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Nicolas Bernier

 

⚫️

 

CD :

 

Nicolas Bernier

Frequencies ( A / Archives )

901 Editions

9ED004

 

Limited Edition 200

 

Including unique tuning fork alongside a laser cut acrylic base with the frequency engraved

 

Latest release in the series of Nic⚫️las Bernier’s worldwide acclaimed and Prix Ars Electronica Golden Nica awarded project 'Frequencies'

 

Design . Mote Studio

 

Postcard :

 

901

Editions

9ED004

 

Use Hearing Protection

 

GMA

Meticulously assembled by Jeff Desom, using just After Effects and Photoshop, the video "Rear Window Loop" condenses Hitchcock’s masterwork "Rear Window" into 3 breathtaking minutes in which the entirety of the film’s events–sans the dramatic, personal scenes between the protagonists–play out before Jeff’s gaze. Desom’s collage is completely comprised of footage from the film, with the iconic window panorama being neatly tailored and augmented with various photographic effects (tilt-shift, stabilization, “rain”) so as to achieve verisimilitude with the original and to re-create the environmental changes that propel the narrative along.

 

credit: Jeff Desom (LU)

www.jeffdesom.com

     

"The reactable is a collaborative electronic music instrument with a tabletop tangible multi-touch interface. Several simultaneous performers share complete control over the instrument by moving and rotating physical objects on a luminous round table surface. By moving and relating these objects, representing components of a classic modular synthesizer, users can create complex and dynamic sonic topologies, with generators, filters and modulators, in a kind of tangible modular synthesizer or graspable flow-controlled programming language."

Reactable

Creators Series

Meticulously assembled by Jeff Desom, using just After Effects and Photoshop, the video "Rear Window Loop" condenses Hitchcock’s masterwork "Rear Window" into 3 breathtaking minutes in which the entirety of the film’s events–sans the dramatic, personal scenes between the protagonists–play out before Jeff’s gaze. Desom’s collage is completely comprised of footage from the film, with the iconic window panorama being neatly tailored and augmented with various photographic effects (tilt-shift, stabilization, “rain”) so as to achieve verisimilitude with the original and to re-create the environmental changes that propel the narrative along.

 

credit: Jeff Desom (LU)

www.jeffdesom.com

    

Levers and Buttons is a video game, more precisely an asymmetrical, cooperative VR puzzle for two players. One player controls a character in two-dimensional space, the other acts in virtual reality. Both are stationed on a spaceship that has caught fire and is to be protected from burning out. The player in virtual reality has to solve puzzles to extinguish the fire and is supported by his/her fellow player. Everything in the game revolves around communication between the players. Levers and Buttons is equally suitable for inexperienced and experienced VR users. The game was awarded at the 2018 Prix Ars Electronica with a Golden Nica in the category u19 - CREATE YOUR WORLD.

 

Credit: Klemens Horvath

Twelve Releases About The Cutting Edge Of The Millenium

 

...

 

12 x CD Set :

 

20' To 2000

Twelve Releases About The Cutting Edge Of The Millenium

Raster - Noton

RN16

 

Monthly magazine-like 12 x CD Set released over the last year of the millenium. 12 artists were invited to produce a piece for the last 20 minutes of the year 1999. Completed by a special magnetic link system which joins the individual clam shells to form one object and a postcard.

The series was awarded the Golden Nica from Ars Electronica in 2000 and is now part of the collection of the MoMA and the Centre Pompidou.

 

Design by Olaf Bender & Carsten Nicolai

 

January . Komet

February . Ilpo Väisänen

March . Ryoji Ikeda

April . CoH

May . Byetone

June . Senking

July . Thomas Brinkmann

August . Scanner

September . Noto

October . Mika Vainio

November . Wolfgang Voigt

December . Elph

 

Raster - Noton . Archiv Für Ton Und Nichtton

 

Use Hearing Protection

 

GMA

ManicVR is an impressive narrative about the complex world of people with bipolar disorder. The two siblings Felicia and François Bertin are themselves affected by the mental illness. They have been using the voicemail of their sister, filmmaker Kalina Bertin, as a personal diary for three years now.

 

Foto showing Kalina Bertin.

 

Credit: tom mesic

Photo showing the winners of the Golden Nicas and STARTS Prize 2018.

 

Credit: vog.photo

The "reactable" is an intelligent musical instrument specially conceived for multi-user

performances. There’s room for several players at this round table; visible on its surface are geometric figures, each of which symbolizes a specific sound. Moving the figures back

and forth, rotating or interlinking them modifies the sounds they produce. With its highly intuitive, user-friendly interface, the reactable can be played by anyone—from little kids to professional musicians. But this is not just some music-making toy; the reactable is a genuine instrument and, accordingly, it takes some practice to get the most out of it.

Proof of this was recently provided by Scandinavian artist Björk, who used one on her latest world tour.

 

credit: Jordà, Geiger, Kaltenbrunner, Alonso / Music Technology Group

Image showing this years winner of the Golden Nica in the category Computer Animation / Film / VFX: "Forms". Forms is a collaboration between visual artists Quayola and Memo Akten. It is a series of studies on human motion, and its reverberations through space and time.

 

credit: David Quayola and Memo Akten

 

vimeo.com/38017188

“K-9_topology is a true hybrid artwork with profound bio-political message and is certain to bring a lot of discussion to the audience from both art and science sides.” ( Statement of the Jury). K-9_topology was awarded the Golden Nica in the category "Hybrid Art" at the 2017 Prix Ars Electronica.

 

credit: MIHA FRAS

The internet installation makes use of a troop of bots that comb through Twitter accounts for particular keywords: affluence, Apple, assets, benefit, common, data, data economy, cash and cost. When they’re found, the respective Twitter user is contacted and invited to join the BitSoil Popup Tax & Hack Campaign, which the user can do in a variety of ways: obtain information about the project and its mission; create and launch their own bots; or, if they prefer, send a digital postcard from BitREBUPLIC to a CEO of one of the 10 biggest high-tech companies or the chancellor/prime minister of their country of choice. Each of these activities, in turn, generates new data—which is to say new BitSoil— and the resulting profit is divided up fairly and transparently among all participants.

 

"BitSoil Popup Tax & Hack" awarded a Golden Nica in the category Interactive Art + at the 2018 Prix Ars Electronica.

 

Credit: vog.photo

“K-9_topology is a true hybrid artwork with profound bio-political message and is certain to bring a lot of discussion to the audience from both art and science sides.” (Statement of the Jury).

 

K-9_topology was awarded the Golden Nica in the category "Hybrid Art" at the 2017 Prix Ars Electronica.

 

Photo showing Maja Smrekar.

 

credit: BORUT PETERLIN

Image showing a scene from Boris Labbé's movie Rhizome which won the Golden Nica in 2016 in the categoriy Computer Animation / Film / VFX.

 

credit: Boris Labbé

Stelarc has been experimenting with art and biomedical research for over 30 years. The philosophy behind his work: Prostheses not as means of compensating for physical deficiencies but rather as ways to enhance our physical capabilities. Instead of replacing a missing or defective body part, Stelarc improves or expands the form and functions of his body with the help of custom-developed interfaces and apparatuses. “Ear on Arm,” an ear implanted onto his forearm, consists of soft tissue and flexible cartilage, and is thus a prosthesis that could possibly be produced right on the body itself. It’s based on a concept that originated in the 1990s. The artist has been continually conducting research and upgrading the ear’s functional efficiency, using his own body as a field of experimentation, as a human-machine interface.

 

credit: Nina Sellars

The internet installation makes use of a troop of bots that comb through Twitter accounts for particular keywords: affluence, Apple, assets, benefit, common, data, data economy, cash and cost. When they’re found, the respective Twitter user is contacted and invited to join the BitSoil Popup Tax & Hack Campaign, which the user can do in a variety of ways: obtain information about the project and its mission; create and launch their own bots; or, if they prefer, send a digital postcard from BitREBUPLIC to a CEO of one of the 10 biggest high-tech companies or the chancellor/prime minister of their country of choice. Each of these activities, in turn, generates new data—which is to say new BitSoil— and the resulting profit is divided up fairly and transparently among all participants.

 

"BitSoil Popup Tax & Hack" awarded a Golden Nica in the category Interactive Art + at the 2018 Prix Ars Electronica.

 

Photo showing the Larbits Sisters.

 

Credit: vog.photo

Design Dialogues Fall 2010: Computation After New Media

 

Guest Curator: Garnet Hertz

 

This lecture series explores key concepts in computational media to empower individuals to imagine, collaborate, provoke, and prototype through computing.

 

As a result of its widespread adoption, digital media has transitioned from "new media" to a ubiquitous part of contemporary life. This shift from novelty to familiarity has considerable ramifications for academic institutions working in the fields of media arts and digital culture. Exploring the formal potentials of information and networked technologies is no longer of significant interest: information technologies need to be understood as an embedded part of culture and history. Digital cultural practices must also work to extend their parent disciplines, including the studio arts, media history and theory, design, computer science and engineering.

 

Each speaker in the "Computation After New Media" series will focus on one word— a single term they feel is a core part of their work within the framework of computation. These lectures will be aimed at exploring the underlying structures of computationalism, providing an important leverage into the philosophy, languages, and principles of digital media.

 

SCHEDULE:

 

- October 1: Sharon Daniel, UCSC

- October 8: Eddo Stern, UCLA

- October 22: Paul Dourish, UCI

- October 29: George Legrady, Experimental Visualization Lab, UCSB

- November 19: Casey Reas, UCLA, author, Form + Code in Design, Art, and Architecture

- December 3: Celia Pearce, Georgia Tech, author Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds

 

Design Dialogues brings provocateurs from the worlds of design, art, academia, and technology into the MDP Studio. Each term, a guest curator is invited to build a series around a theme of their choosing.

 

Meetings: 12-2 pm. Talks: 3-6 pm in the Wind Tunnel Gallery. Open only to Media Design students, alumni, and faculty.

   

October 1: Sharon Daniel

 

Sharon Daniel is Professor of Film and Digital Media at the University of California, Santa Cruz where she teaches classes in digital media theory and practice. Her research involves collaborations with local and on-line communities, which exploit information and communications technologies as new sites for "public art." Daniel’s role as an artist is that of “context provider”—assisting communities, collecting their stories, soliciting their opinions on politics and social justice, and building the online archives and interfaces that make this data available across social, cultural and economic boundaries. Her goal is to avoid representation—not to attempt to speak for others but to allow them to speak for themselves.

 

Daniel’s work has been exhibited internationally at museums, festivals including the Corcoran Biennial, the University of Paris, the Dutch Electronic Arts Festival, Ars Electronica and the Lincoln Center Festival as well as on the Internet. Her essays have been published in books and professional journals such as Leonardo and the Sarai Reader. Daniel has recently presented “Improbablevoices.net” at the Fundacion Telefonica in Buenos Aires and at the conference “contested commons” in New Delhi, India. Her current research is supported by grants from the Daniel Langlois Foundation, the UCIRA, UCSC Arts Research Institute, and the Creative Work Fund.

   

October 8: Eddo Stern

 

Eddo Stern works on the disputed borderlands between fantasy and reality, exploring the uneasy and otherwise unconscious connections between physical existence and electronic simulation. His work explores new modes of narrative and documentary, experimental computer game design, fantasies of technology and history, and cross-cultural representation in computer games, film, and online media. He works in various media including computer software, hardware and game design, kinetic sculpture, performance, and film and video production. His short machinima films include "Sheik Attack", "Vietnam Romance", "Landlord Vigilante" and "Deathstar". He is the founder of the now retired cooperative C-level where he co-produced the physical computer gaming projects "Waco Resurrection", "Tekken Torture Tournament", "Cockfight Arena", and the internet meme conference "C-level Memefest" He is currently developing the new sensory deprivation game "Darkgame". Stern's work can be seen online at www.eddostern.com/

    

October 22: Paul Dourish

 

Paul Dourish is a Professor of Informatics in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at UC Irvine, with courtesy appointments in Computer Science and Anthropology. He teaches in the Informatics program and in the interdisciplinary graduate program in Arts Computation and Engineering. His primary research interests lie at the intersection of computer science and social science; he draws liberally on material from computer science, science and technology studies, cultural studies, humanities, and social sciences in order to understand information technology as a site of social and cultural production. In 2008, he was elected to the CHI Academy in recognition of his contributions to Human-Computer Interaction.

 

Dourish is the author of "Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction" (MIT Press, 2001), which explores how phenomenological accounts of action can provide an alternative to traditional cognitive analysis for understanding the embodied experience of interactive and computational systems. Before coming to UCI, he was a Senior Member of Research Staff in the Computer Science Laboratory of Xerox PARC; he has also held research positions at Apple Computer and at Rank Xerox EuroPARC. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from University College, London, and a B.Sc. (Hons) in Artificial Intelligence and Computer Science from the University of Edinburgh.

   

November 19: Casey Reas

 

Casey Reas lives and works in Los Angeles. His software, prints, and installations have been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions at museums and galleries in the United States, Europe, and Asia. Casey's ongoing Process series explores the relationship between naturally evolved systems and those that are synthetic. The imagery evokes transformation, and visualizes systems in motion and at rest. Equally embracing the qualitative human perception and the quantitative rules that define digital culture, organic form emerges from precise mechanical structures.

 

Casey is a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. He holds a masters degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Media Arts and Sciences as well as a bachelors degree from the School of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning at the University of Cincinnati. With Ben Fry, Reas initiated Processing in 2001. Processing is an open source programming language and environment for creating images, animation, and interaction.

 

Reas and Fry published Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists, a comprehensive introduction to programming within the context of visual media (MIT Press, 2007). In 2010, they publishing Getting Started with Processing, a casual introduction to programming (O'Reilly, 2010). With Chandler McWilliams and Lust, Casey has just published Form+Code in Design, Art, and Architecture (PAPress, 2010), a non-technical introduction to the history, theory, and practice of software in the arts.

 

Casey is the recipient of a 2008 Tribeca Film Institute Media Arts Fellowship (supported by the Rockefeller Foundation), a 2005 Golden Nica award from the Prix Ars Electronica, and he was included in the 2008 ArtReview Power 100. His images have been featured in various publications including The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, Print, Eye, Technology Review, and Wired.

   

December 3: Celia Pearce

 

Celia Pearce is a game designer, author, researcher, teacher, curator and artist, specializing in multiplayer gaming and virtual worlds, independent, art, and alternative game genres, as well as games and gender. She began designing interactive attractions and exhibitions in 1983, and has held academic appointments since 1998. Her game designs include the award-winning virtual reality attraction Virtual Adventures (for Iwerks and Evans & Sutherland) and the Purple Moon Friendship Adventure Cards for Girls.

 

Celia received her Ph.D. in 2006 from SMARTLab Centre, then at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, University of the Arts London. She currently is Assistant Professor of Digital Media in the School of Literature, Communication and Culture at Georgia Tech, where she also directs the Experimental Game Lab and the Emergent Game Group. She is the author or co-author of numerous papers and book chapters, as well as The Interactive Book (Macmillan 1997) and Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds (MIT 2009). She has also curated new media, virtual reality, and game exhibitions and is currently Festival Chair for IndieCade, an international independent games festival and showcase series. She is a co-founder of the Ludica women’s game collective.

   

Curator: Garnet Hertz

Doctor Garnet Hertz is a Fulbright Scholar and contemporary artist whose work explores themes of technological progress, creativity, innovation and interdisciplinarity. Hertz is a Faculty Member of the Media Design Program at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena California, a Postdoctoral Research Scholar at the Institute for Software Research at UC Irvine and is Artist in Residence in the Laboratory for Ubiquitous Computing and Interaction at UC Irvine. He has shown his work at several notable international venues in eleven countries including Ars Electronica, DEAF and SIGGRAPH and was awarded the prestigious 2008 Oscar Signorini Award in robotic art. He is founder and director of Dorkbot SoCal, a monthly Los Angeles-based DIY lecture series on electronic art and design. His research is widely cited in academic publications, and popular press on his work has disseminated through 25 countries including The New York Times, Wired, The Washington Post, NPR, USA Today, NBC, CBS, TV Tokyo and CNN Headline News.

Photo showing the Golden Nica statuettes estowed upon the Prix Ars Electronica prizewinners.

 

credit: tom mesic

Image showing Temps Mort / Idle Times by Alex Verhaest.

Alex Verhaest’s (BE) works are visual explorations and investigations of the nature and boundaries of language, communication and social conventions and the potential of contemporary storytelling. Her highly pictorial work operates by the juxtaposition of painting, video and contemporary technology.

 

credit: Alex Verhaest

 

Photo showing a Golden Nica, the highest prize of the Prix Ars Electronica, that is awarded during the Ars Electronica Gala 2013.

 

Credit: tom mesic

The "reactable" is an intelligent musical instrument specially conceived for multi-user

performances. There’s room for several players at this round table; visible on its surface are geometric figures, each of which symbolizes a specific sound. Moving the figures back

and forth, rotating or interlinking them modifies the sounds they produce. With its highly intuitive, user-friendly interface, the reactable can be played by anyone—from little kids to professional musicians. But this is not just some music-making toy; the reactable is a genuine instrument and, accordingly, it takes some practice to get the most out of it.

Proof of this was recently provided by Scandinavian artist Björk, who used one on her latest world tour.

 

credit: Jordà, Geiger, Kaltenbrunner, Alonso / Music Technology Group

Photo showing from left to right:

 

Samuel Stallybrass, Martin Hatler, Lorenz Gonsa, Vincent Thierry / Five Hours of Sleep (alle AT). For "Levers & Buttons", they were awarded the Golden Nica at the Prix Ars Electronica 2018 in the category u19 - CREATE YOUR WORLD.

 

credit: Klemens Horvath (klemenshorvath.com)

Universal Everything's “Walking City” is a spare but stylish video that merges elements of sculpture, architecture and motion. What the viewer sees throughout the eight-minute work is an abstract, humanoid figure resolutely striding from left to right, constantly maintaining the same unwavering rhythm. While the sculpture keeps up its forceful but monotonous locomotion, its shape is undergoing incessant metamorphosis (though its color never varies from white).

 

Credit: Universal Everything

"1kg more" got a Golden Nica in the Digital Communities category.

 

credit: rubra

presented during the award ceremony of the Ars Electronica Festival Gala 2013.

 

Credit: tom mesic

Design Dialogues Fall 2010: Computation After New Media

 

Guest Curator: Garnet Hertz

 

This lecture series explores key concepts in computational media to empower individuals to imagine, collaborate, provoke, and prototype through computing.

 

As a result of its widespread adoption, digital media has transitioned from "new media" to a ubiquitous part of contemporary life. This shift from novelty to familiarity has considerable ramifications for academic institutions working in the fields of media arts and digital culture. Exploring the formal potentials of information and networked technologies is no longer of significant interest: information technologies need to be understood as an embedded part of culture and history. Digital cultural practices must also work to extend their parent disciplines, including the studio arts, media history and theory, design, computer science and engineering.

 

Each speaker in the "Computation After New Media" series will focus on one word— a single term they feel is a core part of their work within the framework of computation. These lectures will be aimed at exploring the underlying structures of computationalism, providing an important leverage into the philosophy, languages, and principles of digital media.

 

SCHEDULE:

 

- October 1: Sharon Daniel, UCSC

- October 8: Eddo Stern, UCLA

- October 22: Paul Dourish, UCI

- October 29: George Legrady, Experimental Visualization Lab, UCSB

- November 19: Casey Reas, UCLA, author, Form + Code in Design, Art, and Architecture

- December 3: Celia Pearce, Georgia Tech, author Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds

 

Design Dialogues brings provocateurs from the worlds of design, art, academia, and technology into the MDP Studio. Each term, a guest curator is invited to build a series around a theme of their choosing.

 

Meetings: 12-2 pm. Talks: 3-6 pm in the Wind Tunnel Gallery. Open only to Media Design students, alumni, and faculty.

   

October 1: Sharon Daniel

 

Sharon Daniel is Professor of Film and Digital Media at the University of California, Santa Cruz where she teaches classes in digital media theory and practice. Her research involves collaborations with local and on-line communities, which exploit information and communications technologies as new sites for "public art." Daniel’s role as an artist is that of “context provider”—assisting communities, collecting their stories, soliciting their opinions on politics and social justice, and building the online archives and interfaces that make this data available across social, cultural and economic boundaries. Her goal is to avoid representation—not to attempt to speak for others but to allow them to speak for themselves.

 

Daniel’s work has been exhibited internationally at museums, festivals including the Corcoran Biennial, the University of Paris, the Dutch Electronic Arts Festival, Ars Electronica and the Lincoln Center Festival as well as on the Internet. Her essays have been published in books and professional journals such as Leonardo and the Sarai Reader. Daniel has recently presented “Improbablevoices.net” at the Fundacion Telefonica in Buenos Aires and at the conference “contested commons” in New Delhi, India. Her current research is supported by grants from the Daniel Langlois Foundation, the UCIRA, UCSC Arts Research Institute, and the Creative Work Fund.

   

October 8: Eddo Stern

 

Eddo Stern works on the disputed borderlands between fantasy and reality, exploring the uneasy and otherwise unconscious connections between physical existence and electronic simulation. His work explores new modes of narrative and documentary, experimental computer game design, fantasies of technology and history, and cross-cultural representation in computer games, film, and online media. He works in various media including computer software, hardware and game design, kinetic sculpture, performance, and film and video production. His short machinima films include "Sheik Attack", "Vietnam Romance", "Landlord Vigilante" and "Deathstar". He is the founder of the now retired cooperative C-level where he co-produced the physical computer gaming projects "Waco Resurrection", "Tekken Torture Tournament", "Cockfight Arena", and the internet meme conference "C-level Memefest" He is currently developing the new sensory deprivation game "Darkgame". Stern's work can be seen online at www.eddostern.com/

    

October 22: Paul Dourish

 

Paul Dourish is a Professor of Informatics in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at UC Irvine, with courtesy appointments in Computer Science and Anthropology. He teaches in the Informatics program and in the interdisciplinary graduate program in Arts Computation and Engineering. His primary research interests lie at the intersection of computer science and social science; he draws liberally on material from computer science, science and technology studies, cultural studies, humanities, and social sciences in order to understand information technology as a site of social and cultural production. In 2008, he was elected to the CHI Academy in recognition of his contributions to Human-Computer Interaction.

 

Dourish is the author of "Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction" (MIT Press, 2001), which explores how phenomenological accounts of action can provide an alternative to traditional cognitive analysis for understanding the embodied experience of interactive and computational systems. Before coming to UCI, he was a Senior Member of Research Staff in the Computer Science Laboratory of Xerox PARC; he has also held research positions at Apple Computer and at Rank Xerox EuroPARC. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from University College, London, and a B.Sc. (Hons) in Artificial Intelligence and Computer Science from the University of Edinburgh.

   

November 19: Casey Reas

 

Casey Reas lives and works in Los Angeles. His software, prints, and installations have been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions at museums and galleries in the United States, Europe, and Asia. Casey's ongoing Process series explores the relationship between naturally evolved systems and those that are synthetic. The imagery evokes transformation, and visualizes systems in motion and at rest. Equally embracing the qualitative human perception and the quantitative rules that define digital culture, organic form emerges from precise mechanical structures.

 

Casey is a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. He holds a masters degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Media Arts and Sciences as well as a bachelors degree from the School of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning at the University of Cincinnati. With Ben Fry, Reas initiated Processing in 2001. Processing is an open source programming language and environment for creating images, animation, and interaction.

 

Reas and Fry published Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists, a comprehensive introduction to programming within the context of visual media (MIT Press, 2007). In 2010, they publishing Getting Started with Processing, a casual introduction to programming (O'Reilly, 2010). With Chandler McWilliams and Lust, Casey has just published Form+Code in Design, Art, and Architecture (PAPress, 2010), a non-technical introduction to the history, theory, and practice of software in the arts.

 

Casey is the recipient of a 2008 Tribeca Film Institute Media Arts Fellowship (supported by the Rockefeller Foundation), a 2005 Golden Nica award from the Prix Ars Electronica, and he was included in the 2008 ArtReview Power 100. His images have been featured in various publications including The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, Print, Eye, Technology Review, and Wired.

   

December 3: Celia Pearce

 

Celia Pearce is a game designer, author, researcher, teacher, curator and artist, specializing in multiplayer gaming and virtual worlds, independent, art, and alternative game genres, as well as games and gender. She began designing interactive attractions and exhibitions in 1983, and has held academic appointments since 1998. Her game designs include the award-winning virtual reality attraction Virtual Adventures (for Iwerks and Evans & Sutherland) and the Purple Moon Friendship Adventure Cards for Girls.

 

Celia received her Ph.D. in 2006 from SMARTLab Centre, then at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, University of the Arts London. She currently is Assistant Professor of Digital Media in the School of Literature, Communication and Culture at Georgia Tech, where she also directs the Experimental Game Lab and the Emergent Game Group. She is the author or co-author of numerous papers and book chapters, as well as The Interactive Book (Macmillan 1997) and Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds (MIT 2009). She has also curated new media, virtual reality, and game exhibitions and is currently Festival Chair for IndieCade, an international independent games festival and showcase series. She is a co-founder of the Ludica women’s game collective.

   

Curator: Garnet Hertz

Doctor Garnet Hertz is a Fulbright Scholar and contemporary artist whose work explores themes of technological progress, creativity, innovation and interdisciplinarity. Hertz is a Faculty Member of the Media Design Program at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena California, a Postdoctoral Research Scholar at the Institute for Software Research at UC Irvine and is Artist in Residence in the Laboratory for Ubiquitous Computing and Interaction at UC Irvine. He has shown his work at several notable international venues in eleven countries including Ars Electronica, DEAF and SIGGRAPH and was awarded the prestigious 2008 Oscar Signorini Award in robotic art. He is founder and director of Dorkbot SoCal, a monthly Los Angeles-based DIY lecture series on electronic art and design. His research is widely cited in academic publications, and popular press on his work has disseminated through 25 countries including The New York Times, Wired, The Washington Post, NPR, USA Today, NBC, CBS, TV Tokyo and CNN Headline News.

Crystal Sounds of a Synchrotron is 38 minutes.It has been written for 5.1 DVD and Download.It was composed to highlight the engaging sounds Diamond Light Source. Crystal Sounds of a Synchrotron is a sound work composed directly from frequencies generated by the electron storage ring, a particle accelerator. The work also uses binaural recording from locations inside Diamond’s experimental hall, storage ring and beamlines.

 

Photo showing Jo Thomas.

 

credit: Green Lens Studios, London

  

Design Dialogues Fall 2010: Computation After New Media

 

Guest Curator: Garnet Hertz

 

This lecture series explores key concepts in computational media to empower individuals to imagine, collaborate, provoke, and prototype through computing.

 

As a result of its widespread adoption, digital media has transitioned from "new media" to a ubiquitous part of contemporary life. This shift from novelty to familiarity has considerable ramifications for academic institutions working in the fields of media arts and digital culture. Exploring the formal potentials of information and networked technologies is no longer of significant interest: information technologies need to be understood as an embedded part of culture and history. Digital cultural practices must also work to extend their parent disciplines, including the studio arts, media history and theory, design, computer science and engineering.

 

Each speaker in the "Computation After New Media" series will focus on one word— a single term they feel is a core part of their work within the framework of computation. These lectures will be aimed at exploring the underlying structures of computationalism, providing an important leverage into the philosophy, languages, and principles of digital media.

 

SCHEDULE:

 

- October 1: Sharon Daniel, UCSC

- October 8: Eddo Stern, UCLA

- October 22: Paul Dourish, UCI

- October 29: George Legrady, Experimental Visualization Lab, UCSB

- November 19: Casey Reas, UCLA, author, Form + Code in Design, Art, and Architecture

- December 3: Celia Pearce, Georgia Tech, author Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds

 

Design Dialogues brings provocateurs from the worlds of design, art, academia, and technology into the MDP Studio. Each term, a guest curator is invited to build a series around a theme of their choosing.

 

Meetings: 12-2 pm. Talks: 3-6 pm in the Wind Tunnel Gallery. Open only to Media Design students, alumni, and faculty.

   

October 1: Sharon Daniel

 

Sharon Daniel is Professor of Film and Digital Media at the University of California, Santa Cruz where she teaches classes in digital media theory and practice. Her research involves collaborations with local and on-line communities, which exploit information and communications technologies as new sites for "public art." Daniel’s role as an artist is that of “context provider”—assisting communities, collecting their stories, soliciting their opinions on politics and social justice, and building the online archives and interfaces that make this data available across social, cultural and economic boundaries. Her goal is to avoid representation—not to attempt to speak for others but to allow them to speak for themselves.

 

Daniel’s work has been exhibited internationally at museums, festivals including the Corcoran Biennial, the University of Paris, the Dutch Electronic Arts Festival, Ars Electronica and the Lincoln Center Festival as well as on the Internet. Her essays have been published in books and professional journals such as Leonardo and the Sarai Reader. Daniel has recently presented “Improbablevoices.net” at the Fundacion Telefonica in Buenos Aires and at the conference “contested commons” in New Delhi, India. Her current research is supported by grants from the Daniel Langlois Foundation, the UCIRA, UCSC Arts Research Institute, and the Creative Work Fund.

   

October 8: Eddo Stern

 

Eddo Stern works on the disputed borderlands between fantasy and reality, exploring the uneasy and otherwise unconscious connections between physical existence and electronic simulation. His work explores new modes of narrative and documentary, experimental computer game design, fantasies of technology and history, and cross-cultural representation in computer games, film, and online media. He works in various media including computer software, hardware and game design, kinetic sculpture, performance, and film and video production. His short machinima films include "Sheik Attack", "Vietnam Romance", "Landlord Vigilante" and "Deathstar". He is the founder of the now retired cooperative C-level where he co-produced the physical computer gaming projects "Waco Resurrection", "Tekken Torture Tournament", "Cockfight Arena", and the internet meme conference "C-level Memefest" He is currently developing the new sensory deprivation game "Darkgame". Stern's work can be seen online at www.eddostern.com/

    

October 22: Paul Dourish

 

Paul Dourish is a Professor of Informatics in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at UC Irvine, with courtesy appointments in Computer Science and Anthropology. He teaches in the Informatics program and in the interdisciplinary graduate program in Arts Computation and Engineering. His primary research interests lie at the intersection of computer science and social science; he draws liberally on material from computer science, science and technology studies, cultural studies, humanities, and social sciences in order to understand information technology as a site of social and cultural production. In 2008, he was elected to the CHI Academy in recognition of his contributions to Human-Computer Interaction.

 

Dourish is the author of "Where the Action Is: The Foundations of Embodied Interaction" (MIT Press, 2001), which explores how phenomenological accounts of action can provide an alternative to traditional cognitive analysis for understanding the embodied experience of interactive and computational systems. Before coming to UCI, he was a Senior Member of Research Staff in the Computer Science Laboratory of Xerox PARC; he has also held research positions at Apple Computer and at Rank Xerox EuroPARC. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from University College, London, and a B.Sc. (Hons) in Artificial Intelligence and Computer Science from the University of Edinburgh.

   

November 19: Casey Reas

 

Casey Reas lives and works in Los Angeles. His software, prints, and installations have been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions at museums and galleries in the United States, Europe, and Asia. Casey's ongoing Process series explores the relationship between naturally evolved systems and those that are synthetic. The imagery evokes transformation, and visualizes systems in motion and at rest. Equally embracing the qualitative human perception and the quantitative rules that define digital culture, organic form emerges from precise mechanical structures.

 

Casey is a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. He holds a masters degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Media Arts and Sciences as well as a bachelors degree from the School of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning at the University of Cincinnati. With Ben Fry, Reas initiated Processing in 2001. Processing is an open source programming language and environment for creating images, animation, and interaction.

 

Reas and Fry published Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists, a comprehensive introduction to programming within the context of visual media (MIT Press, 2007). In 2010, they publishing Getting Started with Processing, a casual introduction to programming (O'Reilly, 2010). With Chandler McWilliams and Lust, Casey has just published Form+Code in Design, Art, and Architecture (PAPress, 2010), a non-technical introduction to the history, theory, and practice of software in the arts.

 

Casey is the recipient of a 2008 Tribeca Film Institute Media Arts Fellowship (supported by the Rockefeller Foundation), a 2005 Golden Nica award from the Prix Ars Electronica, and he was included in the 2008 ArtReview Power 100. His images have been featured in various publications including The New York Times, The International Herald Tribune, Print, Eye, Technology Review, and Wired.

   

December 3: Celia Pearce

 

Celia Pearce is a game designer, author, researcher, teacher, curator and artist, specializing in multiplayer gaming and virtual worlds, independent, art, and alternative game genres, as well as games and gender. She began designing interactive attractions and exhibitions in 1983, and has held academic appointments since 1998. Her game designs include the award-winning virtual reality attraction Virtual Adventures (for Iwerks and Evans & Sutherland) and the Purple Moon Friendship Adventure Cards for Girls.

 

Celia received her Ph.D. in 2006 from SMARTLab Centre, then at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, University of the Arts London. She currently is Assistant Professor of Digital Media in the School of Literature, Communication and Culture at Georgia Tech, where she also directs the Experimental Game Lab and the Emergent Game Group. She is the author or co-author of numerous papers and book chapters, as well as The Interactive Book (Macmillan 1997) and Communities of Play: Emergent Cultures in Multiplayer Games and Virtual Worlds (MIT 2009). She has also curated new media, virtual reality, and game exhibitions and is currently Festival Chair for IndieCade, an international independent games festival and showcase series. She is a co-founder of the Ludica women’s game collective.

   

Curator: Garnet Hertz

Doctor Garnet Hertz is a Fulbright Scholar and contemporary artist whose work explores themes of technological progress, creativity, innovation and interdisciplinarity. Hertz is a Faculty Member of the Media Design Program at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena California, a Postdoctoral Research Scholar at the Institute for Software Research at UC Irvine and is Artist in Residence in the Laboratory for Ubiquitous Computing and Interaction at UC Irvine. He has shown his work at several notable international venues in eleven countries including Ars Electronica, DEAF and SIGGRAPH and was awarded the prestigious 2008 Oscar Signorini Award in robotic art. He is founder and director of Dorkbot SoCal, a monthly Los Angeles-based DIY lecture series on electronic art and design. His research is widely cited in academic publications, and popular press on his work has disseminated through 25 countries including The New York Times, Wired, The Washington Post, NPR, USA Today, NBC, CBS, TV Tokyo and CNN Headline News.

El Campo de Cebada is both a physical and a virtual space, an open source square in the center of Madrid. It started off as a citizen initiative to a situation generated by the worlds and a deeper Spanish recession. It’s co-managed by the neighbors and the local administration with dynamic and open tools to “save” the traditional understanding gap that there is normally between them. El Campo de Cebada received the Golden Nica of Prix Ars Electronica 2013 in the category Digital Communities.

  

credit: El Campo de Cebada

 

elcampodecebada.org/

  

The "reactable" is an intelligent musical instrument specially conceived for multi-user

performances. There’s room for several players at this round table; visible on its surface are geometric figures, each of which symbolizes a specific sound. Moving the figures back

and forth, rotating or interlinking them modifies the sounds they produce. With its highly intuitive, user-friendly interface, the reactable can be played by anyone—from little kids to professional musicians. But this is not just some music-making toy; the reactable is a genuine instrument and, accordingly, it takes some practice to get the most out of it.

Proof of this was recently provided by Scandinavian artist Björk, who used one on her latest world tour.

 

credit: Jordà, Geiger, Kaltenbrunner, Alonso / Music Technology Group

Artist Maja Smrekar (SI) holding the Golden Nica.

 

credit: tom mesic

Photo showing the Golden Nica Awards at Ars Electronica Gala at Brucknerhaus.

 

credit: tom mesic

Photo showing Gabriel Radwan (AT) the winner of this year’s Golden Nica in the Prix Ars Electronica’s u19 – CREATE YOUR WORLD category

 

credit: Florian Voggeneder

Photo showing David OReilly (IE) (Golden Nica for the project Everything) during Prix Forum I – Computer Animation/Film/VFX

at Central Linz.

 

credit: Florian Voggeneder

Dominik Koller created a drumset that interactively produces visuals. For this work, he received the Golden Nica in the u19 - CREATE YOUR WORLD category at the Prix Ars Electronica 2013.

 

credit: Dominik Koller

 

Photo showing The Golden Nicas and the STARTS Prize trophies of Ars Electronica 2018.

 

Credit: tom mesic

Photo showing the winners of the Golden Nica in the category u19 - CREATE YOUR WORLD. Martin Hatler, Vincent Thierry, Samuel Stallybrass and Lorenz Gonsa. They received their award for their video game "Levers & Buttons".

 

Credit: vog.photo

"TORSO #1" is a sound sculpture that is visually reminiscent of a "Klopotec", a windmill-like scarecrow. Like the wings of a windmill, four 100V loudspeakers rotate and generate sound signals plus feedback in the room. Static microphones simultaneously transmit the movement of the sculpture via a quadraphonic PA system. The sound movements can be perceived both horizontally and vertically, creating a completely unorthodox listening experience. All sounds are specially designed for this unique system and maximize its psychoacoustic effect.

 

Credit: Igor Ripak

Source: networkedpublics.org/locative_media/beyond_locative_media

 

Beyond Locative Media

 

by Marc Tuters and Kazys Varnelis

 

Abstract

 

Locative media has been attacked for being too eager to appeal to commercial interests as well as for its reliance on Cartesian mapping systems, yet if these critiques are well-founded, they are also nostalgic, invoking a notion of art as autonomous from the circuits of mass communication technologies, which we argue no longer holds. This essay begins with a survey of the development of locative media, how it has distanced itself from net art, and how it has been critically received before going on to address these critiques and ponder how the field might develop.

 

At the 2004 Transmediale festival in Berlin, a locative media project titled .walk (dot-walk) received an honorable mention in the prestigious festival's Software Award. Developed by Utrecht-based arts collective Social Fiction, .walk combined computer code and "psychogeographic" urban exploration. Participants of .walk left the doors of the gallery to follow a randomly generated path through the city, thereby, according to Social Fiction, "calculating" the city as though it were a "peripatetic computer." The success of this simple project is representative of a larger event taking place in the media art world, in which, having left behind net art, locative media escaped the bounds of the screen to enter the city at large.

 

Locative media emerged over the last half decade as a response to the decorporealized, screen-based experience of net art, claiming the world beyond either gallery or computer screen as its territory. Initially coined as a title for a workshop hosted by RIXC, an electronic art and media center in Latvia during 2002, the term is derived from the "locative" noun case in the Latvian language which indicates location and vaguely corresponds to the English prepositions "in", "on", "at", and "by." A report produced during the workshop outlined the scope for locative media: "Inexpensive receivers for global positioning satellites have given amateurs the means to produce their own cartographic information with military precision... As opposed to the World Wide Web the focus here is spatially localized, and centred on the individual user; a collaborative cartography of space and mind, places and the connections between them." In what is in many ways the ur-text for locative media, the 1999 Headmap Manifesto, Ben Russell described an incipient "new world":

 

location aware, networked, mobile devices make possible invisible notes attached to spaces, places, people and things.

 

[...]

 

computer games move outside and get subversive.

 

Sex and even love are easier to find.

 

Real space can be marked and demarcated invisibly.

 

”¦what was once the sole preserve of builders, architects and engineers falls into the hands of everyone: the ability to shape and organise the real world and the real space.

 

Real borders, boundaries and space become plastic and maleable [sic], statehood becomes fragmented and global.

 

Geography gets interesting.

 

Cell phones become internet enabled and location aware, everything in the real world gets tracked, tagged, barcoded and mapped.

 

Overlaying everything is a whole new invisible layer of annotation. Textual, visual and audible information is available as you get close, as context dictates, or when you ask.

 

The related free networks movement is similarly interventionist. Here any distinction between artist and hacker disappears in an attempt to create wireless networks that would provide free connectivity while also eluding both government surveillance and commercial control on the Internet. Emerging out of a Do-It-Yourself punk culture, projects like the London-based "Consume the Net" sought to build a nation-wide peer-to-peer infrastructure of free wireless nodes throughout the United Kingdom. Similar grassroots projects helped catalyze communities of artists globally from Berlin to San Francisco. In suggesting that ubiquitous Internet access would change our relationship with place by overlaying a second virtual world over the physical one, the free wireless movement was a seminal source for locative media's ambitions. Moreover, in the United Kingdom, the government's ownership of virtually all geographic data encouraged participants in free wireless, who sought to make information freely accessible, to move into more mapping-based practices when these became available. It was in this context that much of the initial locative media work emerged. Since its inception, then, locative media's practitioners have claimed an avant-garde position, insisting that their work is capable of not only creating a paradigmatic shift in the art world, but also that it can reconfigure our everyday life as well by renewing our sense of place in the world.

 

Locative media's recent rise to prominence came at an opportune moment, just as the net art movement showed signs of exhaustion. On March 31, 2004, in response to the disappearance of an "Internet Art" section from that year's Whitney Bienniel, Ben Sisario, an art critic for the New York Times, declared that having lost its initial novelty, the net art boom had come to an end. Net art would continue, he concluded, but its earlier sense of purpose or distinctiveness was gone.[1] In response to Sisario's article, net art practitioner Patrick Litchy observed, "this is not to say that net art is 'dead' per se, but at least in institutional discourse it has been chiseled into art history and so has been drained of its dynamism." Only if net art could "morph into hybrid forms" he suggested, could it still retain its oppositionality. During the last two years, a new set of practices which Turbulence.org director Jo-Anne Green collectively refers to as "Networked Performance"—among which locative media is a key player—has come to displace the hegemony of net art within media art circles, with the term "locative media" now becoming common currency in art establishment venues such as ArtForum. In 2004, Leonardo Electronic Almanac would recognize locative media's rise with a call for papers. In December 2005, Rhizome.org editor and curator-at-large Marisa Olson proposed that the long-established "Net Art News" mailing list be renamed to "Media Art News" to encompass "software art, performance, sound art, data visualization, technology-enabled social sculpture, locative media, video, and the myriad other branches of new media practice."

 

Where net art sought to maintain its autonomy in order to claim art status, locative media has been far less interested in this such claims. On the contrary, as Saul Albert observes, the fundamental manifestations of locative media—maps—and the typical site—the handheld PDA—are ubiquitous and easily understood. In reaching beyond art, locative media has been welcomed with often remarkable claims, in particular by computer industry pundits suggesting that it will be "the Next Big Thing." Mike Liebhold of the Institute for the Future (IFF) understands "geohackers, locative media artists, and psychogeographers" as key players in constructing the "geospatial web," in which the web becomes tagged with geospatial information, a development that he sees as having "enormous unharvested business opportunities." Even more emphatically, in another essay in Leonardo, Anthony Townsend, who works with Liebhold at the IFF and was formerly one of the most outspoken advocates of the free wireless movement, states: "[The IFF's] forecast for the next decade is that this context-aware computing will emerge as the third great wave of modern digital technology."[2] While it is important not to overstate locative media's influence in the geospatial web, the fact remains that the IFF and others look to locative media artists as prime movers within this space.

 

Nor is this lost on locative media practitioners. Net art often promoted its uselessness as a means of affirming its own autonomy as art, but the practitioners of Locative Media often seem less preoccupied with these concerns and indeed often embrace the possibility of commercial application. And if some net art projects such as Carnivore by Alex Galloway claimed autonomy through oppositionality and resistance by developing a radical political stance against the libertarian-entrepreneurial "California Ideology" that, spread eagerly by Wired Magazine, so dominated the discourse on the Internet in the 90's, it appears that for the moment a fair number of locative media producers seems content to collaborate with industry and government. Unlike net art, which largely sought to emphasize its autonomy from the dot.com boom, this new media art practice is often eager to blur distinctions between art and capital. It is no coincidence that one of the most important media art blogs today goes by the name "We Make Money Not Art."

 

Broadly speaking, locative media projects can be categorized under one of two types of mapping, either annotative—virtually tagging the world—or phenomenological—tracing the action of the subject in the world. Roughly, these two types of locative media—annotative and tracing—correspond to two archetypal poles winding their way through late 20th century art, critical art and phenomenology, perhaps otherwise figured as the twin Situationist practices of détournement and the dérive. Annotative projects generally seek to change the world by adding data to it, much as the practice of détournement suggested. The paradigmatic annotative work is the Urban Tapestries project by Proboscis In a series of trials in 2003 and 2004, participants used Global Positioning System (GPS) enabled 3G mobile phones and handheld PDAs to annotate areas of London, thereby embedding social knowledge in the landscape of the city for others to retrieve later. In their project 34n 118w, Jeffrey Knowlton, Naomi Spellman, and Jeremy Hight had users take Tablet PCs with Global Positioning Devices and headphones to a vacant lot in downtown Los Angeles adjacent to an old railroad depot now used as an architecture school. As participants walked around the site, they would hear fictional statements purporting to recount the history of the place played back to them. The result, Hight claims, "creates a sense that every space is agitated (alive with unseen history, stories, layers)." Similarly, in adopting the mapping-while-wandering tactics of the dérive, tracing-based locative media suggest that we can re-embody ourselves in the world, thereby escaping the prevailing sense that our experience of place is disappearing in late capitalist society. For examples of this type of work we might look to Christian Nold's 2002 Crowd Compiler. Here the artist generates time-lapse images of crowds in public space to understand the movement of all the individuals in one place over time simultaneously. More typically, these projects resort to the map, using high technology to reproduce the famous diagram created for urban sociologist Paul-Henry Chombart de Lauwe to trace the daily movements of a young woman living in the XVIe arrondissement of Paris over the course of one year, a map of great importance to the Situationists. Where annotative projects seek to demystify, tracing-based projects typically seek to use high technology to stimulate dying everyday practices such as walking or occupying public space. In this spirit, Jo Walsh and Schulyer Erle's London Free Map marks the paths of participants in the street through paths downloaded from GPS units, thereby locating participants in the world while also producing copyright-free maps of London. .walk, which we cited earlier, is another such project, seeking to get people out of the gallery or conference room and into the streets in order to create a "generative psychogeography."

 

Social Fiction's invocation of "generative psychogeography" is no accident. Situationism is frequently claimed as a precursor to the locative media movement. That said, it is worth observing that over time Situationism increasingly turned to code. Situationist leader Guy Debord steadily whittled away at art practices, finally leaving the movement as a series of programmatic texts that advocated intervening in the city with only minor modifications, such as adding light switches to street lights so that they could be turned on and off at will and allowing people to wander in subways after they were shut off at night or even abandoning that degree of interventionism and simply turning to a ceaseless repetition of the dérive.[3] Locative media, too, is virtually unthinkable except as a question of code. The .walk project represents this reliance on code, turning individuals into processors. Virtually all locative media projects rely on programs for their execution. The resulting product is generally either delivered live to a user in the field who then performs the piece or, alternatively, crystallized as an indexical trace of the event, later displayed at a gallery or on a web site. But if the work itself resides in the pure code itself, what is the difference between locative media and software development?

 

This is a central question for locative media today, as it is for many contemporary artists today who are using research and development, or at least research, as models. Raised on a steady diet of institutional critique, this generation sees art’s purview as transdisciplinary and eagerly pursues projects that could be classified as research (Center for Land Use Interpretation or Multiplicity) or design and development (Andrea Zittel or Jorge Pardo). In the case of locative media, this means that artists adopt the model of research and development wholesale, looking for corporate sponsorship or even ventura capital. Proboscis, for example received sponsorship from Orange, a 3G cellular network, computer hardware manufacturer Hewlett-Packard and had proprietary geodata donated to it by the Ordnance Survey for their Urban Tapestries project. Blast Theory, a locative media group composed of several London-based avant-garde theatre artists have gained renown for projects such as Can You See Me Now (2001), Uncle Roy All Around You (2003), and I Like Frank (2004), in which they used location-aware mobile mapping devices to coordinate interactions of audience and performers in both real and virtual space. Their performances and installations have been supported throught corporate sponsorship, public arts funding, and through a six-year collaboration with the Mixed Reality Laboratory at the University of Nottingham. The group's own web site claims "Blast Theory has a history of working with corporate clients to deliver innovative marketing strategies," thereby creating "commercial projects that draw global audiences to compelling, high adrenaline interactive experiences. The team of artists and scientists has worked with blue chip clients in the television, apparel and telecoms sectors to launch products, build profile, inspire staff and engage customers." Anthropologist Anne Galloway, who studied Urban Tapestries for her dissertation, has critiqued this model of hybrid arts/researcher and community organizing for not yet having developed a mature sense of accountability, professionalism and ethics.[4]

 

The reluctance of many locative media practitioners to position their work as political has led some theorists such as Andreas Broekman (director of the Transmediale Festival in Berlin) to accuse locative media of being the "avant-garde of the 'society of control'," referring to Gilles Deleuze's description of the contemporary regime of power. Broekman suggests that since locative media is fundamentally based on the appropriation of technologies of surveillance and control, its practitioners have a duty to address that fact in that their work. Instead, however, Geert Lovink claims that the movement has turned the media art conference circuit into a "shopping-driven locative spectacle." Media artist Coco Fusco also launched a headlong attack on new media practices associated with networks and mapping, declaring: "It is as if more than four decades of postmodern critique of the Cartesian subject had suddenly evaporated." Fusco minced few words: "In the name of a politics of global connectedness, artists and activists too often substitute an abstract 'connectedness' for any real engagement with people in other places or even in their own locale." Instead, she suggested a return to the kind of art practices made famous at the 1993 Whitney Biennial: "Socially conscious artists and activists, rather than embracing tactics that rely on dreams of omniscience, would do well to examine the history of globalism, networks, dissent and collective actions in order to understand that they are rooted in the geopolitical and cultural margins." Artist-theorist Jordan Crandall would similarly indict the locative project for enslaving us to a new Cartesianism, condemning the "resurgence of temporal and locational specificity witnessed in new surveillance and location-aware navigational technologies." In "Drifting Through the Grid: Psychogeography and Imperial Infrastructure," Brain Holmes discusses locative media's recuperation of Situationism, stating "All too often in contemporary society, aesthetics is politics as decor... the aesthetic form of the dérive is everywhere. But so is the hyper-rationalist grid of Imperial infrastructure. And the questions of social subversion and psychic deconditioning are wide open, unanswered, seemingly lost to our minds, in an era when civil society has been integrated to the military architecture of digital media." According to Holmes, since the United States Army controls GPS satellites, in using them we allow ourselves to be targeted by a global military infrastructure and to be "interpellated into Imperial ideology." These critiques are well-founded, but their antagonist tenor often seems to be an inversion of the boosterist claims made in favor of locative media. There's something peculiar, even comical, in how the movement is, on the one hand "the Next Big Thing" to some, a capitalist apocalypse to others.

 

But perhaps this shouldn't be so surprising. In "Postmodernism, or the Logic of Late Capitalism," Fredric Jameson, writing of Vincent Van Gogh's painting of peasant shoes, notes how the work simultaneously represents the peasant's brutal world of labor and toil while creating a Utopian gesture, an "act of compensation" through the "glorious materialization of pure colour in oil paint." But so much is a redemptive re-reading of Herbert Marcuse's writings on the affirmative nature of art.[5] What makes Jameson's observation important is a third, darker side, this "whole new Utopian realm of the senses" becomes "part of some new division of labour in the body of capital, some new fragmentation of the emergent sensorium which replicates the specializations and divisions of capitalist life at the same time that it seeks in precisely such fragmentation a desperate Utopian compensation for them. The artist's role is only temporary then, and already flawed from the start. But even if Jameson suggests that the process of absorption is inescapable, he also vehemently rejects any suggestion that we should abandon art. In the world of late capital, Jameson argues, the drive to envision Utopia is still important and, above all, the task of cognitive mapping one's place in postmodern hyperspace is crucial, a claim that locative media has certainly embraced. Deleuze, too, agrees, writing expressly of the society of control: "There is no need to fear or hope, but only to look for new weapons."

 

We suggest that locative media offers a conceptual framework by which to examine the certain technological assemblages and their potential social impacts. Unlike net art, produced by a priestly technological class for an elite arts audience, locative media strives, at least rhetorically, to reach a mass audience by attempting to engage consumer technologies, and redirect their power. Today, this is more important than ever. According to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), we are entering into a society of ubiquitous networked objects. Soon, the ITU observes, objects will be the most prevalent users of the Internet, relentlessly communicating various kinds of data to each other like some flock of Hasbro "emoto-tronic" Furby dolls. What does this turn to what the ITU calls the "Internet of Things" mean, though? Bruno Latour suggests that things are a focus for our time, in particular, a focus that demands the attention of the arts: "'Things' are controversial assemblages of entangled issues, and not simply objects sitting apart from our political passions. The entanglements of things and politics engage activists, artists, politicians, and intellectuals. To assemble this parliament, rhetoric is not enough and nor is eloquence; it requires the use of all the technologies—especially information technology—and the possibility for the arts to re-present anew what are the common stakes."

 

We can get a sense of what Latour means by this by looking at "MILK," a project by Ieva Auzina and Esther Polak exhibited by Latour in his "Making Things Public" exhibit at ZKM that also won the 2005 Golden Nica at Ars Electronica. The work of a group of Latvian locative media artists, MILK is clearly indebted to more traditional aspects of the movement in that it uses GPS trace-routes. But instead of seeking a phenomenological regrounding of the self, the MILK team traced the path of milk from its origins in the udder of a cow in rural Latvia to a cheese vendor in the Netherlands. To be sure, this project is still more suggestive than fully realized: MILK's artists are not terribly interested in Latour's reading and instead see their work more as a form of romantic landscape art. Nevertheless, MILK suggests a powerful vision of how locative technologies could allow one to more fully understand how products are commodified and distributed through the actions of global trade, thereby making visible the networked society. Here Fusco's anti-mapping diatribe runs aground, for when tied to a materialist vision, the recent turn to maps is among the strongest critiques of globalization available to us. Recognizing this, philosopher Alain Badiou referred to the maps of power drawn by artist Mark Lombardi as "the creation of a new possibility of art and a new vision of the world."

 

In his book Shaping Things, Bruce Sterling suggests that we détourne the Internet of Things itself to become more fully aware of the ecological role of objects in the world. Sterling coins the neologism "Spimes" to refer to future objects that could be aware of their context and transmit "cradle-to-grave" information about where they have been, where they are and where they are going. Cory Doctorow has called Spimes "the hactivist's ultimate tool—an evidentiary rallying point for making the negative outcomes of industrial practices visible and obvious so that we can redress them.] Similarly, even if it is not so much locative as suggestive of such practices, Natalie Jeremijenko's How Stuff Is Made project is something of a response to Sterling and Latour's theories, comprising a visual encyclopedia of photoessays produced by engineering and design students that to document how objects are manufactured and investigates both the labor conditions of that manufacture and its environmental impact.

 

By geotagging objects instead of people, and having these objects tell us their stories, we might finally realize a thought experiment expressed by Jean-Jacques Rousseau at the very dawn of industrialization. In Émile, his book on the ideal education of a child, Rousseau wrote of "A problem which another child would never heed [that] would torment Émile half a year." Émile and his instructor would go to an elegant dinner hosted by wealthy people where the two are dazzled by the many guests, servants, dishes, and elegant china. In Émile’s ear the instructor whispers "How many hands do you suppose the things on this table passed through before they got here?" The virus or the Trojan horse, is successfully implanted in the child’s mind and the result is a crisis:

 

In a moment the mists of excitement have rolled away. He is thinking, considering, calculating, and anxious. The child is philosophizing, while philosophers, excited by wine or perhaps by female society are babbling like children. If he asks questions I decline to answer and put him off to another day. He becomes impatient, he forgets to eat and drink, he longs to get away from table and talk as he pleases. What an object of curiosity, what a text for instruction. Nothing has so far succeeded in corrupting his healthy reason; what will he think of luxury when he finds that every quarter of the globe has been ransacked, that some 2,000,000 men have laboured for years, that many lives have perhaps been sacrificed, and all to furnish him with fine clothes to be worn at midday and laid by in the wardrobe at night.[6]

 

In other words, we suggest applying the strategies of locative media to create what Rousseau suggested, an awareness of the genealogy of an object as it is embedded in the matrix of its production. This genealogical vision would embody an awareness of the history that Walter Benjamin reminds us is always there, no matter how suppressed:

 

[T]he cultural heritage we survey has an origin that we cannot contemplate without horror: it owes its existence not merely to the effort of great geniuses who created it, but to the anonymous toil of their contemporaries. There is not a single artifact of culture that is not simultaneously an artifact of barbarism. And just as no artifact is free of barbarism, so too the process of its reception, by means of which it has been passed on from one recipient to the next, is equally fettered.[7]

 

If Spimes and their kin make it possible for us to envision new forms of cognitive mapping, we need to guard against using that mapping to only place ourselves, thereby reducing objects to a subservient position in regard to humans. After all, the ITU's prediction of tens of billions of objects connected to the Internet leaves human users as a distinct second. Here, it may be worthwhile revisiting our standard theoretical frames for interpreting technological fetishism. If Marx considered the object as the result of alienation of the product from its production and, by extension, its origins, Freud understood it as symbolic replacement for an irrecoverable object lost in a primordial trauma. For both Marx and Freud, the aliveness of objects is nothing more than an illusion, object fetishism merely a substitute to avoid. But, as Steven Shaviro notes, the fetish object is always more powerful than what it is thought to stand in for [49]. As an art practice, to date, locative media seems fundamentally tied to discourses of representation centered on a human subject, privileging the experience of the human in space (tracing) and time (annotative). To turn Fusco's argument on its head: in both locative media and much of the criticism launched agains the movement, it is as if more than four decades of postmodern critique of the humanist subject had suddenly evaporated. Even MILK's project is not about milk, but rather about the people involved in the production and distribution of milk as it transforms from Latvian biological fluid to Dutch product.

 

In contrast, Sterling provides us with a darker, more idiosyncratic vision. Humans don't control Sterling's world of Spimes. On the contrary, it is an unruly object world in which people are, at best, "spime wranglers." At the dawn of the Internet of Things we have to wonder if we aren't entering a world in which the object becomes sentient, thereby finally liberating itself from human bondage. If, in the Enlightenment, we learned that nature—in its role as background to human activity—had been replaced by human second nature, then today we are perhaps at the threshold of a machinic third nature. It is the task of whatever remains of art after the locative turn to get involved in the messy business of this new world of objects, even if the Utopian and critical moments that can emerge as a result are only temporary and contingent.

 

References

 

[1] Ben Sisario, "Internet Art Survives, But the Boom Is Over," The New York Times, March 31, 2004, Section G, p. 11.

 

[2] Anthony Townsend, "Locative Media Artists in the Contested-Aware City", forthcoming essay, Leonardo, Fall 2006.

 

[3] Simon Sadler, The Situationist City, (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1998).

 

[4] Anne Galloway, in presentation at the PLAN (Pervasive Locative Arts Network) event at the ICA, February 1st 2004.

 

[5] Herbert Marcuse, "The Affirmative Character of Culture," Negations: Essays in Critical Theory (Boston: Beacon, 1968), 88-133.

 

[6] Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Émile, (New York: Dutton, 1974), 127.

 

[7] Walter Benjamin, "Theses on the Philosophy of History," Illuminations. Essays and Reflections, (New York: Schocken Books, 1969), 256. Modified translation used from Geoffrey Waite, "Truckin’ Under a Pink Sky, Seeing Red," Human Rights/Human Wrongs, ed. Robert Hobbs and Frederick Woodard. (Iowa City: Museum of Art, University of Iowa, 1986), 72.

Leonardo accompanies and supports artists, scientists, researchers, theoreticians and practitioners who, in turn, have made their marks on the Leonardo Network, forming it and constantly modifying it further. The Leonardo communities was singled out Leonardo is being singled out for recognition with a Golden Nica by the Prix Ars Electronica.

 

Fotocredit: Ars Electronica / Robert Bauernhansl

Photo showing an impression of the Golden Nicas awarded at the Prix Ars Electronica Gala 2014 at Brucknerhaus.

 

credit: Florian Voggeneder

With Paolo Cirio (IT/US) (Loophole for All / Golden Nica),

Matthew Plummer-Fernandez (UK) (Disarming Corruptor / Award of Distinction) and

Jacob Tonski (US) (Balance From Within / Award of Distinction)

moderated by: Irini Papadimitriou (GR/UK) (Jury member).

 

Credit: tom mesic

A tremendous number of discussion domains—chats, message boards, forums—have spun off from the possibilities afforded by online communication. These spaces are indeed public, but the user cannot experience the communication sensorially. “Listening Post” now fills this gap. Every message that appears in this installation was written somewhere in the Web just seconds before. After passing through a variety of filtering mechanisms, visible and audible reflections of this global communication appear on 231 text displays and a sound system. The irregular staccato of the messages forms the installation’s optical and acoustic rhythm.

 

"Listening Post" is a work by Mark Hansen and Ben Rubin (USA)

 

credit: rubra

Photo showing an impression of the Golden Nicas at the Prix Ars Electronica Award 2014 at Brucknerhaus.

 

Credit: tom mesic

An evening totally dedicated to the artists themselves. The 2010 Ars Electronica gala featuring the presentation of the Golden Nicas to the Prix Ars Electronica prizewinners is one of the Festival’s highlights.

 

Chaos Computer Club

Golden Nica Digital Communities.

 

Photo shows: (from left to right) Michael Krammer (Orange), Tim Pritlove (DE)

 

credit: rubra

Levers & Buttons is a video game, more precisely an asymmetrical, cooperative VR puzzle for two players. One player controls a character in two-dimensional space, the other acts in virtual reality. Both are stationed on a spaceship that has caught fire and is to be protected from burning out. The player in virtual reality has to solve puzzles to extinguish the fire and is supported by his/her fellow player. Everything in the game revolves around communication between the players. Levers and Buttons is equally suitable for inexperienced and experienced VR users. The game was awarded at the 2018 Prix Ars Electronica with a Golden Nica in the category u19 - CREATE YOUR WORLD.

 

Photo showing, from left to right:

Marion Friedl (u19 - CREATE YOUR WORLD), Lorenz Gonsa, Martin Hatler, Vincent Thierry, Samuel Stallybrass / Five Hours of Sleep

 

Fotocredit: Ars Electronica / Robert Bauernhansl

www.designandenvironment.co.uk/2011/02/crowd-sourcing-env...

 

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“Crowd-sourcing Environmental Governance” workshop by Cesar Harada & Shannon Dosemagen.

2011 March 8 & 10, Design & Environment, Goldsmiths University of London.

 

Hello! Here is Cesar Harada and Shannon Dosemagen writing from the Gulf of Mexico, USA. We are thrilled to announce the upcoming hands-on workshop we’ll be having together in London : Come! And let’s ignite the discussion here.

 

ABSTRACT : Problem, Questions, Objectives

Each of us is not only witnessing, but actively participating in the degradation of our environment, our only life support system. The symptoms range from climate change, man made catastrophes, resource wars, resulting environmental refugees, etc. We are lacking a powerful environmental authority, a court of justice, and coordination in general. We have amazing earth science but poor individual education, international collateral treaties but no capacity to reinforce them. Governments and institutions are powerless to mitigate such complex and border-less issues. Can the solution emerge from the civil society? Can the people re-invent environmental governance with new technologies, collaborative medias, crowd sourcing, and mobile technologies? Do we need a central authority or can we generate decentralized, local, humble, bottom-up solutions? Can we design alternative services, products, technologies, infrastructures and behaviors as the new form of environmentalism. How can we go beyond activism and sustain long term positive change – what is your strategy?

 

WORKSHOP

Social Geometry, Architecture of play, Natural or Man-made Catastrophe, Humanitarian response to crisis, Crowd sourcing Environmental Governance. During 2 days, 10 students will be supervised by Cesar Harada (France – Japan) and Shannon Dosemagen (USA) at the Design & Environment department at the Goldsmith University, London. During the first half, they will experiment with social networks and how they can generate an operational organization and architecture. The students will be introduced to existing forms of environmental governance and cutting edge design and activism. During the second half, groups of students will elaborate their own designs in the area of their interest. Workshop leaders will help them model-building ideas that are creative, local, replicable and scalable. The workshop is aimed at starting a discussion, to encourage the students to take action in the “real world” and have short-term local experiments to learn from.

 

THE PEOPLE : Students, Workshop leaders

The workshop for the Design & Environment students from Goldsmiths University will require the students to venture their thinking into diverse fields : architecture, law, economy, politics, environmental engineering, anthropology, computer science, social media etc. The groups projects are expected to be diverse and exploratory. Cesar Harada has a background in Design Interactions at the Royal College of Art, won the Ars Electronica Golden Nica [NEXT IDEA] with the Open_Sailing project, worked as project leader and researcher at MIT, and is coordinating the making of the WEA (World Environment Action) website started in *iHub_ Nairobi, Kenya. Cesar is currently coordinating the development of Protei : an oil cleaning open hardware robot.

 

Shannon Dosemagen has a background in Anthropology from the University of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Shannon is the coordinator of the Oil Spill Map at LA Bucket Brigade, mapping the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico, using Ushahidi, a software allowing people to report by SMS, twitter, mail, on the acclaimed website oilspill.labucketbrigade.org. Shannon has also been piloting the aerial mapping of the Oil Spill by communities as part of the Public Laboratory group. Shannon has extensive community, field and teaching experience, interested in social implications of environmental events, and environmental refugees in particular.

 

DAY 1 : March 8th

Morning : Oil Spill mapping, World Environmental Action. Environmental governance and cutting edge activism. Groups brainstorming.

Afternoon : Social networks and Architecture of Play (choreography, construction)

 

DAY 2 : March 10th

Morning : Design. Theory in practice.

Afternoon : Thinking by doing.

Evening : Presentation of project ideas.

 

Discussion

We would like to start asking questions to open up the discussion, please comment below and ask more questions – we’ll answer in line :)

1>> When you think about environmentalism, what comes first to your mind? Is it the little actions like recycling / the activist social group / the green ‘leaders’ / green designs and brands / the materials we use / scientific research / global warming / your own body / your children / the philosophical current / something else? Which action has the strongest and longest lasting impact? Can you make a personal numbered list below here, in the comments?

 

2>> When you think about environmental politics, what comes first to your mind? How do you feel about the current relation between the environment and politics today? How does it affect the majority of peoples life?

 

3>> As a designer what do you think is your role about environmental issues?

 

Feel free to contact us before and after the workshop : contact {at} cesarharada {dot} com _ shannon {at} publiclaboratory {dot} org. Looking forward to meet you all! Cesar and Shannon.

www.designandenvironment.co.uk/2011/02/crowd-sourcing-env...

 

Close

“Crowd-sourcing Environmental Governance” workshop by Cesar Harada & Shannon Dosemagen.

2011 March 8 & 10, Design & Environment, Goldsmiths University of London.

 

Hello! Here is Cesar Harada and Shannon Dosemagen writing from the Gulf of Mexico, USA. We are thrilled to announce the upcoming hands-on workshop we’ll be having together in London : Come! And let’s ignite the discussion here.

 

ABSTRACT : Problem, Questions, Objectives

Each of us is not only witnessing, but actively participating in the degradation of our environment, our only life support system. The symptoms range from climate change, man made catastrophes, resource wars, resulting environmental refugees, etc. We are lacking a powerful environmental authority, a court of justice, and coordination in general. We have amazing earth science but poor individual education, international collateral treaties but no capacity to reinforce them. Governments and institutions are powerless to mitigate such complex and border-less issues. Can the solution emerge from the civil society? Can the people re-invent environmental governance with new technologies, collaborative medias, crowd sourcing, and mobile technologies? Do we need a central authority or can we generate decentralized, local, humble, bottom-up solutions? Can we design alternative services, products, technologies, infrastructures and behaviors as the new form of environmentalism. How can we go beyond activism and sustain long term positive change – what is your strategy?

 

WORKSHOP

Social Geometry, Architecture of play, Natural or Man-made Catastrophe, Humanitarian response to crisis, Crowd sourcing Environmental Governance. During 2 days, 10 students will be supervised by Cesar Harada (France – Japan) and Shannon Dosemagen (USA) at the Design & Environment department at the Goldsmith University, London. During the first half, they will experiment with social networks and how they can generate an operational organization and architecture. The students will be introduced to existing forms of environmental governance and cutting edge design and activism. During the second half, groups of students will elaborate their own designs in the area of their interest. Workshop leaders will help them model-building ideas that are creative, local, replicable and scalable. The workshop is aimed at starting a discussion, to encourage the students to take action in the “real world” and have short-term local experiments to learn from.

 

THE PEOPLE : Students, Workshop leaders

The workshop for the Design & Environment students from Goldsmiths University will require the students to venture their thinking into diverse fields : architecture, law, economy, politics, environmental engineering, anthropology, computer science, social media etc. The groups projects are expected to be diverse and exploratory. Cesar Harada has a background in Design Interactions at the Royal College of Art, won the Ars Electronica Golden Nica [NEXT IDEA] with the Open_Sailing project, worked as project leader and researcher at MIT, and is coordinating the making of the WEA (World Environment Action) website started in *iHub_ Nairobi, Kenya. Cesar is currently coordinating the development of Protei : an oil cleaning open hardware robot.

 

Shannon Dosemagen has a background in Anthropology from the University of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Shannon is the coordinator of the Oil Spill Map at LA Bucket Brigade, mapping the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico, using Ushahidi, a software allowing people to report by SMS, twitter, mail, on the acclaimed website oilspill.labucketbrigade.org. Shannon has also been piloting the aerial mapping of the Oil Spill by communities as part of the Public Laboratory group. Shannon has extensive community, field and teaching experience, interested in social implications of environmental events, and environmental refugees in particular.

 

DAY 1 : March 8th

Morning : Oil Spill mapping, World Environmental Action. Environmental governance and cutting edge activism. Groups brainstorming.

Afternoon : Social networks and Architecture of Play (choreography, construction)

 

DAY 2 : March 10th

Morning : Design. Theory in practice.

Afternoon : Thinking by doing.

Evening : Presentation of project ideas.

 

Discussion

We would like to start asking questions to open up the discussion, please comment below and ask more questions – we’ll answer in line :)

1>> When you think about environmentalism, what comes first to your mind? Is it the little actions like recycling / the activist social group / the green ‘leaders’ / green designs and brands / the materials we use / scientific research / global warming / your own body / your children / the philosophical current / something else? Which action has the strongest and longest lasting impact? Can you make a personal numbered list below here, in the comments?

 

2>> When you think about environmental politics, what comes first to your mind? How do you feel about the current relation between the environment and politics today? How does it affect the majority of peoples life?

 

3>> As a designer what do you think is your role about environmental issues?

 

Feel free to contact us before and after the workshop : contact {at} cesarharada {dot} com _ shannon {at} publiclaboratory {dot} org. Looking forward to meet you all! Cesar and Shannon.

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