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Recipe Link: asmallbite.com/plain-dosa-recipe-dosa-batter-in-mixie/

 

If you are a die hard fan of crispy, golden coloured, ghee drizzling dosa but don’t want to grind in wet grinder? or don’t have it?, then just hop into this post, dosa batter in mixie as the whole grinding process will be finished within 10 minutes. There is no need of lifting the grinder stone in between, or cleaning the stone is really a laborious task, you can grind it frequently in a breeze and use fresh batter also. I have already shared another post, soft idli recipe which can be used for preparing both idli and dosa but this plain dosa recipe is completely different from that. Please read the recipe till the end, as I have shared lots of tricks and tips and this is a foolproof recipe, if you follow the proportions correctly. It tastes heavenly with hotel style tiffin sambar and urad dal chutney.

How to make rava dosa is a very simple recipe with minimal ingredients but a nightmare to most of us, as we don’t get the lacy and porous texture like restaurant ones. There is no such hidden secrecy in the recipe, the only tricky part that has to be noted here is the batter consistency and the tawa should be extra hot before making the dosa. I had been hooked to this recipe for the past 3 to 4 years, and whenever I run out of idli batter, I immediately prepare this Instant Onion rava dosa recipe as it doesn’t require soaking, grinding or fermenting process. Undoubtedly, it goes very well with hotel sambar, coconut chutney, kara chutney etc.

 

asmallbite.com/category/sidedish/dosa/

From The NYT

 

Delhi Snacks Move Up From the Street

 

By SOMINI SENGUPTA

NEW DELHI

 

INDIAN street food is a snack of endless varieties, eaten on the run or on a date, while playing or playing hooky from school. It is served and sometimes entirely prepared on the street. It is eaten while standing, also on the street, usually within whiffing distance of the gutter.

 

But as incomes rise and ways of eating change, the inevitable has happened. Street food, that emblem of raucous, messy, urban India, is slowly being tamed.

 

In recent years, it has begun to come indoors, get sterilized, and go upmarket. Most recently, a court order has prompted this city’s government to consider a ban on cooking food outdoors.

 

Across India, street food can range from the gilauti kebab of Lucknow, skewered lamb so tender that legend says it was invented by a toothless nawab’s cook, to the kathi roll of Calcutta, a deep-fried wrap of grilled meat, raw onion and hot sauce of secret provenance.

 

The iconic street food of Delhi is chaat, a variety of snacks that are meant to deliver a rave of tastes and sensations to the tongue, from crunchy to soft, tart to hot and sweet. The word is derived from the verb to lick.

 

A good chaat is a complex assemblage, as pleasure always is, and, by definition, it is not good for you. In Delhi, you can find nearly a dozen different kinds of chaat on the streets. They all involve something fried and starchy, and indulging in chaat requires abandoning all concern for hygiene.

 

Today, across India, brightly lit fast-food chains offer the standard varieties of chaat. Specialty restaurants self-consciously peddle the nostalgia of the unruly street in the least unruly surroundings of all: the mall. Even at a five-star hotel restaurant called Fire, a slender glass platter of chaat can be sampled, improbably, with a bottle of champagne.

 

Increasingly in these tamed chaat enclaves, the cooks use gloves for the sake of hygiene. Plastic cups and plates have replaced the cups and plates washed on the side of the road (though to say they are washed is being generous and invariably it is done by children, which is illegal).

 

The algae-green-colored tamarind juice that is the vital fluid of the type of chaat called pani puri, and that looks exactly like the sort of the thing you should not ingest, is now prepared with mineral water — and advertised as such at some of Delhi’s oldest chaat establishments.

 

The pani puri, also known as the gol gappa, or phoochka, depending on which part of the country you’re in, is a deep-fried hollow shell that is deftly punctured by the chef’s thumb, stuffed with boiled potato, dunked in the aforementioned green juice, and ferried from the hand that makes to the hand that eats. That intimate public exchange is as central to its pleasure as the hot-sour explosion on the palate.

 

Not surprisingly, a recent government-sponsored survey of street food vendors across India found “poor knowledge” of food- and water-borne diseases. Most vendors, the study found, threw their trash on the roadside and did not decontaminate water used to clean utensils or serve for drinking. Even more remarkably, the study found that on the hygiene survey, fast-food restaurants did not fare much better.

 

The pani puri has been repackaged in sterile and unexpected ways. Haldiram’s, an Indian fast-food chain, offers the shells in a sealed plastic bag, which you have to puncture and dunk in juice yourself. A trendy restaurant chain called Punjabi by Nature offers an inventive cocktail built around the pani puri: Two potato-filled shells are served with a shot of vodka infused with green chili and lime, along with a glass of draft beer as chaser.

 

As in everything in India today, the old co-exists effortlessly with the new.

 

And so one afternoon under a blazing mid-April sun, devotees of old-style chaat huddled near the acclaimed Prabhu Chaat Bhandar, a grouping of hot stoves propped up on a wooden platform, shaded by four large umbrellas, in a narrow alley of dogs, cars and trash in the heart of the capital.

 

Shubha Dua, 22, and four college friends had come for one of their regular lunch breaks. They sat squeezed inside a small car, all holding in their hands small foil plates of papri chaat, a blend of crisp wafers, yogurt, tamarind and spice.

 

They said they chose not to think about the cleanliness of the fingers that had blended their chaat. “We’re not looking over there,” is how Ms. Dua put it. They wouldn’t mind if the alley were a bit cleaner, they said, or if the flies could be kept away. Still, they confessed, they were lured here, week after week. You could customize your chaat to your taste, they said — ask for a bit more heat or a bit more sourness, or adjust the amount of yogurt. The mall chaat, they said, wasn’t the same, or as cheap. Prabhu’s chaats go for about 50 cents a plate.

 

Naresh Chand Jain, a vendor of betel leaves who came one afternoon for his regular helping, insisted that the pani puri juice at Prabhu’s had the power to cure all stomach ailments. (Prabhu’s pani puris are indeed so perfectly tart and refreshing that his theory seems entirely credible.)

 

For a contrast, there’s Fire, the cool, posh restaurant at the Park Hotel. The chaat platter comes with five items, all largely traditional fare, but arranged for the contemporary cuisine set, between mounds of thinly sliced cucumbers, carrots and beets, which gives it a deceptive air of healthfulness.

 

The raj kachori, a large deep-fried shell, is stuffed with two varieties of sprouts, green chilies and dollops of sweetened yogurt. True to tradition, the papri chaat is blended by hand. There are also deep-fried vegetable pakoras; chickpea dumplings in a spiced yogurt sauce called dahi bhalla; and the least successful of all, a deep-fried spinach leaf topped with yogurt and spice.

 

The chaat maker’s signature lies in his sonth, a sweet tamarind chutney whose recipe he is likely to zealously guard (Fire’s exceptionally tasty sonth incorporates dry ginger powder from the desert state of Rajasthan), and his masala, a spice mixture that in this kitchen can take up everything from rock salt and roasted cumin to crushed pomegranates and dried mango powder.

 

The perfect chaat, said Fire’s executive chef, Bakshish Dean, must “thrill” the brain. Here, it is not a cheap thrill; a chaat platter for two, spectacularly garnished with fenugreek sprouts, can set you back roughly $16, or easily five times the Indian daily minimum wage.

 

A more modest version of domesticated chaat can be found at City Square, one of dozens of new malls that have lately mushroomed across Delhi. One of the mall’s sit-down restaurants, Khaaja Chowk, exploits street kitsch in its décor but produces workaday chaats that taste exactly like what they are: food made in the mall. Upstairs, in a food court crammed with purveyors of pizza and nachos, as well as mutton sheekh kebab, is a place that calls itself Street Foods of India and promises the roadside snacks of Delhi, Mumbai and Amritsar, in the west.

 

Neelima Chadha, out shopping one Saturday, was unimpressed with what she called the “refined” taste of air-conditioned mall chaat. “If you want street food you go to the street,” was her verdict. She dug instead into a platter of fried bread and vegetables.

 

Street foods in the mall do not immediately threaten the street food of Delhi, but the roadside vendors may well have to change the way they do business. A court order earlier this year directed the city to ban the cooking of food outdoors, though not the sale of precooked foods. The city has yet to issue final rules, but it is likely to usher in changes to chaat-making.

 

The chaat makers along Chandni Chowk, in the tourist-filled old walled city, for instance, fry their potatoes outside, though most of the chaat fixings do not require cooking.

 

Those who would be most affected by the proposed ban are those for whom street food is the stuff of sustenance, not leisure. The daily meals for the city’s rickshaw pullers, porters, construction workers and the like are all made outside. Rice and curries are prepared in giant vats, fresh bread is baked in clay ovens all under the shade of a tree or a sooty tarpaulin. Because there is little or no overhead — for example, the cost of indoor kitchens or refrigerators — the food is exceptionally cheap. A full meal costs roughly 25 cents.

 

“Every day, they are passing new laws,” said Kamal Yadav, 16, who runs his family’s open-air lunch counter near Chandni Chowk. “Where will the poor go to eat?”

 

Not far away, in the heart of Parantha Wali Gali in Hindi — literally “the alley of the maker of parantha,” a fried flatbread — an old Delhi hand was mulling new possibilities.

 

Rajesh Sharma, who manages his family’s 117-year-old restaurant, said people who drive around in air-conditioned cars “can’t digest these paranthas.” Business, he said, had begun to slow down in the alley, heavy with flies and the smell of the ghee — clarified butter — he uses to fry the bread.

 

He said he had begun negotiating for a stall at a new mall across town.

 

Unbeknownst to Mr. Sharma, someone had beaten him to it. In the food court next to Street Foods of India there is already a stall that borrowed its name from this alley. “Parawthe Wali Gali,” it called itself.

 

Here's Chaat

 

SOME of the foods sold at street stalls in India are also available at the following places in the New York area:

 

BENGALI SWEET HOUSE 836 Newark Avenue, Jersey City, (201) 798-9241, and other locations; www.bengalisweet.com.

 

BOMBAY TALKIE 189 Ninth Avenue (21st Street), (212) 242-1900.

 

CHOWPATTY 1349 Oak Tree Road, Iselin, N.J., (732) 283-9020; chowpattyfoods.com.

 

DELHI PALACE 37-33 74th Street (37th Avenue), Jackson Heights, Queens, (718) 507-0666.

 

DIMPLE 11 West 30th Street, (212) 643-9464.

 

MAHARAJA 73-10 37th Avenue (73rd Street), Jackson Heights, Queens, (718) 505-2680.

 

MASALA BOLLYWOOD 108 Lexington Avenue (27th Street), Murray Hill; (212) 679-1284.

 

RAJBHOG 72-27 37th Avenue (72nd Street), Jackson Heights, Queens, (718) 458-8512, and other locations; rajbhog.com.

 

SATKAR 806 Newark Avenue, Jersey City, (201) 963-6309.

 

SHALIMAR RESTAURANT 1335 Oak Tree Road, Iselin, N.J., (732) 283-3350.

 

SUKHADIA’S 17 West 45th Street, (212) 395-7300, and other locations; sukhadia.com.

Bye bye, brands

 

With the news that the Yanks have been messing with our Cadbury Creme Eggs, we thought it might be interesting to take a look at other iconic British brands now in foreign hands.

 

So there you are cruising around a picturesque village in the Cotswolds in your Aston Martin Rapide, eating your bacon sandwich covered in lashings of HP sauce and ready to chase it down with a bag of Smarties.

 

What could be more British than that? A Bond car, a sauce with the Houses of Parliament on the front and a sweet that has been a part of British childhood since 1937.

 

But change is afoot. Aston Martin is considering building the Rapide abroad, Smarties has moved production from York to Hamburg in Germany and the last bottle of British HP plopped mournfully off the line in Aston in March, giving way to production in Elst, in the Netherlands.

 

In a totally non-UKIP way, Here is a list of food and drink products familiar to UK shoppers, dating from as far back as 1778 but now owned by Johnny Foreigner.

 

1. Sarson's Malt Vinegar

 

There's nothing quite as British as fish and chips. But unfortunately that vinegar you shake on it isn't quite so British anymore. Store cupboard staple and the UK's number one vinegar brand Sarson's was sold off to the Japanese Mizkan Group in 2005.

 

Created in Shoreditch, London, by Thomas Sarson, the popular vinegar has been traditionally brewed in vats since 1794. Those vats are just now in Japan.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJeM3cxRCD4

 

2. Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce

 

U.S. company Heinz has owned the Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce brand since 2005.

 

This is ironic, considering it's doubtful Americans can pronounce it properly.

 

It is at least still produced in Worcester, rather than Heinz's native Pennysylvania-shire.

 

Devised by Worcester chemists John Wheeley Lea and William Henry Perrins to please a nobleman, the sauce has a distinctive flavour. The recipe has been a closely guarded secret since the 1830s, and is actually slightly different in the States, although both versions contain anchovies.

 

In the ad campaign we've chosen to highlight, the brand recommends adding Lea & Perrins to traditional British cuisine, to create new twists on old classics such as "bangers and splash" and "splish and chips."

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWGB0ChsfO4

 

3. Boddingtons Draught Bitter

 

Boddingtons Draught Bitter ("The Cream of Manchester") is as Mancunian as Coronation Street, the Madchester movement and a certain football club, right?

 

Wrong. Although the brewery was British-owned at the time of the infamous "Do you want a flake with that, love?" ad, it now belongs to a Belgian-Brazilian-American multinational behemoth. Despite history dating back to 1778, production in Manchester stopped in 2005.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=XEEU1nQeGNA

 

4. Beefeater London Dry Gin

 

Britain built an empire on gin. It's running in our very veins. There's not a lot a good gin and tonic can't cure, from a common cold to a bad day at work. Heck, we practically put it on our cornflakes.

 

Since 1862 Beefeater London Dry Gin has been proudly made in the UK's capital. It looks British, thanks to the Yeomen of the Guard on the label. It tastes like gin.

 

But it's technically no longer a British brand. French company Pernod Ricard bought it (no doubt just to tick us off) in the 1980s.

 

However, Beefeater is still made in Kennington, and it just opened quite a snazzy Beefeater Distillery museum and visitor's centre, so it's kind of all good. We suppose.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1g_ts3M-7XI

 

5. Hovis Bread

 

With Britons once voting the Ridley Scott-directed "Gold Hill" Hovis ad their favourite of all time, you can be sure the brand has a special place in the nation's heart. So special in fact, the company felt confident to release this heartstring-tugging nostalgia fest of a commercial as a 122-second way to commemorate the company's 122-year history.

 

They may as well make the next ad on Mulholland Drive, though, as L.A.-based investment company The Gores Group now owns the majority stake in the bread-maker.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4tFzuFGUOI

 

6. Branston Pickle

 

Every patriotic Brit knows a cheddar sandwich can only be improved with a handsome dollop of Branston Pickle. Created by Crosse & Blackwell in Branston, a suburb of Burton upon Trent, in 1922, generations of Britons have grown up with cheese and pickle sandwiches in their lunch boxes.

 

Fast forward to 2013 and struggling Premier Foods flogs our nation's favourite pickled chutney to Japan. Mizkan again. What's next, we wonder? Some kind of "small chunk" abomination?

 

There's nothing particularly British about the ad we're highlighting, apart from Harry Hill's dulcet tones.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzKcoRzCWmo

 

7. Terry's Chocolate Orange

 

The Yanks might have snagged Cadbury, but we still have Terry's Chocolate Orange, right?

 

Actually, no. That's also owned by U.S. interests in the form of Mondelez International, an American multinational conglomerate.

 

Despite Terry's of York being able to trace its roots back to 1923, Chocolate Oranges have been made in Poland since 2005. They better not mess with the recipe, though, or next Christmas Britain will actually revolt.

 

You may remember the vintage Terry's Chocolate Orange campaign. It was on well before fat Dawn French started scoffing them all.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=J99MEk6RZd0

 

8. Tetley Tea

 

Joseph Tetley & Co. was started way back in 1837. The world's second-largest tea brand is now available in 70 countries, even ones where they put the milk in first.

 

But it's not British anymore. It's owned by Indian giant Tata Global Beverage. Tata bought the company in 2000 in what was then the biggest acquisition in Indian corporate history, after Tetley got into a spot of bother with a shrinking UK market and competition from whippersnapper rivals.

 

Incidentally, Tetley was the first company to sell tea bags in the UK in the 1950s, hence posh Prunella in the above ad trying to persuade British housewives they don't need the fuss of tea leaves.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=d2vhtM_-jHI

 

9. HP Brown Sauce

 

The ultimate condiment for a classic English breakfast or bacon sandwich, HP Brown Sauce is named for the Houses of Parliament and even features the distinctive building on its label.

 

Created in 1899 by a grocer from Nottingham, the sauce was made in the Midlands from the early 1900s right up until 2007, when the factory at Aston was closed down as new owner Heinz moved production to the Netherlands.

 

In 2012, an advertising campaign emphasizing the sauce's Britishness saw a social media backlash. It's reported that sales of brown sauce of all types dropped 19% in 2014.

 

This amusingly bad advert from HP Brown Sauce's golden years shows a family of Brits abroad impressing the natives with the condiment. Maybe if they'd just shut up, it would still be ours.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXPhPLSmrH4

 

10. Lyle's Golden Syrup

 

We've saved the sweetest 'til last. Syrup sponge pudding, golden syrup cake, treacle sponge, treacle tart – all these quintessentially British comfort foods have one thing in common: Golden Syrup.

 

Launched by Abram Lyle in 1881 as "Goldie" syrup, from a sugar refinery on the banks of the Thames in London, the story goes that the sticky stuff was soon selling like the hot cakes it was used to make.

 

Still available in its delightfully old-fashioned tin – which Guinness World Records confirmed a few years back as the world's oldest unchanged brand packaging – it's now owned by another American megacorp, American Sugar Refining, Inc.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFblDo6X-a8

 

11. Twinings Tea

 

Nothing is as quintessentially English as a cup of tea. Thomas Twining began selling tea from a stand in the Strand in 1706. But today although Twinings still packs tea here, in Andover, Hampshire, if you open one of those little sachets in your hotel room it will have been made in Poland after almost 300 British workers were sacked in an efficiency drive.

 

12. Smarties

 

Whatever next, made in Germany? Well, yes, the popular tubes of sweets now roll off production lines in Hamburg after being made in York by Nestlé for 69 years.

 

The company says other top brands such as Quality Street will not be moving to Germany. After all, Quality Strasse just doesn't sound right.

 

13. Cadbury

 

Much of the confusion over flags of convenience seems to originate when British companies are sold to new foreign owners who pay scant regard to our proud manufacturing history. A classic example is Cadbury, with its long tradition of confectionery making in the UK. Its chocolate, including Britain’s bestselling brand Dairy Milk, is still made in Bournville, Birmingham. However, following the controversial purchase of the company by American giant Kraft, if you fancy a Crunchie or Turkish Delight it will have been manufactured in Poland.

 

14. Robertson's

 

Like Branston pickle, the marmalade firm was owned by Premier Foods.

 

It was sold, along with other famous spreads like Hartley’s jam, Gale’s honey and Sun-Pat peanut butter to an -American firm Hain Celestial for £200million earlier this year.

 

15. Weetabix

 

Chinese company Bright Foods bought the majority stake in the company, which also makes Alpen and Ready Brek, valuing the firm at £1.2billion.

 

16. Newcastle Brown Ale

 

Scottish & Newcastle, makers of the famous ale, was bought by Dutch brewer Heineken and Denmark’s Carlsberg in 2008 for a combined £7.8billion.

 

S&N was the UK’s largest and world’s seventh biggest brewer. It was split between Carlsberg and Heineken.

 

17. Jaffa Cakes

 

Jaffa Cakes and McVitie’s maker sold to Turkish food group in £2bn deal. United Biscuits will now be part of Yildiz, making the new owner the world’s third-largest biscuit manufacturer.

 

18. Shippam's fish paste

 

It was founded in 1750 by Shipston Shippam, a quality butcher based in Chichester on the south coast of England. Now wholly owned subsidiary of Mitsubishi Corporation since 1989.

 

19. Walker Crisps

 

Walker Crisps are 56% of all crisps and popcorn sold in Britain. The brand was bought by PepsiCo back in 1989.

 

20. Hartley's Jam

 

was bought by American corporation Hain Celestial in 2012, for £200 million.

 

21. Milk

 

A third of the milk drunk in Britain is owned by foreign companies: Wiseman Milk is now part of the German group Müller, which bought it in 2012.

 

Britain has sold more than half its companies to foreigners

 

Just for a moment, imagine being a tourist in search of the full British experience. Where would you start? Well, you might take a sight-seeing trip around London on a red double-decker bus.

 

You’d possibly visit a quintessentially British store, such as Boots the chemist, Selfridges or Harrods, before having a proper English tea at the Savoy, Fortnum & Mason or the Dorchester.

 

You’d almost certainly go home, via a British airport, thinking you’d seen a slice of the real Britain. But, in one sense at least, you’d be totally wrong.

 

That bus you boarded at Trafalgar Square is run by a German company. Boots fell to the Italians in 2007. Selfridges, Fortnum & Mason and the Savoy are owned by Canadians; Harrods has been bought by a firm based in Qatar; the Dorchester by one based in Brunei. As for our airports, most of them are now run by a Spanish firm.

 

Maybe a tourist wouldn’t care all that much, even if he knew. But should we? After all, does it make any real difference if a British company has a foreign master?

 

For the past three decades, the UK has had a completely relaxed attitude about selling off its assets to companies based abroad. Indeed, most of the time, the swallowing up of yet another great British institution barely makes a headline.

 

How The Monarchy Can Make You Millions

 

• Shadow leader of the House of Commons calls for £4bn system of royal warrants to be overhauled;

 

• Dozens of companies which hold royal warrants benefit from corporate structures with bases in tax havens including royal “crown” jeweller Mappin & Webb

 

• Several firms have closed UK factories and no longer make their royal warranted products in the UK

 

• Royal warrants are used on products high in sugar and marketed at children

 

• Royal warrant given to firm that makes guns used to kill elephants and other big game hunting.

 

Royal warrants have been granted to companies for centuries and a regal seal of approval can be hugely valuable but an investigation by Channel 4 Dispatches has led to calls for the warrant system to be overhauled.

 

The Queen, Prince Philip or Prince Charles can grant a warrant to a company whose products have been used by the royal household for more than 5 years but the process is far from transparent.

 

For the past two months Dispatches has been scrutinising those companies with royal warrants

 

- an award that allows firms to put a royal coat of arms on their product stamped with the words ‘by royal appointment.’

 

City firm Brand Finance estimate royal warrants are worth £4.5bn to companies with the royal seal of approval. They claim firms with warrants are able to charge more for their products and generate a higher volume of sales into the future.

 

The programme – led by reporter Antony Barnett - discovered that a number of the royal family’s favourite firms are owned by companies that could benefit from offshore tax havens. These include royal “crown” jeweller Mappin & Webb whose parent company is based in Luxembourg.

 

Mappin & Webb holds warrants from the Queen and Prince Charles as royal jeweller, goldsmiths and silversmiths. In 2012 the Queen appointed Mappin & Webb’s master craftsman the prestigious role of crown jeweller whose job is , among other things, to prepare the jewels for the state opening of Parliament. Dispatches traced Mappin & Webb’s parent company to the controversial tax haven of Luxembourg and reveals how it is using complex financial methods that could reduce the tax it pays in Britain. Prem Sikka, Professor of Accounting at Essex University, scrutinised the firm’s accounts and calculated that its legal use of offshore tax havens has cut its UK tax bill by £3m in the last two years. There is no suggestion that the company is doing anything illegal however Dispatches asks if it’s appropriate that the company hold a royal warrant.

 

Mappin & Webb told Dispatches: “Mappin & Webb… …act transparently and responsibly in all our tax affairs… …Mappin & Webb and the Aurum Group are fully resident in the UK for tax purposes and always have been.”

 

Dispatches also found that several of the royal’s favourite brands with warrants have closed production in the UK and moved it overseas. Some of these include Hunter wellies, Bendicks Bittermints, HP Sauce and Pringle of Scotland.

 

Shadow leader of the House Chris Bryant, who campaigned to get Burberry stripped of its warrant when they closed a factory in his Welsh constituency, told Dispatches:

 

The whole point of a Royal Warrant is it’s a kind of statement of British satisfaction and it must add phenomenal value to a brand especially overseas in markets like China, the far east, the middle east - and I think that it should underline modern British values and that means it should be a company that pays taxes in this country, employs people in this country, does most of its business in this country

 

Bryant added: It’s a statement of Britishness which I think in a way doesn’t belong to the Royal Family…it belongs to the whole of us as citizens, and subjects of this country.

 

An opinion poll conducted for the programme revealed that 68%of people asked said royal warrants should only be given to companies whose products are made in Britain and more than three-quarters said they should not be given to products whose owners are based in tax havens.

 

The programme also reveals how Kellogg’s, the US firm that has a royal warrant from the Queen as ‘purveyors of Cereals’ legitimately puts royal warrants on many of its products including those high in sugar and marketed at children such as Pop Tarts, Coco Pops, Kraves , Rice Krispie cereal bars.

 

Dispatches also considers gunmaker Holland & Holland which has a royal warrant from Prince Charles and discovers the firm sells rifles that could be used for big game trophy hunting including the killing of lions and elephants. Whilst there is nothing illegal in this Dispatches notes that both Prince Charles and his son Prince Harry have been outspoken against the ivory trade and threats to endangered species.

 

On calling for the system of granting warrants to be overhauled, Chris Bryant said:

 

There’s a great cloud of unknowing…... I think it should be transparent…If I ran a British company now I’d be desperate for it to get a Royal Warrant, from any one of the members of the Royal Family who can grant them now. But when William and Harry come along, and they start to be able to issue Royal Warrants, that value will go up exponentially. And that’s why I think even, before we get to that point it’s all the more important that we have a proper review of the process so that it’s open and transparent and the whole of the country- the subjects and citizens of this country, get to understand how these things are awarded.

 

Made in Britain

 

Royal warrant firms that have moved all or most of their production overseas include:

 

• Bendicks Mints of Mayfair which is now made in Germany

 

• Parker Pens who have moved all operations to France

 

• Pringle of Scotland which is now made entirely in Asia

 

• HP sauce which is made in the Netherlands

 

In a statement to Dispatches, the Lord Chamberlain’s office said:

 

Standards are monitored, and any credible allegation that a warrant holder was acting unlawfully would result in an immediate review and may lead to a warrant being cancelled. It would be a breach of commercial confidence to reveal the details of those who were not successful in applying for, or retaining, a Warrant.

 

The Royal Warrant Holders Association told Dispatches they do not comment on the operations of specific warrant holding companies and the system is monitored for compliance on an on-going basis.

 

Regarding firms which move production overseas, the Association said these are commercial decisions made against the backdrop of a global market… some warrant holding companies have decided to relocate production and other functions to the UK.

 

How The Monarchy Can Make You Millions: Channel 4 Dispatches, Monday 14 December at 8pm

Approx: 10 min. Lunch

 

Salmon Gourmet Chutney ,Dressing,Salad

 

Method for Salmon Sauce Chutney and Salad Dressing :

 

In a mixing bowl add the following:

  

1 table spoon of Raw unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar (Bitter Tart}

 

1 table spoon of Lime or Lemon Juice (Sour)

 

Add ½ tea spoon of ground Mustard Powder (Hot)

 

1 table spoon of Raw unfiltered Honey (Sweet)

 

Tip: Stir and taste to see if it brings a Smile to Your Face ?

Remember that all people have different taste buds even in the slightest of degree.

Make adjustments to the desire of your taste using the 4 ingredients above until your Smile spreads from ear to ear. Great!

 

Optional: if you desire Salty then you can add a bit of Sea Salt or do what I do add a bit of SOLE ( A glass jar of water an already disolved pure christal rock of Himalayan Pink Sea Salt)

For the Thai people or persons liking it spicy and hot a little sprinkle of Chili Powder will bring out the effect your looking for.

 

Note Food for Thought:

 

To prove that all people have different taste buds ,just consider the following scenario.

If 100 people sat down to order a meal from the restaurant menu and the menu contained 100 choices. It would be extremely remote that all or even most people would order the same thing on the menu am I right?

 

Of course people have different dislikes and likes and cravings for a certain taste in foods that they eat. So it would be fare to say that the choices would be varied as much as the people ordering of the menu.

 

The whole structure and purpose of the way my Recipes are presented to you is to give you the opportunity to create your own recipes to your liking and taste. To give you lots of options to create and to explore exciting new possibilities of your own personal Gourmet Foods presentation. Remember when it comes to Gourmet Cuisine I do not believe the recipe should be written in Stone. The recipe in my view serves as a guide only to bring out the Gourmet in YOU.

 

I encourage you to be your Own Gourmet Health Guru Master Chef , to have fun and to share your Recipe ideas to every one around you.

 

Many 5 star Hotel chefs will taste prepare ,taste prepare to more or a lesser degree to make sure that the meal passes the taste test before it is served to the valued customer.

So it is a good practice to get into and after a while you will get used to it and it will become second nature to you.

 

Make your food choices Whole and Natural and taste test in your preparations when necessary and you will soon become your own Gourmet Food Expert at Heart with passion.

 

Chutney Herb Dressing preparation: Add one table spoon of each chopped fresh green herbs to the mixing bowl. Rosemary, Sage, and Mint

 

These herbs are very pungent and the flavors will blend together and uplift the senses when you start adding your Salmon Sauce to the Herbs and taste with your personal adjustments.

Put the rest of the herb dressing to the side.

 

Tossed Salad Ingredients:

 

Put a hand full of your favorite chopped greens into your mixing bowl.

Add some shaved Fresh Beet Root

Toss in a few cherrie tomatoes

 

Add loosely some soybean sprouts raw

 

For Temperate Zones Western : Add chopped apple with skins if (Organic) without skins if conventional ,put the other half aside.

Now toss your salad and add slowly your Temperate Zone Cold Pressed Olive Oil or your Salmon Salad Dressing toss again and taste.

Now to your satisfaction shave the other half Apple to the top of your Salad in layers.

  

For Tropical Zones Eastern : Cut 1 inch thick fresh Pineapple discard tough skins , and cut into small pieces and add to the salad and toss.

Add your Tropical Zone Cold Pressed Coconut Oil or Salmon Salad Dressing.

Sprinkle more Soy Bean sprouts on top.

 

Health Tip: Any left over Salmon Dressing can be stored in your refrigerator for further toppings to be used up in 2 days. You can sprinkle Bee Pollen and add your favorite nuts and milled seed over your salad for added superior Nutrition as well.

 

You will find below all the information you need for Steaming your Salmon Fish Fillet.

“Enjoy”

        

Cholesterol! Is Cholesterol Healthy for you?

 

“It really depends who you are talking to and for sure the main stream medical community has a vested interest in this issue with the statin pharmaceutical industry at stake.”

 

“This cholesterol question has been hotly debated for ages and In this report I am going to put this answer to rest . After all millions of patients are taking statin drugs for the rest of their life to lower cholesterol so it must be the right thing to do yes? No it is not! “

 

My report will finally put this cholesterol debate to rest. What main stream medicine does not want you to know? Barry Gourmet & Raw “ The Nutritional Myth Buster”

“The Hypocrisy of it All” And finally the making of Barry Gourmet's Cholesterol Rap Recipe

 

Written by Barry Anderson aka Gourmet Gourmet & Raw © Copyright Sept. 27 2012

 

We have been told for decades by mainstream medicine and the advertizing media arms of the medical business that high cholesterol in our blood is unhealthy for us that we are at risk of heart disease with such a high count. This assumption has spurned on a new lucrative multi million pharmaceutical industry for producing statin drugs to lower cholesterol levels in people. But the side effect risks of these drugs can be debilitating to some people and I have one close friend and one relative that is forced to stop taking statin drugs for health reasons.

 

The fact is we need cholesterol in our body. It is part of our immune system. In fact cholesterol circulates in our blood stream to be used as weapons for destroying the antigen cell walls for the rest of the immune cells like macrophages to engulf the cel bad guys.

 

Many people walking around this planet has high cholesterol in their blood but no sigh of heart disease. In fact our liver makes cholesterol and even stores the stuff and uses it when needed, in fact we cannot live with out cholesterol . We would all die with out it.Cholesterol is essential for our good health and immune function. The real true marker for heart disease is not your total cholesterol count but instead your blood count for your Triglycerides.

 

Why is this so important to your heart health and why does it matter?

 

First triglycerides is a type of fat lipid ,circulating in your blood from the foods that you eat. These unused fats are in your blood from excessive consumption of fatty foods that are not burned off through exercise and a sedentary life style. A reading of 200 to 500 mg/dL and above is considered high and a risk factor by the AHA American Heart Association for Heart Disease.

 

A reading of 100 mg/dL or lower is considered optimum for your heart health by the American Heart Association.

 

Life style changes are recommended such as a whole food diet , losing excess weight, and regular physical activity for lowering a high triglyceride reading. NO Drug therapy is recommended by the AHA , that leads us to the next question . Why is it that staten drugs are used for lowering cholesterol that our own liver makes anyway for us and for high triglycerides its eating right and proper life style changes that is the recommended protocol. Wouldn’t you think that for cholesterol this would also be the same solution as well?

 

My dear valued guest from the UK staying with us at the garden Villa Phuket in Thailand explained in horrific detail to me what the side effects where for her on statin drug therapy. In the end her own Doctor was forced to discontinue its use in the 5th year of her therapy. She was experiencing excruciating muscle pain and weakness and even had trouble lifting her camera up for still photo shots. These painful side effects continued even after stopping the medication.

 

My step father taking a popular statin cholesterol lowering drug was also forced by his MD to stop using the drug because of painful gout flare ups and unexplained joint pain. If you really want the real reason for heart disease that some heart experts and recent studies are pointing to ? Then all you need to do is look at the word INFLAMATION and Heart Disease on any search engine like Google with well over 13 million results.This is the true culprit and not cholesterol.” Well over Cholesterol lowering drugs is one of the biggest pharmaceutical SCAM perpetuated on the innocent public for pure profit and has nothing to do with human health. “

 

According to a leading heart surgeon with 25 years of experience, and with over 5,000 open heart surgeries this Physician is speaking out against the theory of the mainstream medical system that high cholesterol in the blood stream is the main cause of heart disease.

Doctor Lundell,s discovery was simple. The inside lining of the arterial damage was caused primarily from chronic inflammation from a poor diet of processed foods and vegetable oils. Simple refined carbohydrates with a lot of refined sugar and a diet that was low in fat exasperated the problem further.

 

The solution to get rid of the internal inflammation was simply to eat a whole food plant based diet that included quality fats from organically produced grass fed meats and dairy.

This dietary protocol of course went against many special interest groups such as the statin drug industry , the process food industry, and the AMA , American Medical Association , including the AHA, American Heart Association. Generally speaking your liver manufactures about 75 % of your blood cholesterol and about 25 % comes from your food. From my own experience I lowered my own high cholesterol count using a plant based diet with out resorting to using cholesterol lowering statin drugs so what does this tell you?

And I am sure that I am not some isolated case.

 

Quote from Thomas Martin who followed many of the diet recommendations of DR. Dwight Lundell.

“This book chronicles my descent from perfect health to near death from heart failure in less than eight months. My surgery to implant a mechanical pump (LVAD), my frustration with the medical community, my journey finding a cure to my disease and my recovery. I discuss my life with the Thoratec Heartmate II left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and how my life changed. This book is about taking control of your health. Optimal health can not be dispensed from a pharmacy. (Thomas Martin)” unquote

Reference: www.sott.net/article/242516-Heart-Surgeon-Speaks-Out-On-W...

 

“In fact Vitamin D that you get from the sun and Cholesterol manufactured in your liver works together for your immune function. Its essential for your good health.”

Again its the unused fatty lipids in your blood vessels that causes chronic inflammation in your body and not the so called high cholesterol count that the Statin Drug industry is touting as the enemy .

 

The father of modern medicine Hippocrates had it right when he said “Let Food be your medicine, and medicine be your food” This famous truthful affirmation is sworn in by all recruited Med school students upon graduation but thats where it ends . Nutrition for health is not in the Pharmaceutical curriculum so the famous MED oath does not have any teeth and therefore most MD,s at no fault of their own is I am sorry to say Nutritionally Ignorant to giving advice to their patients but very smart at prescribing drugs that the human liver does not recognize as nourishment or food.

 

In fact the notion of Health Freedom of people knowing and practicing preventative medicine is a direct threat to the pharmaceutical industry bottom line profits and this is a fact in life today.

A persons own body immune system does all the repair work if the owner takes care the proper way living according to Nature. There are scores of communities of elderly people around the world that live this way today and they do not take statin drugs or any pharmaceutical drug and live well into advanced age with good health and vigor.

 

These people have no need for taking multiple vitamin and mineral supplements and they do not have gym memberships that we have in modern day fast paste living. They have all the secrets to good health , and living pain free.

 

“The answers are so simple yet so many special industry groups that have high financial gain to protect in the chronic disease care industry will do anything to keep things just the way they are.”

 

And its not just our mainstream medical industry but also the agricultural Bio Tech industry and our process food giant industry that together has compounded the problem against us.

 

The giant Biotech industry Monsanto refuses to serve their GMO product in their corporate cafeteria for health risks , but they force their product into our bodies with products unlabeled. “Is this OK with you? “

 

It is not uncommon for large farm corporations that use pesticides on the foods that you eat but for the farmer they will not eat this contaminated food themselves because they know what is in it. And instead will grow their own organic foods in some other location for personal consumption. “Is this OK with you?”

 

Often food giants for the processed food industry will not disclose everything on their label that they think will reflect negatively on their sales. They will use deceptive advertising like showing something healthy on the front to get you to buy it, but often this photo represents only a fraction of the graphics presented. The word “Natural “ is used as hype to get you to by but interestingly enough you do not see this word used in the produce section of the store.

“Is this OK with you? “

 

Many of our foods that are processed overseas have been irradiated, sprayed , gassed, dipped in chemicals,bleached, fumigated,lined with plastic,stripped of material that would shorten shelf life and packaged in expensive advertizing that the retailers on top of this pass on to you.All this is a dirty little secret that they do not want you to know because it would negatively reflect on their bottom line sales funnel. “Is this OK with you? “

 

“The Hypocrisy of it All”

 

First “Again I wish to reflect upon to you the hypocrisy of many of the corporate founders that are driving this relentless machine against you, and against Nature . “

 

“ The founder John D. Rockefeller who spear headed the Rockefeller Foundation back in 1913, started the whole thing of funding heroic medicine of slash, burn, and poison. But not known to most people this man of incredible wealth and corporate influence, would privately shun his own funded medicine. “

As quoted from the You Tube Video the “Cancer Report Full Version” “Through out his life ,John D. Rockefeller Sr, refused to take his own medicine. Instead he used traditional holistic medicines for his own health.

 

Mission Statement of the Rockefeller Foundation:

John D. Rockefeller, Sr., established The Rockefeller Foundation in 1913 to promote the well-being of humanity around the world.

 

Secondly today fast forward to the Hypocrisy of our Oncology . Many studies and surveys have shown that the vast majority of Oncologists ( Cancer Doctors ) if diagnosed with cancer would refuse their own treatments . Many of them would look for other ways of treating their cancers including seeking out alternative holistic therapies.

 

When asked they would never give their therapy of slash, burn, and poison with chemo therapy to their family or loved ones either.

 

“The oncologists know that only a dismal 3% recovery of Cancer is possible with their treatments with in only 5 years survival. If you live one day , past this time frame but die later you are considered cured in their statistics. They know very well about this failure to cure but they still give hope to their patients for a protocol that they know very well has close to a zero success rate. Many others in the know if diagnosed will jump ship and seek out alternative holistic treatments but on the other hand will enforce and shove their protocols that they themselves do not believe in down your throat literally. “

“Is this Ok with You? “

 

“More than 10 years ago I witnessed up front what chemotherapy did to my own father.I saw first hand how this drug stripped my Dad of all his dignity. How this poison drug scared his throat and took away his ability to eat solid foods forcing him to drink from a feeding tube. I saw his voice box disappear and the loss of his body and limbs lose total mobility.I saw his urine turn brown and black. I saw my Dad slip into a coma with a fungal infection attacking his brain. With my Dad still alive my oncologist turned to me and asked me point blank if they could do further experiments on my Fathers near dead body to find a cure for cancer? They wanted me to donate my Dad to science that would allow them to do things to my Dad that I dare not write in this report. “

 

With all this stuff going on behind the scenes , its no wonder why we are experiencing serious health challenges today , and that 60 percent of the American aging population is going bankrupt from medical costs.

 

There is an epidemic of obesity , and type 2 Diabetes in our population that can be prevented and even fixed with proper nutrition and right lifestyle. And yes Heart Disease can also be prevented and fixed with proper nutrition and life style. Just ask our former President Bill Clinton. He is reversing his failing heart condition with a healthy protocol of eating a plant based diet with exercise. Heart disease and yes even Cancer responds to eating right and living right. So many physicians and people around the world today are advocating a holistic approach to support an immune response. Are these people all wrong? Is it possible to reverse disease with diet .right lifestyle, and powerful natural holistic protocols. Of course it is ?

 

“In fact I have seen my own body more than 20 years ago drop half my own excess body weight through right eating and lifestyle.Taking pharmaceutical drug therapy did not accomplish this phenomenon. My painful symptoms are a thing of the past ,and now I live better ,feel better , look better, have more energy , and feel stronger today all due to my healthy transition.”

 

I give you a short list of You Tube Video References and resources:

Following is the You Tube Video “ Cancer Report Full Report”

www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=AnN3Y...!

 

The following You Tube video is about “Cancer The Forbidden Cures”

www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWLrfNJICeM&feature=related

 

The following You Tube Video “Food that Kills “

www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNCGkprGW_o&feature=related

 

The following You Tube Video regarding the GMO Genetically Modified Organisms

entitled “genetic roulette full movie”

www.youtube.com/watch?v=odCSWY05u4Q

 

You Tube Video Reference History of Monsanto “Monsanto Extinction”

www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZ5OxdIq5DY&feature=related

  

In this You tube Health Video Dr. Lustig will explain “the bitter truth” of the processed

food industry and how it relates to our addiction to sugar and obesity around the world. www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

 

And finally a good tip on Sensible Shopping at the SuperMarket

www.youtube.com/watch?v=snP40-unO0A&feature=related

 

About the Barry Gourmet Photo taken at the Garden Villa Phuket in Thailand

Starting at the far top left and moving counter clockwise. Made for 2 people in less than 15 minutes. 5 minutes for food preparation and about 10 minutes for the cooking.

(1) Two free range organic Duck eggs ( with all the cholesterol the body can use for good health)

(2)

The bottom of the stainless steal steamer with a broth of medicinal herbs)

(3) The 2 Eggs mixed into a ceramic or glass bowl of vegetables

(4) Recipe of the finished gourmet meal plan I call “ Barry Gourmet's Healthy Cholesterol Raps”

(5) And yes thats me yours truly at the end wishing you all the best for your gourmet endeavors.

 

“If creating recipes is like an exact measured science of a paint by number formula system then why bother! Lets have some fun instead.”

 

Barry Gourmet & Raw

 

“What makes the Recipes of Barry Gourmet so different from all the other recipes out there? “

 

It is very important for branding your name ,your product in my case it is Food & Beverage and to differentiate your self from the rest of the market. By doing this the Barry Gourmet and Raw recipes will be fresh (excuse the bun) extraordinarily different but practical to make and takes less time then most recipes since time in todays economy and fast paste living for most people comes at a premium.

 

“If a recipe takes more than 15 minutes to make from start to finish no matter how nutritious , delicious, fresh, or ease of making it is ,I cannot allow this recipe to be on my menu. Many restaurants and even 5 star hotels today have I very high turn over of foods and beverage to stay in profit so much of it is made someplace else and stored in packages to be opened when the order comes in. I am not saying that every restaurant or hotel does this with every meal I am just saying that there is industry standards and practices for staying in profit and this is one of them. This is not fresh food and therefore this thinking is not acceptable to me. “

 

“The ingredients must be fresh and perishable in most cases for the main ingredients to supply life giving enzymes ,optimum nutrition , and yes the all important taste that we value so highly .”

  

What Barry Gourmet does not use?

For good taste ,and foods that are off my do not use short list are the following: I never use processed food ingredients of any kind like refined sugar, table salt (sodium chloride) conventional cow dairy, conventional grain and corn fed meats, farm raised fish,no flour of any kind, No packaged processed food ingredients that has man made fillers,like MSG,GMO, artificial color,Soy,corn,Gluten,Artificial Preservatives, No Rancid Vegetable oils that are sold in plastic containers, no conventional produce or very little of it that is imported in from another country. Only about 5 to 10 percent of my food intake per meal may have a long shelf life. This is my high standard for freshness of my food and beverage recipes.

 

Barry Gourmet & Raw practices a whole food ,plant based rainbow color diet plan as nature intended.

 

“And trust me I have good reason from my food industry research over the last 20 years to explain why I implement such a high standard for these recipes that is good for your good health and well being. “

 

What Barry Gourmet does use?

  

My selected produce of Vegetables and Fruits in that order are fresh ( no more than 3 days storage) and ORGANIC as much as possible and in season. Always support your local organic farmer for your fresh produce as much as possible. All foods that are used in my Earth Kitchen come directly from NATURE . These local foods grow on trees , bushes, in the ground and in the sea (seaweed).

 

All fish is fresh from the market and wild caught including any frozen red wild salmon.

 

My chicken is free range and organic.

All eggs of duck or hen are free range and organic.

As much as possible Barry Gourmet will grow fresh Thai Herbs in his garden to add more variety ,nutrition and taste to the recipe.

 

It is not that difficult to start your own herb garden even if it is simply done in clay container pots.

Not much space is needed for this and it can be done near windows , on your patio or balcony anywhere really that receives natural light.

 

This part is where things get more interesting. I use the whole organic food including the skins, pulp, and seed to make the recipe. This includes sprouting the seed, or milling it . All my kitchen scraps are returned to nature through recycling using my compost tumbler bin. A one time investment that pays for itself over the years of usage.

 

Even much of my yard waste is recycled back to nature by feeding the Elephants near the camp not far from the Garden Villa Phuket located in Thailand.

My recipes are 100 percent sustainable and nothing is wasted.

For taste I use only whole foods from nature. The local tropical fruits of Phuket are often made into a sauce, topping,chutney,dressing, using a blender and juice machine for preparation.

Some of my seed is milled as needed for the recipe and blended into my selected fruit .

Adding sprouted nuts ,dry and fresh herbs to the condiment will further bring out the taste.

 

My main method of food preparation involves Raw, Steamed, Blanched, Cultured,Marination, some quick stir fry using only pure filtered water , with selected organic cold pressed oil applied later or at the very end of the applied heat. (All oils even good healthy oils easily break down and become rancid when cooked or heated at high temperatures. ) My selected oil for this job that has a much higher temperature point than the other oils is pure virgin cold pressed organic coconut oil.

 

“The only dairy that I would use if you could find it and even I cant find it would be raw organic butter preferably made from gouts milk ,but this product I am afraid to say is something from the past before the conventional long shelf dairy industry came in and hijacked the small independent family dairy farm. “

 

The Barry Gourmet way of preparing food and beverage.?

Every meal that I create has at least 50 percent of the food fresh and raw and this is why I do this for your better health and wellness. Raw food when eaten first , along side your cooked meal will help you with your digestion as the raw food chime in your gut will assist the organs that produce enzymes such as your pancreas for enzyme activity and better assimilation of your meal. Studies show that any recipe that is 100 percent cooked and eaten this way at one sitting causes your white blood cell count to go up as this is evidence of your bodies immune system attacking the very food that you thought was good and healthy for you . This chemical reaction in your body is called “Digestive leukocytosis where your bodies immune system cells attack the cooked food like it is some kind of foreign invader. The only way to prevent this problem is to make sure that at least 50 percent of your food at one sitting is raw or 100 percent raw. By following my recommendation you will not experience Digestive leukocytosis. This is why it is much healthier for you not to drink to much beverage with your meal that only dilutes the enzymes and your stomachs hydrochloric acid can to a much better job of doing this. Your main beverage intake should be between your meals about one half to an hour on either side.

 

Reference : www.beyondveg.com/tu-j-l/raw-cooked/raw-cooked-1i.shtml

  

Nutritional Tips from Barry Gourmet :

Even with the best selected organic raw produce you can easily destroy its nutritional value and yes even taste by over heating and by using refined processed oils. Our body is in constant change as we have a new one about every 7 years so even our own taste buds can change as we transition to a more natural way of eating .

 

“ Yes our body never stops changing and in seven years we have new organs, new skin , new eyes, bones ,blood, lymph a new brain you name it our body is remarkable and to support this renewable change for the better it will take a good diet of whole plant based foods with the nature made Fats, Complex Carbohydrates, and Proteins to do the job. Moving our body out doors in the sun with clean air will support our lymphatic system , our bones and every function of our body. And just as important good sleep, rest and managed stress will support the other 2 pillars of health and well being.

The 4th and last pillar will be our sense of purpose , happiness , gratitude, Love for our self and for humanity ,family and nature and our spirituality will round out our wholeness in life.”

 

“Yes you can find many recipes on line in the thousands of millions if you had time to go through them all but ,what I am offering to you is different .

“Any recipe can offer an ingredient list and a method of preparation with a follow up comment with signature but to my thinking this is not engaging to the reader at all and not giving enough information about the readers demographics or dietary needs.

 

“I think of the health benefits of the food inside your body , and yes I even think of where you live and what is your nationality because all these important personal facts will relate to the best food plan the works for you .”

 

“Let me give you an example! “ I live in South East Asia in Phuket Thailand and I know from experience that if you want good health you must eat a diet of mostly organically grown vegetables and fruits in that order that is local and in season . At least 50 percent at every sitting must be raw.

But chances are most of you live in other parts of the world and my diet suggestions will not apply to you with different food choices growing in your area am I right when I say this?”

 

So to make it easy for you to follow my recipe I list food options for you and I also list foods that grow in your area if you live outside of South East Asia for example food substitutes in brackets if you live for example in Europe or America.

 

“Also I encourage you to make food choices in the recipe that I present to you that match your heritage or the foods of your mother and father land. This is very important as we carry the genes of our parents with us for life and their foods should be included no matter where you live.”

For some recipes that are exact for ingredients I think in some cases this could be problematic as the store may not have everything that the recipe is asking for so I make it easy to follow with ingredient substitutes and options.

 

For example in Thailand where I live. I see many Thai People eating less traditional Thai foods and eating more introduced western foods and now obesity, heart disease,diabetes,and even cancer is on the rise in this country.More than sixty years ago Thailand was famous for a country with the lowest cancer rates of any country in the world all due to the Thai famous cuisine of whole foods of plant based eating. The kind of food we eat has a profound affect on our bodies internal environment ,positive or negative.

Often I like to give my original food for thought quote that relates to the recipe, to health and your wellness, our environment, or toward a particular food industry.

“A recipe should be fun to make, easy to make , nutritious with many food options offered for most places around the world and takes less than 15 minutes to prepare from start to finish. My personal nutritional tips for health and weight loss are included and I try to over deliver for your benefit. Its a toll order I know but it is my passion for you . To bring out the Gourmet in you no matter where you live. I am reaching out to you for your good health and wellness. “

 

“Simply every Barry Gourmet recipe creation is my personal mission to you”

 

Ingredients for Barry Gourmet's Cholesterol Rap Recipe:

 

2 large leaves of chinese cabbage: “I find that the chinese cabbage leaf has the same durability and stability of a slice of multi grain bread but much healthier for you . A whole grain flowerless bread would be your second best choice ,and a floured multi grain bread slice would be a distant third for whole nutrition.

 

2 organic free range Duck or Hen Eggs.

 

A small handful of fresh mixed leafy greens ,such as sweet basil , mint, sage, rosemary, parsley, Chicory, any green tops of root vegetable is a good choice.

 

One small onion egg size.

 

One whole slice of fresh pineapple ½ to 1 inch thick depending on the fruit sweetness that you desire. Discard the skins. Or substitute(One organic whole apple sliced with skins on.)

 

(1)I finger size white turmeric root that is used in this photo recipe. Or you can use any root vegetable such as yellow turmeric,carrot,a small beet,small turnip or white radish.

 

(2)A few stalks of Asparagus or you can substitute with a few sticks of celery.

 

(3)A small hand full of cherrie tomatoes.

 

(4)One inch by ½ cube of ginger root.

 

(5) 8 to 10 presoaked chinese dry jujubes.can substitute with prunes.

 

Half a cucumber

 

I/4 cup of cooked brown rice or any grain of your desire such as oats,millet,quinoa or millet.

Note that in Asian homes it is very normal to have cooked rice on stand by through out the day. For the other grains its best to presoak them in a bowl of water over light and store them in a glass jar for quick cooking the following day.

 

Ingredients for the topping and sauce :

 

A table spoon of pre soaked Goji Berries. Can substitute for fresh, frozen thawed or presoaked dry cranberries.

 

Your choice of a few crushed nuts such as walnut , brazil, almond, filbert, macadamia,pecan or mixed nut . A table spoon is good.

 

2 to 3 tables spoons of Tamarind juice. Easy to make just add the tamarind seed inside a glass container then fill with pure water and store in the refrigerator with the lid securely closed. Tamarind that grows on very tall trees through out South East Asia is a savory sweet long bean type fruit brown in color and is used a lot in Thai cuisine. I used this ingredient in the photo recipe.

 

Or you can use 2 to 3 table spoons of coconut cream.

 

In a temperate climate you can substitute for 2 to 3 table spoons of apple sauce.

 

Ingredients for the soup broth: A Tonic Immune Support Broth

 

3 to 4 cups of pure water.

2 to 3 dry medicinal mushrooms of your choice.

One stick of cinnamon

A few dry sticks of licorice root

A few dry sticks of astragalus root

A few pieces of dry seaweed soaked in water on the side. Possible choices can be wakame, chinese,kelp,brown,nori or dulse.

Some presoaked Goji berrie or substitute cranberries on the side

Note that the above ingredients are in combination used in TMC Traditional Chinese Medicine

You can find these ingredients in most health food stores or any Asian Food Store.

  

Method for the making of Barry Gourmet's Cholesterol Rap Recipe:

 

First pour in your 3 to 4 cups of pure water into your stainless steal steamer.

 

Then place all your soup broth ingredients into the water except for your selected seaweed and berries.

 

Have your flame on high to get the water boiling and place the steamer lid on top.

 

Then in a large enough glass or ceramic bowl add all the finely chopped ingredients 1 through 5.

 

Then break open your 2 selected eggs and add them to the bowel. Mix the egg well into the ingredients.

 

Then place the bowl on top of the steam basket and cover with the lid. About 10 minutes of steaming will solidify the egg and vegetable mix a bit.

 

Method for making the topping and sauce :

 

Your selected ingredients from the following list can be mixed well together in a mixing bowl.

 

A table spoon of pre soaked Goji Berries. Can substitute for fresh, frozen thawed or presoaked dry cranberries.

 

Your choice of a few crushed nuts such as walnut , brazil, almond, filbert, macadamia,pecan or mixed nut . A table spoon is good.

 

2 to 3 tables spoons of Tamarind juice. Easy to make just add the tamarind seed inside a glass container then fill with pure water and store in the refrigerator with the lid securely closed. Tamarind that grows on very tall trees through out South East Asia is a savory sweet long bean type fruit brown in color and is used a lot in Thai cuisine. I used this ingredient in the photo recipe.

 

Or you can use 2 to 3 table spoons of coconut cream.

 

In a temperate climate you can substitute for 2 to 3 table spoons of apple sauce.

 

When this is done you can check on how your steamed egg with vegetables is doing.

I test the consistency and firmness or lack there of with a fork.

 

Near the 15 minute mark you can turn off the heat and prepare the following.

 

On a dinner plate place 2 of your Chinese lettuce leaves.

 

Then with kitchen mitts lift the bowl of steamed egg and vegetables out of your steamer and place it near the dinner plate of Chinese lettuce leaves.

 

Using a spoon spread Barry Gourmet,s Cholesterol over the lettuce leaves.

 

Then spoon the topping over this.

 

Add some of your berries on top.

 

Garnish your plate with sliced cucumber, mixed fresh leafy greens, and sticks of pineapple or apple pieces.

 

Pour the TCM broth at the bottom of the steamer into a serving bowl and garnish with your selected soaked seaweed and berries.

 

Any left over egg vegetable can be stored in a glass jar and used later in the day .

 

Your done and you can serve or relish this incredible nutrient dense delicious easy to make meal.

 

'I hope that I have busted the food myth for you that says eggs and cholesterol is bad or unhealthy for you ? Both eggs and coconut for years has been demonized by mainstream medicine and the media as unhealthy fats for the human body. We need fat in our diet of quality sources. If you do as I do and practice raw vegan meals of high water content foods with all its dietary fiber that takes center stage at the odd sitting of free range or wild animal proteins that take up far less space on your plate then you should not have any problem with

your weight management , or any problem with your CBC Complete blood count if you take care of your other 3 pillars of good health .

 

Nutritional Benefits of an Egg!

 

We have been eating eggs through out the centuries and a few cholesterol studies in our life time has turned the egg debate upside down. In truth this excellent resource below by Livestrong will break all the myths surrounding the consumption of eggs from a reliable source. You really need to know your egg well before buying it because of the dubious poultry practices for conventional egg laying.

 

Always look for organically fed birds that are free range only. It seems there is something about the color of the yolk. I know for fact that ducks in Thailand are free range and I see them on Thai Television running around this way feeding off the land. Their yolks are a deep orange yellow and the egg tastes great even though the package does not claim free range and organic. These eggs are in short supply.

 

And on the other hand when I buy labeled free range organic hen eggs in Thailand I find the yolks to be a more pale yellow and the taste is to me more bland less egg like if I can make this analogy? They are in great supply as well. Just an observation. You can guess which egg I prefer?

 

The Livestrong URL Link will bust the following myths for you as follows.

Myth 1- Eating eggs will make you fat ? Actually they will help you to lose excess weight!

Myth 2- Eating eggs will raise your cholesterol? The truth is eggs do not affect cholesterol levels in the blood.

Myth 3- You should only eat egg whites for best health? This is false as the yolk has all the nutrition and protection and support for good health.

Myth 4- Eating raw egg is more healthy for you? Truth is more nutrients are available to you through cooking of the egg and certain bacterial strains are destroyed by the heating of your egg. Enjoy a good egg now and then its healthy for you.

 

Resources:

 

www.livestrong.com/article/556213-nutrition-debate-are-eg...

 

“ If whole edible foods of plant and animal origin is deemed unhealthy after centuries of human consumption then why is it that processed foods that pales in comparison on our planets timeline gets a pass? “

 

Barry Anderson aka Barry Gourmet & Raw

 

Many of Barry,s Gourmet recipes are served at the Garden Villa Phuket at

www.gardenvillaphuket.com For booking at this private garden retreat Barry,s email is info@earththailandandhouse.com

For more of Barry,s Health content and what mainstream medicine does not want you to know please visit his Face Book at www.facebook.com/barry.anderson.338863

Where it all started please visit Barry at www.flickr.com/photos/54619340@N07/ for more of Barry,s earth bound plant based recipes and health content.

 

www.flickr.com/photos/54619340@N07/

 

Asian Spa Detox Breakfast

 

Takes only 5 minutes to make ! Not including the time for sprouting the living foods and possibly opening the coconut ! A Garden Villa Phuket Presentation.

Written by Barry Gourmet & Raw © Copyright Dec.24 2011

 

Introduction:

 

A breakfast that is simple and easy to make in the morning that contains all of Natures fresh ingredients is what you will find in this Alkalizing food preparation of the Asian Spa Detox .

This incredibly nutritious and living food meal will support your body for Cleansing ,for losing weight and even maintaining your present weight. Your digestion will be helped. This almost 100% Vegan breakfast has all the good fats, fiber, complex carbohydrates, organic minerals and vitamins ,with all the amino acid proteins , and is non Gluten.

 

A simple breakdown of the foods and health benefits to you in my layperson terms.

 

Coconut water is excellent for body hydration with electrolytes.

Coconut meat is at the top of the list for dietary fiber,with medium chain saturated fatty acids that are not the same as the saturated long chain fats that come from animal. In fact coconut meat will help you to lose weight and the meat will help restore your friendly bacterial flora that resides in your intestinal tract and stomach.

As we age our body does not make the hormones and does not manufacture hydrochloric acid in the stomach as efficiently as a younger person does so adding some cold pressed apple cider vinegar to a meal or beverage will help hydrochloric acid production that helps to break down the foods into more bioavailable proteins for better assimilation.

All sprouted seeds become less starchy and with much more nutritious life giving enzymes and much higher amino acids and minerals especially magnesium and calcium that can be more utilized by your body.

Pineapple is excellent for weight lose, cleansing ,and detoxing having mostly down the center core of the stem proteolytic enzymes (bromelain) that help your digestive organs in breaking down the proteins in foods.Pineapple is also anti inflammatory for sports medicine.

All the green leafy vegetables rich in chlorophyl the blood of plants will deliver a wealth of minerals and vitamins to to your body and they are natural detox cleansers. The fiber supports liver function.

The Mandarine orange is of course very high in Vitamin C and the skin is a flavanoid that is immune enhancing.

Lemon and Lime juice is Acid out side of our bodies but very alkaline inside our body and very cleansing . This applies to the apple cider vinegar as well.

Cashew nuts are extremely high in the mineral magnesium and studies have shown that they can calm the nerves and mind demonstrated in the “Food Matters” Video.

Bee Pollen is a potent all around super food source of enzymes , trace minerals, and vitamins that are deficient in many other foods. I consider Bee Pollen as Natures whole food Vitamin and Mineral supplement.

The probiotic sachet of powder is a prebiotic which means that it provides food directly to your friendly flora bacteria that weighs about 6 to 7 pounds in a healthy persons gut and probiotic which supports the colonization of your intestinal friendly bacteria .

This detox cleansing breakfast will not abruptly break the 7 to 8 hour fast that we call sleeping.

 

Ingredients:

 

The Vegan Chutney Dressing:

One whole coconut

one inch thick fresh pineapple slice skin removed.

One cup of your mixed favorite fresh green herbs? ( I like to use sweet basil,mint, & chicory)

One mandarine orange ( with out seeds but add ¼ of the skin must be organic Lemon works as well)

 

Set aside your raw apple cider vinegar cold pressed, raw unfiltered honey, and fresh lemons and limes to make squeezed,, lemon or lime juice some tamarind juice.( These ingredients will be used for final taste)

 

For your Sprinkled Topping:

 

On the side some whole raw or baked cashew nuts (unsalted )

Bee Pollen

A probiotic sachet 3 grams Dairy or Vegan . Contains Yogurt Powder & a prebiotic

Fructooligosaccharide (I use a product named lactomin Plus) The only probiotic I can find in Thailand.

Some dry garlic granules or flakes. ( Never use fried Garlic it is rancid and damaging to cells)

 

For your main ingredients:

 

Enough fresh garden wild green herbs to fill a pie plate. At the Garden Villa Phuket Spa and Wellness Retreat we are blessed with wild crafted Herbs and yes edible weeds and exotic edible tropical flowers that traditional elders use for their classic Thai food presentations. But for this breakfast the flowers are left out. We used Chicory, Dandelion leaf, Tiger leaf, Thai olive leaf,and sweet basil all evenly harvested and mixed together.

 

If you buy your fresh herbs in the market then a good choice would be your favorite mixed leafy greens that will do just as well.

 

For the Living Sprouted Foods that took only 2 to 3 days to make by nature but only a couple of minutes to make by me.

 

I used sprouted black sesame seed and sprouted alfalfa.

You can buy your own alfalfa sprouts in most supermarkets but I always find that its saving you money and its a fresher product to just sprout seeds from scratch for more choices of living foods.

 

The Basic Technique before bedtime that I use for sprouting sesame and alfalfa seed is as follows.

I usually place enough seed that will last me for 3 to 4 days half a cup each sounds good.

Put the seeds in 2 separate bowls then fill with enough pure filtered water about one inch above the seed level. The seeds over night will absorb all this water and will expand looking much bigger than before.The seeds are very small I know but if you had a magnifier glass you would notice this wonderful phenomenon.

 

In the morning check up on your seeds . Most or all of the water has been absorbed into each seed . Next step is to give the bowl of seeds repeat rinsing by pouring fresh water into the bowl then pouring all into a trainer with a pail underneath to catch the discarded seed water. Keep doing this until the water becomes super clear and then you can place the strained seeds on a dish to collect the water that drains through the seed bed. The discarded leftover seed water is excellent nourishment for your potted plants and herbs.

An enzyme inhibiter is a clear protective protein coating every seed and nut for its own individual protection until the right conditions will allow it to sprout or come to life from dormancy. These conditions would be water, darkness, air and the correct temperature for that particular seed or nut.

 

Tip: Less is more when it comes to sprouting living foods. The less water used and more air with darkness in the first and second day brings fantastic results. Over watering will prolong the process and you may lose some of your product to spoilage. The trick is to add less water for each passing day for best results.

 

The seeds at the top of the bunch bowl shaped straining basket will always be more dry than the seeds underneath especially at the bottom so it is always a good idea to take a spoon or fork and turn them over for even drying 2 times per day. Then return the baskets to a dark place like a cupboard , or bathroom ,any dark space under the sink can use your imagination here.

Why keep the seeds in darkness? Because I know this sounds weird , they think they are planted in the ground already so they are growing to find the light or the sun.

Just cover the strainer basket with a light towel and in the 2nd or 3rd day you will see something amazing. Just bring them outside to soak up the suns indirect rays on a table or shelf with an empty straining basket serving as a protective lid on top to keep the birds and other creatures in your garden from eating your new fresh sprouts.

 

I have had sprouts lasting for days and even a couple of weeks with care. I will cover this in another article. I have been sprouting for decades with different methods but generally it is really easy to do with practice.

 

How to make tamarind juice? Its easy just by the whole tamarind paste sold in most Asian Food stores and but some in your blender with some water and blend to the consistency you like. A fantastic taste enhancer that is savory sweet and tangy for many of my Asian Recipes.

Method for making Barry Gourmets Asian Detox Breakfast Vegan Chutney Dressing:

 

The whole Coconut: I like to get the hard part out of the way first and I have been cutting open coconuts everyday for years now so it just takes a little practice.

Mine are picked fresh straight off the tree and take more time to open up ,but yours will most likely will be purchased in the store . The store will sell these coconuts with the tops already cut on 45 degree angles making the largest seed in the world looking like snow capped mountain tops. Just take out your coconut cleaver,( They have rectangle blades and a large enough handle for a good hand grip and the knife has a good weight to it) Just cut down into box shape pattern then lift open the top.

Pour the sweet juice into your glass blender. Then cut down several times down the middle section of the nut and split the coconut in to halves. With a sharp spoon scoop out all the meat into your blender.

 

Tip for the Environment: Do not trash the 2 half coconut shells. Instead cut them in smaller pieces and use them as excellent drainage beds at the bottom layer of planted pots of house plants indoors or out doors. “That can be done at another time because you may use up your 5 minutes of preparing your Asian Spa Detox breakfast meal when doing this”

"Live Earth Day every day"

 

Add to your blender your chopped pineapple chunks, your green herbs finely chopped,your Mandarin Orange in small pieces with a little bit of the skin and or some lemon skin peal is nice.

 

With the lid on securely blend slow to faster and add more water if needed to create your smooth consistency.

Pour the liquid paste into your bowl and taste with your eyes closed. This is when you decide if its just right for you or it needs some fixing up?

 

You have an arsenal of fantastic natural flavor enhancers at your disposal for making these crucial adjustments.

To sweeten add your raw unfiltered honey.

To add bite or sharpness add your apple cider vinegar.

To make more sour add some lemon or lime juice.

Sometimes a little sprinkle of ground cinnamon is all it takes to bring out that special flavor.

 

I do not believe in paint by number recipes of adding this and adding that to the exact letter because all foods are flavored differently.It depends on their origin, method of agriculture,and even every persons taste buds are different. For example if you where going to the store to buy lets say mangos. Well the yellow ones would be sweet to taste and the green ones would be sour to taste and the yellow green ones of course would be some where in between but they are still mangos. Even in many of the high end restaurants and 5 star hotel and resort back kitchens the head chef will often taste the food served first and make necessary adjustments before serving to their guests.

 

Method for the pie plate of salad leafy greens:

 

Spread your pre cut leafy greens evenly across then circle the perimeter with a thin layer of sprouted black sesame seeds.

Spoon your chutney layered in the center and add your island of alfalfa sprouts on top in the middle.

Then place your whole cashew nuts into the chutney.

Sprinkle your sachet of probiotic powder over the chutney in a circle pattern.

Sprinkle your bee pollen over top.

Garnish with 2 lime wedges and 2 of your favorite fresh green leafy whole herbs.

In the photo I used chicory and a Thai olive leaf.

 

For all the garlic lovers out there just spoon what you like into your mill grinding machine unit that hopefully comes with your blender purchase?

Mill to a fine powder for findger sprinkling over your food.

Garlic supports your immunity and is a potent detoxifyer.

   

Method for the Detoxing Beverage: Add some pure water to your cup .

Add a dash of Apple Cider Vinegar.

Some raw unfiltered honey.

Some lime or lemon juice.

Stir and taste with adjustments

 

Enjoy your Asian Spa Detox Breakfast.

 

Barry Gourmet & Raw

        

France

 

Ce bento était destiné à mon mari, à l'occasion de notre premier anniversaire de mariage (le 3 juillet). J'y ai restructuré une recette ramenée de notre voyage de noces en Australie et que je fais souvent depuis : le fabuleux Chicken Burger du JD's (Snack un peu chic de notre résidence hôtelière à Melbourne) Il est habituellement composé de bas en haut dans un petit pain, de chutney de mangue, d'une escalope de volaille grillée, d'une salade mélangée et de guacamole.

Ici, pour une version un tout petit peu plus légère (on n'a pas perdu tous les kilos de notre voyage de noces en mars !) j'ai remplacé petit pain et frites par des chips de légumes qui permettent de "dipper" le guacamole - qui est décoré du demi noyau de l'avocat pour empêcher l’oxydation. La salade s'est un peu tranformée, j'ai omis les tomates et remplacé le concombre par de la courgette (ça colle mieux au goût de mon mari) elle est accompagnée de sa sauce de salade préférée (vinaigre balsamique, sirop d'érable et huile neutre). Sinon, tout y est, y comprit le chutney "made in Australia"!

 

This bento is for my husband as we are celebrating our first wedding anniversary (the 3rd of July). I transformed a recipe we brought back from our Honeymoon trip in Australia : the fabulous Chicken Burger from the JD's (a chic snack at our hotel in Melbourne) It is usually made of mango chutney, broiled chicken breast, mixed salad and guacamole within a bun, served with potato wedges.

Here, I choose vegetables crisps instead of the bread and wedges for a lower carb version (we haven't shed all the pounds gained last March in Oz!). The crisps are nice for dipping in the guacamole - I used the avocado pit to decorate and to protect the guacamole for oxidation. The salad was adaptated to my husband's tastes by omitting the tomatoes and replacing cucumber by raw zucchinis. The salsa is his favorite (balsamic vinegar, maple syrup and neutral oil) Otherwise all is there, including the Autralian made mango chutney!

 

Merci à toute l'équipe et aux partenaires de nous mijoter des concours aussi motivants tant par les cadeaux de par les sujets!

  

Martine

 

What can you do with Sprouts?

 

Written from the Earth Desk of Holistic Chef Barry from his Garden Villa Phuket residence in Thailand. You can freely share my photo and article as you wish through out the internet.

 

You can do a lot of wonderful things with sprouts.

 

First what is a sprout.? Amy seed ,nut, legume, grain ,and kernel that has started to grow out of its dormancy is a sprout. A sprout can look like anything but these are the common signs. Swelled and larger in size. Moist body to the touch and tender. Showing a short pointed stem. Changed its shape dramatically from its original shape. Even the color of the seed can change like with basil seed from black to a brilliant blue in color that you can see in some of my recipe creations here at flic.kr/ps/QgogH

 

I don’t no where to start in telling you how versatile sprouts can do for your recipe creations and how they increase your nutritional status 10 fold . I have been sprouting for 3 decades now in different parts of the world as I was sent to different countries to supervise Animation production studios mostly all over Asia.

 

Hotels , guest rooms , apartments do not have outside garden spaces that will allow you to garden so I turned my interest into indoor gardening to increase my nutritional status .

 

“ Can you just imagine me secretly growing my sprouted greens in the privacy of my payed 5 star hotel the as my cleaning lady comes in she opens the closets of my wardroom to find a garden of eden filling trays and trays of edible sprouts . Something against Hotel policy about growing your own food in side your room so that did not last very long.”

 

This is my film credit list of Cartoon Animated shows that I worked on in the past with many of the major production studios. Working and drawing cartoons from 1980 to 2001 for my professional career.

This is my film credit list here at www.imdb.com/name/nm0026395

I would get comments from my fellow Animators when ever I brought in my home made lunch .

 

“I still draw today but more for my holistic real estate design projects and now my Garden Villa Phuket is in the works .”

 

“This is what you can do with sprouts and it is just my short list as I am constantly creating new ways of incorporating them into my Holistic Recipe creations.

All of them are fast and easy and take only 15 minutes or less to create .

I always say eating right does not have to be complicated. “

 

This is what you can do with your sprouts. You can

use them in different stages of development from the presoaked all the way to a planted juvenile potted plant.

 

You can eat them raw !

Blanch them in hot water

Steam them

Add them together for complete protein ,fats, and complex carbohydrates on one serving dish

You can juice them ,blend them , and make smoothies become more alive.

You can make dressings,toppings,puddings, chutney, vinaigrette , sauces, seasonings , teas , beverages, salads , deserts, pizza, sandwiches, soups, and all kinds of interesting culinary creations just with sprouts and incorporating sprouts into other methods of culinary art.

 

I just cannot imagine working in my Whole Food Earth Kitchen with out my sprouts.

 

Enjoy your sprouting journey . It is an art of “ Elegant Culinary Cuisine”

 

Holistic Chef Barry

   

It goes well with The Hotel Kitchen products.

Why is eating raw vegetables and fruits in that order so very important to your good Health?

 

What can you do with Sprouts? (Living Foods)

 

How important is raw foods to your health and what “Essential Master Super anti-oxidant does raw foods contain for your body that cooked foods and processed fake food do not have ?

 

They really do not want you to have this information believe me ! This information would blow a hole through the industries sales marketing plan to the general public that could possibly affect their sales if enough people had this information , and this is why you have not heard about it until now. Read this very important nutritional article.

 

Written from the Earth Desk of Holistic Chef Barry from his Garden Villa Phuket residence in Thailand. You can freely share my photo and article as you wish through out the internet. A credit to my name Holistic Chef Barry and a link back to my content is appreciated. Thank You

 

“Adding your own sprouts of living foods to your own recipe that you just created is empowering YOU more than you can imagine” Such As Lose weight effectively , have more energy right down to the cellular level. Support your body with the master super anti-oxidant named "Glutathione" that is found in every living human cell in the body and that only fresh raw foods have and cooked foods do not have . This means all man made processed fake foods that you put into your body is missing this essential element from Nature and when people have illness their "Glutathione" levels are down.

 

All perishable foods from Nature that provide life giving enzymes are loaded with Glutathione.

 

But on the other hand some perishables like mushrooms must be cooked to deactivate the plant toxins and undigestible chitin proteins . And for a second example other plants have a thicker tougher cellulose fiber that needs heat to properly digest in the human body like dry legumes for example.

And yes meats in their raw form start out with Glutathione but they need to be cooked well to kill all the parasites and microbes that this food harbors .

Raw dairy has "Glutathione" and pasteurize dairy is a dead food and is missing this essential antioxidant that we all need for good health . Something the big Dairy Industry does not want you to know!

  

You can do a lot of wonderful things with sprouts. You really can . My recipes are a living testament to this .

 

First what is a sprout.? Any seed ,nut, legume, grain ,and kernel that has started to grow out of its dormancy is a sprout. A sprout can look like anything but these are the common signs. Swelled and larger in size. Moist body to the touch and tender. Showing a short pointed stem. Changed its shape dramatically from its original shape. Even the color of the seed can change like with basil seed from black to a brilliant blue in color that you can see in some of my recipe creations here at flic.kr/ps/QgogH

 

I don’t no where to start in telling you how versatile sprouts can do for your recipe creations and how they increase your nutritional status 10 fold . I have been sprouting for 3 decades now in different parts of the world as I was sent to different countries to supervise Animation production studios mostly all over Asia.

 

Hotels , guest rooms , apartments do not have outside garden spaces that will allow you to garden so I turned my interest into indoor gardening to increase my nutritional status .

 

“ Can you just imagine me secretly growing my sprouted greens in the privacy of my payed 5 star hotel the as my cleaning lady comes in she opens the closets of my wardroom to find a garden of eden filling trays and trays of edible sprouts . Something against Hotel policy about growing your own food in side your room so that did not last very long.”

 

This is my film credit list of Cartoon Animated shows that I worked on in the past with many of the major production studios. Working and drawing cartoons from 1980 to 2001 for my professional career.

This is my film credit list here at www.imdb.com/name/nm0026395

I would get comments from my fellow Animators when ever I brought in my home made lunch .

 

“I still draw today but more for my holistic real estate design projects and now my Garden Villa Phuket is in the works .”

 

“This is what you can do with sprouts and it is just my short list as I am constantly creating new ways of incorporating them into my Holistic Recipe creations.

All of them are fast and easy and take only 15 minutes or less to create .

I always say eating right does not have to be complicated. “

 

This is what you can do with your sprouts. You can

use them in different stages of development from the presoaked all the way to a planted juvenile potted plant.

 

You can eat them raw !

Blanch them in hot water

Steam them

Add them together for complete protein ,fats, and complex carbohydrates on one serving dish

You can juice them ,blend them , and make smoothies become more alive.

You can make dressings,toppings,puddings, chutney, vinaigrette , sauces, seasonings , teas , beverages, salads , deserts, pizza, sandwiches, soups, and all kinds of interesting culinary creations just with sprouts and incorporating sprouts into other methods of culinary art.

 

I just cannot imagine working in my Whole Food Earth Kitchen with out my sprouts.

 

Enjoy your sprouting journey . It is an art of “ Elegant Culinary Cuisine”

 

Holistic Chef Barry

   

96 of the world’s best chefs share their favorite food experiences

ift.tt/1rh1YgL

 

CNN.com – Travel ift.tt/1Oh9IdM

 

On the eve of the 2016 World’s Best Restaurant awards, we asked chefs from the world’s current top 100 eateries to nominate an all-time favorite culinary experience that they’d recommend to traveling foodies.

 

We heard from 96 chefs at 93 restaurants and here’s what they proposed, in their words.

 

Breakfast at Krabi market in Thailand.

 

It opens very early in the morning and closes at lunchtime, so it’s best to reach the place at 7 a.m., a magic hour, with the remaining freshness of the night, the still atmosphere, and the rising sun that starts waking up your senses.

 

Exuberant local products, the smell of the fruits, the durian perfume, fantasy textures.

 

For a cook, it’s like arriving in paradise when reaching the food area of the market, with lots of people cooking and eating, the fragrance of fermented shrimp paste, the rich variety of curries, coconut and coriander, and then discovering a very interesting sweet kitchen — don’t miss the steamed pumpkins, filled with a curdled eggs, milk and sugar shake.

 

Full spoons of pleasure.

 

Whenever I travel, the first place I want to see is the local market.

 

This gives me a sense of how people relate to food and how important it is to them.

 

I love shopping in the covered

 

Albineli Market

 

in the center of Modena. It is a gathering place, bustling with great energy and even better products.

 

There are many stalls, from dairy products with the best Italian cheeses to

 

Manzini

 

, gastronomy with condiments, anchovies and spices, as well as fresh fruit, vegetables, meat, fish and cold cuts.

 

I encourage all our guests to stop by the turn of the century market just to soak up the busy atmosphere and see Italians doing what they do best — shop for their kitchens!

 

3. Rene Redzepi, Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)

 

The greatest market I’ve ever been to is the Mercado de Abastos in Oaxaca, Mexico.

 

There’s a mind-blowing diversity of ingredients available.

 

You can spend hours trying to wrap your head around it.

 

There’s hundreds of food stalls serving seasonal drinks, tacos, and the crunchiest chicharrones (fried pork rind).

 

4. Virgilio Martinez Veliz, Central (Lima, Peru)

 

There is nothing like being up in the Andean mountains of Janac Chuquibamba in Lamay near Cusco, having freshly harvested native potatoes that are cooked under the ground with hot stones, and surrounding aromatics like muna (medicinal plant) and huacatay (black mint-like herb).

 

It’s an amazing experience to see the native Andean communities doing this type of cooking. Ask a local hotel chef in Cusco to recommend the best place to go and take a taxi to Lamay or ask a tour guide to take you.

 

There is this goat farm and restaurant in Provence called Ferme Auberge Le Castelas at Le Castelas, Sivergues, France, that is the most amazing place to visit. (84400 Sivergues;

 

+33 4 90 74 30 81)

 

The food is delicious, simply prepared, with dishes like roasted vegetables and local ham, roasted pork and potatoes, beautiful cheeses made on the property, and plenty of wine. Everything is served communally and the tables are all made of large rocks.

 

While you dine the goats from the farm roam the grounds following the food. The property provides you with stunning views overlooking the valley.

 

It’s a remarkable spot and one of the most memorable dining experiences I’ve ever had.

 

6. Andoni Luis Aduriz, Mugaritz (Renteria, Spain)

 

Gastronomic experiences are not bound to eating in fine dining restaurants. There are even times where they are not even related to eating or cooking. Just simply being close to iconic produce is enough to give me goose bumps.

 

A cold morning before dawn in the damp surroundings of

 

Tsukiji market

 

in Tokyo is one of my dearest memories.

 

The non-existent fish smell I had expected to find at the market and the collection of fish that resembled pricey rocks displayed like jewelery shocked me to the bone. I could only find comfort after eating a steaming bowl of ramen in one of the nearby shops.

 

Another experience I remember fondly is cooking mandioca flour at Belen de Para in Brazil. I didn’t do it at a restaurant, but at a family’s house surrounded by their warmth and teachings.

 

One of my favorite experiences would have to be at

 

Asador Etxebarri

 

in Spain.

 

The drive to this area alone is twice spectacular with an amazing outlook.

 

Chef Victor Arguinzoniz cooked a brilliant tasting menu, simple dishes sometimes only showcasing a single ingredient.

 

His cooking technique is amazing, preserving ancient cooking techniques using carefully selected firewood.

 

The grilled red prawn was perfectly cooked over embers and a desert of reduced milk ice cream made by reducing the milk slowly in the oven, then transferring it to the grill, where he cooked it in a pile of small embers.

 

The great thing is that you can easily go for lunch from most of Europe as it is located just 45 minutes by car from Bilbao.

 

8. Yoshihiro Narisawa, Narisawa (Tokyo)

 

My favorite place is Okinawa, the far southern islands of Japan.

 

My eternal interest is to create a cuisine that enables diners to live longer and more healthily.

 

Japan has the longest life expectancy in the world and the Okinawans the longest life expectancy in Japan.

 

Known for stunning beaches and coral reefs, the sub-tropical climate and rich history of Okinawa has created a unique culinary tradition

 

There are many great restaurants that serve traditional Okinawan food, but try

 

Cafe Garamanjyaku

 

.

 

You will be amazed by the flavor of the vegetables, herbs and pulses, probably like nothing you have ever experienced before — a meal that makes you feel you are being detoxicated while you’re eating; a meal that makes you feel healthy.

 

9. Alex Atala, D.O.M. (Sao Paulo, Brazil)

 

Definitely one of my favorite food experiences is

 

Mugaritz

 

. I’m a huge fan and friend of chef Andoni Aduriz.

 

The simplicity and elegance with which Andoni interprets ingredients fascinates me.

 

I take inspiration from this and use it in my work with the unusual Amazonian ingredients of my own culture.

 

10. Gaggan Anand, Gaggan (Bangkok, Thailand)

 

The street food on Kolkata in the Vardhan market area — the chats, kulfi, deep fried pakoras with chutney, milk shakes, sherbets, and puchkas — all this standing in the hustle and bustle of the busy streets and people pushing you.

 

Into that madness I like to dive, into this magic moment, and I have flashbacks of memories of what I ate and grew up with during the years I lived there. I literally crave it every time I am back in my homeland.

 

11. Mauro Colagreco, Mirazur (Menton, France)

 

During my honeymoon in Trancoso, in the state of Bahia in Brazil, I was walking on beautiful Coqueiros beach when I saw two guys bringing a bag from the sea.

 

I asked them what was inside and they showed me live rock lobster that they had just catch in the coral.

 

I asked them where I could eat that and they indicated to me a very simple restaurant with very good produce called

 

Barraca do Jonas

 

, just in front of the beach.

 

I ate there every day until I left Trancoso.

 

12. Alain Passard, L’Arpege (Paris)

 

A food experience that is worth going back to each year would be lunch at the Chinese restaurant in the garden of the Summer Palace in Beijing, China, at the

 

Aman

 

, as it takes you back in time.

 

The imperial food is delicate and surprising.

 

13. Victor Arguinzoniz, Asador Etxebarri (Bizkaia, Spain)

 

My most memorable food experience was dining at

 

Nihonryori RyuGin

 

in Tokyo on a trip to Japan.

 

I loved the discipline, extremely high quality of product, and incredible technique the chef uses.

 

14. Gaston Acurio and Diego Munoz, Astrid y Gaston (Lima, Peru)

 

Gaston Acurio: A few hours eating in Lima, the city of cebiches. We hit the streets at noon to visit the ceviche vendors.

 

One of them, Bam Bam, does black clam ceviche, conches negras ceviche.

 

After, we walk to Picanteria nearby, to experience northern Peru style ceviche. Around 12:30 p.m. we go to Chez Wong to enjoy pret-a-porter ceviche by Javier Wong.

 

At 1:30 p.m. we go for a very cheap but good ceviche at Ronald, a family neighbourhood-style cebicheria.

 

At 2:30 p.m. we finish in our La Mar Cebicheria, where you can have sea urchins, raw crayfish, and pejerrey ceviches with Peruvian cocktails.

 

Diego Munoz: I have a few favorite food experiences. First, I will travel to eat whatever my mom cooks since we live far apart.

 

Secondly, I would love to be able to eat again at El Bulli,

 

Dos Palillos

 

,

 

Noma

 

and

 

Mugaritz

 

. I also love to discover more huariques (small hidden restaurants) in Peru and around the world.

 

All of them have something in common that make them special at any level, and that is that their cooks have decided to make the best food that they can.”

 

15. Heinz Reitbauer, Steirereck (Vienna, Austria)

 

Something I look forward to every year is the Bio-Jungpflanzen Markt ran by the

 

Noah’s Ark

 

seed savers association in Schiltern, Lower Austria.

 

Hobby gardeners and small organic farmers from all over the country descend upon this small village with their rare plants, seeds and delicious homemade products, creating a real festival atmosphere.

 

It is always a joy and an inspiration to walk the stalls and see, taste, and be inspired by the passion and creativity on display.

 

16. Enrico Olivera, Pujol (Mexico City)

 

My favorite food experience is the Sunday market at Tlacolula, in Oaxaca.

 

The quality and diversity of the ingredients, the smells, colors and people are almost too beautiful to be true.

 

Walking through the butcher shops where you can buy some tasajo (thinly sliced beef) and cook it over some charcoal gives it a ceremonial charm.

 

17. Juan Mari Arzak, Arzak (Guipuzcoa, Spain)

 

I love the Anana salt roasted squid at Pedro Subijana’s restaurant

 

Akelarre

 

. The squid are served raw on a base of the salt and fresh seasonal tomato at the table, where they are covered by oven-heated salt.

 

That way they are cooked perfectly, right in front of the diner.

 

The flavor and texture are marvelous. It reminds me of the bottom of the sea. It’s pure iodine, aroma, multi-sensoriality, and integrity.

 

It is an experience that you can only have in a place that stands out for its magic, bio-sensoriality, and dependence on the light and the sea.

 

Pedro Subijana is one of the best chefs in the world and his restaurant is without doubt a unique spot overlooking the sea.

 

18. Eric Ripert, Le Bernardin (New York)

 

Every spring, I try and visit the market in the old town in Nice.

 

I love the smells, the colous and the taste of the produce — it is just so fresh and gorgeous and I really try to make an excuse to visit every year!

 

19. Eneko Atxa, Azurmendi (Bizkaia, Spain)

 

I was really impressed when I discovered the street food culture of Thailand, especially in Bangkok, but also on Phuket and north of the island where my restaurant Aziamendi is.

 

There, people eat everyday on the streets — at food stalls by the side of the road and simple family-owned restaurants.

 

It is a different way to enjoy food, its smells, its flavors and textures.

 

It makes me happy to see that there are societies where daily life revolves around food and people enjoy meals together each day, sitting outside around the same table with strangers.

 

20. Brett Graham, The Ledbury (London)

 

A special place for me was on holidays with my wife and we visited this great little place called

 

Restaurant Boccon di Vin

 

, which is in Montalcino in Tuscany.

 

The views are amazing of course, but the onion soup was superb, made by the father of the owner to the same recipe everyday.

 

22. David Thompson, Nahm (Bangkok)

 

One of my favorite street food restaurants does one of the best renditions of an oyster omelet I have ever had.

 

A crisp and rich base of eggs topped with an unctuous sauce of oysters and spring onions.

 

Sprinkle it with some white pepper and splash over the Sriracha chilli sauce and you’ll understand why the place has been going for 40 years.

 

They sell other dishes but I have never been able to forgo this pearl.

 

The name of this shop house is Nai Mong Hoi Nang Tort (539 Thanon Phlapplaachai, off Charoen Krung Road) but locals know it as “the oyster omelet house.”

 

For non-locals, look for the two mirrors on the wall and the dark smoky pan sticking out onto the street.

 

23. Vladimir Mukhin, White Rabbit (Moscow, Russia)

 

Food, seasonal products, new combinations of flavors — every day they give me the most thrilling experiences of my life, the most recent trying bread with birch lub.

 

Lub is a soft piece of wood between the bark and trunk.

 

In Russia, since ancient times, birch and pine lub have been added to bread when wheat flour was expensive.

 

It was exciting to restore the recipe.

 

And it turned out that it is really a gastronomic product with an amazing aroma and unusual fine bitterness that comes after the crisp sweetness, and is immediately replaced by the light tenderness of a crumb.

 

For me, there is no such a thing as one favorite food experience.

 

There are moments, sublime encounters of the third type, conjunction of circumstances that build strong memories and cannot be duplicated.

 

Tthe veal cutlet of my mother; the surprising Turkish burger and orange juice from over-touristy Taksim Square, Istanbul; the essential perfection of naked food wrapped with smoke from

 

Bilbao at Etxebarri

 

; the unbelievable chefs’ communion of Alain Ducasse’s 25 years at the

 

Louis XV

 

.

 

Humble, surprising, eccentric, choking, down to earth and moon-like moments.

 

Yes, they are map-able, on the planet and in your head.

 

25. Magnus Nilsson, Faviken (Jarpen, Sweden)

 

I think it is always worth traveling to eat food prepared by people who are passionate about what they do, regardless of where they do it and what it is that they produce.

 

There are so many great food experiences out there, I would never single one out.

 

26. Grant Achatz, Alinea (Chicago)

 

Dining in Kyoto at

 

Kitch

 

.

 

The blend of service, technique, ambiance and food makes it like no other place in the world and makes it worth a trip to Japan.

 

27. Enrico Crippa, Piazza Duomo (Alba, Italy)

 

Everyday I take a sort of trip to my biodynamic garden, located on the way to Barolo village, not far from the restaurant.

 

All the produce I see there has been chosen by me and I decide when to pick something to give my diners the best taste possible.

 

I love the vegetables and I love to share this passion with my diners through my cuisine.

 

That is what makes my garden very special!

 

28. Luke Dale Roberts, The Test Kitchen (Cape Town, South Africa)

 

Being half Swiss, as a child I traveled most years to Switzerland with my family.

 

You cannot beat a really good fondue in an alpine restaurant after a hard day’s skiing.

 

The last fondue I had was at

 

Le Namaste

 

in Verbier whilst I was visiting my pop-up Pot Luck Club.

 

That combination of healthy exhaustion, the smell of melting cheese and the cozy atmosphere is unique.

 

29. Seiji Yamamoto, Nihonryori RyuGin (Tokyo, Japan)

 

The blow fish called “fugu” in Japanese — only the chefs who have a specific license are allowed to prepare this luxurious fish.

 

For me, there is only one restaurant in all of Japan that serves the best fugu.

 

It’s Maru Yasu (7-6 Koushien Ichibancho Nishinomiya City, Hyogo, Japan).

 

It might be a little bit far from Tokyo, but it’s definitely worth the visit.

 

30. Joachim Wissler, Restaurant Vendome (Cologne, Germany)

 

Especially when I travel, I always get inspired by the culture, by the people, and by the local food.

 

I am convinced that my curiosity to always try to discover something new plays an extraordinary role in my work.

 

As a result my dishes deal with different aspects of the produce or the philosophy, represented at the center of each plate.

 

This center also can be a culinary throwback to memories from my childhood, like a Sunday meatloaf or the smell of little mushrooms on the lawn at springtime.

 

31. Bjorn Frantzen, Restaurant Frantzen (Stockholm, Sweden)

 

Every year I travel to the west coast of Sweden to Smogen.

 

They have the best langoustines.

 

You cook them with dill and beer and it’s probably the best meal you will ever enjoy.

 

Served best with a cold beer.

 

32. Ben Shewry, Attica (Melbourne, Australia)

 

For me, it’s a road trip from San Diego to Santa Cruz on the west coast of the United States, stopping at the many taquerias that are a great feature of the Californian food scene.

 

The generosity and humility of these taco stands, small restaurants and food trucks, is a poignant reminder that sometimes the most delicious food can cost as little as $1.

 

33. Sven Elverfeld, Aqua (Wolfsburg, Germany)

 

I worked in the small fishing village Agios Nikolaos on the island of Crete in Greece in the early 90s and spent one of the best times of my life there so far.

 

When you take the track from this village to Lassithi Pleateau you find different small taverns, which are unknown to tourists.

 

Eating the supposedly simple Cretan salad with tomatoes, feta cheese, cucumber, green bell pepper, onions, a great olive oil, red wine vinegar, wild mountain oregano, sea salt and the typical dry bread Dakos, will always remain in my memory.

 

Simplicity can be awesome if you have the perfect products.

 

34. Massimiliano Alajmo, Le Calandre (Padua, Italy)

 

I have two favorite food experiences.

 

The first is lunch in

 

Faith Willinger’s kitchen

 

in Florence because she serves some of the most authentic Italian food made with the most high-quality and hard-to-come-by ingredients.

 

The second is eating the spaghetti con le patelle, a coastal mollusk, served at I

 

l San Pietro di Positano

 

.

 

35. Jorge Vallejo, Quintonil (Mexico City)

 

My best dining experience was in a small restaurant in the city of Copenhagen called

 

Noma

 

.

 

Since I also had the opportunity to be part of this restaurant for a small period as a cook, I experienced the entire philosophy and must say that the food is absolutely delicious, which at the end is what matters.

 

37. Mikel Alonso, Biko (Mexico City)

 

In Oaxaca, Mexico, during the first rains of the year different varieties of insects are collected: chapulines, chinicules, hormigas. One of the delicacies there that most astonished me is called Chicatana’s Mole, made with giant winged flying ants.

 

This exotic and delectable dish is served at the

 

Restaurant Pitiona

 

.

 

You must try it with rib eye and hand-made tortillas, along with a good mezcal from the region.

 

38. Richard Ekkebus, Amber (Hong Kong)

 

Hong Kong is no doubt one of the most amazing dining scenes in the world, where every food culture is represented at its very best.

 

One of my all time favorite experiences is eating at our favorite Cantonese restaurant,

 

The Chairman

 

.

 

The steamed flowery crab with aged Shao Xing wine and chicken oil, and their braised spareribs with preserved plums and black vinegar are amazing.

 

The restaurant is special because it does not do the traditional and predictable menus you see in most restaurants. It takes pride in bringing old family recipe recipes to life and in the ingredients used.

 

39. Mikel Ponce, Quique Dacosta (Alicante, Spain)

 

The best experiences I ever have lived have been in Spain — in Sevilla, small and homely but very good bars like

 

Casablanca

 

; pintxo bars in San Sebastian; and one very special market, Mercado Central in Valencia, a beautiful and interesting place to visit because of the products and especially the people.

 

If we talk about gastronomic experiences at restaurants, my favorites are

 

El Celler de Can Roca

 

and

 

Mugaritz

 

.

 

They are representatives of the avant garde cuisine of the Spanish movement.

 

I’m convinced that if you want to live a wonderful experience, you can live it in these places.

 

40. Chef Thomas Keller, Per Se (New York)

 

There’s so much I enjoy about visiting Australia, starting with the wonderfully generous people.

 

But the food is a huge draw. I’m enthralled by Neil Perry’s cooking and the warmth of his personality.

 

And I love Australian wines.

 

If I had to single out just one food experience down under, it would be the date tart at

 

Rockpool

 

, with its sublime texture and alluring color palate.

 

It’s the best tart I’ve eaten in my life.

 

41. Helena Rizzo, Mani (Sao Paulo, Brazil)

 

My favorite food experience was witnessing a small industry in Kyoto, Japan, where they make yuba (soy milk) in a wooden pool.

 

Wonderful!

 

42. Rodolfo Guzman, Borago (Santiago, Chile)

 

El Rancho de la Senora Maria is a very humble place to eat and very cheap.

 

You will find the Mapuche chickens running all over the place and the best empanadas and short ribs cooked on the earth oven.

 

The place is about 35 minutes from Santiago and has no address.

 

From Santiago go to Kilometer 41, General San Martin Highway, in the direction of Los Andes on the way to the border with Argentina and you will see a big sign.

 

(Tie) 42. Albert Adria, Tickets (Barcelona, Spain)

 

Restaurant Umi (Sanminami Building, 1st Floor, Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku; 03 3401 3368) in Tokyo. It’s special because of the perfection.

 

The perfection starts by knowing that it doesn’t exist, but this restaurant gets very close. The chef is a true character and his knowledge of what he does is almost offensive.

 

Another experience very important to me is the fact that I live right next to la Boqueria market (Las Ramblas, Barcelona) which allows me to keep track of the new features and changes at the market.”

 

44. Mitsuharu Tsumura, Maido (Lima, Peru)

 

My favorite food experience was in Arequipa, a beautiful city south of Lima in Peru, where talking about food is something very serious.

 

We had an amazing experience having typical preparations from the ladies who cook in picanteras, where you can try the traditional cuisine from Arequipa.

 

Every preparation is full of taste and top quality products, such as river prawns, pork trotters, cuy (guinea pig meat) and rocoto relleno (stuffed peppers).

 

Mindblowing.

 

45. Christian F. Puglisi, Relae (Copenhagen, Denmark)

 

On my first pizza research trip to Campania, Italy, I drove my way down to Paestum, south of Napoli, to

 

Tenuta Vannulo

 

.

 

They make the most incredible organic buffalo mozzarella you can imagine.

 

As you drive up to the farm, you are surrounded by fields speckled with buffaloes chilling in the ponds.

 

I could hear their mooing and booing in the background, as I tasted the freshest and tastiest cheese of my life.

 

That’s when I truly understood what mozzarella was about.

 

I was born in Taiwan and grew up in France, until six years ago when I decided to settle down in Singapore and start my own restaurant.

 

Taiwan, this beautiful island, holds my happiest childhood memory.

 

I was fascinated by the native nine tribes spread out all over Taiwan.

 

Some still today live in the mountains and farm, fish and hunt.

 

The tribes not only have their own language but also distinct cuisine.

 

I was lucky to travel to the deep mountain to visit the tribe in Hualian, north of Taiwan, to discover traditional native tribe cuisine, which is nearly extinct in this modern day.

 

We foraged for wild ferns, wild succulents, most of them without names, and had them with game and wild boar, cured and cooked on the hot slate, and homemade rice wine.

 

Ever since, I return to Taiwan once a year to discover the authentic Taiwanese tribal flavors, and most importantly, re-discover my roots.

 

47. Alain Ducasse, Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athenee (Paris)

 

I love visiting markets to feed my curiosity and my passion for produce, to meet local people, and eat delicious simple food.

 

I have visited many of them around the world gaining inspiration, from Tunisia to Tokyo to San Sebastian.

 

A favorite of mine is the Cour Saleya market in Nice, where the popular street food socca — a thin crepe made of chickpea flour, water and olive oil — is made and eaten warm on the spot.

 

48. Andreas Caminada, Schloss Schauenstein (Furstenau, Switzerland)

 

One of my most favorite dishes reminds me of my childhood.

 

When I was young we used to eat maluns (slow-fried, scrambled potatoes) on special occasions, which is traditionally served with apple puree and a piece of Alps cheese.

 

It is this cheese, made of milk provided by cows fed on altitudes as high as 1,800 meters, which triggers the taste of pure and untouched nature.

 

My favorite place from which I get this cheese for my restaurant is Stizun Da Latg Andeer (Veia Granda 7440, Andeer, Switzerland).

 

At

 

Aponiente

 

, where chef Angel Leon hangs a picture of himself near the kitchen, his hulking frame emerging from the body of a squid, merman-like.

 

He’s not lording over the fish, like so many photos adorning the walls of fish restaurants; he’s emerging from its core, at one with the squid.

 

It’s humble in the same way Angel’s cuisine is infused with humility.

 

The picture tells you he’s going to speak for the fish.

 

Which he does.

 

Angel breaks rules, not with wild juxtapositions or chemical manipulations, but by looking to the sea to define his cuisine.

 

A single clam is poached so lightly in its own juices that it appears to be raw. Tomaso, a fish that’s usually ground up into meal, is salted and thinly sliced, acquiring a delicate, custard-like consistency.

 

50. Thomas Keller, French Laundry (Yountville, California)

 

Whenever I’m in London attending the World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards, it’s become a ritual to have a late dinner with my colleagues at

 

St. John restaurant

 

.

 

Chef Fergus Henderson’s generous spirit is always present and the food is so good; he refines simplicity to the highest level.

 

Last year we broke tradition and dined at Bentley’s

 

Oyster Bar and Grill

 

where chef Richard Corrigan has exemplified what a true oyster bar should be.

 

The freshness of the local catch and texture of the batter for the fish and chips cannot be beat; they are some of the best I have ever tasted.

 

Along with the chips with tartar sauce, we ordered local oysters, mushy peas and toasted with a bottle of Sancerre.

 

51. Rasmus Kofoed, Geranium (Copenhagen, Denmark)

 

My favorite food experience in the world is a trip to San Sebastian in northern Spain.

 

If you love food, here are all your heart’s desires, from extreme creativity at

 

Mugaritz

 

, amazing flavors at the rural restaurant

 

Asador Etxebarri

 

, to late-night dining at the busy pinxtos-bars of the old town.

 

Have a walk through town, which is beautifully placed around a lagoon, up to the old fortress where you can take in the breathtaking views.

 

If you get hungry on your way, you can either snack on wild sea fennel growing on the old city wall or stop by the very simple, but excellent seafood restaurant at the harbor and order grilled octopus with lemon and parsley.

 

52. Tim Raue, Tim Raue (Berlin, Germany)

 

Since my cooking style is mostly Chinese, I travel to Hong Kong several times per year, to be in touch with Asian flavors and tastes.

 

Every time, I go first to Tim Ho Wan (Shop 8, 2-20 Kwong Wa Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon), an outstanding dim sum restaurant, which allows me to immerse in the textures and tastes of Cantonese food.

 

Afterwards, I go to the dry market to buy ingredients that I would never get in Germany.

 

53. Gert De Mangeleer, Hertog Jan (Bruges, Belgium)

 

During a research trip to Japan, I was overwhelmed by the sushi culture, the technique and the way how top level restaurants serve it at the counter.

 

The search for freshness, the quality of the products and the respect for them is the same way I work myself.

 

The Japanese food culture inspires me to bring peace and even more simplicity to my own way of cooking.

 

But the place where I enjoy this culture most is

 

Zuma

 

in London. I visit Zuma at least five times per year.

 

54. Peter Goossens, Hof Van Cleve (Kruishoutem, Belgium)

 

Every food experience is special to me.

 

I admire every professional chef and cook who is engaged with the craft.

 

Each chef has his or her own style, which I surely appreciate, even if it’s very different from mine.

 

My favorite food experiences are all at restaurants in Belgium and include

 

Bon-Bon

 

in Brussels,

 

Bistrot Du Nord

 

in Antwerp,

 

Souvenir

 

in Ypres, and

 

L’Air du Temps

 

in Liernu.

 

I had the most amazing time at the

 

Fremont Diner

 

, driving through Sonoma County and the redwood forests of Muir woods in the U.S.

 

We stopped for a bite to keep us going.

 

With a great outdoor space, great setting, and Napa up ahead it was a great meal.

 

Fried chicken and Ruebens washed down with a Coke, it was a great all American experience.

 

56. Joshua Skenes, Saison (San Francisco, California)

 

There are a few experiences that come to mind but in Tokyo, there are a couple of place that have a heightened understanding of ingredient quality, handling, restraint, respect and hospitality.

 

At first glance it’s easy to miss the depth and extraordinary work that go into this “simplistic” approach but “simple” is often the most complex and difficult.

 

Each is a special place.

 

For me, they’re like home: restaurants

 

Ishikawa

 

and Matsukawa (

 

Akasaka 1-11-6, Roppongi, Minato-Ko, Tokyo, Japan; +81 3 6277 7371

 

).

 

57. Bertrand Grebaut, Septime (Paris, France)

 

I think my favorite food experience is eating a little milk fed pork in Bangkok, which is poached, dried and then caramelized by turning above a big wood fire.

 

Then it is served in two courses like a roast Peking duck, the crispy skin first and the meat after.

 

The restaurant is super simple, on the side of the highway, so it’s just street food, but so tasty and so rough, it’s crazy.

 

Eating this kind of dish can create emotions as great as the best dish you could eat at one of the restaurants on this list.

 

58. Peter Gilmore, Quay (Sydney, Australia)

 

One of my favorite things to do whilst in London is visit

 

Borough Market

 

near London Bridge.

 

The sheer quality and variety of produce on offer is inspiring.

 

It’s hard to go past the grilled Comte cheese and pickles served on sourdough from one of the stalls in the market.

 

I have been many times to Singapore and to Newton Street Food Centre (500 Clemenceau Ave. North, Newton), an amazing food court.

 

One night I went with Sam Leong, one of the most influential chefs in the city and that night was one of the most unforgettable gastronomic experiences of my life.

 

Two hours of gastronomic pleasure — sweet, acidic, smoke, heat, bitter and spice flavours — from the famous BBQ satay, oyster omelette with Sriracha sauce, black pepper frog legs, chilli crab, beef kway teow, prawns with salted duck egg, chicken and rice, to crispy baby squid with chilli.

 

60. Mikael Jonsson, Hedone (London)

 

My favorite food experience is walking around the food markets of the French and Italian Riviera.

 

The diversity of produce is exceptional.

 

I try not to miss a visit to Longo Saverio, the fishmonger at the market in Ventimiglia, who will have super fresh gamberoni or red deepwater prawns, caught the night before, resting in buckets with seawater and ice.

 

The eyes of the prawns are like light bulbs. I just chew down a couple of prawns, raw with shells and heads.

 

The flavor explosion is to die for.

 

61. Martin Berasategui, Martin Berasategui (San Sebastian, Spain)

 

In all the places I visit in the world I have great experiences, but I find in the local markets a lot of tenacity, effort, fight.

 

These people tug at my heartstrings with their generosity.

 

It’s all about sharing with all of us who like cooking. You never see a long face.

 

They’re always happy, with a fantastic disposition, trying to make us feel great.

 

All the local markets that I visit evolve, improve and overcome obstacles.

 

They’ve always worked really hard to provide us with the best products. They know what they do and they do it right, and that makes me happy.

 

Chinese cuisine, especially Cantonese cuisine, is one of my favorite cuisines in the world, because it has a long history, precise cooking techniques, and the food is simply amazing.

 

One of my favorites, Celebrity Cuisine (3 Kau U Fong, Central; +852 3650 0000), is the best Cantonese restaurant in Hong Kong.

 

Chef Fu’s magic hands create wonders that you can never imagine.

 

Don’t leave without trying the Braised Beef Brisket with Turnip in Pot.

 

64. Esben Holmboe Bang, Maaemo (Oslo, Norway)

 

I’m fascinated by Norwegian nature.

 

We have such a unique climate in Norway that makes for some remarkable produce.

 

One of my most memorable food experiences was at Grondalen Farm some 50 kilometers from Oslo.

 

It’s an old farm that’s been in the same family since the 1600s and they raise organic dairy cattle that are allowed to roam and eat a great diversity of grasses, clover, flowers and herbs.

 

I vividly remember drinking the warm milk straight from the cow after I had milked it and immediately felt so close to nature.

 

It gave me a new perspective on cooking and taught me how important it is to always be honest to the ingredients.

 

65. David Scabin, Combal.Zero (Rivoli, Italy)

 

Foxy’s Bar

 

on Jost Van Dyke Island, British Virgin Islands.

 

Jost Van Dyke is a minuscule island with a big reputation. The only way to get there is by sea on a speedboat.

 

There I had the most amazing aromatic green fish curry with rice.

 

The whole experience is magical and the place breathtaking. Unforgettable experience!

 

66. Matt Orlando, Amass (Copenhagen, Denmark)

 

My favorite food experience was dinner at a country house in an Italian town called Dolceacqua with my wife and mother.

 

The house was overlooking these amazing olive orchards and everything we ate came either directly from the family farm or from the immediate area.

 

And the ravioli was the best I have ever eaten.

 

67. Daniel Humm, NoMad (New York)

 

Russ & Daughters

 

is one of the quintessential spots for me in New York and is a place that I always recommend.

 

It’s a special place, one with deep roots in both the culinary and cultural history of New York.

 

The smoked and cured fish is some of the best around, the service always friendly. Try a bagel with trout roe and horseradish cream cheese.

 

It’s a bit of a dark horse.

 

68. Josean Alija, Nerua (Bilbao, Spain)

 

The pintxos of Bilbao. Eating pintxos, going bar by bar, is an alternative way to taste a cuisine born from the total freedom and from the mastery of joining different, purely local ingredients.

 

Walking to different local bars to enjoy their specialties and, above all, sense of humor, relationships, stories, is a very enjoyable experience that has inspired Nerua to develop our menus and the Nerua experience itself.

 

69. Sean Gray, Momofuku Ko (New York)

 

Sitting at the chefs table at

 

Cabane a Sucre Au Pied De Cochon

 

in Canada, on chairs lined with wolf pelts, a multi-course family-style feast was prepared for eight of us.

 

In between courses, we were presented with an opportunity to get up and sit back on large leather sofas, watch ice hockey on a 60″ TV (also in the kitchen), and have shots of Canadian whiskey chased with the day’s maple sap boil, while the next course was prepared.

 

Courses included a 30-egg omelet souffle with two whole lobsters, as well as six young chickens, slow roasted in maple syrup, a traditional presentation of a whole smoked sturgeon and a whole smoked pork shoulder which came from a smoker set up on the front porch.

 

We later found ourselves smoking cigars presented to us from the kitchen on that same porch.

 

It was the best experience I’ll probably ever have.

 

70. Tetsuya Wakuda, Waku Ghin (Singapore)

 

Having been traveling to Singapore for the last 20 years, I am fond of the food culture, as Singaporeans really love to eat.

 

I would even call it one of the national sports.

 

This makes Singapore a very interesting and rich gastronomic hub.

 

Whenever I’m there, I hop into a cab and go around town to enjoy some great food.

 

A favorite is the Old Tiong Bahru Bak Kut The (58 Seng Poh Road) for herbal pork rib soup for breakfast, because it is a very authentic local dish that is well prepared by the owners.

 

The side dishes also complement the soup nicely.

 

I love the experience of being in a local coffee shop located in an old neighborhood in Singapore.

 

71. Jonnie and Therese Boer, De Librije (Zwolle, Netherlands)

 

One of our favorite places is

 

Yardbird

 

in Hong Kong.

 

This restaurant serves one of the best yakitoris we have ever had!

 

It is a fantastic place by the former chef of Zuma.

 

The vibe and atmosphere are amazing!

 

It is a typical restaurant that can only be found outside Europe.

 

72. Christopher Kostow, Restaurant at Meadowood (St. Helena, California)

 

Scootering around the island of Koh Samui, Thailand, stopping at various noodle stands along the way.

 

My wife determining where to stop based on smells as we drove by.

 

The island is beautiful in parts and when the warm rains hit, the stands provide sustenance and shelter.

 

73. Jonny Lake, The Fat Duck (Berkshire, UK)

 

A visit to a cabane a sucre or sugar shack in Quebec, Canada, in early spring is one of my favorite food experiences in the world.

 

Traditionally it is a celebration of the sap harvest from the maple trees, which is used to make maple syrup.

 

There’s an enormous meal comprised mainly of pork in various incarnations and traditional Quebecois recipes, accompanied by jugs of maple syrup, followed by drinking, music and line dancing.

 

74. Julien Royer, Jaan (Singapore)

 

My best food experience is the one I can get back home in Cantal in the countryside of Auvergne, France, at a very particular period at the end of spring and beginning of summer, when the family garden is at its peak.

 

The tomatoes, radishes, melon, eggplant, zucchinis, haricots verts and garlic are just so great and pure in taste.

 

This is absolutely fantastic.

 

Other than that I always enjoy discovering local markets wherever I am to “feel” the soul of food.

 

75. Daniel Patterson, Coi (San Francisco)

 

I grew up in a small town on the coast of Massachusetts and one of my earliest seafood memories is digging and eating steamed soft-shell clams, which everyone there calls steamers.

 

We would remove them from their shells, drag them through ocean water to rinse off the grit, and then dip them in melted butter.

 

I’ve lived in California for 25 years now, but every time I go home during the summer I find a restaurant near the coast, order a bucket of steamers, and eat them outside, where I can listen to the sound of the ocean.

 

Try

 

The Back Eddy

 

in Westport, Massachusetts.

 

77. Manish Mehrotra, India Accent (New Delhi, India)

 

One of my most memorable meals was the mushroom tasting menu at

 

Mathias Dahlgren

 

, Stockholm.

 

The textures, the presentation, the service, everything was par excellence.

 

I also had a great experience at

 

NoMad

 

, New York. Their roast chicken is to die for.

 

78. Michel Troisgros, La Maison Troisgros (Roanne, France)

 

I live in a small house five minutes from my work.

 

We have a garden of herbs, spices and tomatoes.

 

My greatest pleasure is to spend a little time there, to pick the produce, and appreciate the generosity and gesture of Marie-Pierre, my wife.

 

This is the best food experience because it has feeling.

 

79. Tae Hwan Ryu, Ryunique (Seoul, South Korea)

 

I love eating the produce of Jeju Island, a big island located in Southeast Korea.

 

Jeju produce, such as seafood like sea urchins, shellfish and fish like mackerel, along with fresh fruit like mangoes and mandarins, is so fresh and so different to anywhere else that it’s on a unique level.

 

80. Daniel Boulud, Daniel (New York)

 

I trained under

 

Michel Guerard

 

when I was in my early twenties.

 

He was one of my first chef-mentors and taught me an immense amount about cooking creatively, soulfully and elegantly.

 

Fifteen years later, after I had moved to New York City and opened my own restaurant, I went back to the remote village of Eugenie-les-Bains and dined as a paying guest for the first time.

 

That dinner was one of the most memorable I’ve had, because it was a journey to get to the restaurant, a journey through the meal itself, and symbolic of my life journey.

 

All the best food experiences are ones that have roots in something more than the food you’re eating in that moment.

 

81. David McMillan and Fred Morin, Joe Beef (Montreal, Canada)

 

Eating our way through French Montreal.

 

Firmly rooted in Montreal history, our markets and French culinary heritage provide all the fodder we need to cook our version of the food of Quebec and Montreal.

 

We practice the old foods of Quebec and all our memories stem from French Canada.

 

82. Alain Ducasse, Le Louis XV (Monte Carlo, Monaco)

 

At the

 

Rivea London

 

, young chef Damien Leroux gives his take on the socca and the iconic popular dish, the Nicoise salad.

 

Damien gently wraps the ingredients of the Nicoise salad into the warm crispy socca. It is one of his signature starters.

 

83. German Martitegui, Tegui (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

 

I have three favorite food experiences: Eating on the street in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam, visiting the foodie city of San Francisco and enjoying the seasonal produce of summer in Buenos Aires.

 

84. Martin Benn, Sepia (Sydney, Australia)

 

One of my favorite food experiences has to be in Tokyo, Japan, at

 

Den

 

.

 

Chef Zaiyu Hasegawa’s menu is a whimsical take on tradition and so very delicious. The counter seats just eight guests and it’s fun to watch him work as he has a great sense of humor that translates to his cuisine.

 

86. Hajime Yoneda, Hajime (Osaka, Japan)

 

I spent my childhood and adolescence in the small, simple mountain town of Hirakata, where there were a lot of wild raspberries, akebia vine, Japanese knot-weed and other wild plants.

 

Their tastes and that formative experience made a profound impression on me.

 

87. Dan Hunter, Brae (Birregurra, Australia)

 

After working in the Basque Country many years ago and returning regularly ever since, it has become my favorite food destination.

 

There is such a great range of high quality eating options, from small local markets and provedores such as La Bretxa, Don Serapio and Solbes in San Sebastian with the best wild mushrooms, jamon, cheeses, fresh fruit and vegetables, to the high-end Michelin-star experience at iconic restaurants like

 

Mugaritz

 

,

 

Arzak

 

and

 

Azurmend

 

.

 

The traditional seaside village of Guetaria is great for a day trip for the classic fish restaurants such as

 

Elcano

 

.

 

Or head out to Etxebarri for super-local, produce-driven food.

 

Tolosa is fantastic for Carne ala Brasa at

 

Casa Julian

 

or

 

Casa Nicolas

 

.

 

The pintxo bars of Bilbao and San Sebastian are a highlight — every visit, I find new places to eat, such as the modern Atari Gastroteka (Calle Major 18) which we discovered on our last visit — but don’t make the classic mistake of eating pintxos every day. There’s so much more to discover!

 

I love eating street food when I travel, especially when I go to Asia.

 

In Singapore there are hawker centers with many small stalls inside. A well known one is Newton Circus, but I also visited smaller unknown ones.

 

One of my favorite dishes is yong yau foo, a sort of DIY Chinese dish where you choose different types of fishcakes and tofu, mushrooms and gourd that are cooked on the spot in a very fragrant broth.

 

(Tie) 88. Rainer Becker, Zuma (Dubai, UAE)

 

Lunch at

 

Nerua

 

in the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao by chef Josean Alija was a fascinating experience: the room was very simple and minimalist but the views of the external building by Frank Gehry and artwork were so incredible.

 

The juxtaposition of room with the exterior building became part of the dining experience.

 

Eating within that very simplistic environment, meant you focused everything on the flavours and textures of the dish, which had a great affect on the relationship you had with it.

 

It was only then you realized how the lines of the external building mirrored the curvature of the plates for example. It’s those details that inspire and excite.

 

Everything you choose as a chef has a great artistic element to it.

 

90. Ignacio Mattos, Estela (New York)

 

One of the best places I’ve been to is

 

Gjusta

 

in Venice Beach, California.

 

It’s an all-day operation from the people behind hot spot restaurant Gjellina. You walk into Gjusta and it’s this beautiful and kind of mind-blowing warehouse space.

 

The menu is overwhelming, with breakfast dishes, sandwiches, rotisserie plates, so many things. I like to go in the morning.

 

The porridge waffle is a standout. Once you grab your food, you can head to the outdoor space, sit on a bench or plastic crate, and enjoy your food in the LA sun.

 

91. Jose Avillez, Belcanto (Lisbon, Portugal)

 

Fish and shell fish from the Portuguese coast.

 

I’m sure it’s one of the world’s best.

 

The flavor is unique: delightful, fresh, delicate and deep at the same time.

 

Scientists believe that the Portuguese coastline offers a unique cradle at the world level, enabling highly appreciated fish species to reproduce.

 

Try the fresh fish and shellfish in Lisbon at Mercado da Ribeira (Ribeira’s Market) on Avenida 24 de Julho.

 

92. Fergus Henderson, St John (London)

 

There are many joys to be had in a world full of good things.

 

A sense of place and context is vital: perhaps an urchin fresh from the sea around the British Isles (just know a good fishmonger!) or a magical moment in a small sushi restaurant in Ginza at the hands of a master.

 

Perhaps a bowl of tripe and noodles at Lavender Food Square (

 

195 Lavender Street

 

) in Singapore or the ribs at

 

Martin’s BBQ

 

just outside Nashville, which I last washed down with more beer than I should have.

 

The company is as important as the context.

 

Many years ago on a glorious summer evening Thomas Keller treated Trevor (St John co-founder) and myself to dinner at The French Laundry that was memorable and marvellous, not only for the food, drink and conversation, but also for the length.

 

It is a magical moment when all these ingredients come together perfectly.

 

93. Yim Jung-sik, Jungsik (Seoul, South Korea)

 

My favorite food experience is eating the roasted chicken at

 

Golden Leaf

 

, the Cantonese restaurant at the Conrad Hotel, Hong Kong.

 

You cannot believe how crispy the skin is and how juicy tender the breast is.

 

96. Mehmet Gurs, Mikla (Istanbul, Turkey)

 

Simple hot smoked flounder right out of the smoker with a nice beer.

 

You can’t go wrong with that.

 

I’m always looking forward to it before going to the family summer house in Hitis on the Finnish Archipelago.

 

97. Sayan Isaksson, Esperanto (Stockholm, Sweden)

 

A nice place at the Golden Gai in Shinjuku, Tokyo, rather scabby and rough, but a nice area filled with small bars and izakayas.

 

We found this tiny bar which had a teppanyaki stove of some sort and the wall was literally dripping of brown fat caused by the cooking and we had a magical beef stew, funky okonomiyaki and cold beer.

 

98. Gebhard Schachermayer, Vila Joya (Albufeira, Portugal)

 

The experiences I never want to miss in my life are based on the two countries I love.

 

On my days off there is nothing better than going to the beach just in front of Vila Joya and enjoying great seafood like grilled fish and a chilled bottle of Vinho Verde.

 

On the other hand, I love traditional Austrian food and whenever I get the chance to visit Vienna, I go to the Naschmarkt (6 Naschmarkt, between Getreidemarkt and Chain Bridge), a great combination of a traditional food market and Austrian street food.

 

A Vienna sausage and fresh beer — it hardly can be better at least not for me.

 

99. Chan Yan Tak, Lung King Heen (Hong Kong)

 

I appreciate home cooking after a day of hustle and bustle in the kitchen and traditional steamed garoupa fish with soya sauce and Chinese steamed meat cake are my favorites.

 

There is nothing as simple and gratifying as a simple meal at home with family and friends. Man Sing Cafe (16 Wun Sha Street, Tai Han, Hong Kong) is a small local eatery that has been in service for half a century.

 

So juicy, it melts in the mouth, their signature steamed-pork patty tower with salty egg is a must-try.

 

100. David Kinch, Manresa (Los Gatos, California)

 

Most of my inspiration happens when stopping by

 

Love Apple Farms

 

, the farm and sustainability center, where Manresa has an exclusive relationship in growing a major portion of the vegetables we use at the restaurant.

 

Throughout seasonal changes, just taking a walk through the rows of growth — the colors, smells, and tastes; the anticipation of beds not quite ready, but just a little bit longer — serves as our menu muse through the course of the year.

 

Lara Dunston is a travel and food writer who has contributed to Australian Gourmet Traveller, Feast and Delicious magazines. She also blogs on slow, local and experiential travel at Grantourismotravels.com.

 

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Terrine of venison, figgy toast, rhubarb chutney

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Caché au cœur de la végétation luxuriante du village de Moka, Escale Créole est installé au milieu d’un jardin tropical exubérant. Dans ce lieu merveilleux, les clients sont invités à profiter de délicieux plats mauriciens traditionnels dans leur contexte local.

 

À l’entrée, les deux hôtesses vous réservent un accueil chaleureux. Le sourire éclatant de Marie-Christine à lui seul rentabilise votre visite, tandis que sa mère, Majo, règne avec une douce autorité sur la cuisine. Dans ce lieu consacré à une cuisine insulaire authentique, le menu reflète véritablement le style de vie sur place.

 

Un succès rapide

 

Il y a dix-sept ans, Marie-Christine rentrait de France après avoir terminé ses études d’hôtellerie et de restauration en tant que majeure de promotion. Son désir le plus cher était de retrouver la cuisine maison traditionnelle, spécialité de sa mère. Les deux femmes décidèrent donc de combiner leurs talents afin de créer Escale Créole, une table d’hôte pouvant recevoir une douzaine de convives sous la véranda au cœur du jardin. Leur petite affaire connu un succès immédiat et la terrasse fut étendue pour pouvoir accueillir quelque 60 clients, n’ouvrant que pour le déjeuner et nécessitant bien souvent des réservations à l’avance.

 

Chaque jour, un menu 100 % organique et abondant est proposé à table. Les plats comprennent la fameuse saucisse créole faite maison, la rougaille, des légumes secs, le traditionnel cari volaille, le cangraillé de chou et poisson salé et une salade d’aubergines en conserve, le tout accompagné d’une variété de chutneys et condiments. Et pour le dessert, des tartes à la noix de coco, à la papaye et aux fruits du jardin sont servies avec du rhum parfumé fabriqué sur place.

 

En parlant de rhum, sachez que l’Escale Créole fabrique son propre mélange en utilisant des herbes et épices spéciales, afin de créer un goût simple et distinctif, mais la recette traditionnelle demeure un secret bien gardé parmi la population créole. Le restaurant prépare également ses propres mélanges d’épices, que vous pouvez acheter en souvenir, ainsi que de la vanille du pays fraîche, des bâtons de cannelle et du miel d’eucalyptus. Et si vous avez de la chance, Marie-Christine vous fournira même la recette du menu du jour, au cas où vous vouliez essayer de recréer votre déjeuner chez vous.

 

Préparé avec amour

 

Confirmant que tous les repas sont préparés à partir de produits frais le jour même, Marie-Christine insiste : « la cuisine créole est extrêmement variée et généreuse. C’est une cuisine qui nécessite beaucoup d’amour dans sa préparation puisque les plats doivent cuire pendant longtemps. » Tôt le matin, Majo s’affaire en cuisine, un lieu dans lequel est si à l’aise qu’elle peut suivre les différents stades de préparation d’un plat rien qu’à son arôme.

 

« Nous défendons la cuisine traditionnelle et ses saveurs fabuleuses. Nos plats sont authentiques et inspirés des recettes de notre grand-mère Simone, qui ont été transmises d’une génération à la suivante. Je me fais toujours un plaisir de parler avec nos invités de notre culture et de nos recettes. C’est un excellent moyen d’exprimer qui nous sommes et d’où nous venons, » explique Marie-Christine.

 

Hidden among the lush greenery of Moka, Escale Creole stands in the middle of an exuberant tropical garden. In this beautiful location, guests are invited to enjoy delicious, traditional Mauritian dishes in a typical local setting.

 

We’re greeted with a warm welcome at the entrance by the two hostesses. Marie-Christine’s dazzling smile is already worth the visit, while her mother, Majo, reigns with gentle authority over the kitchen. In this place – dedicated solely to authentic island cuisine – the menu truly expresses the local lifestyle.

 

Rapid success

 

Seventeen years ago, Marie-Christine returned from France, having won the valedictorian award at the end of her hotel and food studies. She was happy to reunite with home cooking, her mother’s speciality. The two ladies decided to combine their talents to create Escale Creole, serving a dozen seats under a veranda in the garden. The business encountered rapid success and the terrace was extended to cater for some 60 guests today, opening exclusively for lunch and preferably with a reservation in hand.

 

The daily all-organic menu at each table is abundant. Dishes include typical homemade Creole sausage, rougaille, pulses, chicken curry and fricasseed cabbage and salted fish, as well as a salad of preserved aubergine, all accompanied with a variety of chutneys and condiments. And for dessert, coconut, pawpaw and garden fruit tarts are served with local flavoured rum.

 

Speaking of rum, Escale Creole makes its own blend with special herbs and spices to create a distinctive homely taste, though the local recipe is a closely guarded secret among the Creole population. The house prepares its own spice mixes too, which you can purchase to take away as a souvenir, along with fresh local vanilla, cinnamon sticks and eucalyptus honey. And if you’re lucky, Marie Christine may even provide the recipe of the day’s menu if you want to try and re-create your lunch at home.

 

Lovingly prepared

 

Stating that all the meals are freshly prepared on the same day, Marie-Christine insists: ‘Creole cooking is extremely varied and generous. It is a cuisine that requires a lot of love in the preparation, since the dishes need to cook for a long time.’ Early in the morning, Majo starts in the kitchen, which she knows so well she can even follow the various stages of preparation by its aroma alone.

 

‘We defend local traditional cooking with fabulous flavours. Our cooking is authentic and is inspired by our grandma Simone’s recipes, which have been transmitted from one generation to the next. I find immense joy in telling our visitors about our culture and recipes. It is a great way to express who we are and where we come from,’ says Marie-Christine.

Okra (Bhindi) Tomato Curry Recipe South Indian Recipes

 

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www.sailusfood.com/2015/07/30/bhindi-masala-recipe/

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Okra (Bhindi) Tomato Curry Recipe South Indian Recipes from foodviva.com

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Punjabi Bhindi Masala Recipe | Okra Recipes ~ Indian Khana

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Apr 15, 2013 - Punjabi Bhindi Masala Recipe, Punjabi Recipes, Bhindi Masala Sabzi Recipe, Side Dish, Okra, Bhindi recipes, Ladies ... While frying okra, finely chop onion, tomato, green chili and cilantro. 3. ..... Side Dishes (South Indian).

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Title: Cranberries; : the national cranberry magazine

Identifier: cranberriesnatio5860port

Year: 1936 (1930s)

Authors:

Subjects: Cranberries

Publisher: Portland, CT [etc. ] : Taylor Pub. Co. [etc. ]

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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Allentown (PaJ Editor Leads Cranberry Crusade, Larger Servinas Bulletin â Pennsylvania House page of the Allentown paper. The i-caU-J writer of Representatives has under con- sideration a bill recommending- that restauranteurs, serve larger por- tions of cranberries in their res- taurants in order to enhance meals arid'"to ^satisfy the desire of pa- t^^s:_'foi- this desirable delicacy. "'i'hV'^bill has been referred to the Committee on Rules. Bill further points out thul "It is of utmost importance that no item be overlooked which can contribute to the completeness of meals seived in home or in res- taurants. Cranberries and can- berry sauce, long- established foods which have been appreciated dur- ing the holiday seasons of Christ- mas and Thanksgiving can ad- mirably make this contribution throughout the year." For some years John Y. Kohl ha^ been smoldering abort the small servings of cranberry sauce he received in restaurants, and occasionally he would air his feelings in his v/eekly editorial column called "This and That" in the Sunday Call-Chronicle Avhich he has edited for thirty years. By December, his remark? b came so saucy that the niivo- â the city of Allentown wrote a proclamation of whereases and Be it resolveds making 1958 the year of the Cranberry Crusade, stafng "and, FURTHER, I hereby desi'jnate citizen John Y. Koh^ columnist and gourmet, Chairman of Said Crusade, and in evidence thereof I herewith sign my name with a pen of two colors, silver and cranberry red, which pen I herewith entrust to said John Y. Kohl that it might ever remind him of the trust imposed upon him by Americans the country .over who are dedicated to the :;cause of MORE CRANBERRY ;SAUCE WITH TURKEY." From that time on the Crusade was off to a big start with Mr. Kohl editorializing week after week and quoting people who were staunchly behind the crusade. A Queen was chosen, Mrs. Ralph C. Swartz, because she made the dandiest cranberry chutney and her picture and recipe.s covered a writer v: v.'rote of the cru-sai. . that appeared in newspapers froci ceast to coast. (Mr. Othman ha. since passed away.) In Hanson, NCA pi:blicist Bett;/ campaign was endorsed by chefb> school children, political figures and just plain diner-outers. Ai lentown restaurants and hotels began bringing on cranberry sauce in soup dishes, especially Buchan was keeping the mails : when campaigner Kohl was dining Allentown bright v/ith cranberr:. there. information, and Ocean Spray George M. Leader, then Goven- gales in the Allentown area show- er of Pennsylvania, wrote, "It gd a decided increase in botl. seems tragic that workers who fresh fruit and processed products- go into cranberry bogs to pick cranberry sauce of course, cranberries can have so little to q^ December 16th she journey- show for their etTorts at State functions and public banquets, am unequivocally in favor of cran- berry sauceâin huge quantitiesâ I realize that this broad statement may be political suicide, but on behalf of the cranberry bog work- ers and Pennsylvania gourmets, 1 am willing to stake my political future." ed to Allentown to pay tribute to the crusade and the crusaders at a luncheon for loyal followers. The menu was cranberry punch, ham with cranberry glaze, cran- berry jellied salad, vegetables, ice cream with cranberry topping, and the Cranberry Queen brought festive jars of her cranberry chut- To the dismay of his followers, ney as gifts. (: .^xiior Leader was not re-elect- -i but the Cranberry Crusade V c it on. a November, Mr. Kohl wrote f ;" tm-e article called "Cranberry ice 'All-American' " and syn- On a display table was the Cranberry Crusade Proclamation, the pen that signed it, and other mem.ento centered around a small paper cup bearing the sign "Hor- msmm)NTROL

 

Text Appearing After Image:

qqins ^^Irwaui MM NORWOOD. MASS. ' DUSTING and SPRAYING RAY MORSE, Agent TEL. WAREHAM 1553-W Twelve

  

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