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Model: Jenna

MUA: Lindsay Ambrosio (www.makeupmadame.com)

 

Single light creating rim and bouncing for fill.

 

www.dehavendigital.com

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twitter.com/#!/DeHavenDigital

 

Taken with a Nikon D7000, ISO 200, 1/125 sec, and a Nikon 85 mm f/1.8 at f/6.3. I used two Travel Lite 750's, one in a 50x72 in soft box at chest level, and a 22 inch beauty dish above her face. Four Nikon SB-900's illuminate the background slightly. All the strobes were fired using a Pocketwizard TT5 with an AC3 Controller on the camera, and a Pocketwizard TT5 connected to the strobes using manual control. I used white background paper, and it was shot at night to keep ambient light under control.

 

Edited with Lightroom 5 and CS6.

 

Khrist (MM 622216) at Union 206, Alexandria VA

Makeup by Khrist

 

Wham!! you'ld think i would have taken a picture with her- i got flustered and missed me chance!! =)

Tangerine Creme with Honey Comb or petro-chemical exposure - you decide !

11-27-17 - 100K views 109 faves 3 galleries

11-26-16 - 100K views + 101 faves

7-22-17 - 125,000 views 112 faves

Blaise's first photo got a good number of views and a couple of favourites, so she's been back to pose for more.

Up The Banner Photography , Noel Moore.

 

Copyright © All Rights Reserved.

Images are the property of Up The Banner Photography

and may not be reproduced without permission.

  

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My Web page

 

Glamour photography is a genre of photography whereby the subjects, usually female, are portrayed in a romantic or sexually alluring way. The subjects may be fully clothed or seminude, but glamour photography stops short of deliberately arousing the viewer and being pornographic photography.

 

Glamour photography is generally a composed image of a subject in a still position. The subjects of glamour photography are often professional models, and the photographs are normally intended for commercial use, including mass-produced calendars, pinups and for men's magazines, such as Playboy; but amateur subjects are also sometimes used, and sometimes the photographs are intended for private and personal use only. Photographers use a combination of cosmetics, lighting and airbrushing techniques to produce an appealing image of the subject

  

While there is some overlap in the time periods, the term glamour photography did not begin to be commonly applied to such photography until the 1960s. Before then, the term erotic photography was more commonly used. Early types of this kind of modeling were often associated with "French postcards", small postcard sized images, that were sold by street vendors in France. In the early 1900s the pinup became popular and depicted scantily dressed women often in a playful pose seemingly surprised or startled by the viewer. The subject would usually have an expression of delight which seemed to invite the viewer to come and play. Betty Grable was one of the most famous pinup models of all time; her pinup in a bathing suit was extremely popular with World War II soldiers.

 

In December 1953, Marilyn Monroe was featured in the first issue of Playboy magazine. Bettie Page was the Playmate of the Month in January 1955. Playboy was the first magazine featuring nude glamour photography targeted at the mainstream consumer.

 

The British Queen of Curves in the 1950s and early sixties was Pamela Green. Harrison Marks, on the encouragement of Green, took up glamour photography and together in 1957 they published the pinup magazine Kamera. Currently in England the earliest use of the word "glamour" as a euphemism for nude modeling or photography is attributed to Marks' publicity material in 1950s.

 

Glamour models popular in the early 1990s included Hope Talmons and Dita Von Teese and the modern era is represented in the U.S. by models like Heidi Van Horne and Bernie Dexter, while the UK's leading representative of the genre is Lucy Pinder.

 

Playboy was instrumental in changing the world of glamour photography as the first magazine which focused on nude models and was targeted at the mainstream consumer. In December 1953, Hugh Hefner published the first edition of Playboy with Marilyn Monroe on the cover, and nude photos of Monroe inside. Monroe's star status and charming personality helped to diminish the public outcry. When asked what she had on during the photoshoot, she replied "the radio". After Playboy broke through, many other magazines followed and this was instrumental in opening the market for the introduction of glamour photography into modern society. Today, softcore nude photographs of models appear in publications such as Perfect 10, or tabloid newspapers such as Britain's The Sun's Page 3.

 

Recently in order to increase profits by expanding possible sale locations, several popular glamour magazines (known as lad mags) are modifying the trend. They revert to styles of glamour photography of years ago by showing less nudity, in favor of implied (covered) nudity or toplessness, such as the handbra technique, where a woman hides her nipples and areolae by covering both breasts with her own hands, or those of another person.[4] Examples include FHM (For Him Magazine) and Maxim magazines, which launched in 1994 and 1995, respectively.

Abbi Lawrence at Union 206

Custom latex Green Lantern mask is glued on, not strapped on.

Up The Banner Photography , Noel Moore.

 

Copyright © All Rights Reserved.

Images are the property of Up The Banner Photography

and may not be reproduced without permission.

  

My Facebook Fan Page

  

My Web page

 

Glamour photography is a genre of photography whereby the subjects, usually female, are portrayed in a romantic or sexually alluring way. The subjects may be fully clothed or seminude, but glamour photography stops short of deliberately arousing the viewer and being pornographic photography.

 

Glamour photography is generally a composed image of a subject in a still position. The subjects of glamour photography are often professional models, and the photographs are normally intended for commercial use, including mass-produced calendars, pinups and for men's magazines, such as Playboy; but amateur subjects are also sometimes used, and sometimes the photographs are intended for private and personal use only. Photographers use a combination of cosmetics, lighting and airbrushing techniques to produce an appealing image of the subject

  

While there is some overlap in the time periods, the term glamour photography did not begin to be commonly applied to such photography until the 1960s. Before then, the term erotic photography was more commonly used. Early types of this kind of modeling were often associated with "French postcards", small postcard sized images, that were sold by street vendors in France. In the early 1900s the pinup became popular and depicted scantily dressed women often in a playful pose seemingly surprised or startled by the viewer. The subject would usually have an expression of delight which seemed to invite the viewer to come and play. Betty Grable was one of the most famous pinup models of all time; her pinup in a bathing suit was extremely popular with World War II soldiers.

 

In December 1953, Marilyn Monroe was featured in the first issue of Playboy magazine. Bettie Page was the Playmate of the Month in January 1955. Playboy was the first magazine featuring nude glamour photography targeted at the mainstream consumer.

 

The British Queen of Curves in the 1950s and early sixties was Pamela Green. Harrison Marks, on the encouragement of Green, took up glamour photography and together in 1957 they published the pinup magazine Kamera. Currently in England the earliest use of the word "glamour" as a euphemism for nude modeling or photography is attributed to Marks' publicity material in 1950s.

 

Glamour models popular in the early 1990s included Hope Talmons and Dita Von Teese and the modern era is represented in the U.S. by models like Heidi Van Horne and Bernie Dexter, while the UK's leading representative of the genre is Lucy Pinder.

 

Playboy was instrumental in changing the world of glamour photography as the first magazine which focused on nude models and was targeted at the mainstream consumer. In December 1953, Hugh Hefner published the first edition of Playboy with Marilyn Monroe on the cover, and nude photos of Monroe inside. Monroe's star status and charming personality helped to diminish the public outcry. When asked what she had on during the photoshoot, she replied "the radio". After Playboy broke through, many other magazines followed and this was instrumental in opening the market for the introduction of glamour photography into modern society. Today, softcore nude photographs of models appear in publications such as Perfect 10, or tabloid newspapers such as Britain's The Sun's Page 3.

 

Recently in order to increase profits by expanding possible sale locations, several popular glamour magazines (known as lad mags) are modifying the trend. They revert to styles of glamour photography of years ago by showing less nudity, in favor of implied (covered) nudity or toplessness, such as the handbra technique, where a woman hides her nipples and areolae by covering both breasts with her own hands, or those of another person.[4] Examples include FHM (For Him Magazine) and Maxim magazines, which launched in 1994 and 1995, respectively.

Dedicated to L this reminds me of her.

 

wings by ~PinkMonkeyLove from deviant art browse.deviantart.com/resources/?qh=&section=&q=w...

stunning woman by Dewayne Flowers from dreamstime

abstract by Kirill Zdorov from dreamstime

Up The Banner Photography , Noel Moore.

 

Copyright © All Rights Reserved.

Images are the property of Up The Banner Photography

and may not be reproduced without permission.

  

My Facebook Fan Page

  

My Web page

 

Glamour photography is a genre of photography whereby the subjects, usually female, are portrayed in a romantic or sexually alluring way. The subjects may be fully clothed or seminude, but glamour photography stops short of deliberately arousing the viewer and being pornographic photography.

 

Glamour photography is generally a composed image of a subject in a still position. The subjects of glamour photography are often professional models, and the photographs are normally intended for commercial use, including mass-produced calendars, pinups and for men's magazines, such as Playboy; but amateur subjects are also sometimes used, and sometimes the photographs are intended for private and personal use only. Photographers use a combination of cosmetics, lighting and airbrushing techniques to produce an appealing image of the subject

  

While there is some overlap in the time periods, the term glamour photography did not begin to be commonly applied to such photography until the 1960s. Before then, the term erotic photography was more commonly used. Early types of this kind of modeling were often associated with "French postcards", small postcard sized images, that were sold by street vendors in France. In the early 1900s the pinup became popular and depicted scantily dressed women often in a playful pose seemingly surprised or startled by the viewer. The subject would usually have an expression of delight which seemed to invite the viewer to come and play. Betty Grable was one of the most famous pinup models of all time; her pinup in a bathing suit was extremely popular with World War II soldiers.

 

In December 1953, Marilyn Monroe was featured in the first issue of Playboy magazine. Bettie Page was the Playmate of the Month in January 1955. Playboy was the first magazine featuring nude glamour photography targeted at the mainstream consumer.

 

The British Queen of Curves in the 1950s and early sixties was Pamela Green. Harrison Marks, on the encouragement of Green, took up glamour photography and together in 1957 they published the pinup magazine Kamera. Currently in England the earliest use of the word "glamour" as a euphemism for nude modeling or photography is attributed to Marks' publicity material in 1950s.

 

Glamour models popular in the early 1990s included Hope Talmons and Dita Von Teese and the modern era is represented in the U.S. by models like Heidi Van Horne and Bernie Dexter, while the UK's leading representative of the genre is Lucy Pinder.

 

Playboy was instrumental in changing the world of glamour photography as the first magazine which focused on nude models and was targeted at the mainstream consumer. In December 1953, Hugh Hefner published the first edition of Playboy with Marilyn Monroe on the cover, and nude photos of Monroe inside. Monroe's star status and charming personality helped to diminish the public outcry. When asked what she had on during the photoshoot, she replied "the radio". After Playboy broke through, many other magazines followed and this was instrumental in opening the market for the introduction of glamour photography into modern society. Today, softcore nude photographs of models appear in publications such as Perfect 10, or tabloid newspapers such as Britain's The Sun's Page 3.

 

Recently in order to increase profits by expanding possible sale locations, several popular glamour magazines (known as lad mags) are modifying the trend. They revert to styles of glamour photography of years ago by showing less nudity, in favor of implied (covered) nudity or toplessness, such as the handbra technique, where a woman hides her nipples and areolae by covering both breasts with her own hands, or those of another person.[4] Examples include FHM (For Him Magazine) and Maxim magazines, which launched in 1994 and 1995, respectively.

 

Up The Banner Photography , Noel Moore.

 

Copyright © All Rights Reserved.

Images are the property of Up The Banner Photography

and may not be reproduced without permission.

  

My Facebook Fan Page

  

My Web page

 

Glamour photography is a genre of photography whereby the subjects, usually female, are portrayed in a romantic or sexually alluring way. The subjects may be fully clothed or seminude, but glamour photography stops short of deliberately arousing the viewer and being pornographic photography.

 

Glamour photography is generally a composed image of a subject in a still position. The subjects of glamour photography are often professional models, and the photographs are normally intended for commercial use, including mass-produced calendars, pinups and for men's magazines, such as Playboy; but amateur subjects are also sometimes used, and sometimes the photographs are intended for private and personal use only. Photographers use a combination of cosmetics, lighting and airbrushing techniques to produce an appealing image of the subject

  

While there is some overlap in the time periods, the term glamour photography did not begin to be commonly applied to such photography until the 1960s. Before then, the term erotic photography was more commonly used. Early types of this kind of modeling were often associated with "French postcards", small postcard sized images, that were sold by street vendors in France. In the early 1900s the pinup became popular and depicted scantily dressed women often in a playful pose seemingly surprised or startled by the viewer. The subject would usually have an expression of delight which seemed to invite the viewer to come and play. Betty Grable was one of the most famous pinup models of all time; her pinup in a bathing suit was extremely popular with World War II soldiers.

 

In December 1953, Marilyn Monroe was featured in the first issue of Playboy magazine. Bettie Page was the Playmate of the Month in January 1955. Playboy was the first magazine featuring nude glamour photography targeted at the mainstream consumer.

 

The British Queen of Curves in the 1950s and early sixties was Pamela Green. Harrison Marks, on the encouragement of Green, took up glamour photography and together in 1957 they published the pinup magazine Kamera. Currently in England the earliest use of the word "glamour" as a euphemism for nude modeling or photography is attributed to Marks' publicity material in 1950s.

 

Glamour models popular in the early 1990s included Hope Talmons and Dita Von Teese and the modern era is represented in the U.S. by models like Heidi Van Horne and Bernie Dexter, while the UK's leading representative of the genre is Lucy Pinder.

 

Playboy was instrumental in changing the world of glamour photography as the first magazine which focused on nude models and was targeted at the mainstream consumer. In December 1953, Hugh Hefner published the first edition of Playboy with Marilyn Monroe on the cover, and nude photos of Monroe inside. Monroe's star status and charming personality helped to diminish the public outcry. When asked what she had on during the photoshoot, she replied "the radio". After Playboy broke through, many other magazines followed and this was instrumental in opening the market for the introduction of glamour photography into modern society. Today, softcore nude photographs of models appear in publications such as Perfect 10, or tabloid newspapers such as Britain's The Sun's Page 3.

 

Recently in order to increase profits by expanding possible sale locations, several popular glamour magazines (known as lad mags) are modifying the trend. They revert to styles of glamour photography of years ago by showing less nudity, in favor of implied (covered) nudity or toplessness, such as the handbra technique, where a woman hides her nipples and areolae by covering both breasts with her own hands, or those of another person.[4] Examples include FHM (For Him Magazine) and Maxim magazines, which launched in 1994 and 1995, respectively.

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