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A bunch of really terrible fusion welds along a couple lengths of 1/8" rod. This is the sort of thing I'm going to have to do over and over again with my sculpture, so I tried a big bunch of it with bad and not-so-great results. Practice, practice, practice!

Identifier: hardeningtemperi00wood

Title: Hardening, tempering, annealing and forging of steel; a treatise on the practical treatment and working of high and low grade steel ..

Year: 1903 (1900s)

Authors: Woodworth, Joseph Vincent, 1877-

Subjects: Steel Forging Tempering

Publisher: New York, N. W. Henley & Co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

  

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ll not be any soft spots in the die after hardening. It is often necessary to construct dies from forgings ofwrought iron and tool steel, and, as the dies when finished arerequired to be hardened, it is necessary there should be a goodweld between the two parts. To accomplish this result, whenwelding mix mild steel chips, from which all of the oil has been THE HARDENING AND TEMPERING OF DIES. 163 removed, with the borax and there will be no difficulty in produc-ing a clean weld and one which will not buckle or separate inhardening. Hard or Soft Punches and Dies.At times, when tools are required for sheet-metal working,it is hard to determine whether a punch and die should be hard-ened, or whether one of them should be left soft, and if so,which one? The stock to be worked and the nature of the workliave to be considered when deciding this matter. Some classes ofwork will be accomplished in the best manner by using a softpunch and a hard die; others when a hard punch and a soft die are

 

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FIG. 115.—push-through FIG. I16.—SOLID BOTTOM CUTTING CUTTING AND DRAWING AND DRAWING DIE. DIE. used, while in a majority of cases the best results will be obtainedby using a punch and die that are both hard. For punching orshearing heavy metals both die and punch should be hard, whilefor all metals which are soft and not over 1-16 inch thick, a softpunch and a hard die will be found to work v/ell. By leavingone of the dies soft it will be easy to produce clean blanks duringthe life of the tools, as when the punch and die become dull itwill only be necessary to grind the hard one, upset the soft oneand shear it into the die. Hardening and Tempering Drop Dies.If there is one class of tools the hardening of which is less gen-erally understood than others, it is the class used for drop presswork. When dies of this class are to be hardened special careis necessary. Instead of plunging the whole die into the quench- 164 HARDENING, TEMPERING AND ANNEALING. ing bath (when heated properly

  

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Not a great shot of the weld, but I was happy with this weld on Coop's 1929 Model A hotrod.

Some crappy fusion welds on 1/8" plain steel rod.

Edge weld. Not bad! No filler rod, just fusion/autogenous style welding.

Here's a butt weld that is ridiculously porous. Turns out there's a coating on the steel that I didn't get scrubbed off, and the impurities in it made it bubble and pit. This drove me nuts, because I was using different pieces of steel, and some welds would come out fine, then I'd go do another couple of pieces and this would happen. The steel looked so good I didn't realize it had any contaminants on it.

A ton of practice coupons that I cut up.

Identifier: hardeningtemperi00wood

Title: Hardening, tempering, annealing and forging of steel; a treatise on the practical treatment and working of high and low grade steel ..

Year: 1903 (1900s)

Authors: Woodworth, Joseph Vincent, 1877-

Subjects: Steel Forging Tempering

Publisher: New York, N. W. Henley & Co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

 

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IflG. 114-—COMBINATION DIES, WITH HARDENED AND GROUND TOOLSTEEL WORKING PARTS SOLID-FORGED TO WROUGHT-IRON PLATES. from the bottom upward. When the die is to be quenched thewater should be turned on and kept running until the steel hascooled. When a good circulation of water is kept up in the tankthere will not be any soft spots in the die after hardening. It is often necessary to construct dies from forgings ofwrought iron and tool steel, and, as the dies when finished arerequired to be hardened, it is necessary there should be a goodweld between the two parts. To accomplish this result, whenwelding mix mild steel chips, from which all of the oil has been THE HARDENING AND TEMPERING OF DIES. 163 removed, with the borax and there will be no difficulty in produc-ing a clean weld and one which will not buckle or separate inhardening. Hard or Soft Punches and Dies.At times, when tools are required for sheet-metal working,it is hard to determine whether a punch and die should be hard-en

  

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Butt weld, fusion.

A view of the sculpture I'm working on. This is made out of plain steel. The first several sections of it were done with a MIG.

Here's the setup I'm using to create these metallic aberrations: Miller Maxstar 150 STH. I've used a little ER70s2 filler rod, but most of it is fusion/autogenous welding.