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This Gloster Gladiator, K7985/G-AMRK, was the last Gladiator built in 1937 (assembled 1938) and is the last flying example in the world. It now flies in the 1937 markings of 73 squadron which it took on in 2007. It came to the Shuttleworth Collection at Old Warden, Bedfordshire in 1960. May 2011

Gloster Meteor Prototype_Royal Air Force Museum_Hendon_London_GB

Classic Air Force's Gloster Meteor T.7 WA591 displaying at RAF Fairford, July 2013

  

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Gloster Gladiator and Hawker Sea Hurricane.

Aircraft taken at Shuttleworth,background Faifield church kent,pilot taken at Duxford.Photoshop and nik efex used.

This Gloster Gladiator, K7985/G-AMRK, was the last Gladiator built in 1937 (assembled 1938) and is the last flying example in the world. It now flies in the 1937 markings of 73 squadron which it took on in 2007. It came to the Shuttleworth Collection at Old Warden, Bedfordshire in 1960. May 2011

Gloster Meteor on display at IWM Duxford.

One of the first jets to take to the skies. This preserved example roars over the Dawlish coast. Taken from Holcombe hill

Gloster's finest - the Meteor, Britain's first operational jet fighter, WA591 wheels around the skies at Dunsfold.

 

Please do press the L key to see her on black

It really did get that dark and gloomy.

Gloster's finest - the Meteor, Britain's first operational jet fighter, WA591 wheels around the skies at Dunsfold.

 

Please do press the L key to see her on black

Evening Air Show at Shuttleworth

On display at Newark Air Museum

The Gloster Gladiator (or Gloster SS.37) was a British-built biplane fighter, used by the RAF and Royal Navy as well as a number of other air forces during the late 1930s. It was the RAF's last biplane fighter (and the first with an enclosed cockpit!) and was often pitted against more formidable foes during the early days of the WWII, although it acquitted itself well in combat.

 

It first flew in 1934 and entered service in 1937. It had a top speed of around 257 mph yet even as it was introduced, the design was being eclipsed by the new generation of monoplane fighters, such as the new Hurricanes and Spitfires and the Messerschmitt Bf 109. Gladiators were also modified for carrier operations and flown by the FAA as the Sea Gladiator. 747 airframes were built (483 RAF, 98 RN; 216 exported to Belgium, China, Egypt, Finland, Free France, Greece, Iraq, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Portugal, South Africa and Sweden, some of them from the total allotted to the RAF).

 

The Gladiator was largely replaced in front-line RAF service by the Hurricane and Spitfire by September 1939, although two squadrons were used in the French and Norwegian campaigns. It also performed reasonably well in limited Finnish service against Soviet fighters during the Winter War, but was found to be outclassed by German fighters in other theatres. Carrier-based Sea Gladiators were more successful, since their slower speed made them more suitable for carrier operations and they were less likely to be facing more modern fighter opposition.

 

One of the most enduring campaigns fought by Gladiators was the siege of Malta in 1940. Malta was for 10 days protected by a small force of Sea Gladiators, the Hal Far Fighter Flight, giving rise to a myth that three aircraft, named Faith, Hope and Charity formed the entire fighter cover of the island. In fact, more than three were operational, although not always at the same time; others were used for spare parts. The fuselage of the only surviving Gladiator from the Hal Far Fighter Flight, N5520, Faith, was presented to the people of Malta in 1943 and has been preserved in Malta. - more details on Wikipedia.

 

This example was seen flying during the Shuttleworth Collection's 50th Anniversary Air Show at Old Warden, Bedfordshire.

Snow standing on top of the rails.

8th September 2012 - Gloster Meteor pulling vapour and leaving some fabulous wing tip vortices.

Flown superbly at Sywell last year.

 

The Gloster Meteor was the only Allied Jet aeroplane to be used in the Second World war and this T7 version is seen here flying at Duxford's VE Day Anniversary Air Show 24/05/2015.

First British jet fighter. Pencil and watercolour.

The world's only Gloster Gauntlet left flying, seen in a perfect sky above Selänpää, Finland.

 

This aircraft bears the markings of the Suomen Ilmavoimat (Finnish Air Force) as used from its inception as a branch of the Finnish army in 1918 until the adoption of the blue and white roundel at the end of th second world war.

  

The Gloster Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies' first operational jet aircraft during the Second World War. The Meteor's development was heavily reliant on its ground-breaking turbojet engines, pioneered by Sir Frank Whittle and his company, Power Jets Ltd. Development of the aircraft itself began in 1940, although work on the engines had been underway since 1936. The Meteor first flew in 1943 and commenced operations on 27 July 1944 with No. 616 Squadron RAF. Nicknamed the "Meatbox", the Meteor was not a sophisticated aircraft in its aerodynamics, but proved to be a successful combat fighter. This is one of my favourite planes.

 

Role: Fighter

Manufacturer: Gloster Aircraft Company

First flight: 5 March 1943

Introduction: 27 July 1944

Retired: 1980s (RAF target tugs)

Primary users: Royal Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force, Belgian Air Force and

Argentine Air Force

Number built: 3,947

 

General characteristics

=================

Crew: 1

Length: 44 ft 7 in (13.59 m)

Wingspan: 37 ft 2 in (11.32 m)

Height: 13 ft 0 in (3.96 m)

Wing area: 350 ft² (32.52 m²)

Empty weight: 10,684 lb (4,846 kg)

Loaded weight: 15,700 lb (7,121 kg)

Powerplant: 2 × Rolls-Royce Derwent 8 turbojets, 3,600 lbf (16.01 kN) each

 

Performance

==========

Maximum speed: 600 mph (522 knots, 965 km/h, Mach 0.82) at 10,000 ft (3,050 m)

Range: 600 mi (522 nmi, 965 km)

Service ceiling: 43,000 ft (13,100 m)

Rate of climb: 7,000 ft/min (35.6 m/s)

Wing loading: 44.9 lb/ft² (218.97 kg/m²)

Thrust/weight: 0.45

Time to altitude: 5.0 min to 30,000 ft (9,145 m)

 

Armament

========

Guns: 4 × 20 mm British Hispano MkV cannons

Rockets: Provision for up to sixteen "60lb" 3 in rockets or eight 5 inch HVAR rockets. under outer wings

Bombs: two 1000 lb (454 kg) bombs

*information from wikipedia

 

Photograph Information

=================

Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark III

Lens: Canon EF500mm f/4L IS USM

 

Shutter speed: 1/800

Focal length: 500mm

Aperture: f/7.1

ISO speed: 100

 

Photograph by: Rouben Dickranian

~Tableau Vivant~ Gloster Hair ( coming soon )

 

-Glam Affair - Romy skin - Base ( Asia )

 

-UtopiaH- My Eternum Makeup

 

MANDALA]Chunkeey_Jewelry_Set_Silver

It was amazing to see a Gladiator in the air again. This was Britain's last biplane fighter to be built.

 

Ian Garfield Photography Website

 

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Jubilee Air Show - Imperial War Museum - Duxford - Cambridgeshire.

This old store is no longer standing. It was in a community called Bewelcome, Mississippi, about 6 miles outside of Gloster. There were a lot of these 'Mom & Pop' sotres when I was a kid but they are very rare now.

Evening Air Show at Shuttleworth

The quirky little Gloster Gladiator based at Old Warden but captured here flying at Duxford during the Flying Legends weekend.

The Finnish blue swastika had nothing to to with the Nazi Germany swastika (though both have their roots in the nationalist movement) The Finnish swastika was used during the Finnish Civil War 1918, years before Hitler took the swastika as the symbol for the NSDAP

Beautiful display at RIAT 2013

Night fighter variant of the Meteor family. Newark Air Museum.

From Wikipedia:

“The Gloster Javelin was an all-weather Interceptor Aircraft that served with Britain´s Royal Air Force (RAF) in the late 1950s and most of the 1960s. It was a T-tailed delta-wing aircraft designed for night and all-weather operations and was the last aircraft to bear the Gloster name. It was succeeded in the interceptor role by the supersonic English Electric Lightning.”

 

About the MOC:

Recently, I decided to build a series of “real” and “accurate” planes (mostly fighters). During LEGO Events, people prefer to see planes that they can easily recognize, so I shall make a few of them.

 

The Gloster Javelin has always been one of my favorite fighters. It represents, together with some other planes the best years of British fighter designs. They were also amongst the last fighters designed with guns as their main weapon, not missiles. Those priceless days eventually ended with the “1957 Defence White Paper” and many promising designs were cancelled after that.

The MOC shows a Gloster Javelin from the 60 Squadron. But I still need to print some new stickers first.

 

This is the second Cold War British plane I made. The first was the Blackburn Buccaneer (www.flickr.com/photos/einon/8570802005/); which will also receive RAF markings.

 

Hope you like it! More pictures will be added soon!

 

Eínon

 

General characteristics

•Crew: Two, pilot and radar operator

•Length: 56 ft 9 in (17.15 m)

•Wingspan: 52 ft (15.85 m)

•Height: 16 ft (4.88 m)

•Wing area: 927 ft² (86 m²)

•Empty weight: 24,000 lb (10,886 kg)

•Loaded weight: 31,580 lb (14,325 kg)

•Max. takeoff weight: 43,165 lb (19,580 kg)

•Powerplant: 2 × Armstrong Siddeley Sapphire 7R turbojets, 12,300 lbf (54 kN) each

Performance:

•Maximum speed: 610 knots at sea level (710 mph 1,140 km/h)

•Range: 954 mi (1,530 km)

•Service ceiling: 52,800 ft (15,865 m)

•Rate of climb: 5,400 ft/min (27.45 m/s)

•Wing loading: 34 lb/ft² (166 kg/m²)

•Thrust/weight: 0.79

Armament

•Guns: 4x 30 mm ADEN cannons

•Missiles: Up to four de Havilland Firestreak air-to-air missiles

Avionics

Westinghouse AN/APQ-43 radar

 

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