have done that yourself. Instead of raping my comments with your stupid opinions.” I couldn’t even look past the negative discouragement to see the lives being touched. It’s funny how it affected me so much then but it only took putting myself in the shoes of that negative commenting person to understand and well…calm down ha.

 

-You know what changed it all though? My mother was talking about a couple of her friends who now have cancer. For the first time in weeks now I didn’t get scared or think of my own death and the uncertainty in that. I suddenly just felt this need to go…do something to help. I guess it was a little spark of the fire that I put out. The truth is no, I’m not perfect and never will be. No, I don’t want people who have followed the project to put all this trust into me because just like your youth pastors or friends or anyone really…I’m going to screw up. But people are losing their lives to cancer. People are giving their lives for their country. For people they haven’t even met before. People are losing their lives because of other people’s stupidity. I want more. I want to understand some of those people and their courage. And their bravery. The truth is I fell. And it wasn’t pretty at all. But in the end that’s part of it. I’m going to sound like a corny, motivational speaker haha but it really doesn’t matter how many times you stumble, all that matters is if you’re willing to get up and risk falling down again.

 

Rhythm tagged me and here i am stuck with putting up 16 things about me. If that's the case, this is possibly the best pic i would use to represent. Here is the list -

 

1. I love drama in life and over-react for most things

2. Colorful and full of plans (most of which seldom get executed)

3. I love coming home at the end of the day

4. Love framing things around me and hence the need for photography

5. I (still) love watching the nth reruns of Friends and love 'Big Bang Theory' and 'How i met your mother'

6. I love carrot cake and caramel pudding

7. I like sweeping landscapes and when on holiday tirelessly get out of bed in the wee hours to catch the sunrise

8. I am tactless for most part

9. I love food which is dressed up well

10. I am a little too over possessive about my little red dinky toy car

11. I like the way traveling rearranges my priorities in life, every once in a while

12. I love the open road

13. I hate carrying a tripod around, even though its very handy

14. I have no new year resolutions

15. i feel am on the way to becoming a fossil soon!

16. Every time i sit to make these lists, after a point i really begin to start judging myself

 

Now for the 16 i am tagging, Sneha, Navreet, Nihit Goyal, Gauri Bharat, Amarjeet Singh, Flickrascal (Aneesh), Paavani, Mahesh Gramprohit, Harshuu, Oreofuzzcat (John), Pyngodan, Vinay, Prateek Sharma, Aks (Akshay), Manav Gupta, Shuuro, Kunal. I think its a great way to know you all a wee bit better!

 

~ Mother Teresa

 

Secret # 17: My DH and I will celebrate our 5th year wedding anniversary tomorrow, although we knew each other for 8 years before we finally tied the knot. We met at the university when I was a freshman and he was a graduating senior. =D

 

We're going to an undisclosed location this weekend to celebrate it and my visiting parents will watch Peanut for us!

 

Happy Weekend, everyone!

 

Remarks of President-Elect Barack Obama-as prepared for delivery

Election Night

Tuesday, November 4th, 2008

Chicago, Illinois

 

If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible; who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time; who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer.

 

It's the answer told by lines that stretched around schools and churches in numbers this nation has never seen; by people who waited three hours and four hours, many for the very first time in their lives, because they believed that this time must be different; that their voice could be that difference.

 

It's the answer spoken by young and old, rich and poor, Democrat and Republican, black, white, Latino, Asian, Native American, gay, straight, disabled and not disabled - Americans who sent a message to the world that we have never been a collection of Red States and Blue States: we are, and always will be, the United States of America.

 

It's the answer that led those who have been told for so long by so many to be cynical, and fearful, and doubtful of what we can achieve to put their hands on the arc of history and bend it once more toward the hope of a better day.

 

It's been a long time coming, but tonight, because of what we did on this day, in this election, at this defining moment, change has come to America.

 

I just received a very gracious call from Senator McCain. He fought long and hard in this campaign, and he's fought even longer and harder for the country he loves. He has endured sacrifices for America that most of us cannot begin to imagine, and we are better off for the service rendered by this brave and selfless leader. I congratulate him and Governor Palin for all they have achieved, and I look forward to working with them to renew this nation's promise in the months ahead.

 

I want to thank my partner in this journey, a man who campaigned from his heart and spoke for the men and women he grew up with on the streets of Scranton and rode with on that train home to Delaware, the Vice President-elect of the United States, Joe Biden.

 

I would not be standing here tonight without the unyielding support of my best friend for the last sixteen years, the rock of our family and the love of my life, our nation's next First Lady, Michelle Obama. Sasha and Malia, I love you both so much, and you have earned the new puppy that's coming with us to the White House. And while she's no longer with us, I know my grandmother is watching, along with the family that made me who I am. I miss them tonight, and know that my debt to them is beyond measure.

 

To my campaign manager David Plouffe, my chief strategist David Axelrod, and the best campaign team ever assembled in the history of politics - you made this happen, and I am forever grateful for what you've sacrificed to get it done.

 

But above all, I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to - it belongs to you.

 

I was never the likeliest candidate for this office. We didn't start with much money or many endorsements. Our campaign was not hatched in the halls of Washington - it began in the backyards of Des Moines and the living rooms of Concord and the front porches of Charleston.

 

It was built by working men and women who dug into what little savings they had to give five dollars and ten dollars and twenty dollars to this cause. It grew strength from the young people who rejected the myth of their generation's apathy; who left their homes and their families for jobs that offered little pay and less sleep; from the not-so-young people who braved the bitter cold and scorching heat to knock on the doors of perfect strangers; from the millions of Americans who volunteered, and organized, and proved that more than two centuries later, a government of the people, by the people and for the people has not perished from this Earth. This is your victory.

 

I know you didn't do this just to win an election and I know you didn't do it for me. You did it because you understand the enormity of the task that lies ahead. For even as we celebrate tonight, we know the challenges that tomorrow will bring are the greatest of our lifetime - two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century. Even as we stand here tonight, we know there are brave Americans waking up in the deserts of Iraq and the mountains of Afghanistan to risk their lives for us. There are mothers and fathers who will lie awake after their children fall asleep and wonder how they'll make the mortgage, or pay their doctor's bills, or save enough for college. There is new energy to harness and new jobs to be created; new schools to build and threats to meet and alliances to repair.

 

The road ahead will be long. Our climb will be steep. We may not get there in one year or even one term, but America - I have never been more hopeful than I am tonight that we will get there. I promise you - we as a people will get there.

 

There will be setbacks and false starts. There are many who won't agree with every decision or policy I make as President, and we know that government can't solve every problem. But I will always be honest with you about the challenges we face. I will listen to you, especially when we disagree. And above all, I will ask you join in the work of remaking this nation the only way it's been done in America for two-hundred and twenty-one years - block by block, brick by brick, calloused hand by calloused hand.

 

What began twenty-one months ago in the depths of winter must not end on this autumn night. This victory alone is not the change we seek - it is only the chance for us to make that change. And that cannot happen if we go back to the way things were. It cannot happen without you.

 

So let us summon a new spirit of patriotism; of service and responsibility where each of us resolves to pitch in and work harder and look after not only ourselves, but each other. Let us remember that if this financial crisis taught us anything, it's that we cannot have a thriving Wall Street while Main Street suffers - in this country, we rise or fall as one nation; as one people.

 

Let us resist the temptation to fall back on the same partisanship and pettiness and immaturity that has poisoned our politics for so long. Let us remember that it was a man from this state who first carried the banner of the Republican Party to the White House - a party founded on the values of self-reliance, individual liberty, and national unity. Those are values we all share, and while the Democratic Party has won a great victory tonight, we do so with a measure of humility and determination to heal the divides that have held back our progress. As Lincoln said to a nation far more divided than ours, "We are not enemies, but friends...though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection." And to those Americans whose support I have yet to earn - I may not have won your vote, but I hear your voices, I need your help, and I will be your President too.

 

And to all those watching tonight from beyond our shores, from parliaments and palaces to those who are huddled around radios in the forgotten corners of our world - our stories are singular, but our destiny is shared, and a new dawn of American leadership is at hand. To those who would tear this world down - we will defeat you. To those who seek peace and security - we support you. And to all those who have wondered if America's beacon still burns as bright - tonight we proved once more that the true strength of our nation comes not from our the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals: democracy, liberty, opportunity, and unyielding hope.

 

For that is the true genius of America - that America can change. Our union can be perfected. And what we have already achieved gives us hope for what we can and must achieve tomorrow.

 

This election had many firsts and many stories that will be told for generations. But one that's on my mind tonight is about a woman who cast her ballot in Atlanta. She's a lot like the millions of others who stood in line to make their voice heard in this election except for one thing - Ann Nixon Cooper is 106 years old.

 

She was born just a generation past slavery; a time when there were no cars on the road or planes in the sky; when someone like her couldn't vote for two reasons - because she was a woman and because of the color of her skin.

 

And tonight, I think about all that she's seen throughout her century in America - the heartache and the hope; the struggle and the progress; the times we were told that we can't, and the people who pressed on with that American creed: Yes we can.

 

At a time when women's voices were silenced and their hopes dismissed, she lived to see them stand up and speak out and reach for the ballot. Yes we can.

 

When there was despair in the dust bowl and depression across the land, she saw a nation conquer fear itself with a New Deal, new jobs and a new sense of common purpose. Yes we can.

 

When the bombs fell on our harbor and tyranny threatened the world, she was there to witness a generation rise to greatness and a democracy was saved. Yes we can.

 

She was there for the buses in Montgomery, the hoses in Birmingham, a bridge in Selma, and a preacher from Atlanta who told a people that "We Shall Overcome." Yes we can.

 

A man touched down on the moon, a wall came down in Berlin, a world was connected by our own science and imagination. And this year, in this election, she touched her finger to a screen, and cast her vote, because after 106 years in America, through the best of times and the darkest of hours, she knows how America can change. Yes we can.

 

America, we have come so far. We have seen so much. But there is so much more to do. So tonight, let us ask ourselves - if our children should live to see the next century; if my daughters should be so lucky to live as long as Ann Nixon Cooper, what change will they see? What progress will we have made?

 

This is our chance to answer that call. This is our moment. This is our time - to put our people back to work and open doors of opportunity for our kids; to restore prosperity and promote the cause of peace; to reclaim the American Dream and reaffirm that fundamental truth - that out of many, we are one; that while we breathe, we hope, and where we are met with cynicism, and doubt, and those who tell us that we can't, we will respond with that timeless creed that sums up the spirit of a people:

 

Yes We Can. Thank you, God bless you, and may God Bless the United States of America.

 

“You can ask the universe for all the signs you want, but ultimately...

we'll see what we want to see... when we’re ready to see it.”

 

- How I Met Your Mother (CBS sitcom)

Tracy Sings

 

He was in the same place as the last time I met him. I suppose because its his home. He's lived on the Los Angeles River for the past 10 years and close to being directly under the 6th street Bridge. As we walk past his house, a tent in a run off drain, shaping pictures of the historic art deco bridges. I call out, "Tracy are you home?" "Yes, I am. Who is it?" he answer in a a upbeat singsongy voice. "I met you the last time I was down here taking pictures." "Oh OK I'll be right out."

 

He politely asks me how things have been and what's been going on as if was had talked many times before and needed to catchup on the before absence since our last meeting. He tells of of things he used to do, "to sing and act". "I'll sing you a song if you want?" he asked a little shyly. We we argree he tells us the acoustics under the bridge are great so we walk in the tunle with him. He sings for us a song he wrote for his mother just before she passed away, called, "Someday". He sings beautifully as if to a crowd.

 

"Soon this bridge will be torn down" Tracy tells us, "On Jan 1st of next year." "A lot of people won't have a place to go."

I did a landscape?? Landscapes are not my forte... this is Vancouver though, I really should be using the mountains and beaches to my advantage... Anyway, something a little different today.

 

I am posting this as it is pouring rain outside. Quite the change from the afternoon! But not going to lie, I am liking the rain! Also... random fact... How I met your Mother marathon is the best thing ever.

 

Hope you all had a great Monday!

 

sorry, this is nothing special

 

nairnpwirnipewrfaspdoapsjdie.. does anyone also watch how i met your mother?

 

double exposure

 

43/365

february 12, 2011

Dirt.

 

The final frontier.

 

These are the camping adventures of the roadship Rueb….blah blah blah.

 

Camping is supposed to be relaxing….vacation-esque if you will. I remember when I was young, we camped quite a bit…I vaguely remember my parents being rested while there and when we returned...so much so that we did it at least two weeks a year.

 

For the past few years my friend Pecos and his family have gone on a campout with me and my family over labor day weekend. It’s always interesting.

 

Pecos didn’t get the time off work so we were forced to change our plans from heading north to Crater Lake to staying locally at Butte Lake.

 

Saturday morning I took my littlest to get a canoe from my mother’s house. This time I wasn’t going out in that raft. Lesson learned. Plus after I got out of the lake the previous weekend, I discovered an otter had savagely attacked a swimmer there recently. Had I known that BEFORE I went rafting with my booty in dangling in the water…I might not have gone. The funniest part was reading the comments from the last trip, and Digital Sasquatch had “joked” about otters biting people…and really, it happened.

 

While I was away my wife and Pecos’ wife discussed the trip. They of course checked the important things….weather, chance of rain, facilities, etc...

 

People check that stuff? Really? Pit toilets aren’t OK? Weird.

 

Pecos wife discovered that temperatures were going to be in the low 30s at night, and there was also a chance of rain. My wife freezes below 70 degrees. She would NOT be thrilled camping in 30 degree nights. Plus, she’d already made it known. If it was too cold…we were heading home.

 

I completely understand. If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.

 

Somewhere in the translation between Pecos’ wife, my wife, and me…the chance of rain was made to sound more inevitable rather than possible.

 

I checked the weather, and it was listed at 10-20% Rain was not going to be an issue…but cold was going to be a real problem.

 

Pecos has access to a RV and they decided to bring that…The wives, and kids would be warm at night…I would sleep in the van, with the dogs…so I could get up and photograph without disturbing the rest of the group.

 

3pm Saturday my family was finally loaded and ready to go, dogs and all. We were in no real hurry. We were staying in an RV, we didn’t need to pack a tent…or bring nearly as much gear as we would normally. We could take it easy on our way up…

 

While in the in/out drive-thru….We got a call from Pecos’ wife….the RV was having issues.

 

Awesome.

 

We took a detour to see if there was anything we could do. Luckily, by the time we arrived she had gotten the rig running…and eventually decided it was good to go. She did tell us before we left that….

 

”Pecos gets off at 6….if we’re not there by 8:30 or so….just come back…it’ll mean we couldn’t get it (the RV) going again, or something went wrong.”

 

RV issues solved…onto the next issue.

 

The canoe.

 

Canoes don’t ride nicely…no matter how well you affix them to the roof of your vehicle. They won’t fly off…but they certainly make you think they will. Siding around...as the cross breeze hits them….and then after you’ve pulled over and checked the straps 10-20 times, finally convincing yourself the canoe IS secure and WON’T fly off….you can sit and enjoy the ride while what sounds like a 4 ton mosquito hovers above your car.

 

Makes for a relaxing two-hour car ride.

 

The last 6 miles to Butte Lake is dirt….washboard style. It turns out, neither dog is particularly fond of driving on that style of road…it freaks them out a little. When they’re freaked out they let out a foul odor that smells, well, really foul…I called it dead hooker…but really it was like a fish dinner that had been left out in the sun for a few days.

 

Thanks Dogs…

 

Glad I get to sleep with you two.

 

Finally…we arrived at our campsite, and set up shop. Everyone was thrilled. A couple rangers showed up…saw my cool radio, and volunteer hat…and talked with me. I told them about the campers I saw on top of the Cinder Cone the previous weekend.

 

“Really?” One ranger said “You can’t camp up there…what day was it?.”

 

“Saturday when we saw them…so Friday night I guess” I said

 

“ooooh those bastards…”

 

I got the impression he really wanted to have caught them….

I had to cut my conversation with the rangers short, because my littlest child was hovering around them, trying to get their weaponry.

 

“Let’s see those guns!” He kept saying…

 

The rangers left…and told me to call them if I saw any guns in the park.

 

It was getting late now…time to cook dinner. I forgot the stove piece that connects the propane to the stove…so we had to BBQ.

 

We ate.

We roasted marshmallows.

We waited for Pecos to arrive in the RV.

 

It was 8:00pm

 

It was 8:30pm

 

It was 9:00pm

 

We sat….we waited.

 

Finally it was decided that at 9:30 we’d head for home. No way were 4 people and 2 dogs fitting in a van to sleep.

 

The kids were NOT pleased about the decision…and wept.

 

9:30 came…no RV was seen, so we packed up…and left. Weeping children in back.

 

1-mile into the dirt road, we met the RV.

 

Better late than never…turn around…head back.

 

The kids are happy again.

 

I got practice tearing down camp.

 

We returned to camp…set up again…and enjoyed campfire round 2. The dogs were getting cold, so I put them in the van to sleep.

 

Eventually temperatures dropped, and the ladies and kids went to the RV to sleep, and warm up. Pecos and I sat around the fire for a little while longer…but I was getting up to photograph in the morning…and I needed some rest…off I went to my doghouse.

 

When I opened up the van…both dogs were in my sleeping bag.

 

It was going to be a long night.

 

This photo was taken after dinner, but before campfire round 1, and before we packed up and left…My oldest son and I made the short hike to Bathtub Lake…which was a nice lake…the sunset wasn’t at all interesting, so I waited until the sun was gone and took a long exposure shot…I really liked this log too.

 

My brother and I have been obsessed with The Big Bang Theory for the past few months. We watch good shows. :) Such as How I Met Your Mother, The Office, and Friends. I highly recommend them.

 

On another note, I have my last day of school tomorrow before Christmas break! But sadly, there is currently no snow on the ground here in Illinois and I AM PEEVED. It just doesn't feel like Christmas without it.

 

I hope you all have a wonderful holiday vacation :)

EXPLORE, #16 & Explore Front Page!

 

For Flickr Group Roulette challenge, Uncluttered.

 

This isn't some illusion here. That is a big, red wall I'm leaning on right in the middle of downtown Orlando. It happens to be a great spot for portrait or model photography but the empty lot where this is is up for sale so I don't know how long this will stay like this.

 

The photo might be uncluttered but this description isn't. My friend Natasha tagged me so now I have to give Nine Random Goals & Facts About Me. This wasn't easy but here you go....

 

1) I am an only child to older parents. I do have a half-brother on my dad's side but I only met him once growing up and don't know anything else about my father's side of the family.

 

2) I'm a full-blooded Filipino but was born and raised in the U.S. My mom immigrated by normal means, my dad through the U.S. Navy. I don't observe Filipino customs which don't cast me in a good light with my relatives over there due to diametrically different Asian & Western customs.

 

3) Six years ago I 'lost' my mother to Alzeimer's dementia. It was a traumatic period in my life trying to take care of her with help with my aunt and it being my last semester in college. I was an emotional wreck seeing someone I've known and loved turn into someone I didn't recognize. If it wasn't for the support of some friends from my business fraternity, those times could've have easily destroyed me. It still haunts me but at least I'm comforted that she's being cared for by the family back in the Philippines.

 

4) I am a Pisces by astrological sign but I don't exhibit anything resembling one. Pisces are suppose to be creative and I'm creatively-challenged. I'm more of an analytical person.

 

5) I am a native San Franciscan but I've been living in Florida for 15 years now. My mom and I moved here because of lower cost of living and friends & family here. I haven't been back to S.F. in that time but I still call it my hometown.

 

6) I absolutely despise eggplant and liver. Other than that I can eat almost anything.

 

7) Laziness and procrastination are my prime weaknesses and they've gotten me in trouble on too many occasions. I don't know if I'll ever learn.

 

8) After 19 years off and on through college I finally got a Bachelors degree but getting 3 other Associates degrees along the way. That was a big monkey off my back.

 

9) My biggest goal for this year is to get a job. I really don't wanna be loafing off the government, I want to use my college education to make something of myself and contribute to others.

 

Now I'm supposed to tag friends but I'm really lazy to pick out victims so anyone who'd like to take this up, be my guest!

Fun fact n°5: I think my bottom lip is a bit too full, compared to my top one. Or the other way round.

Fun fact n°6: I started to like my lips after a friend pointed me out that they were beautiful. I've kinda stopped believing that after we lost touch. It's amazing how it's easier to think you're pretty when someone's telling you so.

Fun fact n°7 I bite my lips. I chew on them. They're always a mess, they often bleed because of that. I need to put lip balm on them twice or three times a day at least, and they don't even heal.

Fun fact n°8 I am really self conscious about my chin ever since I read the comments on this picture. Now I think it's too big and ugly. I tried to totally crop it out in this picture but it looked weird, so I have to deal with it. But I hate it.

 

I'm so vain, you're gonna get 16 fun facts about myself in 4 days, and they're all gonna be about my body. Duh.

 

Just for a change:

Fun fact n°8 bis I'm totally addicted to How I Met Your Mother. Hence the "Fun Facts" I borrowed from Ted Mosby, and the "Wait For It" from Barney Stinson. I'm shameless.

Name: Nicole

Age: 16

Hobbies: Photography, filming....and im obesessed with going to the movies.

Goals in life: To make something out of what i love... photography/filming.

Favorite color: black.

Where would you like to visit?: Greece

Favorite holiday: Christmas !!! and guyfawkes.

Favorite book: BEASTLY. Freaking loved it

Favorite food: frozen coke

Favorite movie: inception haha. and ........ anything scary? and definately TITANIC

Favorite 90's show: cant remember any haha ! Will smith in fresh prince?

Current tv shows you watch: off the map, how i met your mother, Skins, misfits, shortland street (sometimes)

Preferred music genre: Anything!!! soft rock mostly though

One random fact about you: i like when it rains, feels like im in a movie scene, so i run in slow motion for effect . haha true story

 

YOU GOT TAGGED

As she approached me on the sidewalk in my neighborhood I felt an immediate sense of kinship. My own collarbone still throbbing almost a year after a cycling accident, I paused when we met and asked “Does it still hurt?” She was surprised by this question from a total stranger and seemed uncertain. I repeated my question and said I was asking because I too feel like the “walking wounded” after an accident. “Yes it does” she replied. “Every day.” Meet Ezerine.

 

We chatted as others walked past and I heard some of her story. She had been rushing to catch a streetcar a year ago and hadn’t noticed a pothole. “I tripped and went down. I broke a toe but also tore the tissue up here” (she pointed to the area below her shoulder, just above her sling). Like old soldiers sharing their war stories, we chatted about our experiences with the medical profession and our injuries which by this time both qualify as long-standing. Ezerine said “But I won’t let them operate on it. They wanted to and I told them ‘No thank you. I’m letting the Lord take care of it for me.’”

 

As the conversation evolved, I heard more of Ezerine’s remarkable story. She explained that she had been deaf in her right ear for quite a long time. Her doctor had written a prescription for her to get a hearing aid, but she didn’t fill the prescription. “Do you want to hear what happened?” she asked. “Of course I do” was the logical reply. “I woke up one day and the Lord had given me my hearing back.” I commented that she must be a woman of very strong faith for that to have happened. She pointed to the heavens and said she was. “And I’m going to let Him fix this too,” referring to her shoulder. She gave another example of her divine connection. “I had a vision of my mother’s death” she told me. “Oh, I didn’t know at the time that it was her in the vision, but I saw her dying… and then she did.” “Remarkable” was all I could say.

 

Because a sense of “connection” had already been established, I showed her my camera and explained my project. I said I would like to photograph her and tell her story. “What for?” she asked. I explained that I enjoy photographing strangers I meet – especially ones that have an interesting story to tell and I share them with my project friends so that we can all become better photographers. “I guess so” she said. I quickly scanned the surroundings. The only option I could see other than the sidewalk location was the recessed doorway of a bank so we took a few steps and I explained the light was good there and we would both just have to be aware of any customers coming and going through the doorway.

 

I took very few photos and, in fact, one customer did exit the building and expressed concern that she might accidentally bump Ezerine with the door as it opened. I apologized and ushered Ezerine out of the way, explaining how guilty I would feel if I caused her another injury while taking her photo. She told me not to worry and we looked at the photos. She was amazed that they looked so nice and had taken so little time. Learning that she does not have email or use the computer, I arranged to have copies made and send them to her in the mail. This pleased her and we exchanged contact information. It wasn’t until I checked the photos at home that my contact card was prominently displayed in one of the photos. Although I am always improving when it comes to spotting distracting elements in photos as I am taking them, I’m still surprised at how often my “tunnel vision” as I focus on a stranger’s eyes causes me to miss things that I should have noticed and corrected at the time.

 

Ezerine explained that she is in her 70s and came to Canada from Jamaica which fit with her lovely accent and colorful head scarf. She and I are both in our 70s but she said she’s further along in the decade than I am. Her message is “Believe in the Lord.”

 

Ezerine and I parted with a friendly goodbye and my reiterated promise to send her the photos as soon as I can get them printed. We wished each other well in our recoveries and as we parted I was hoping that although we are using different paths toward health, I hope we both have made the right choice. I continue to reflect on Ezerine's story of great personal strength.

 

Thank you Ezerine for taking the time to chat and for participating in my photography project.

 

This is my 476th submission to The Human Family Group on Flickr.

 

You can view more street portraits and stories by visiting The Human Family.

 

Maila Nurmi was the original Queen of the Modern Gothic. Vampira, her iconic macabre creation, influenced generations of filmmakers, musicians, artists and lifestylers. Sadly, she shuffled off her mortal coil on January 10th, 2008. She was aged 86.

 

A Finnish-born model and actress, Maila had posed for Man Ray, Vargas and Bernard of Hollywood before being discovered at a masquerade ball by a TV producer. Her pale-skin and tight black dress complete with black wig and long, haemorrhage-red fingernails were quite unique in 1953. A year later, she became the eponymous star of The Vampira Show bringing a distinctive mix of sex, horror and death.

 

As the world’s first TV horror host, Vampira’s sardonic wit and eye-popping hourglass-figure made her the ghoulish fantasy of guys and ghouls across the globe, despite appearing on a show that was only broadcast in LA. Every week the voluptuous vamp would unleash blood-curdling screams and utter puns in an exotic and alluring Marlene Dietrich-like drawl – ‘I am…Vampira. I hope you all had the good fortune to have had a terrible week.’

 

After her show was cancelled, Maila accepted a tiny fee to appear as the reanimated corpse bride in Plan 9 From Outer Space, a role in the unfairly dubbed ‘Worst Film of all Time’, but it was one that would ensure Vampira’s immortality in popular culture.

 

As a star in the Golden Age of Tinsletown, Maila gigged with Liberace, dated Orson Welles, was friends with Marlon Brando and formed a tremendous kinship with James Dean, whose spirit, she claimed, haunted her for six months after his death.

 

Even as lady in her eighties, she was an incredible bright spark, a feisty old dame and a terrific raconteur, recalling stories from the old days with childlike glee. Like her icons-in-crime Bela Lugosi and Ed Wood, Maila Nurmi died nearly penniless, but she left behind a legacy that will endure forever.

     

Here's the article I wrote for Bizarre Magazine...

 

The Lady is a Vamp

 

I’m sat in Pioneer Chicken, a fast-food joint off Sunset Boulevard, deep in discussion with Vampira, the world’s first TV horror host. Maila Nurmi, the Finnish-born performer beneath the famous black wig and nails was a phenomenon in the nineteen-fifties. Her iconic gothic style, sardonic wit and eye-popping hourglass-figure made her the ghoulish fantasy of guys and ghouls across the globe, despite appearing on a show that was only broadcast to the Los Angeles area. Every week the voluptuous vamp would emerge from dry-ice studio fog to the sound of creepy organ music. She would unleash a blood-curdling scream and utter puns in an exotic, sexual, Marlene Dietrich-like drawl - “I am…Vampira. I hope you all had the good fortune to have had a terrible week."

 

But this is not simply an interview with a vampire. Conversing with Naila Nurmi means taking a voyeuristic journey through the lives of mythological cult icons of fifties Hollywood. It seems that Vampira’s finger was firmly on the jugular pulse of the tinsletown scene during the beat generation. Captivating tales with James Dean, Marlon Brando, and Elvis Presley pour from her octogenarian lips, memories recalled with intensity and insight.

 

Since Maila claims psychic capabilities, one can also add a touch of the paranormal to this Hollyweird concoction. She speaks of clairaudience, strange premonitions and visions. Most sensationally, it was such psychic sensitivity that found her haunted by the spirit of James Dean, whose death profoundly affected her.

 

She’s certainly one tough cookie though, that’s for sure - strongly opinionated and gutsy. Before international fame, back when she was modeling for the likes of Bernard of Hollywood, Vargas and a young Man Ray, she still wasn’t taking any crap from studio big shots. Even movie mogul Howard Hawks - who discovered Maila performing a skeleton striptease in a New York show - suffered the wrath of Vampira’s razor-witted tongue, despite having just turned Lauren Bacall into a household name.

 

“I thought he was stupid, so I tore up my contract,” she giggles, tucking into her rice. “I told him to kindly find a place for it in one of his numerous waste baskets.”

 

Yet in 1956, her outspoken manner caused her blacklisting from the system. Broke, she accepted a measly $200 to play the reanimated corpse-bride of Bela Lugosi in the trash sci-fi epic Plan 9 From Outer Space. Irony, for this movie cemented her position in popular culture and led to Tim Burton’s marvelous biopic of director Ed Wood, one that cast model Lisa Marie as Maila.

 

At eighty-three, she’s still hip and sharp like Vampira’s fingernails.

 

So how did your famous horror host role come about?

 

I decided I wanted to become an evangelist. I had to sponsor myself and I thought I needed $20,000. How could I do it? Well, television was just warping people’s minds, so I thought could do that - and they paid big. I thought I’d satirise soap operas, I’d take improbable people and make them do all these bourgeois things. Since Charles Addams had already done it in comic form, I wanted it to bring it to television. So that is why I made the dress, went to a masquerade ball and won first prize. They discovered me and that was the end of it. But Vampira wasn’t really acting. It was television, just a lot of hogwash.

 

What went wrong with the revival of Vampira in the early eighties and the subsequent launch of the Elvira character?

 

Well I was dealing with KTTV for three months and then they suddenly didn’t want me to come to the studio anymore. They eventually called me in to sign a contract and she was there (Cassandra Peterson). They had hired her without asking me.

 

So it was going to be the Vampira name?

 

It’s Vampira all together. She did the whole thing with the Rocky Horror people. They stole it. They stole $100 million dollars. She was in 51 markets at one time with 350 kinds of merchandise; milked my cupboard bare.

 

Did you successfully sue?

 

I sued for eight years but not successfully. Finally I ran out of money. To continue would have cost $60,000. I wrote to the judge and said, “I’m sorry, I have no money. I have to close the case.” So he charged them to pay all the expenses. That money was meant for animal welfare and she spent it on cocaine and red limousines. Boy has the devil got that bitch—it’s the devil in her blood. That slut was a big player in porno movies - she was trying to hide her background. They deemed it unwise to reveal that fact so they told her to make up stuff if she was asked. But she said, “Why make it up when it is written here?” She was pretending to be me. How dare she? She’s such a low-life, such a no talent. She’s so stupid and she has no sense of timing. No sense of humor; such a common slut that speaks Americanese. Nasal. Phlegmatic. You know, the limousines and the lovers and the houses—they can take all that. Initially they wanted me. I wouldn’t do it because I didn’t want Vampira to be anything but perfect. I certainly didn’t want it to be a streetwalker-slut like that. Angelina Jolie would be a good Vampira.

 

Didn’t Vampira lead you to James Dean?

 

With the character I had been handed the keys to the city. I wanted to see who’s who and so I attended a movie premiere. But all I could find was vapid identities, people of whom I had no interest, except for one fellow who was with Terry Moore. I thought “him, that’s the one with the tuxedo and the collar, the farm boy hair that wouldn’t stay down.” Twelve hours after, I was sitting in Googies, and Jimmy rode up on his motorcycle, the windows rattled and the rest was history. We were never apart again. We were best friends instantly, like psychic Siamese twins.

 

Was he openly gay to his friends?

 

No. As he said, “do I look like someone who would go through life with one hand tied behind my back?” That was a courageous statement in those days. Jimmy was primarily heterosexual but he used men sexually to get ahead, and if he saw someone he liked, he liked them. More often it was women, but maybe that was because he had never got the really pretty girls before. He had always got the ugly leftovers that nobody else wanted.

 

How much time did you spend with him?

 

Seventeen-hundred hours, every moment to treasure. But he was just a little boy in search of his mother. Everyone must have seen it, maybe not known what it was, not how to read it, but they saw the feeling. I was a little more psychic so I knew what it was. He had the impression she had abandoned him. But after, I found out she died of cancer and hadn’t abandoned him at all, but she did go away and leave him all alone in the world. He was an only child and it was impossible for him to relate to his father. The father had probably married his mother for her boobs or something and had nothing in common with her. She raised a boy whom she named after a poet, James Byron. And the father didn’t know poetry from a hole in the ground. He was a nice, practical, and sensible dentist.

 

Do you remember when you heard that James Dean had died?

 

Yeah I was at home with Tony Perkins (Psycho). Jack Simmons (actor in Rebel Without A Cause and friend of Dean) had just left to visit some lesbian whores that lived a block away. We knew we had to tell Jack before someone else did, but then we had to go tell Ursula (Andress), Jimmy’s ladylove. We drove up and I waited in the car because I didn’t really know her very well. It was in a dead end street, and now dark. Then suddenly, Marlon (Brando) appeared at the car - he had been hiding in the bushes. Ursula had called him in hysterics screaming, “They are trying to kill me. They’re threatening me. They think he killed himself because of me. I’m frightened! You have to come. I’m alone.” She would have used any device to get to Marlon at that time, even though she was trying to break up John Derek’s marriage. She wanted Marlon above all; she even bought the same car that he had. So he went, but looked in the windows first to be sure that she wasn’t putting him on and that she was really upset. Then Jack found him in the bushes. “Maila’s over there, in the hearse,” he said.(laughs) So he came over to offer condolences.

 

I heard that the spirit of James Dean visited you.

 

He visited a lot of people. He was very active. Now a lot of people made it up too I’m sure, but even people who weren’t psychic had experiences. He was that strong. Jimmy was following me around and was with me a lot of the time for the first six months. There would be an ashtray, I’d look and say “don’t anybody touch the ashtray, it’s gonna go up. That’s Jimmy’s sign that he’s here.” And it would go up!

 

Did you have psychic tendencies early on?

 

Yeah, I was very psychic in those days. My first husband Dean Eisner (writer of Dirty Harry and Play Misty For Me) and I lived in Laurel Canyon. He came home from work one day and said a story editor was writing a TV series about us. TV was very new and it was very easy to get anything you wanted done. He said they called it “Laurel Canyon”, but apparently sold it under the working title Bewitched. That was written about Dean Eisner and I. You see my mother was a witch. She wasn’t practicing, but she couldn’t help but be a witch. It was natural. It exuded from her, the very essence of her. And I was very psychic too.

 

Didn’t you share some strange, paranormal experiences with Marlon Brando?

 

We were sitting around and chatting in the dining room and Einstein had died just three weeks before. Marlon always had a wonderful portrait of Einstein on his headboard and sometimes he would just shove it in your face. Suddenly Marlon says, “There’s someone here. It’s Einstein. He has a message for us.” I was included in the message. “You young ones have to hurry up,” That’s what Einstein told Marlon, who wasn’t inventing it - he believed it. He may have seen it or heard it. The point is that Marlon really wanted to believe that he was a humanitarian, and Einstein was urging him to hurry up with his duties. Marlon was a very humane human being, though he didn’t know how to be humane with his own children. Some of his best friends despised him and said he was a brute and a beast and nothing in-between. He’s either the gentlest, noble of human beings or the coarsest and grossest. How do you like them apples?

 

What was your first introduction to any of the Ed Wood clan?

 

I was a young girl window-shopping on Hollywood Boulevard. I was bending low to see the detail of some shoes and someone whizzed around the corner on roller skates, almost bumped my fanny and crashed into me. “Pardon me,” said he, and “Pardon me,” said I. He was wearing an ascot and a beret. It was Bela Lugosi on roller skates. He was on his way to a cigar store.

 

Had you heard of Ed Wood before you met him?

 

Yes, because there had been an article in a newspaper, saying that he wanted to make a movie with Vampira. The nerve of him! This was before I was blacklisted. After, I had no money and I couldn’t get a job. A guy came and visited me and offered $200 to make this Ed Wood movie called Grave Robbers From Outer Space (later changed to Plan 9). I thought it was a good title at least. Oh boy! So I did it, and he came into my life right after then.

 

Did you find Ed Wood to be an intelligent guy?

 

No. But anyone who has become a phenomenon has a karmic current carrying them there. Nobody who is normal has such drive. That’s got to be driven by something larger than life. There was something there that I didn’t understand or respect because I was an intellectual snob, but it was there alright.

 

How did Ed Wood react when he heard you didn’t want to speak his words?

 

Paul Marco told him, so I don’t know. I didn’t want to hurt his feelings, but my God, I could not say those words. I wish I had them today because I threw them away. Do you know what jewels those lines must have been? I tried to say them, but I curdled my own blood. (laughs) They were awful!

 

Did you go to the premiere of Plan 9 From Outer Space?

 

Yeah. The theatre was full of people. I was backstage and I could see the images behind the screen. People were in the wings, dictating to me when to walk out, so that I was there on screen at the same time as I walked across stage. The audience booed, whistled and threw popcorn – they loved it! But I never actually got to see the film as I had to leave, then the film was banned in Los Angeles for 26 years. It never played here and Ed Wood never knew why. They hated him I guess or maybe it was because of me. But Criswell told me that the film played in a small theatre in New York for over a year and a half, with just standing room only all the time. When it was on the road in Indianapolis, even though it was pouring with rain, people queued around the block with newspapers over their heads. It was very popular. People knew it was Lugosi’s last film.

 

What kind of state of mind do you think Ed Wood have when he later made porn films?

 

He loved the porn. He was in his element. He would have been very unhappy if he had known he couldn’t have done porn again. He just kept writing them so fast. He’d write a whole pornographic book in just two days.

 

Did Tim Burton talk to you before he filmed the movie Ed Wood?

 

Yes. He introduced me to his stuffed bat. The film was accurate in some way but he wasn’t really trying to be accurate. It was a docu-drama. He was taking liberties, which he was entitled to do, but he got some of the essences correct—the ones that he should have retained. And then he embroidered a little. Johnny Depp is such a good actor and was believable as Ed Wood. Although it wasn’t exactly the same persona, his essence was there. The enthusiasm was so believable - such gung-ho enthusiasm.

 

Finally, is it right you had an encounter with Elvis before he became famous?

 

I went to Las Vegas with Liberace and met a19 year-old Elvis. I was there eating breakfast in the hotel and across the huge dining room in backlight - because the sun was shining through the windows - I could see three older men, smoking cigars, looking plump and eating. A tall, young, graceful man came in, and sat with them. Then on the intercom it said that somebody was wanted on the telephone. This young guy got up, and walked like Robert Mitchum. All I saw was his silhouette, that was it. So I paid my bill and walked past the men and said, “well congratulations, he’s going to be the biggest movie star in the world. I see he has tremendous magnetism.” “Ah,” they said, “thank you.” (laughs). And I hadn’t yet seen Elvis’ face. But the next night when he opened, I went with Liberace and his whole family. A side curtain parted and this kid comes out alone. I had never seen someone boldly standing on a stage – supposedly a heterosexual male – wearing turquoise eye shadow and grinding his hips like that. I thought, “oh-my-god. What am I seeing? This music is great.” The orchestra, one by one put down their instruments. They crossed their arms and refused to play. The audience started booing, and they booed him off the stage. Then a voice said to me – and I wasn’t on any drugs – “go around the side of the hotel and in the back, there’s a swimming pool and you’ll find someone in a canary yellow jacket.” Now I hadn’t seen a jacket like that anywhere. But I went around and in the dark moonless night, far away I could see the double doors of the casino, golden with light. They opened and a figure came into the doorway. It was Elvis, wearing a canary yellow jacket. He looked confusedly into the darkness, so I said, “I’m over here.” We walked towards each other, sat down and talked. I told him that I was a performer and that what happened was absolutely awful. He said, “every night before I go on, I talk to God and he always answers me. But tonight he didn’t answer. When them curtains opened and I saw all those white heads and them glasses, I knew why.“ I told him I admired his courage and that they only did that because they’re sheep and they do as they think they are supposed to do. One person booed and so then they all did. They’ve never, ever seen anything like you and it frightened them. But, Life Magazine are going to discover you (because that’s what they did in those days) and they will kiss your shoes.” He said, “it’s coming out Thursday” and it did. I was thirty-three and he said to me, “I know you’re getting old and all, but if you’d like to come back after the show, I’d be proud to take you back to my bungalow.” (laughs) His hallowed words! And so Elvis went back to do a second show.

 

Many thanks to Joe Moe and Forry for their assistance with this interview.

 

(Photos and Words Copyright - Mark Berry)

I hope you all have a wonderful start in the new year. I decided to do a 52 weeks project now. It just seems to be easier to do than a 365. Apropos 365. Today’s shot

Is dedicated to someone. Someone who finished her 365 today. I know that many of you have their last 365 day today. And I would like to congratulate all of you.

But particularly I wanna congratulate the girl that inspired me like nobody else.

 

Kelly, I remember exactly the day when found your stream. You were at day 81 and I just added you as a contact without thinking about. Then I forgot about your stream. Sometimes I saw some new uploads from you, but I didn’t really realize them. Until day113. On this day you uploaded a wonderful flower shot and I thought “ wow that’s pretty cool”. From this day I started to pay attention to your stream.

And holy mother. You got better and better. Your photography fascinated me and I was so inspired. I loved your ideas and how creative your were. I loved your bokeh work. Like day 189, it was during the football world cup and the colors in this shot just blew me away. I was so so so incredibly impressed. I started to scout out every little detail in your shots and my enthusiasm about your photography grew and grew. I began to absorb everything your posted like a sponge and I commenced to learn from you. You showed me so many emotions I had never seen.

 

Present day.

Day 306 passed by. Day 313 came. Day 314 let my eyes almost plop out of my head.

Day 318 made me realize that you had become my favorite contact on earth.

Since this day I took a look on your stream every single day. This was something like my everyday gift. Every new upload fascinated me and even if we never met I feel like knowing you, just because of your photography. You gave me the opportunity to feel your emotions. I did. You gave me the opportunity to explore the locations and the weather where your live. I did. You gave me the opportunity to learn from you. And holy crap. I did.

 

Kelly my dear, I have such a great respect for you. And I’m so proud you finished this. I hope you don’t think now that I’m a creepy Idon’tknowwhat. But I want you to know that you are so brave, strong, creative and beautiful inside & outside.

 

Thank you for giving me this little gift everyday in the year 2010.

   

Grove o' Aspens, Colorado Autumn 2009.... with quite a bit of defocusing around the image...

 

View Large On Black

 

________________

Robin: How come it never came up that Barney has a gay black brother?

Ted: Maybe that's because I focus on what's inside a person rather than the color of their skin. I'm just kidding. I just wanted to see the look on your face...

--"How I Met Your Mother" (CBS)

Mirror in the Showroom ©

 

Strawberry lake stretches on forever

but I know I think it's a dream...

as if a very Special kind of Ghost Town

do you believe...?

that a dream cannot ever drown

 

I...I...I certainly do, and it's never too late

to fall into the spell of Nature,

yes, I'm speaking the mirror,

the mirror in Nature's showroom

never fails to bring me nearer

 

as life becomes clearer each time I come back

a strange thing indeed is this life, this world

when you leave it you want it,

yet when you live upon it, we all disown it

at times we all have to admit...

 

when all alone in our room with the thoughts

from empty arms flapping to the wind

lonely fingers paddle the showroom again

waiting not another day, for we all remember today

skin on skin with nothing to explain

 

isn't it plain enough to feel the touch of eternity

the thirl of wondrous wordless Heaven

calling like nothing else on Earth, (as we know it),

for the moment this becomes our world

in a way a star falling with a wish to transmit

 

rallying cries of hidden charms and salient arms

enrapturing the deepest, keenest sensations

wishing for two worlds to meet, in one embrace

like twinning calls of far flung lustful breaths

this time is met for reality's sake and grace

 

coming back like a spine-tingling mood

soft finger nails up and down the skin-

of seductive pereniality of love in the air

which possesses each and all at different times

as if it ever needed such compare!

 

when perfectibility enchants you,

Nature will have been close at hand

the quirk of such cyclical work without pretence

to anything other than the truth of action

if we believe, then the matter with us all in this existence

 

will show like a subtle shadow across the water

if we believe, we'll be touched from a reflection

stretching like a hand of desirable temptress

if I believe, I'll be 'touched' like a telepathist

from a rose, a lesson, Mother Nature; our preceptress

 

life's a twisted rose that grows forever

bleeding, brooding, blooming well brilliant

shining when all belief seems gone

land across the water and vice versa

nothing but nothing can alter what She has foregone.

 

by anglia24

18h30: 28/03/2008

©2008anglia24

 

How we make friends

 

I am spending time in a wonderful port town named Bar (Montenegro). Yesterday I did a wonderful photoshoot right on the shore of Adriatic sea, under the waves and spectacular view of yachts in the distance.

 

As I walked back from the shoot I felt myself the happiest person in the world. I was smiling to everyone and received hundreds of smiles in return. I wanted to buy some products so I went to the shop. I saw a queue at the cash desk. I needed to wait. There was a lovely lady standing behind me. Unexpectedly she asked me something in Serbian. I asked her to address me in English. – ‘Could you please tell what time is it now?’- she asked in pure English. I suggested it was about six o’clock (at least it was so 5 minutes ago as I wend through the main street and saw clock on the small tower).

 

Here should be a lyrical digression, my dear readers. As it then turned out it was nearly 8 o’clock. Time has no meaning for Montenegrins. Nobody pays attention on time. Else how can you explain that the main clocks of the town show wrong time? I have gained a little bit of this time indifference from Montenegrins :) In my hometown Surgut my time is always subordinated to some schedule. At first work, then I have tutoring, then one more tutoring, etc. Delay in 10-15 minutes could easily break my schedule and I would be late to everything that day. Since that my life has changed. My time perception has been changed.

 

As I stood in the queue for about 5 minutes I found out a lot about my lovely interlocutor: she is from Bosnia, teaches English, a polyglot, speaks Russian well, she is on her vacation, plans to go to the mountains to meet her brother, she is 45 (looks no more then 35) and so on. Believe me, she found out a lot about me as well. At last she got me acquainted with her mother and asked me for my e-mail, delicately saying – ‘Now we can stay friends’. She wished me a lot of good things and unexpectedly touched me. My palm still burns of her touch. I have no idea if she ever writes me, but I am happy with this warm meeting.

 

This whole situation reminded me of random acquaintances I had and all the strangers I met through whole my life. My heart filled with warmth at once. I believe that all people we have ever met left something on our life road. Everybody has something to learn from. Every meeting isn’t random. All these meetings seemed to be as fallen fruitage from trees that leaves footprints on the ground. This fruitage can be picked, can be eaten, can be left to rot, but the ground will remember them. And I am so grateful to life for these unexpected and wonderful meetings.

 

blog | facebook | instagram | vkontakte

 

photo by: her husband.

 

(photo shot with very basic Box Brownie 127)

  

To see other images from this set, click on the album:. . . . "bath night - Oct 1970 (aged 21)"

 

or click on the following link:

www.flickr.com/photos/vintage_20thcentury_glamour/albums/...

 

____________________________________________________

  

Born in London (England) around 1950, Elizabeth Hogben (née Elizabeth Hook) received a certain amount of public attention in the early 1970s when, as a young bank professional and housewife aged 21, she was featured completely naked in one of the UK’s most popular, more upmarket men’s interest magazines of the time.

 

After leaving Gainsborough Road Girls School, Richmond-upon-Thames, Surrey in the mid 1960s aged 16, Elizabeth joined the Kingston-upon-Thames branch of the Surrey Trustee Savings Bank (later merged with Lloyds Bank Ltd to form part of the Lloyds TSB Group), as a trainee junior clerk where, on her first day at work, she met her future husband (one of the bank's cashiers). The couple married three years later, just four weeks and two days after her nineteenth birthday. Elizabeth went on to enjoy an extremely successful banking career for many years, rapidly gaining promotion, first to clerk, to cashier, then to chief cashier and finally to manager of her own branch at the unusually young age of 26.

 

In her early twenties, whilst working as senior cashier at the Surrey Trustee Savings Bank’s Richmond-upon-Thames branch, Elizabeth was approached by Leslie L. Bainbridge, editor of glossy men's magazine Girl Illustrated. He told her that whilst he fully appreciated she wasn’t a model, with her good looks, her pale complexion, shoulder-length dark hair and slightly fuller figure she had a natural, unassuming, 'girl-next-door' quality, and he said he would very much like to photograph her for a multi-image feature in his publication. With that in mind he invited her to his home studio for a photo-shoot, though he made it clear from the outset that if she agreed to the shoot she would be expected to remove her clothing - not only her blouse, skirt etcetera, but also her underwear, including bra and panties. He said that in order to exploit her wholesome, refreshing good looks and figure to the maximum, he felt that most, if not all of the published pictures should feature her fully naked. He explained that he shot many of the photo sets which appeared in G.I. and assured her that he would shoot the photos (in monochrome) himself. However, Mr Bainbridge told her that whilst he could guarantee her absolute confidentiality before, and privacy during the shoot, he did caution that, because of Girl Illustrated’s extensive circulation, both in the UK and many other parts of the world, once published it would be widely available on newsstands and in shops. As a result there was no way to control who would see the photos and it was almost inevitable that some of her family, friends and even work colleagues would come across the pictures and would, without doubt recognize her. He also cautioned that any subsequent publicity, especially if the national or local press got wind of it, might cause her extreme embarrassment, as well as impact adversely upon her banking career. He therefore strongly advised that, before committing herself, she ought to think very carefully about all the possible consequences, and might also wish to fully discuss the matter with her husband.

 

In an era when banks demanded the very highest standards of probity of their staff, pictures of one of their young ladies in a ‘girlie’ magazine, with her breasts, buttocks and pubic area exposed for all to see would, without doubt, present a considerable threat to that particular young lady's career. Had a copy of the magazine been 'officially' brought to the attention of one of her superiors at the bank’s Head Office in Croydon, Elizabeth's future promotional prospects would almost certainly have been in serious jeopardy, as would her entire banking career. In the event by good fortune (or perhaps at the whim of a General Manager who may, or may not, have kept a copy of Girl Illustrated under his blotter during staff meetings in order to periodically refresh his memory of what the young female cashier on the other side of his desk looked like without her clothing), her career never faltered.

 

As someone who had always been fairly conservative in her choice of clothing, it is inevitable that Elizabeth had considerable misgivings about disrobing in the presence of a comparative stranger, especially one with whom, in her roll as a respected and responsible officer of the bank, she could have professional dealings. It would certainly make any future banking transactions with that particular client acutely embarrassing. She would be keenly aware that as they sat discussing financial matters across her desk in the hallowed precincts of the bank, only days before she had been reclining on a rug, completely nude whilst he circled around within touching distance, arranging her in various revealing poses and taking some particularly intimate, extremely explicit photos of her.

 

Nevertheless, despite any reservations she may have had, and presumably with her husband’s encouragement, she decided to accept Mr Bainbridge’s invitation, but she did so on the strict understanding that her husband would be present throughout the shoot, both to act as chaperon, and to provide moral support and the much needed reassurance she would need when the time came for her to undress in front of the G.I. Editor, allowing him to see her naked for the first time.

 

During the afternoon prior to her visit Mr Bainbridge telephoned to check that she hadn't had second thoughts and, crucially, to confirm that she was still willing to be photographed nude. That done he went on to discuss a few final details. He reiterated that whilst her face and figure were central to the feature, with the easing of censorship in the UK, female nude models now routinely appeared full-frontal in magazines and therefore she would be expected to do the same. He asked Elizabeth if she shaved her pelvic area and crotch. When told she didn't, he enquired how abundant her pubic hair was, and whether or not it completely obscured her vulva, explaining that more and more readers nowadays were pressing to see a little more of the girls' private parts. Elizabeth informed him that she certainly did possess a considerable bushy growth around her crotch and explained that both she and her husband preferred her with a copious pubic bush. She said that in agreeing to disrobe for the photos she hadn’t realized her naturally unkempt pubes would be an issue. Mr Bainbridge then enquired if she would be willing to shave her lower regions ‘just for the shoot’. He said that a complete absence of pubic hair would ensure her pudendum was clearly visible to the magazine's subscribers (thus putting Girl Illustrated at the vanguard of future trends). So it was that, after much soul-searching, for the one-and-only time in her life (and much to her husband's chagrin), on the morning of the shoot Elizabeth submitted her luxuriant beaver to the ministrations of a pair of scissors and her husband’s electric razor.

 

The appearance of an amateur with a smooth, hairless crotch in a so-called ‘soft porn’ magazine, was something of a novelty in the 1970s, hence the attention she received. It was, after all, an age when few girls or women shaved or waxed their lower regions as convention dictated it was an area only husbands (and perhaps boyfriends) were expected to see. It was also an age when respectable girls wore nothing more daring than the mini skirt, cropped-tops or perhaps bikinis; an age when public nudity was extremely rare; an age when topless ‘page 3’ photos had only begun appearing in the Sun newspaper the previous autumn.

 

After this tentative foray into the world of glamour, Elizabeth was offered more nude work with other publications, all of which were more than happy for her to exhibit her bush of pubic hair. Therefore, despite still working full-time for the Surrey Trustee Savings Bank, and having become marginally less embarrassed when taking off her knickers in front of male photographers, Elizabeth did several more semi-professional shoots involving nudity, both in studio and outdoor, going on to appear in several other men’s (girlie) magazines during the 1970s and 1980s, including (but not exclusively); Fiesta; Club International; Mayfair; and Rustler.

 

In the mid 1980s, and by now the mother of two school-age children, Elizabeth gave birth to twins and a few months later, she persuaded the editor of Fiesta magazine to donate £500 to charity. This sum was to be split between Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity (see link below) and her local hospital children’s charity. Although by this time she was in her late thirties, and having resolved some years previously that in future she would keep her clothes on (at least publicly), in return for the editor's generous donation Elizabeth agreed to do one more studio photo-shoot. Additionally, she agreed that a press release and topless photo of her be sent to all the national newspapers, publicizing the charity donations (and thus the magazine). This latest shoot was undertaken in the full knowledge that a photospread now would not only require her to permit intimate photos, but also the more intrusive type of shots which had become almost de rigueur. The results of the shoot were later published in the October edition of that year’s Fiesta (Vol.20 /10) under the banner: ‘Strip Aid – Elizabeth of Surrey does it for charity’.

 

Subsequently, due to popular requests from Fiesta readers, Elizabeth went on to disrobe twice more for Fiesta magazine; once in 1987 for its "Out to Lunch" 21st Anniversary Special issue, and again in 1989 for its (Vol.23/2) "Heaven & Hell" feature.

 

In later life Elizabeth went on to help found a local club for disabled children and their families, serving for many years on its committee as chairman or treasurer.

 

Elizabeth is now retired and is living in happy obscurity somewhere in the leafy suburbs of south-east England, together with her husband and their two youngest daughters.

  

Source: Media Archive & Biographical Research Bloemfontein SA

  

From various archives, vintage-20thcentury-glamour has managed to assemble this extensive biographical and pictorial tribute to a young lady who, at considerable risk to her professional career, graced several glamour magazines in the 70s & 80s. Many of the images are believed to be from her husband’s personal collection, others from her various magazine appearances. It was Elizabeth’s desire to raise funds for charity back in 1986 when she again answered Fiesta’s call to remove her clothes and display that enchanting cleft of much pleasure which most other respectable ladies of her era generally choose to keep hidden away from view, inside their knickers. Therefore, as a token of our appreciation, we are happy to repeat that charity appeal here.

  

If you wish to donate to Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity you can do so by visiting:

 

www.gosh.org/donate/

   

There were two cubs born to a 5-6 year old sow at Katmai. She was a good mother. One of her cubs is pictured. At that same time there was a male bear there that was killing cubs. I watched him ambush another mother and her 3 cubs out on the falls one day. The cubs had followed mom out onto the Brooks Falls. He charged them. The cubs freaked and were swept over the falls. He did kill the one cub. Soon after that he tried to kill the pictured mom's cubs. She was able to drive him off, but, she lost one cub and he broke her front paw. She was very protective of that cub. She managed to get around on 3 legs, but, couldn't catch salmon and had to scavenge dead salmon and left overs. In mid July she was so thin. I didn't think she would make it. But, by fall she had fattened up nicely. There was a very good run of salmon that year. So, this is how the pictured cub learned to survive. Scavenging salmon. Cubs learn from their mothers. If she is good at catching fish most likely they will be to. If she isn't good the same goes for them. I kept track of this cub over the years as she grew up. When she was 5 years old she had 2 cubs. The salmon run was pretty bad. She was having trouble just feeding herself. The cubs were starving. One cub got so weak it couldn't follow mom anymore and just stood in the edge of the woods and cried. I tried to get the Rangers to let me go catch it. Mom, had wandered about a mile down the beach, so, I wasn't worried about her defending the cub. I was told "NO! Just let nature take its course". For 2 days the cub cried. It was heart rending. Then it wasn't crying anymore. The Rangers checked and found it dead. I was pretty upset. I told them that the other cub was almost to weak to walk and if we didn't rescue it, it would die. Again, they told me "let nature take it course". A few days later and that cub also died. That was one of the saddest trips I ever had at Katmai.

Katmai is an awesome place. But, it can also be a very cruel place. I have seen big males with horrible wounds. One had a chunk about a foot square torn out of his side. He was fishing and acting like he wasn't even hurt. My brother and myself used to go there in mid to late September after the lodge had closed and the visitors were all gone. Usually we had the campground all to ourselves. I used to sit on the platform at the falls for 12 hours and see maybe 5 fisherman. Not anymore! The first time a Ranger came down at 6am to see if we had survived the night. They weren't to happy that we were there. I vividly remember the first night. About 1-2am I woke up to a bear snuffling long the edge of my tent. It was about a foot from my head. That thin nylon makes you feel really safe. ;-) After a couple of "Hey Bear's" it wandered away. I laid awake for quite awhile afterwards. But, after a few nights like that, you get to where you can go right back to sleep, knowing that they are mostly curious and mean no harm. We were always very careful to not have anything that might smell like food in our tents. We also started putting a few mothballs under the edge of the tent. This also helped them to keep their distance. We learned about doing that from an old Alaskan woodsman that we met. I must admit that the first time we did it, we over did it. Way to many. We both woke up with splitting headaches. So, many stories. So, many trips. This one was sad. But, there have been so many that were happy trips. They by far, out weigh the sad moments.

A few months ago i met Tramp, he was filthy, cold, hungry and to top it off Homeless, mother no where to be seen. I took him in, like i have with many before, because i adore animals and can't bare to walk past needy ones and this is a fast update of how he is doing now as so many of you asked.

As you see he has survived which is not easy when there so young, you must act like there mother as there totally dependent on you for everything(Yes even need help going to toilet.) He has grown alot this last month and he loves tuna, making a mess and cuddles and is one of the most loving cats ever.. I love him just so much and just wish people would adopt strays and sheltered animals more rather than pay money for so called designer animal, all animals deserve love they don't deserve to suffer because there not the so called good looking one, or small breed etc etc.. <3

Okay, John and Jax. Having been tagged by both of you in less than 24 hours, I guess I really need to go ahead and devote the time to this task. My favorite 10 albums of all time. IMPOSSIBLE! It simply cannot be done. To try and cultivate into a mere 10 albums (and let alone rank them) a half a century of musical tastes and preferences is physically impossible. So I cannot even begin to do so.

 

I can however, relate to you perhaps ten albums that, for a plethera of reasons, have impacted who I am, how I feel about life or world issues or just everyday living, or have seeded themselves firmly into the medley of musical variations I have come to enjoy over the span of 50 years. Some are rock, some are country, some are blues, some are just uniquely different. But the majority of them have had their early roots in the blues, or have been influenced by various blues artists to some degree. So in no particular order, here they are.

 

SRV, Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble, The Sky is Crying.

 

Life by the Drop

 

Released about one year after Vaughan's death in 1990, the album features ten tracks originally recorded between 1984 and 1989.

 

The Sky Is Crying illustrates many of Vaughan's musical influences, including songs in the style of traditional Delta blues, Chicago blues, jump blues, jazz blues, and Jimi Hendrix. The album's tone alternates primarily between uptempo pieces and gritty, slow blues. The album includes a Grammy-winning extended instrumental cover version of Jimi Hendrix's "Little Wing"; "Chitlins con Carne", a jazz instrumental; and, "Life by the Drop", a song written by Vaughan's friend Doyle Bramhall and played on acoustic guitar. This song is not about Vaughan's struggle with drug abuse, as many think, but actually about Vaughan's friendship with Doyle Bramhall from Bramhall's perspective.

 

ZZ Top, Tres Hombres.

 

Hot, Blue and Righteous

 

Tres Hombres is the third album by American blues-rock band ZZ Top, released in 1973, and marked the first of many times the band worked with engineer Terry Manning. It proved to be the group's commercial breakthrough, attracting a far larger fanbase. The album hit the top ten while the single "La Grange" hit 41 on the singles chart.

 

The band's name is often said to be a combination of two popular brands of rolling paper, Zig-Zag and Top. It has also been claimed as a tribute to blues singer Z. Z. Hill. However, Gibbons wrote in his autobiography, Rock + Roll Gearhead, that it actually came from a tribute to and a play on the name of blues guitar master B. B. King. The band had planned to call themselves Z.Z. King, but felt it was too similar. Since B.B. King was at the "top", they settled on ZZ Top.

 

In January 1973, ZZ Top opened for The Rolling Stones three shows in Hawaii. They also began recording with engineer Terry Manning at Ardent Studios in Memphis. The resultant third album, Tres Hombres (1973), was the first for which the band gained a million-seller and wide acclaim. Hombres featured ZZ's classic hit "La Grange", written about the Chicken Ranch, a famous La Grange, Texas bordello (that was also the subject of the musical The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas). Other album cuts like "Waitin' for the Bus" and its immediate follower "Jesus Just Left Chicago" became fan favorites and rock-radio staples. However, my favorite tune to be spawned on this album was "Hot, Blue and Righteous".

 

Delbert McClinton, Never Been Rocked Enough.

 

Every Time I Roll the Dice

 

This album is probably the most currently produced album on my list here, and possibly on my list of the 50 most influential albums for me. It as produced and relased in 1992. Nothing since then, at least to my immediate knowledge, would make the list.

 

Delbert McClinton (born 4 November 1940, Lubbock, Texas) is a singer-songwriter, guitarist, harmonica player, and pianist. Active as a side-man since at least 1962 and as a band leader since 1972, he has recorded several major-label albums, and charted singles on the Billboard Hot 100, Mainstream Rock Tracks, and Hot Country Songs charts. His highest-peaking single was "Tell Me About It", a 1992 duet with Tanya Tucker which reached #4 on the Country charts. He has also had four albums that made it to #1 on the U.S. Blues chart, and another that reached #2.

 

His 1992 release of this album featured the hit single "Every Time I Roll the Dice", which made it to #13 on the US Mainstream Rock charts, While the album only made it to #113. He has written for and recorded with a group of musicians that reads like the who's who or the music industry, including John Lennon.

 

And at the legendary Skyliner Ballroom, where McClinton's band was the only white act to play its Blue Monday nights AND be the backing band for the headliners, he received a first-class tutelage from the masters of blues music like Jimmy Reed, Howlin' Wolf and Sonny Boy Williamson. McClinton cut a number of local and regional singles before hitting the national charts in 1962 playing harmonica on Bruce Channel's now classic “Hey! Baby.” On a subsequent package tour of England, Delbert showed some of his harp licks to the rhythm guitarist for a young band at the bottom of the bill. The lessons he gave John Lennon were later heard on hit singles by The Beatles; when the two met Lennon already knew the instrument's basics, and the experienced McClinton shared some new licks with him.

 

Pink Floyd, Momentary Lapse of Reason

 

On The Turning Away.

 

A Momentary Lapse of Reason is the thirteenth studio album by English progressive rock group Pink Floyd. It was released in the UK and US in September 1987. In 1985 guitarist David Gilmour began to assemble a group of musicians to work on his third solo album. At the end of 1986 he changed his mind, and decided that the new material would instead be included in a new Pink Floyd album. Subsequently Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason and keyboardist Richard Wright (who had left the group in 1979) were brought on board for the project. Although for legal reasons Wright could not be re-admitted to the band, he and Mason helped Gilmour craft what would become the first Pink Floyd album since the departure of lyricist and bass guitarist Roger Waters in December 1985.

 

The album was recorded primarily on Gilmour's converted houseboat, Astoria. Its production was marked by an ongoing legal dispute between Waters and the band as to who owned the rights to Pink Floyd's name, which was not resolved until several months after the album was released. Unlike most of Pink Floyd's studio albums, A Momentary Lapse of Reason has no central theme, and is instead a collection of rock songs written mostly by Gilmour and musician Anthony Moore. Although the album received mixed reviews and was derided by Waters, with the help of an enormously successful world tour it easily out-sold their previous album The Final Cut. A Momentary Lapse of Reason is certified multi-platinum in the US.

 

Although the amazing talents of Water's were not present on this album, it still spawned two of my all time favorite songs, "Dogs of War", and "On the Turning Away".

 

Iron Maiden, Live After Death.

 

Rime of the Ancient Mariner

 

Live After Death is a live album by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on October 14, 1985 on EMI in Europe and its sister label Capitol Records in the US (it was re-released by Sanctuary/Columbia Records in the US in 2002). It was recorded during the band's World Slavery Tour. The album was instrumental in establishing the band as an extraordinary live band and is regarded as one of the best live albums ever recorded.

 

For anyone with a love of metal, Iron Maiden is a must hear band. The cover art was done by Derek Riggs, and pictures the band's mascot, Eddie rising from a grave. On that grave is a tombstone with a quote from the fantasy and horror fiction author H. P. Lovecraft's The Nameless City:

 

"That is not dead which can eternal lie

Yet with strange aeons even death may die."

 

The proper quote is actually "And with strange..." instead of "Yet with strange...". A similar version of this phrase is used in Metallica's song "The Thing That Should Not Be" from the Master of Puppets album.

 

Queensryche, Operation Mindcrime.

 

Suite Sister Mary

 

Operation: Mindcrime is a concept album by American progressive metal band Queensrÿche. Released on May 3, 1988, it is the band's third full-length album. A rock opera, its story follows a man who becomes disillusioned with the society of the time and reluctantly becomes involved with a revolutionary group as an assassin of political leaders. The album is highly regarded within the heavy metal community, often labelled as one of the genre's finest works. It ranked at number 10 at metal-rules.com's best heavy metal albums ever. In January 1989, it ranked #34 on Kerrang! magazine's "100 Greatest Heavy Metal Albums Of All Time."

 

The album begins with the protagonist, Nikki, in a hospital. He lies in a near catatonic state, unable to remember anything but snippets from his past. Suddenly, Nikki's memories come flooding back in a torrent. He remembers how, as a heroin addict and would-be political radical frustrated with contemporary society, he was manipulated into joining a supposed secret organization dedicated to revolution. At the head of this organization is a political and religious demagogue known only as Dr. X, who by manipulating Nikki through a combination of his heroin addiction and brainwashing techniques, uses Nikki as an assassin. Whenever Dr. X uses the word "mindcrime" Nikki becomes his docile puppet, a state which Dr. X uses to command Nikki to undertake any murder that the Doctor wishes. Through one of Dr. X's probable associates, a corrupt priest named Father William, Nikki is offered the services of a prostitute-turned-nun named Sister Mary. Through his friendship and growing affection toward Sister Mary, Nikki begins to question the nature of what he is doing. Dr. X notices this and, seeing a potential threat in Mary, orders Nikki to kill both her and the priest. Nikki goes to Mary's church and kills the priest, but after confronting Mary fails to comply with the command to murder her. He and Mary decided to leave the organization together, and Nikki goes to Dr. X to tell him that they are out. Dr. X, however, reminds Nikki that he is an addict, and that he is the one who can provide him with his daily fix. Nikki leaves, conflicted and returns to Mary, only to find her dead, hanging from her own rosary. He cannot cope with the loss, as well as the possibility that he himself may have killed her and not known it, and begins to succumb to insanity. The police, arriving on the scene, arrest him for Mary's murder and the murders he committed for Dr. X. He is put into a hospital, where he begins to remember what has happened.

 

Rush, Hemispheres.

 

La Villa Strangiato

 

Hemispheres is the sixth studio album by the Canadian rock band Rush, released in 1978. The album was recorded at Rockfield Studios in Wales and mixed at Trident Studios in London. This album continues Rush's trend of using the fantasy and science fiction lyrics written by Neil Peart. Similar to their 1976 release, 2112, Hemispheres contains a single, epic song broken into chapters as the first half of the album ("Cygnus X-1, Book II: Hemispheres") while the second half contains two more conventionally-executed tracks ("Circumstances", "The Trees"), then is rounded out by the nine-and-a-half-minute instrumental, "La Villa Strangiato".

 

The album contains examples of Rush's adherence to progressive rock standards including the use of epic, multi-movement song structures, complex rhythms and time signatures, and flexible guitar solos, like those found in "La Villa Strangiato".

 

Hemispheres was Rush's fourth consecutive Gold album upon release in 1978 and would subsequently go Platinum in the US. For a short period of time, the album was released on Canadian red vinyl in a gatefold sleeve with poster (catalogue number SANR-1-1015), and as a limited edition picture disc (catalogue number SRP-1300),both have which become much sought after collectors items.

 

Hang in there, folks....only 3 to go. I apologize, but I try not to halfway do anything...LOL!

 

Metallica, Ride the Lightning.

 

Ride The Lightning

 

Ride the Lightning is the second studio album by the American heavy metal band Metallica. It was released on July 27, 1984 through Megaforce Records and was re-released on November 19, 1984 by Elektra Records. Ride the Lightning was certified gold by the RIAA on November 5, 1987 and was most recently certified 5x platinum on June 9, 2003.

 

Ride the Lightning retains the speed of Kill 'Em All on songs like "Trapped Under Ice" and "Fight Fire with Fire", but also contains the first of Metallica's longer, more intricate tracks, such as "Fade to Black" and the nearly 9-minute closing instrumental "The Call of Ktulu". "Ride the Lightning" is the last Metallica album to credit former member, Dave Mustaine. Ride the Lightning was listed at #3 on a list compiled by metal-rules.com of the Top 100 Metal Albums of All Time.

 

"Ride the Lightning" is Metallica's first song which directly pointed on the misery of the criminal justice system. The song is one of two on the album that credits former member Dave Mustaine. The lyrics of the song "Ride the Lightning" are written from the perspective of someone who is forthcoming death-by-electrocution, although he didn't commit murder.

 

"For Whom the Bell Tolls" was composed by Cliff Burton, James Hetfield, and Lars Ulrich. The songs inspiration is Ernest Hemingway's novel For Whom the Bell Tolls about the dishonor of modern warfare and Robert Jordan's eminent doom during the bloody Spanish Civil War, with specific allusions to the scene in which five soldiers are obliterated during an air-strike, whilst taking a position on a hill.

 

The lyrics of Fade to Black suggest a man contemplating, then eventually committing suicide. Metallica revealed that they have received letters from fans who were dissuaded from committing suicide by the song.

 

"Creeping Death" describes the Plague of the Firstborn (Exodus 12:29). The lyrics deal with the 10 plagues on Egypt, and throughout the song, four of the ten plagues are mentioned as well as the Passover.

 

"The Call of Ktulu" was Metallica's second instrumental song, following the first instrumental "(Anesthesia) Pulling Teeth" from Kill 'Em All. The song working title was originally "When Hell Freezes Over".

 

The idea of the song "The Call of Ktulu" is based upon H.P. Lovecraft's book The Shadow Over Innsmouth which was first introduced to the rest of the band by Cliff Burton. The song's name was taken from one of H.P. Lovecraft's main stories featuring Cthulhu, The Call of Cthulhu, which was written in 1928 for the magazine Weird Tales. The name "Ktulu" is originally written "Cthulhu" by H.P. Lovecraft.

 

And all this time you thought they were just a bunch of fucking stoners.....hehehe.

 

Led Zeppelin, IV.

 

Battle of Evermore

 

The fourth album by the English rock band Led Zeppelin was released on 8 November 1971. No title is printed on the album, so it is generally referred to as Led Zeppelin IV, following the naming standard used by the band's first three studio albums. Also the album has alternatively been referred to as , Four Symbols, The Fourth Album (those two titles each having been used in the Atlantic Records catalogue), Untitled, Runes, Sticks, ZoSo and The Hermit. Zoso is also the moniker for the band's guitarist, Jimmy Page.

 

Upon its release, Led Zeppelin IV was a commercial and critical success. The album is one of the best-selling albums in history at 37 million units. It has shipped over 23 million units in the United States alone, putting it third on the all-time list in the United States and twelfth world-wide. In 2003, the album was ranked 66th on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

 

"Black Dog" got its name from a stray black dog that was roaming about the concourse of Headley Grange during recording sessions for the song.

 

"The Battle of Evermore" and "Misty Mountain Hop" are references to J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings novels.

 

"Going to California" is a reference to John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath.

 

The idea for each member of the band to choose a personal emblem for the cover was Page's. In an interview he gave in 1977, he recalled:

 

After all this crap that we'd had with the critics, I put it to everybody else that it'd be a good idea to put out something totally anonymous. At first I wanted just one symbol on it, but then it was decided that since it was our fourth album and there were four of us, we could each choose our own symbol. I designed mine and everyone else had their own reasons for using the symbols that they used.

 

Page stated that he designed his own symbol himself and has never publicly disclosed any reasoning behind it. However, it has been argued that his symbol appeared as early as 1557 to represent Saturn. The symbol is sometimes referred to as "ZoSo", though Page has explained that it was not in fact intended to be a word at all.

 

Bassist John Paul Jones' symbol, which he chose from Rudolf Koch's Book of Signs, is a single circle intersecting 3 vesica pisces (a triquetra). It is intended to symbolise a person who possesses both confidence and competence.

 

Drummer John Bonham's symbol, the three interlocking rings, was picked by the drummer from the same book. It represents the triad of mother, father and child, but also happens to be the logo for Ballantine beer.

 

Singer Robert Plant's symbol was his own design, being based on the sign of the supposed Mu civilisation.

 

There is also a fifth, smaller symbol chosen by guest vocalist Sandy Denny representing her contribution to the track "The Battle of Evermore"; it appears in the credits list on the inner sleeve of the LP, serving as an asterisk and is shaped like three triangles touching at their points.

 

And finally we make it home with....

 

Allman Brothers, Live at Fillmore East.

 

Statesboro Blues - Live

 

At Fillmore East is a double live album by The Allman Brothers Band. The band's breakthrough success, At Fillmore East was released in July 1971. It ranks Number 49 among Rolling Stone magazine’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time and remains among the top-selling albums in the band’s catalogue. It is often cited as being one of the most well-known live recordings in history.

 

Recorded at the Fillmore East concert hall, the storied rock venue in New York City, on Friday and Saturday March 12, 1971–March 13, 1971, it showcased the band's mixture of blues, Southern rock and jazz. The cover of Blind Willie McTell's "Statesboro Blues" which opens the set showcases Duane Allman's slide guitar work in open E Tuning. "Whipping Post" became the standard for a long, epic jam that never lost interest (opening in 11/8 time, unusual territory for a rock band), while the ethereal-to-furious "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed", with its harmonized melody, Latin feel and burning drive invited comparisons with John Coltrane (especially Duane's solo-ending pull-offs, a direct nod to the jazz saxophonist).

 

The album was produced by Tom Dowd, who condensed the running time of various songs, occasionally even merging multiple performances onto one track. At Fillmore East peaked at #13 on Billboard's Pop Albums chart.

 

Two other songs recorded during the same set of shows, "Trouble No More", and the memorable "Mountain Jam", were later released on Eat a Peach, the latter spanning two sides of the double album.

 

Those songs were later included in their entirety, along with uncut versions of some, re-edited versions of others, and some previously omitted tracks, on a new release of the Fillmore material entitled The Fillmore Concerts (1992). "Stormy Monday" gained back a harmonica solo; "Don't Keep Me Wonderin'" and "Drunken Hearted Boy" were included as well.

 

In 1998 a 5.1 DTS mix of the original version was released with Duane Allman in the left rear channel, Dickey Betts in the right rear channel, Jai Johanny Johanson in the front left channel, Butch Trucks in the right front channel and Gregg Allman and Berry Oakley both spread out over the front and center channels.

 

George Kimball of Rolling Stone magazine hailed them as "the best damn rock and roll band this country has produced in the past five years." A few months later, group leader Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle accident. The group survived that and the death of bassist Oakley in another motorcycle accident a year later; with replacement members Chuck Leavell and Lamar Williams, the Allman Brothers Band achieved its peak commercial success in 1973 with the album Brothers and Sisters and the hit single "Ramblin' Man". Internal turmoil overtook the band soon after; the group dissolved in 1976, reformed briefly at the end of the decade with additional personnel changes, and dissolved again in 1982.

 

In 1989, the group reformed with some new members and has been recording and touring since. A series of personnel changes in the late 1990s was capped by the departure of Betts. The group found stability during the 2000s with Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks, the nephew of their drummer, serving as its guitarists, and became renowned for their month-long string of shows in New York City each spring. The band has been awarded eleven gold and five platinum albums between 1971 and 2005 and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. Rolling Stone ranked them 52nd on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time in 2004.

A dash of yellow, as a charity collector holds on to his brolly as everyone else rushes past him going about their lives under the cold drizzle in Oxford, UK.

 

The amazing thing is how this turned out to be associated to HIMYM, a sitcom I haven't had the pleasure (nor time) to sit and watch yet.

 

I will continue to buy flowers for my mother. I will think of how she loved them and not how sad it is she will no longer enjoy them.

 

And a special thank you to my Flickr friends for all their kind words these last few days. It's kind of odd (in a good way), but even though I have not met the majority of you lovely people, your words touched me deeply. I am very grateful for your friendship here on Flickr.

 

Selma, AL | March 04, 2007

 

"Here today, I must begin because at the Unity breakfast this morning I was saving for last and the list was so long I left him out after that introduction. So I'm going to start by saying how much I appreciate the friendship and the support and the outstanding work that he does each and every day, not just in Capitol Hill but also back here in the district. Please give a warm round of applause for your Congressman Artur Davis.

 

It is a great honor to be here. Reverend Jackson, thank you so much. To the family of Brown A.M.E, to the good Bishop Kirkland, thank you for your wonderful message and your leadership.

 

I want to acknowledge one of the great heroes of American history and American life, somebody who captures the essence of decency and courage, somebody who I have admired all my life and were it not for him, I'm not sure I'd be here today, Congressman John Lewis.

 

I'm thankful to him. To all the distinguished guests and clergy, I'm not sure I'm going to thank Reverend Lowery because he stole the show. I was mentioning earlier, I know we've got C.T. Vivian in the audience, and when you have to speak in front of somebody who Martin Luther King said was the greatest preacher he ever heard, then you've got some problems.

 

And I'm a little nervous about following so many great preachers. But I'm hoping that the spirit moves me and to all my colleagues who have given me such a warm welcome, thank you very much for allowing me to speak to you here today.

 

You know, several weeks ago, after I had announced that I was running for the Presidency of the United States, I stood in front of the Old State Capitol in Springfield, Illinois; where Abraham Lincoln delivered his speech declaring, drawing in scripture, that a house divided against itself could not stand.

 

And I stood and I announced that I was running for the presidency. And there were a lot of commentators, as they are prone to do, who questioned the audacity of a young man like myself, haven't been in Washington too long.

 

And I acknowledge that there is a certain presumptuousness about this.

 

But I got a letter from a friend of some of yours named Reverend Otis Moss Jr. in Cleveland, and his son, Otis Moss III is the Pastor at my church and I must send greetings from Dr. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. but I got a letter giving me encouragement and saying how proud he was that I had announced and encouraging me to stay true to my ideals and my values and not to be fearful.

 

And he said, if there's some folks out there who are questioning whether or not you should run, just tell them to look at the story of Joshua because you're part of the Joshua generation.

 

So I just want to talk a little about Moses and Aaron and Joshua, because we are in the presence today of a lot of Moseses. We're in the presence today of giants whose shoulders we stand on, people who battled, not just on behalf of African Americans but on behalf of all of America; that battled for America's soul, that shed blood , that endured taunts and formant and in some cases gave -- torment and in some cases gave the full measure of their devotion.

 

Like Moses, they challenged Pharaoh, the princes, powers who said that some are atop and others are at the bottom, and that's how it's always going to be.

 

There were people like Anna Cooper and Marie Foster and Jimmy Lee Jackson and Maurice Olette, C.T. Vivian, Reverend Lowery, John Lewis, who said we can imagine something different and we know there is something out there for us, too.

 

Thank God, He's made us in His image and we reject the notion that we will for the rest of our lives be confined to a station of inferiority, that we can't aspire to the highest of heights, that our talents can't be expressed to their fullest. And so because of what they endured, because of what they marched; they led a people out of bondage.

 

They took them across the sea that folks thought could not be parted. They wandered through a desert but always knowing that God was with them and that, if they maintained that trust in God, that they would be all right. And it's because they marched that the next generation hasn't been bloodied so much.

 

It's because they marched that we elected councilmen, congressmen. It is because they marched that we have Artur Davis and Keith Ellison. It is because they marched that I got the kind of education I got, a law degree, a seat in the Illinois senate and ultimately in the United States senate.

 

It is because they marched that I stand before you here today. I was mentioning at the Unity Breakfast this morning, my -- at the Unity Breakfast this morning that my debt is even greater than that because not only is my career the result of the work of the men and women who we honor here today. My very existence might not have been possible had it not been for some of the folks here today. I mentioned at the Unity Breakfast that a lot of people been asking, well, you know, your father was from Africa, your mother, she's a white woman from Kansas. I'm not sure that you have the same experience.

 

And I tried to explain, you don't understand. You see, my Grandfather was a cook to the British in Kenya. Grew up in a small village and all his life, that's all he was -- a cook and a house boy. And that's what they called him, even when he was 60 years old. They called him a house boy. They wouldn't call him by his last name.

 

Sound familiar?

 

He had to carry a passbook around because Africans in their own land, in their own country, at that time, because it was a British colony, could not move about freely. They could only go where they were told to go. They could only work where they were told to work.

 

Yet something happened back here in Selma, Alabama. Something happened in Birmingham that sent out what Bobby Kennedy called, 'Ripples of hope all around the world.' Something happened when a bunch of women decided they were going to walk instead of ride the bus after a long day of doing somebody else's laundry, looking after somebody else's children. When men who had PhD's decided that's enough and we're going to stand up for our dignity.

 

That sent a shout across oceans so that my grandfather began to imagine something different for his son. His son, who grew up herding goats in a small village in Africa could suddenly set his sights a little higher and believe that maybe a black man in this world had a chance.

 

What happened in Selma, Alabama and Birmingham also stirred the conscience of the nation. It worried folks in the White House who said, “You know, we're battling Communism. How are we going to win hearts and minds all across the world? If right here in our own country, John, we're not observing the ideals set fort in our Constitution, we might be accused of being hypocrites. So the Kennedy's decided we're going to do an air lift. We're going to go to Africa and start bringing young Africans over to this country and give them scholarships to study so they can learn what a wonderful country America is.

 

This young man named Barack Obama got one of those tickets and came over to this country. He met this woman whose great great-great-great-grandfather had owned slaves; but she had a good idea there was some craziness going on because they looked at each other and they decided that we know that the world as it has been it might not be possible for us to get together and have a child. There was something stirring across the country because of what happened in Selma, Alabama, because some folks are willing to march across a bridge. So they got together and Barack Obama Jr. was born. So don't tell me I don't have a claim on Selma, Alabama. Don't tell me I'm not coming home to Selma, Alabama.

 

I'm here because somebody marched. I'm here because you all sacrificed for me. I stand on the shoulders of giants. I thank the Moses generation; but we've got to remember, now, that Joshua still had a job to do. As great as Moses was, despite all that he did, leading a people out of bondage, he didn't cross over the river to see the Promised Land. God told him your job is done. You'll see it. You'll be at the mountain top and you can see what I've promised. What I've promised to Abraham and Isaac and Jacob. You will see that I've fulfilled that promise but you won't go there.

 

We're going to leave it to the Joshua generation to make sure it happens. There are still battles that need to be fought; some rivers that need to be crossed. Like Moses, the task was passed on to those who might not have been as deserving, might not have been as courageous, find themselves in front of the risks that their parents and grandparents and great grandparents had taken. That doesn't mean that they don't still have a burden to shoulder, that they don't have some responsibilities. The previous generation, the Moses generation, pointed the way. They took us 90% of the way there. We still got that 10% in order to cross over to the other side. So the question, I guess, that I have today is what's called of us in this Joshua generation? What do we do in order to fulfill that legacy; to fulfill the obligations and the debt that we owe to those who allowed us to be here today?

 

Now, I don't think we could ever fully repay that debt. I think that we're always going to be looking back; but, there are at least a few suggestions that I would have in terms of how we might fulfill that enormous legacy. The first is to recognize our history. John Lewis talked about why we're here today. But I worry sometimes -- we've got black history month, we come down and march every year, once a year, we occasionally celebrate the various events of the civil rights movement, we celebrate Dr. Kings birthday but it strikes me that understanding our history and knowing what it means is an everyday activity.

 

Now, I don't think we could ever fully repay that debt. I think that we're always going to be looking back, but there are at least a few suggestions that I would have in terms of how we might fulfill that enormous legacy. The first is to recognize our history. John Lewis talked about why we're here today. But I worry sometimes -- we've got black history month, we come down and march every year, once a year. We occasionally celebrate the various events of the Civil Rights Movement, we celebrate Dr. King's birthday, but it strikes me that understanding our history and knowing what it means, is an everyday activity.

 

Moses told the Joshua generation; don't forget where you came from. I worry sometimes, that the Joshua generation in its success forgets where it came from. Thinks it doesn't have to make as many sacrifices. Thinks that the very height of ambition is to make as much money as you can, to drive the biggest car and have the biggest house and wear a Rolex watch and get your own private jet, get some of that Oprah money. And I think that's a good thing. There's nothing wrong with making money, but if you know your history, then you know that there is a certain poverty of ambition involved in simply striving just for money. Materialism alone will not fulfill the possibilities of your existence. You have to fill that with something else. You have to fill it with the golden rule. You've got to fill it with thinking about others. And if we know our history, then we will understand that that is the highest mark of service.

 

Second thing that the Joshua generation needs to understand is that the principles of equality that were set fort and were battled for have to be fought each and every day. It is not a one-time thing. I was remarking at the unity breakfast on the fact that the single most significant concern that this justice department under this administration has had with respect to discrimination has to do with affirmative action. That they have basically spent all their time worrying about colleges and universities around the country that are given a little break to young African Americans and Hispanics to make sure that they can go to college, too.

 

I had a school in southern Illinois that set up a program for PhD's in math and science for African Americans. And the reason they had set it up is because we only had less than 1% of the PhD's in science and math go to African Americans. At a time when we are competing in a global economy, when we're not competing just against folks in North Carolina or Florida or California, we're competing against folks in China and India and we need math and science majors, this university thought this might be a nice thing to do. And the justice department wrote them a letter saying we are going to threaten to sue you for reverse discrimination unless you cease this program.

 

And it reminds us that we still got a lot of work to do, and that the basic enforcement of anti-discrimination laws, the injustice that still exists within our criminal justice system, the disparity in terms of how people are treated in this country continues. It has gotten better. And we should never deny that it's gotten better. But we shouldn't forget that better is not good enough. That until we have absolute equality in this country in terms of people being treated on the basis of their color or their gender, that that is something that we've got to continue to work on and the Joshua generation has a significant task in making that happen.

 

Third thing -- we've got to recognize that we fought for civil rights, but we've still got a lot of economic rights that have to be dealt with. We've got 46 million people uninsured in this country despite spending more money on health care than any nation on earth. It makes no sense. As a consequence, we've got what's known as a health care disparity in this nation because many of the uninsured are African American or Latino. Life expectancy is lower. Almost every disease is higher within minority communities. The health care gap.

 

Blacks are less likely in their schools to have adequate funding. We have less-qualified teachers in those schools. We have fewer textbooks in those schools. We got in some schools rats outnumbering computers. That's called the achievement gap. You've got a health care gap and you've got an achievement gap. You've got Katrina still undone. I went down to New Orleans three weeks ago. It still looks bombed out. Still not rebuilt. When 9/11 happened, the federal government had a special program of grants to help rebuild. They waived any requirement that Manhattan would have to pay 10% of the cost of rebuilding. When Hurricane Andrew happened in Florida, 10% requirement, they waived it because they understood that some disasters are so devastating that we can't expect a community to rebuild. New Orleans -- the largest national catastrophe in our history, the federal government says where's your 10%?

 

There is an empathy gap. There is a gap in terms of sympathizing for the folks in New Orleans. It's not a gap that the American people felt because we saw how they responded. But somehow our government didn't respond with that same sense of compassion, with that same sense of kindness. And here is the worst part, the tragedy in New Orleans happened well before the hurricane struck because many of those communities, there were so many young men in prison, so many kids dropping out, so little hope.

  

A hope gap. A hope gap that still pervades too many communities all across the country and right here in Alabama. So the question is, then, what are we, the Joshua generation, doing to close those gaps? Are we doing every single thing that we can do in Congress in order to make sure that early education is adequately funded and making sure that we are raising the minimum wage so people can have dignity and respect?

 

Are we ensuring that, if somebody loses a job, that they're getting retrained? And that, if they've lost their health care and pension, somebody is there to help them get back on their feet? Are we making sure we're giving a second chance to those who have strayed and gone to prison but want to start a new life? Government alone can't solve all those problems, but government can help. It's the responsibility of the Joshua generation to make sure that we have a government that is as responsive as the need that exists all across America. That brings me to one other point, about the Joshua generation, and that is this -- that it's not enough just to ask what the government can do for us-- it's important for us to ask what we can do for ourselves.

 

One of the signature aspects of the civil rights movement was the degree of discipline and fortitude that was instilled in all the people who participated. Imagine young people, 16, 17, 20, 21, backs straight, eyes clear, suit and tie, sitting down at a lunch counter knowing somebody is going to spill milk on you but you have the discipline to understand that you are not going to retaliate because in showing the world how disciplined we were as a people, we were able to win over the conscience of the nation. I can't say for certain that we have instilled that same sense of moral clarity and purpose in this generation. Bishop, sometimes I feel like we've lost it a little bit.

 

I'm fighting to make sure that our schools are adequately funded all across the country. With the inequities of relying on property taxes and people who are born in wealthy districts getting better schools than folks born in poor districts and that's now how it's supposed to be. That's not the American way. but I'll tell you what -- even as I fight on behalf of more education funding, more equity, I have to also say that , if parents don't turn off the television set when the child comes home from school and make sure they sit down and do their homework and go talk to the teachers and find out how they're doing, and if we don't start instilling a sense in our young children that there is nothing to be ashamed about in educational achievement, I don't know who taught them that reading and writing and conjugating your verbs was something white.

 

We've got to get over that mentality. That is part of what the Moses generation teaches us, not saying to ourselves we can't do something, but telling ourselves that we can achieve. We can do that. We got power in our hands. Folks are complaining about the quality of our government, I understand there's something to be complaining about. I'm in Washington. I see what's going on. I see those powers and principalities have snuck back in there, that they're writing the energy bills and the drug laws.

 

We understand that, but I'll tell you what. I also know that, if cousin Pookie would vote, get off the couch and register some folks and go to the polls, we might have a different kind of politics. That's what the Moses generation teaches us. Take off your bedroom slippers. Put on your marching shoes. Go do some politics. Change this country! That's what we need. We have too many children in poverty in this country and everybody should be ashamed, but don't tell me it doesn't have a little to do with the fact that we got too many daddies not acting like daddies. Don't think that fatherhood ends at conception. I know something about that because my father wasn't around when I was young and I struggled.

 

Those of you who read my book know. I went through some difficult times. I know what it means when you don't have a strong male figure in the house, which is why the hardest thing about me being in politics sometimes is not being home as much as I'd like and I'm just blessed that I've got such a wonderful wife at home to hold things together. Don't tell me that we can't do better by our children, that we can't take more responsibility for making sure we're instilling in them the values and the ideals that the Moses generation taught us about sacrifice and dignity and honesty and hard work and discipline and self-sacrifice. That comes from us. We've got to transmit that to the next generation and I guess the point that I'm making is that the civil rights movement wasn't just a fight against the oppressor; it was also a fight against the oppressor in each of us.

 

Sometimes it's easy to just point at somebody else and say it's their fault, but oppression has a way of creeping into it. Reverend, it has a way of stunting yourself. You start telling yourself, Bishop, I can't do something. I can't read. I can't go to college. I can't start a business. I can't run for Congress. I can't run for the presidency. People start telling you-- you can't do something, after a while, you start believing it and part of what the civil rights movement was about was recognizing that we have to transform ourselves in order to transform the world. Mahatma Gandhi, great hero of Dr. King and the person who helped create the nonviolent movement around the world; he once said that you can't change the world if you haven't changed.

 

If you want to change the world, the change has to happen with you first and that is something that the greatest and most honorable of generations has taught us, but the final thing that I think the Moses generation teaches us is to remind ourselves that we do what we do because God is with us. You know, when Moses was first called to lead people out of the Promised Land, he said I don't think I can do it, Lord. I don't speak like Reverend Lowery. I don't feel brave and courageous and the Lord said I will be with you. Throw down that rod. Pick it back up. I'll show you what to do. The same thing happened with the Joshua generation.

 

Joshua said, you know, I'm scared. I'm not sure that I am up to the challenge, the Lord said to him, every place that the sole of your foot will tread upon, I have given you. Be strong and have courage, for I am with you wherever you go. Be strong and have courage. It's a prayer for a journey. A prayer that kept a woman in her seat when the bus driver told her to get up, a prayer that led nine children through the doors of the little rock school, a prayer that carried our brothers and sisters over a bridge right here in Selma, Alabama. Be strong and have courage.

 

When you see row and row of state trooper facing you, the horses and the tear gas, how else can you walk? Towards them, unarmed, unafraid. When they come start beating your friends and neighbors, how else can you simply kneel down, bow your head and ask the Lord for salvation? When you see heads gashed open and eyes burning and children lying hurt on the side of the road, when you are John Lewis and you've been beaten within an inch of your life on Sunday, how do you wake up Monday and keep on marching?

 

Be strong and have courage, for I am with you wherever you go. We've come a long way in this journey, but we still have a long way to travel. We traveled because God was with us. It's not how far we've come. That bridge outside was crossed by blacks and whites, northerners and southerners, teenagers and children, the beloved community of God's children, they wanted to take those steps together, but it was left to the Joshua's to finish the journey Moses had begun and today we're called to be the Joshua's of our time, to be the generation that finds our way across this river.

 

There will be days when the water seems wide and the journey too far, but in those moments, we must remember that throughout our history, there has been a running thread of ideals that have guided our travels and pushed us forward, even when they're just beyond our reach, liberty in the face of tyranny, opportunity where there was none and hope over the most crushing despair. Those ideals and values beckon us still and when we have our doubts and our fears, just like Joshua did, when the road looks too long and it seems like we may lose our way, remember what these people did on that bridge.

 

Keep in your heart the prayer of that journey, the prayer that God gave to Joshua. Be strong and have courage in the face of injustice. Be strong and have courage in the face of prejudice and hatred, in the face of joblessness and helplessness and hopelessness. Be strong and have courage, brothers and sisters, those who are gathered here today, in the face of our doubts and fears, in the face of skepticism, in the face of cynicism, in the face of a mighty river.

 

Be strong and have courage and let us cross over that Promised Land together. Thank you so much everybody.

  

God bless you."

 

Due to renovations being done in her own living-room, this photo was shot by her husband in his parent's living-room, whilst her husband's mother and father retired to the next room to allow them some privacy.

  

To see other images from this set, click on the album:. . . . "A visit to Mum and Dad's (her husband's parents)"

 

or click on the following link:

www.flickr.com/photos/vintage_20thcentury_glamour/albums/...

 

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Born in London (England) around 1950, Elizabeth Hogben (née Elizabeth Hook) received a certain amount of public attention in the early 1970s when, as a young bank professional and housewife aged 21, she was featured completely naked in one of the UK’s most popular, more upmarket men’s interest magazines of the time.

 

After leaving Gainsborough Road Girls School, Richmond-upon-Thames, Surrey in the mid 1960s aged 16, Elizabeth joined the Kingston-upon-Thames branch of the Surrey Trustee Savings Bank (later merged with Lloyds Bank Ltd to form part of the Lloyds TSB Group), as a trainee junior clerk where, on her first day at work, she met her future husband (one of the bank's cashiers). The couple married three years later, just four weeks and two days after her nineteenth birthday. Elizabeth went on to enjoy an extremely successful banking career for many years, rapidly gaining promotion, first to clerk, to cashier, then to chief cashier and eventually to manager of her own branch at the unusually young age of 26.

 

In her early twenties, whilst working as senior cashier at the Surrey Trustee Savings Bank’s Richmond-upon-Thames branch, Elizabeth was approached by Leslie L. Bainbridge, editor of glossy men's magazine Girl Illustrated. He told her that whilst he fully appreciated she wasn’t a model, with her good looks, her pale complexion, shoulder-length dark hair and slightly fuller figure she had a natural, unassuming, 'girl-next-door' quality, and he said he would very much like to photograph her for a multi-image feature in his publication. With that in mind he invited her to his home studio for a photo-shoot, though he made it clear from the outset that if she agreed to the shoot she would be expected to remove her clothing - not only her blouse, skirt etcetera, but also her underwear, including bra and panties. He said that in order to exploit her wholesome, refreshing good looks and figure to the maximum, he felt that most, if not all of the published pictures should feature her fully naked. He explained that he shot many of the photo sets which appeared in G.I. and assured her that he would shoot the photos (in monochrome) himself. However, Mr Bainbridge told her that whilst he could guarantee her absolute confidentiality before, and privacy during the shoot, he did caution that, because of Girl Illustrated’s extensive circulation, both in the UK and many other parts of the world, once published it would be widely available on newsstands and in shops. As a result there was no way to control who would see the photos and it was almost inevitable that some of her family, friends and colleagues would come across the pictures and would, without doubt recognize her. He also cautioned that any subsequent publicity, especially if the national or local press got wind of it, might cause her extreme embarrassment, as well as impact adversely upon her banking career. He therefore strongly advised that, before committing herself, she ought to think very carefully about all the possible consequences, and might also wish to fully discuss the matter with her husband.

 

In an era when banks demanded the very highest standards of probity of their staff, pictures of one of their young ladies in a ‘girlie’ magazine, with her breasts, buttocks and pubic area exposed for all to see would, without doubt, present a considerable threat to that particular young lady's career. Had a copy of the magazine been 'officially' brought to the attention of one of her superiors at the bank’s Head Office in Croydon, Elizabeth's future promotional prospects would almost certainly have been in serious jeopardy, as would her entire banking career. In the event by good fortune (or perhaps at the whim of a General Manager who may, or may not, have kept a copy of Girl Illustrated under his blotter during staff meetings in order to periodically refresh his memory of what the young female cashier on the other side of his desk looked like without her clothing), her career never faltered.

 

As someone who had always been fairly conservative in her choice of clothing, it is inevitable that Elizabeth had considerable misgivings about disrobing in the presence of a comparative stranger, especially one with whom, in her roll as a respected and responsible officer of the bank, she could have professional dealings. It would certainly make any future banking transactions with that particular client acutely embarrassing. She would be keenly aware that as they sat discussing financial matters across her desk in the hallowed precincts of the bank, only days before she had been reclining on a rug, completely nude whilst he circled around within touching distance, arranging her in various revealing poses and taking some particularly intimate, extremely explicit photos of her.

 

Nevertheless, despite any reservations she may have had, and presumably with her husband’s encouragement, she decided to accept Mr Bainbridge’s invitation, but she did so on the strict understanding that her husband would be present throughout the shoot, both to act as chaperon, and to provide moral support and the much needed reassurance she would need when the time came for her to undress in front of the G.I. Editor, allowing him to see her naked for the first time.

 

During the afternoon before Elizabeth's planned (Sunday) visit to his home-come-studio, Mr Bainbridge telephoned to check that she hadn't had second thoughts and, crucially, to confirm that she was still willing to be photographed nude. When she answered in the affirmative he went on to discuss a few final details. He reiterated that whilst her face and figure were central to the feature, with the easing of censorship in the UK, men's magazines were beginning to include a few 'full-frontal' nude poses of their female models and he impressed upon her that she would also be expected to pose that way. Then, much to her embarrassment, he enquired if she shaved her pelvic area and crotch. Elizabeth told him that no, she didn't. Next he asked how profuse was her pubic hair, and whether or not it significantly obscured her vulva, explaining that increasingly, readers nowadays were pressing to see more of the girls' intimate areas. Somewhat taken aback, Elizabeth told him that when she'd agreed to pose for his publication, she hadn't realized she would be expected to reveal her genitalia for detailed public scrutiny, especially in the pages of a magazine which would be universally available throughout the UK and elsewhere. She said that, if at all possible, she'd prefer not to pose in any way in which her vaginal opening would be visible. She suggested that perhaps an item of underwear, or her hands might be strategically placed for modesty. However, he wanted her to be completely devoid of covering and so, after much discussion, and a considerable amount of coaxing, she agreed she would reveal all, although she advised him that the hair around that area was, indeed, quite bushy. She explained that both she and her husband preferred her with a copious pubic bush. She said that in agreeing to disrobe for the photos she hadn’t realized her naturally unkempt pubic hair would be an issue. Mr Bainbridge then enquired if she would, on this one occasion, be willing to shave her lower regions. He said that a complete absence of pubic hair would ensure that the magazine's subscribers would be in a position to enjoy a completely unhindered view of her labia majora (thus putting Girl Illustrated at the vanguard of future trends).

 

So it was that, after much soul-searching, for the one-and-only time in her life, on the morning of the shoot, and with her husband reluctantly wielding the implements, Elizabeth submitted her luxuriant beaver to the ministrations of a pair of scissors and her husband’s razor.

 

The appearance of an amateur with a smooth, hairless crotch in a so-called ‘soft porn’ magazine, was something of a novelty in the 1970s, hence the attention she received. It was, after all, an age when few girls or women shaved or waxed their lower regions as convention dictated it was an area only husbands (and perhaps boyfriends) were expected to see. It was also an age when respectable girls wore nothing more daring than the mini skirt, cropped-tops or perhaps bikinis; an age when public nudity was extremely rare; an age when topless ‘page 3’ photos had only begun appearing in the Sun newspaper the previous autumn.

 

After this tentative foray into the world of glamour, Elizabeth was offered more nude work with other publications, all of which were more than happy for her to exhibit her bush of pubic hair. Therefore, despite still working full-time for the Surrey Trustee Savings Bank, and having become marginally less embarrassed when taking off her knickers in front of male photographers, Elizabeth did several more semi-professional shoots involving nudity, both in studio and outdoor, going on to appear in several other men’s (girlie) magazines during the 1970s and 1980s, including (but not exclusively); Fiesta; Club International; Mayfair; and Rustler.

 

In the mid 1980s, and by now the mother of two school-age children, Elizabeth gave birth to twins and a few months later, she persuaded the editor of Fiesta magazine to donate £500 to charity. This sum was to be split between Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity (see link below) and her local hospital children’s charity. Although by this time she was in her late thirties, and having resolved some years previously that in future she would keep her clothes on (at least publicly), in return for the editor's generous donation Elizabeth agreed to do one more studio photo-shoot. Additionally, she agreed that a press release and topless photo of her be sent to all the national newspapers, publicizing the charity donations (and thus the magazine). This latest shoot was undertaken in the full knowledge that a photospread now would not only require her to permit intimate photos, but also the more intrusive type of shots which had become almost de rigueur. The results of the shoot were later published in the October edition of that year’s Fiesta (Vol.20 /10) under the banner: ‘Strip Aid – Elizabeth of Surrey does it for charity’.

 

Subsequently, due to popular requests from Fiesta readers, Elizabeth went on to disrobe twice more for Fiesta magazine; once in 1987 for its "Out to Lunch" 21st Anniversary Special issue, and again in 1989 for its (Vol.23/2) "Heaven & Hell" feature.

 

In later life Elizabeth went on to help found a local club for disabled children and their families, serving for many years on its committee as chairman or treasurer.

 

Elizabeth is now retired and is living in happy obscurity somewhere in the leafy suburbs of south-east England, together with her husband and their two youngest daughters.

  

Source: Media Archive & Biographical Research Bloemfontein SA

  

From various archives, vintage-20thcentury-glamour has managed to assemble this extensive biographical and pictorial tribute to a young lady who, at considerable risk to her professional career, graced several glamour magazines in the 70s & 80s. Many of the images are believed to be from her husband’s personal collection, others from her various magazine appearances. It was Elizabeth’s desire to raise funds for charity back in 1986 when she again answered Fiesta’s call to remove her clothes and display that enchanting cleft of much pleasure which most other respectable ladies of her era generally choose to keep hidden away from view, inside their knickers. Therefore, as a token of our appreciation, we are happy to repeat that charity appeal here.

  

If you wish to donate to Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity you can do so by visiting:

 

www.gosh.org/donate/

   

(Practice, practice, practice.)

 

My Mom is a church organist and a piano hobbyist. Her sister has an incredible natural ear and has put her piano playing skills to use most recently as the two of them have hit the nursing-home performance circuit. (Seriously! They're a big hit!)

 

My great-grandparents were Vaudeville performers, travelling though the midwest tent shows in the days of radio and live performance. PG, my Great-Grandma was an AMAZING pianist in the Ragtime/stride style. I was fortunate enough to know her and be so influenced by her playing and love of the American Songbook (Porter, Gershwin, Carmichael, etc.). We had a very special bond.

 

My great-grandaunt Bernie, who passed away not that long ago (after finally turing 100), was another incredible pianist, and could tell you stories about dining with Duke Ellington and the like. Although I never met her mother, my (great-great) Grandmother Mayne, I know that she was a conservatory-trained classical pianist who instilled the love of music in her children.

 

I'm a solid if not virtuosic player. I teach lessons to young kids and love to play. (I also had a major crush on my college piano teacher, which is another topic unto itself...)

 

My husband took lessons for years as a child and still plays now and then. His mother is another gifted piano player who continues to play on a regular basis.

 

Emma can't pass by the piano without playing a few notes, and sometimes I wonder if this is indeed something "in our blood".

 

There are worse afflictions to inherit ;-)

 

Sleeping 6 hours.

Reading.

Watching How I Met Your Mother.

Trying on clothes.

Eating and drinking.

Listening to Lars Winnerbäck.

 

My last day of summerbreak. It's raining.

Me and good friend Elissa like to have fun creating photos in the comfort of my living room. Really pleased with this one, lovely lighting, a shoot through umbrella above her and a gold reflector underneath :)

 

its been a while and I'm guessing that was a very technical description so here goes with other stuff, I'm still at uni doing a photography foundation degree, I love it. I hope to finish this year and start into the photography world!

Random facts atm my favourite shows are 2 broke girls

how I met your mother - just to add really sick of ted stalling, come on who is the mother?!?!

desperate housewives- last series upset to see it go its an end of an era !

 

so I'm currently sitting in my student house listening to the noisy drunks outside, something I WILL NOT miss about the student lifestyle ! lol

 

anyway hope ur all doing good! :D

 

Facebook Page - Twitter - Website

Según How I Met Your Mother, en este edificio trabaja Barney Stinson...

sorry for posting so irregular.. hope you are doing good!

 

i was tagged by Johanna! :-)

 

10 random facts about me:

1 - i love grey's anatomy and how i met your mother!

2 - i don't know why but i love to watch corny series like my grandma does..

3 - my favorite movies are american beauty, little miss sunshine and my sister's keeper

4 - i just moved in an other room in our house

5 - my favorite book is looking for alaska by john green

6 - i would love to speak spanish!

7 - i love sailing with my uncle

8 - i would love to play paino again

9 - i love taking photos with the beautiful evening sunlight

10 - i just photographed with film, but i was disappointed with the result.. :-(

well, i think that these facts about me are quite boring.. :D

  

i tried everything, to make them see me, but every one sees what I can't be

And she lived sadly ever after.

   

Knowing the Prince she so often dreamed about would never save her, because he did not even know of her existence.

   

He met a beautiful but spoiled princess during the ball and married her. But they had an unhappy, marriage which resulted in a divorce and nearly caused a war between the two nations.

  

Meanwhile Cinderella fantasized about him saving her from the clutches of her evil step mother every night.

She never ever met her Prince Charming because the Fairy God Mother never existed, it was all just a dream.

               

Rats: slimfadey and xNickiXstockx

     

(this photo got front page explored and hit number One on explore, it's my first time!!!! thank you all very much!)

 

First day in Sanibel the sky got kinda epic... Clouds are definitely my favorite thing to shoot on this earth...

 

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Ted: She wants casual... OK. I'll be casual, I'm gonna be a mushroom cloud of casual!

--"How I Met Your Mother" (CBS)

 

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