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This was my other grandmother's book. Meant for the new bride, these books contain recipes as well as household tips. This one is copywrighted 1929, but they were married in 1939 ... it seems to have been a standard book published in CA that would be re-issued locally with local advertisements and coupons included in it. This one is from Peoria, IL, and contains many (some unused) local coupons and advertisements for dry cleaners, banks, photo studios, the Peoria newspaper, etc. Love the graphics!

I'd never heard of this one before, until I found a few copies in an antique mall booth the other day. It's similar to the 1940's Ladies Home Journals in content, complete with the fiction short stories and household tip articles.

WATER PEBBLES

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

                

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

                                                                

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

         

See where this picture was taken. [?]

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL SEPTEMBER 2012

  

See where this picture was taken. [?]

...I decided to repost this handy kitchen household tip for those of my friends that missed it the first time around...I wonder how many of you are now using those tabs...lolololololol. Getting ready to go out for a bit...I'll visit your streams when we get back. I hope you're having a wonderful day, my friends. :~}

 

...a friend sent me this suggestion, and you know I just had to share it...hahahahah. :~}

 

I've been using aluminum foil for more years than I care to remember. Great stuff, but sometimes it can be a pain. You know, like when you are in the middle of doing something and you try to pull some foil out and the roll comes out of the box. Then you have to put the roll back in the box and start over.

The darn roll always comes out at the wrong time. Well, I would like to share this with you. Yesterday I went to throw out an empty Reynolds foil box and for some reason I turned it and looked at the end of the box. And written on the end it said, 'Press tab to lock end,' or 'Press to secure roll.' Right there on the end of the box is a tab to lock the roll in place. How long has this little locking tab been there? I then looked at a generic brand of aluminum foil and it had one too.

I then looked at a box of Saran wrap and it had one too! I can't count the number of times the Saran wrap roll has jumped out when I was trying to cover something up. I'm sharing this with everyone who didn't know this and those of you who already knew it. If you didn’t know this, e-mail me and let me know so I won’t feel so 'out of the loop.' I hope I'm not the only person that didn't know or had forgotten about this.

 

...rats...foiled again...lolololol...I hope your weekend is rolling right along, my friends. :~}

 

***an update...I just found out Reynolds has only been doing this since 1996...12 years...whew, and I thought I was tearing up my hands foolishly for longer...lolol. :~O

 

*** Thank you my friends...Explore #332 10/25/08 ***

Ideas About DIY Life Hacks & Crafts 2017 / 2018

  

Turn a Shoebox into a Recharge Station in 30 mins | Click Pic for 25 Simple Life Hacks Every Girl Should Know | Household Tips and Tricks for Life

  

-Read More –

  

diypick.com/lifehacks/diy-life-hacks-crafts-25-awesome-li...

   

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

   

See where this picture was taken. [?]

From Lucy's Notebook, a helpful household tips book, ostensibly by Lucille Ball.

miel / b look book page 8

.'Household Tips' scarf. 90x90cm.

Model: Nia ColemanPhotographer: Kate LynchScarves: all miel / b

Original vintage inspired digitally printed chiffon scarves and bespoke scarf design.

www.miel-b.co.uk

‘The Kadambini’ contains cover-features on topical social and cultural issues; life-style and fashion trends; movies and television; fiction, poetry, serial novels; Odia translations of classics from other languages; health; beauty; cookery and household tips.

It is the largest circulated (47,722 copies, certified by ABC) monthly family magazine of Odisha with an effective readership of about 1.44 million. A comprehensive family magazine ‘The Kadambini’ has captured the mindscape of all sections of people of the state.

WATERED PEBBLES

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

    

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

                

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

  

See where this picture was taken. [?]

   

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

After all the commotions of the last few days I finally had time to iron my meadow blanket. It was quite crumpled because I used it a lot when I had to camp out in the woods. Besides looking very nice when it’s ironed it’s also a little trick to keep warm during the cold winter months. You just have to curl up in it after you’ve ironed it and it will keep you warm and cosy for quite some time.

 

This tip was brought to you by Shaun’s Energy Conserving Programme.

You can also use a toaster to heat up your blanket but you have to be careful not to get crumbs all over it.

 

My gift from my mother-in-law was this book, The Best of Mrs. Beeton's Household Tips. It came with a tag that said "Lynn, Knowing your love of tradition.....Love, Mum". Such a great gift for me! I do love it =)

 

Day 51 of 365

CHINESE GARDEN

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

 

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

    

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

  

See where this picture was taken. [?]

check my profile for more info! ♥

 

This little collage concotion has been printed on antique ledger paper from the 1800's that someone later used as a scrapbook for all sorts of recipes and household tips...It features a portrait of Miss Shirley Bran Drops, complete with her finest crown and monacle...contemplating her next move and wondering if she has all the ingredients for the scalloped kidney bean recipe she's been eyeing...

 

SUMMER PALACE ON THE POND

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

    

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

                

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

This is one of a collection of photos i created for a little project organised by the Pavilion Art Gallery in the Holbeck Urban Village on the outskirts of leeds.

 

The brief was to create a collection of grouped photos of something you see everyday that gets overlooked.

 

Since the partial collapse of the historic Temple Mill building next door to my work's office, my route to work had to change slightly, and i found myself driving through a not particularly nice bit of wasteland.

A lunchtime a couple of weeks ago i went for a wonder around it and found an interesting sofa. I decided i'd expand it into a collection of photos for the project, as it's a place that's very easy for you to dismiss and ignore.

 

When i started to look for things of interest, i soon realised that there was an awful lot of house-hold junk, things that are more commonly found in a house, now found in a somewhat contextually alien landscape, so i zeroed in on this to form the subject of my collection.

 

Also, part of what i wanted to do (and the reason for taking the initial sofa shot) was that, as a landscape-y photographer a lot of my photography is presenting things that are already beautiful in a beautiful way, and i felt drawn to the idea of trying to portray an un-beautiful landscape in a beautiful way too.

 

The critique at the end of the 2 weeks we had to take photos was very interesting, both from the prospective of seeing and discussing what everyone else had taken (which was both varied and universally excellent - very interesting stuff!), i think the general gist was there is essentially a mix of 2 styles here - traditional landscape (eg the sofa, the bathtub) and items that are still within a landscape but much more item-led (the lampshade, the dolls head, the sofa arm).

I think i need to continue taking photos as a longer-term project to expand the range of images i have, and then decide if, as a presentable work, if it's about the objects themselves, or if it's about the context of the objects within the landscape. Either im going to have to expand the area i'm shooting in for this, or take more photos over time as more is dumped there.

  

Avoid zipper jingle by putting a piece of heat-shrink tubing on the handle.

THE EDGE OF THE PAGODA

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

    

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

                

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

Household Tips Energy Efficiency

Lighting Efficiency

Location Efficiency

Cooking Efficiency

Water Heating Efficiency

Dishwasher Efficiency

This is one of a collection of photos i created for a little project organised by the Pavilion Art Gallery in the Holbeck Urban Village on the outskirts of leeds.

 

The brief was to create a collection of grouped photos of something you see everyday that gets overlooked.

 

Since the partial collapse of the historic Temple Mill building next door to my work's office, my route to work had to change slightly, and i found myself driving through a not particularly nice bit of wasteland.

A lunchtime a couple of weeks ago i went for a wonder around it and found an interesting sofa. I decided i'd expand it into a collection of photos for the project, as it's a place that's very easy for you to dismiss and ignore.

 

When i started to look for things of interest, i soon realised that there was an awful lot of house-hold junk, things that are more commonly found in a house, now found in a somewhat contextually alien landscape, so i zeroed in on this to form the subject of my collection.

 

Also, part of what i wanted to do (and the reason for taking the initial sofa shot) was that, as a landscape-y photographer a lot of my photography is presenting things that are already beautiful in a beautiful way, and i felt drawn to the idea of trying to portray an un-beautiful landscape in a beautiful way too.

 

The critique at the end of the 2 weeks we had to take photos was very interesting, both from the prospective of seeing and discussing what everyone else had taken (which was both varied and universally excellent - very interesting stuff!), i think the general gist was there is essentially a mix of 2 styles here - traditional landscape (eg the sofa, the bathtub) and items that are still within a landscape but much more item-led (the lampshade, the dolls head, the sofa arm).

I think i need to continue taking photos as a longer-term project to expand the range of images i have, and then decide if, as a presentable work, if it's about the objects themselves, or if it's about the context of the objects within the landscape. Either im going to have to expand the area i'm shooting in for this, or take more photos over time as more is dumped there.

  

Household tips on cleaning metals on p.4, with a testimonial that "Vinol is Just the Thing for Feeble Old People" on p.5. Part of a booklet entitled "Aunt Rebecca Says".

   

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

   

See where this picture was taken. [?]

Simply place tape across front door, and hey presto, cold callers, door-to-door salespersons, con-men and christmas carollers bugger off!

 

For the January MSH - When it's a jar

Save 20 to 44% on your energy bills. Energy pirates.com is a virtual home energy audit. Using our room to room audit and videos you’re able to control your energy lose. Which also saves the environment?

ACROSS THE POND

 

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

 

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

Picked up all at the same yard sale.

 

Trader Vic's Pacific Island Cookbook, c. 1968

 

A Taste of Aloha (Jr League of Honolulu) c, 2000

 

Betty Crockers Bisquick Cookbook, c. 1971

 

Atlanta Cooks for Company, c. 1968

 

Acworth's Favorite Recipes (Acworth Garden Club) circa 1960's

 

700 of the Best Household Tips, c. 1980

 

Foxfire 2, c.1973

 

Gems from Georgia's Kitchens (Garden Club of GA), c. 1963

  

A MERSEY VIEW

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

    

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

                

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

  

See where this picture was taken. [?]

A WOODLAND PATH

@ THE FESTIVAL GARDENS

 

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

    

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

    

See where this picture was taken. [?]

Household tips and advice on taking Vinol for convalescents. Part of a booklet entitled "Aunt Rebecca Says".

   

In 1984, a former household tip site adjacent to the River Mersey was transformed into the country’s first ever garden festival. The International Garden Festival was a concept born from the Conservative government to regenerate Liverpool and drive tourism to the city in the wake of the Toxteth riots and industrial decline. A five month pageant from May to October, the International Garden Festival attracted some 3.4 million visitors with its mix of 60 ornamental gardens from all parts of the world and the centrepiece Festival Hall which contained various floral displays. When the festival closed its doors, a large part of the site was developed into residential housing, while the remainder experienced various incarnations as leisure and entertainment facilities, until it was left derelict in 1997 to fall into disrepair. In 2007, Liverpool City Council granted Langtree planning permission to develop a residential-led regeneration scheme of the festival gardens which included the restoration of the formal gardens and the development of 1,300 homes. This new dawn for the Festival Gardens has been a long time coming and represents a unique opportunity to create a public park which is befitting the spirit of the Garden Festival movement. The redevelopment work began in February 2010 and will see the Japanese gardens, sculptures, lakes and associated watercourses restored ahead of its re-opening. The Festival Gardens project is being managed by The Land Trust on behalf of the land owner Langtree and Liverpool City Council thanks to a grant of £3.7m from the Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA). This work is the first step in the regeneration of the site which will ultimately see new residential development sitting alongside the newly opened park.The site is situated on Riverside Drive, Liverpool.

 

LIVERPOOL JUNE 2012

   

See where this picture was taken. [?]

Household tips for curing baby's rashes, corns, bunions, boils, eczema and car sickness on p.12 and a testimonial on Vinol's effectiveness for weak lungs on p.13. Part of a booklet entitled "Aunt Rebecca Says".

miel / b look book page 7

.'Household Tips' scarf. 90x90cm.

Model: Nia ColemanPhotographer: Kate LynchScarves: all miel / b

Original vintage inspired digitally printed chiffon scarves and bespoke scarf design.

www.miel-b.co.uk

This is one of a collection of photos i created for a little project organised by the Pavilion Art Gallery in the Holbeck Urban Village on the outskirts of leeds.

 

The brief was to create a collection of grouped photos of something you see everyday that gets overlooked.

 

Since the partial collapse of the historic Temple Mill building next door to my work's office, my route to work had to change slightly, and i found myself driving through a not particularly nice bit of wasteland.

A lunchtime a couple of weeks ago i went for a wonder around it and found an interesting sofa. I decided i'd expand it into a collection of photos for the project, as it's a place that's very easy for you to dismiss and ignore.

 

When i started to look for things of interest, i soon realised that there was an awful lot of house-hold junk, things that are more commonly found in a house, now found in a somewhat contextually alien landscape, so i zeroed in on this to form the subject of my collection.

 

Also, part of what i wanted to do (and the reason for taking the initial sofa shot) was that, as a landscape-y photographer a lot of my photography is presenting things that are already beautiful in a beautiful way, and i felt drawn to the idea of trying to portray an un-beautiful landscape in a beautiful way too.

 

The critique at the end of the 2 weeks we had to take photos was very interesting, both from the prospective of seeing and discussing what everyone else had taken (which was both varied and universally excellent - very interesting stuff!), i think the general gist was there is essentially a mix of 2 styles here - traditional landscape (eg the sofa, the bathtub) and items that are still within a landscape but much more item-led (the lampshade, the dolls head, the sofa arm).

I think i need to continue taking photos as a longer-term project to expand the range of images i have, and then decide if, as a presentable work, if it's about the objects themselves, or if it's about the context of the objects within the landscape. Either im going to have to expand the area i'm shooting in for this, or take more photos over time as more is dumped there.

  

Household Tips Energy Efficiency

Travel Efficiency

Heating and Cooling Efficiency

Television Efficiency

Refrigerator Efficiency

Furnace Efficiency

For another SplitCoast swap, the recipient wanted something done in the theme of Vintage Black Americana. Again, my images were drawn from Ten Two Studios collection of collage images. I used a page of text from a vintage Watkins household tips book as a background, aged with Distress ink in Vintage Photo. Men's vintage suitcoat buttons act as fasteners to hold the mica and photo in place.

Images: Storyville collage sheet set

a rubber band judiciously placed on your glass of wine will tell you if anyone has been at it while you are out of the room

A night of riotous rock 'n' roll hilarity for adults with reckless hilarity, themed rounds, impromptu dance routines, topical interventions, special guest stars, ecological household tips and a great soundtrack.

This is one of a collection of photos i created for a little project organised by the Pavilion Art Gallery in the Holbeck Urban Village on the outskirts of leeds.

 

The brief was to create a collection of grouped photos of something you see everyday that gets overlooked.

 

Since the partial collapse of the historic Temple Mill building next door to my work's office, my route to work had to change slightly, and i found myself driving through a not particularly nice bit of wasteland.

A lunchtime a couple of weeks ago i went for a wonder around it and found an interesting sofa. I decided i'd expand it into a collection of photos for the project, as it's a place that's very easy for you to dismiss and ignore.

 

When i started to look for things of interest, i soon realised that there was an awful lot of house-hold junk, things that are more commonly found in a house, now found in a somewhat contextually alien landscape, so i zeroed in on this to form the subject of my collection.

 

Also, part of what i wanted to do (and the reason for taking the initial sofa shot) was that, as a landscape-y photographer a lot of my photography is presenting things that are already beautiful in a beautiful way, and i felt drawn to the idea of trying to portray an un-beautiful landscape in a beautiful way too.

 

The critique at the end of the 2 weeks we had to take photos was very interesting, both from the prospective of seeing and discussing what everyone else had taken (which was both varied and universally excellent - very interesting stuff!), i think the general gist was there is essentially a mix of 2 styles here - traditional landscape (eg the sofa, the bathtub) and items that are still within a landscape but much more item-led (the lampshade, the dolls head, the sofa arm).

I think i need to continue taking photos as a longer-term project to expand the range of images i have, and then decide if, as a presentable work, if it's about the objects themselves, or if it's about the context of the objects within the landscape. Either im going to have to expand the area i'm shooting in for this, or take more photos over time as more is dumped there.

  

From Lucy's Notebook, a helpful household tips book, ostensibly by Lucille Ball.

wearandcheer.com/homemade-mascara-and-liner/

I don’t use too much makeup for my face, just mascara, liner and lip gloss. My bag is always full of different types of liner and mascara first but when I use my homemade mascara and liner then throw all those chemical products and put homemade products because homemade makeup is free from the c...

by Sobia Bilal on Wear and Cheer - Fashion, Lifestyle, Cooking and Celebrities - Visit Now wearandcheer.com/homemade-mascara-and-liner/

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Neighbor Lady booklets with recipes and household tips. For 60 years starting in 1941, friendly Wynn Speece rode the state’s airwaves, broadcasting more than 10,000 shows from WNAX, Yankton.

wearandcheer.com/use-homemade-bronzer/

Woo bronzer is a fascinating and unique product that women are using in their makeup. It is used to create the sun-kissed look. When you apply it correctly, it makes your look very attractive, sexy, gorgeous and beautiful. It also used for contouring and adds some shine or shimmer to face....

by Sobia Bilal on Wear and Cheer - Fashion, Lifestyle, Cooking and Celebrities - Visit Now wearandcheer.com/use-homemade-bronzer/

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