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winning picture on the theme "Green" of (TheCCH) Contest #7

 

Friend's pl let me know what do you think I could do different to make this shot more aesthetically pleasing? same question again i am asking today hope this will help me to grow as well..:)

 

Identifier: cu31924105428415

Title: The poetical works of Thomas Hood. With a memoir of the author ..

Year: 1873 (1870s)

Authors: Hood, Thomas, 1799-1845 Houghton, Richard Monckton Milnes, Baron, 1809-1885 Wordsworth Collection

Subjects:

Publisher: New York, James Miller

Contributing Library: Cornell University Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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burnt umber.Even those eruptions he had neverseen,Of which the Caledonian Poet spoke.As rashes growing green — Phoo ! phoo ! a rash growgreen !Nothing of course but a broad Scottishjoke! Saw tongue—felt pulse—exammed the j ^i^^,^ ^^ ^^ flaming visages, for thosebad cheek,— Poked, stroked, pinched, kneaded it—hemmed—shook his head— Took a long solemn pause the cause toseek, (Thinking, it seemed, in Greek,) Then asked—twas Christmas—** Hadhe eaten grass. Or greens—and if the cook was so im-proper To boil them up with copper.Or farthings made of brass; Or if he drank his Hock from darkgreen glass, Or dined at City Festivals, whereat Tnere»s turtle, and green fat? The Scarlet Fever answered, or the Rose IBut verdant ! that was quite a novel stroke !i\Ien turned to blue, by Choleras last stage.In common practice he had really seen ;But Green—he was too old, and grave, and sage.To think of the last stage to Turnham Green ! So matters stood in-doors—meanwhilewithout

 

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MORE HULLAHBALOO. 331 Growing in going like all other ru-mors,The modern miracle Avas buzzed about.By people of all humors.Native ur loreign m their dialecti-cals ;Till all the neighborhood, as if their nosesHad taken the odd gross from littleMoses,Seemed looking through green spec-tacles.** Green faces ! so they all began to comment— Yes—opposite to Druggists lightedshops,But thats a flying color — neverstops—A bottle-green, thats vanished in a mo-ment.Green 1 nothing of the sort occurs tomind—Nothing at all to match the presentpiece ;Jack in the Green has nothing of thekind—Green-grocers are not green, nor yet green geese 1The oldest Supercargoes or Old Sail-ors Of such a case had never heard,From Emerald Isle to Cape deVerd;•* Or Greenland 1 cried the whalers.All tongues were full of the Green Man, and stillThey could not make him out, with all their skill.No soul could shape the matter, head or tail—But Truth steps in where all conjecturesfail. A long half hour, in

  

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Identifier: colonialdaysdame00whar

Title: Colonial days and dames

Year: 1895 (1890s)

Authors: Wharton, Anne Hollingsworth, 1845-1928

Subjects: Women

Publisher: Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott Co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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ifting the napkin and re-^■caling a collection of corn-cobs, * Theseare the result of my endea>x»r to growgreen com in our hot-house; but I hadtile cobs boiled to get the smell, anyhow.Mrs. West w^as a Philadelphia Quakeress,as was her kinswoman, the mother of L^ghHunL Of his mothers lo\-eliness of char-acter the po^ writes with oithusiasm.wiiile Mrs. West seems to ha\-e possesseda charm and \-i\-acit\- all ho own. Apainting by Benjamin West, receitiy dis-co\-ered in a femily g:arret, represents hiswife with her child in her arms, the cos-tume and position e\-idently in imitation ofthe old masters. West was an earh- patror.of the \-oungse that oi his patrcm. A quaintlittle sketch of Master Copl^* and his * TUs Ikde K>t v-i^ ifberinnis acade Lcsu Ltoc-kwsUMdvsstvioeLardCkuKeUQrof Ei^ud. HisHiwHi^ltu, dke Hon. SofMft Qatitey,—iii.it Mr. HaMKtafB DolLcS^ ons iMioii^ aKcr SMay yens of KsracBC?

 

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COLONIAL DAMES. I4I sister is to be found among Wests draw-ings, while the charming face of Mrs. Cop-ley appears in a number of her husbandspaintings, especially in his Scripturalscenes. Mrs. Copley, like Mrs. West,was an ideal artists wife, combining graceand beauty with strong New England com-mon sense and executive ability. To thebrush of Copley we are indebted for such in-teresting portraits of Colonial women as thatof the beautiful Lady Wentworth, in whichappears the flying squirrel, which seems tohave been as great a favorite with Copleyas was the King Charles spaniel with VanDyck; and that of Mrs. Samuel AlleyneOtis, in the dress of a shepherdess, fairenough to have won the heart of anynumber of Florizels, and, like Perdita, tohave draAvn her sheep to leave grazing,and only live by gazing. Among Benjamin Wests earlier por-traits is that of Mrs. Thomas Hopkinson,which now hangs in the rooms of the abroad, these two distinguished American famihes, theHamiltons and the Copleys. 14

  

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Mother Earth.

 

One tree is provided two human oxizen for one year, if we grow more trees, there are reduced in carbon dioxide and pollution. Also many birds are living there.

 

So on earth day, we will decide grow green, and make our earth happy... Happy mother Earth day.

 

#growgreen #reducepollution #trees #earthday #naturelover #photography #explore

we r growing barley fodder even in this extreme heat weather in Kuwait in desert

Me-time is no one to talk to and having more spaces around. Solo time is being productive in my own little ways. .Nobody is around the house to dictate, criticise and control my actions. I am free to try new things/ perform an experiment ( out of the resources I can find around the house).In my solitude, I think about solutions to my problems. Some people are too judgemental so I'd rather read books and magazines for advices, By myself, I am free to dream and to think about my goals in life. Some people sound too contradicting as if they know everything. Look what they have done with their own lives. Whenever you see me being erratically irritable, it means that you are simply boring or you just have to leave me alone for my batteries are already exhausted.

 

Alone, but not lonely. Thus it proves that I am not really extrovert after all.

   

Identifier: whittierlandhand00pick

Title: Whittier-land; a handbook of North Essex

Year: 1904 (1900s)

Authors: Pickard, Samuel T. (Samuel Thomas), 1828-1915

Subjects: Whittier, John Greenleaf, 1807-1892 Essex County (Mass.) -- Description and travel

Publisher: Boston, New York, Houghton, Mifflin and company

Contributing Library: New York Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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RIVER PATH Brissot, the leader of the Girondists in the French Revolu-tion, and Louis Philippe, who were familiar with its scen-ery, remembered it with pleasure. Anne Pradstreet, thewife of Governor Pradstreet, one of the earliest writers ofverse in New^ England, sang of it at her home on its banksat Andover ; and the lovely mistress of Deer Island, whosees on one hand the rising moon lean above the low sea 6 WIIITIIKR-LAXD horizon of the east, and on the other the sunset reddeningthe track of the winding river, lias made it the theme andscene of lier prose and verse. Tile visitor who approaches Whittier-Land by the wayof Haverhill will find in that city many places of interestin connection with the poets early life, and referred toin liis poems. The Academy for which he wrote the ode

 

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HAVERHILL ACADEMY sung at its dedication in 1827, when he was a lad of nine-teen, and before he had other than district school training,is now the manual training school of the city, and may befound, little changed except by accretion, on Winter Street,near the city hall. As this ode does not appear in any ofhis collected works, and is certainly creditable as a juve-nile production, it is given here. It was sung to the airof Pillar of Glory: — HAVERHILL 7 Hail, Star of Science ! Come forth in thy splendor, Illumine these walls — let them evermore beA shrine where thy votaries offerings may tender,Hallowed by genius, and sacred to thee.Warmed by thy genial glow,Here let thy laurels growGreenly for those who rejoice at thy name.Here let thy spirit rest,Thrilling the ardent breast,Rousing the soul with thy promise of fame. Companion of Freedom 1 The hght of her story. Wherever her voice at thine altar is knownThere shall no cloud of oppression come oer thee.No en\dous tyrant thy sple

  

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Concept stationary set for Grow Green who promote organic gardening in Ireland.

Identifier: alabamabirddaybo1913alab

Title: Alabama bird day book

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: Alabama. Dept. of Game and Fish Alabama. Dept. of Conservation

Subjects: Birds

Publisher: Montgomery, Ala. : Dept. of Game and Fish

Contributing Library: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library

  

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1 ^M PtT 1 1 1 Q ? o •J C _ « Alabama, 1913. 53 SPRING WINDS. ♦©■♦- WHEN winds of March like silvery trumpets blow,The whole dead world awakens with new birth;The sun smiles forth, and verdant grasses growGreen mantling the earth. When winds of April flute like pipes of Pan, The brooks and rills awake to dance and sing;The birds across the continents wide span Come back on eager wing.But when the winds of May all laugh in glee, Ah, then, like Orpheus from heavens bowers,The spring leads back to earth with melody The thronging, thronging flowers! —Edward Wilbur Mason. % THE WOOD-DUCK. ♦&♦- THE beauty of the Wood-Duck, or Summer-Duck, depends al-most wholly upon its brilliantly colored plumage; for its formis quite commonplace. It may be wrong to make a cold-bloodedanalysis of its points, but for beauty of form, and the neck of thisbird is too small and too short, its head is too large, and its body isvery ordinary. Its plumage, however, presents a color-scheme ofbri

  

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Identity for Grow Green, a non profit company based in Dublin promoting the allotment movement in Ireland.

10 (Central TX) Plants for Mother’s Day, www.GrowGreen.org #ATXGrowGreen

Stationary set for a non profit promoting organic growing in Ireland.

10 (Central TX) Plants for Mother’s Day, www.GrowGreen.org #ATXGrowGreen

10 (Central TX) Plants for Mother’s Day, www.GrowGreen.org #ATXGrowGreen

Identifier: alabamabirddaybo1913alab

Title: Alabama bird day book

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: Alabama. Dept. of Game and Fish Alabama. Dept. of Conservation

Subjects: Birds

Publisher: Montgomery, Ala. : Dept. of Game and Fish

Contributing Library: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library

  

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1 ^M PtT 1 1 1 Q ? o •J C _ « Alabama, 1913. 53 SPRING WINDS. ♦©■♦- WHEN winds of March like silvery trumpets blow,The whole dead world awakens with new birth;The sun smiles forth, and verdant grasses growGreen mantling the earth. When winds of April flute like pipes of Pan, The brooks and rills awake to dance and sing;The birds across the continents wide span Come back on eager wing.But when the winds of May all laugh in glee, Ah, then, like Orpheus from heavens bowers,The spring leads back to earth with melody The thronging, thronging flowers! —Edward Wilbur Mason. % THE WOOD-DUCK. ♦&♦- THE beauty of the Wood-Duck, or Summer-Duck, depends al-most wholly upon its brilliantly colored plumage; for its formis quite commonplace. It may be wrong to make a cold-bloodedanalysis of its points, but for beauty of form, and the neck of thisbird is too small and too short, its head is too large, and its body isvery ordinary. Its plumage, however, presents a color-scheme ofbri

  

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10 (Central TX) Plants for Mother’s Day, www.GrowGreen.org #ATXGrowGreen

10 (Central TX) Plants for Mother’s Day, www.GrowGreen.org #ATXGrowGreen

10 (Central TX) Plants for Mother’s Day, www.GrowGreen.org #ATXGrowGreen

10 (Central TX) Plants for Mother’s Day, www.GrowGreen.org #ATXGrowGreen

10 (Central TX) Plants for Mother’s Day, www.GrowGreen.org #ATXGrowGreen

10 (Central TX) Plants for Mother’s Day, www.GrowGreen.org #ATXGrowGreen

10 (Central TX) Plants for Mother’s Day, www.GrowGreen.org #ATXGrowGreen

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