new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged glaciation

This is about 20km into our backpacking. The fertile soil from recent glaciation sprang colorful life everywhere, even as the valley was changing colors for autumn. Little streams trickled here and there and fell into larger streams. Fording some of these was always a little sketchy when carrying a bunch of expensive camera equipment, but it was always worth it.

 

I can't explain how often I stopped to take photos along this hike! I am sure it took about 4x as long as needed, but that was the point of the whole trip, after all...

 

If you zoom into the large or original size, you can see the glowing blue glacier there, spilling out from between the edge of the Andes.

 

from the blog at www.stuckincustoms.com

Located at 10,600 ft on the Mt. Evans scenic byway road in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. It formed during the latest period of glaciation roughly 10,000 years ago.

Please click on it to lightbox it and see some detail

Still waters, looking SW over Buttermere from the southern end of the lake

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

Here is another Vertorama from my recent Banff trip… this one was taken shortly after sunrise at the Vermilion Lakes.

 

Unfortunately I don’t have any funny stories about my experience of shooting at these lakes to share with you today. All I am able to say about this shoot… is that the air was slightly hazy but the light was very nice… and there were more exciting compositions here than I could shake a stick at!! :)

 

The following description of the Vermilion Lakes is from a book about the Canadian Rockies, which I bought while I was there…

 

The extensive wetlands immediately west of Banff town are probably the remnants of a large lake that formed at the end of the “Lake Wisconsin Glaciation”. The lake’s waters eventually found an outlet between Tunnel Mountain and Mount Rundle, near the present site of Bow Falls. Today, floods from the Bow River sustain the Vermilion Lakes. In order to preserve boating and fishing opportunities, a dam formerly impounded the First Vermilion Lake. Since the removal of the dam in 1985, the lake level has dropped and the basin has begun to fill with aquatic vegetation – the first stage in succession from montane wetland to floodplain forest. In a few hundred years, the Vermilion Lakes may look like the forest along the nearby Fernland Trail. Beaver damn control the water levels of the second and third lakes. The maximum water depth is about 5 meters.

 

Nikon D300, Sigma 10-20mm at 14mm, aperture of f11, with a 1/160th second exposure.

 

Click here to check out my Vertorama tutorial.

 

The colors are the original colors by recording this night.

 

BEST IN FULL SCREEN

 

The Best of Stevie Wonder || Stevie Wonder's Greatest Hits (Full Album)

 

Camera Sigma DP1

Aperture: 8.0

Iso: 50

Exposure 15 sec.

Self-timer

Heavy tripod

 

Since the weather forecast promises fine weather with no wind, I decide to drive to Hirtshals, located in the northwestern part of Denmark. I have long wished for a picture from the beach below the lighthouse, and I knew in advance that there were a lot of stones.

I took many pictures and continued to photograph until it was completely dark.

I regretted a bit that I kept for so long because I had to walk up a very steep rocky slope to get to the car. In the darkness I was unfortunate enough to stumble, but luckily the camera is not injured, but a fabric tea cozy that I use to cover the camera outdoors when I'm not shooting, had vanished without a trace, and I never found it. But I had a great trip.

 

Hirtshals Klint is a coastal locality southwest of Hirtshals - filled with traces of the past. The cliff is 250 meters long and up to 10 meters high.

 

What else could look like an ordinary beach with large rocks, is in fact a huge collection of Yoldialer and stone, especially from Norway, who arrived here via icebergs as far back as the middle Weichsel glaciation.

 

Hirtshals Klint has great research value, since the cliff is the only location where larger profiles with Older Yoldialer can be studied.

 

By Hirtshals Cliff is "clay", which is a popular lookout point.

Texture thanks to Lenabem-Anna.

 

Bellagio (Italy) is situated upon the extreme cape of the region that divides the Lake Como in two bifurcations. The tourist centre occupies the extreme part of the promontory, while the numerous districts are disseminated both along the lake shores and upon the slopes of the hills. The great Pleistocene glaciations with their imposing flows coming from the Valtellina and Valchiavenna modelled the actual landscape of the Lake Como: for at least four times the glaciers went as far as the Brianza to the South. From the ancient glacial blanket only the highest tops emerged, one of them was mount St. Primo, which obliged the glaciers to divide themselves into two arms. A luxuriance of trees and flowers is favoured by a mild and sweet climate. The medium temperature during winter is never below 6-7 C°, while during summer it is around 25-30 C°, mitigated during the afternoon by the characteristic breva, the gentle breeze of the Lake Como.

 

Source Wikipedia

It's Buachaille Etive Mòr, a mountain at the head of Glen Etive in the Highlands of Scotland.

 

From wikipedia:

Geologically speaking, Glen Coe is the remains of an ancient supervolcano that erupted with a force of VEI-8. It is considered to be one of the best examples of Cauldron subsidence. The eruption happened about 420 million years ago during the Silurian period, and the volcano has long since become extinct.The landscape was further shaped by the processes of glaciation during the last ice age, 10,000 years ago.

Brimham Moor, NYorks, UK. These rocks are Millstone Grit eroded by water, glaciation and wind into totemic-type shapes of some 30metres in height. It is a very atmospheric site to visit, especially during week days outside the school holidays. This tree was actually growing out of the rock :-)

 

Thanx muchly to all who view and/or comment on my pix; each is a help and a pleasure in equal measure :-)

 

Mostly, I feel that my pics benefit from viewing after pressing L and then F11

 

As I awake from a restless night, body breaking down, hurting... But the worry, the real pain, caused by a mind that won't allow respite, refuses to back down in it's relentless assault on my soul....

The Niagara Falls are massive waterfalls on the Niagara River, straddling the international border separating the Canadian province of Ontario and the U.S. state of New York. The falls are 17 miles (27 km) north-northwest of Buffalo, New York, 75 miles (120 km) south-southeast of Toronto, Ontario, between the twin cities of Niagara Falls, Ontario, and Niagara Falls, New York.

 

Niagara Falls is composed of two major sections separated by Goat Island: Horseshoe Falls, on the Canadian side of the border and American Falls on the United States side. The smaller Bridal Veil Falls also is located on the American side, separated from the main falls by Luna Island. Niagara Falls were formed when glaciers receded at the end of the Wisconsin glaciation (the last ice age), and water from the newly-formed Great Lakes carved a path through the Niagara Escarpment en route to the Atlantic Ocean. While not exceptionally high, the Niagara Falls are very wide. More than six million cubic feet (168,000 m³) of water falls over the crest line every minute in high flow,and almost 4 million cubic feet (110,000 m³) on average. It is the most powerful waterfall in North America.

 

The Niagara Falls are renowned both for their beauty and as a valuable source of hydroelectric power. Managing the balance between recreational, commercial, and industrial uses has been a challenge for the stewards of the falls since the 1800s.

EXPLORE Nov.16,2008 # 388

Niagara Falls is a wonder in the world . Its known to every one. There is actually 3 falls. The sound of the falling water is fabulous.

 

Niagara Falls was formed when glaciers receded at the end of the Wisconsin glaciation (the last ice age), and water from the newly formed Great Lakes carved a path through the Niagara Escarpment en route to the Atlantic Ocean. While not exceptionally high, Niagara Falls is very wide. More than six million cubic feet (168,000 m3) of water falls over the crest line every minute in high flow,[4] and almost four million cubic feet (110,000 m3) on average.

The Posbank is located in National Park de Veluwezoom.

 

Veluwezoom National Park is a national park located in the Dutch province of Gelderland. This park is the oldest national park of the Netherlands.[2] It is an area of 50 square kilometers at the southeastern edge of the Veluwe, a complex of terminal push moraines from the Saalian glaciation. It has a pronounced relief by Dutch standards, with the highest point in the park at 110 meters above sea level.[3] It is a private national park, owned by Vereniging Natuurmonumenten, the largest nature conservation organisation in the Netherlands.

 

The landscape of the park consists of forests and heathland, which is kept open by grazing of Highland cattle, and a small sand drift, which is kept open by human maintenance. The native fauna is represented by red deer, wild boar, badger and the regionally rare pine marten.

Cwm Idwal was Wales’ first National Nature Reserve (NNR). Officially recognised in 1954 by the Nature Conservancy, it is one of the finest places to see how glaciation and post-glacial processes shaped our dramatic landscape.

 

The cwm forms a magnificent amphitheatre behind the glacial lake of Llyn Idwal and forms part of the Glydeiriau and Cwm Idwal Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI).

This U-shaped valley was formed by the process of glaciation. Standing in the forground is Russell Island, with Mount Abdallah rising above the clouds. The valley has no offical name that could be found.

jhp.photos

John Hight Photography

...

Scarisoara Glacier, Romania

 

First mentioned in 1863 by the Austrian geographer Arnold Schmidl, who made some observations and the first map of the cave, it was later explored by the Romanian scientist and speleologist Emil Racoviță between 1921 and 1923. It seems that the ice cave was formed 3500 years ago, during the glaciations, when the Carpathian Mts. were covered by snow and ice.

 

The cave is located at an altitude of 1165 m. It is 105 m deep and 720 m long, and the entrance shaft (50 m in diameter and 48 m in depth) gives access through metal stairs to a large chamber, The Big Hall, 108 m long and 78 m wide. From this point three openings lead to The Church (in front, with over 100 ice stalagmites, see below), Great Reservation, Coman Gallery (left) and Little Reservation (right). The part that tourists can visit includes the entrance shaft, The Big Hall and The Church, the other chambers,which can be visited only with the agreement of the Speological Institute of Cluj-Napoca, being reserved for scientists.

The glacier has a volume of 75,000 cubic m and it is 26 m high. The temperature is up to +1°C in summer and down to -7°C in winter. (Wikipedia)

Le Photo prise en face de Saint-Fulgence ou débute le Fjord de la rivière Saguenay. Le fjord a été créé lors de la dernière période de glaciation. Lors du passage des glaces, leur poids a façonné le paysage et creusé la crevasse où est maintenant situé le fjord du Saguenay.

 

Photo taken in front of Saint-Fulgence or begins Fjord Saguenay River. The fjord was created during the fourth and last period of glaciation. During the passage of ice, weight has shaped the landscape and widened the rift is now located where the Saguenay Fjord.

 

Snow near the Posbank, part of National Park 'De Veluwezoom', located in the Dutch province of Gelderland, north and east of Arnhem. It is an area of 50 square kilometers at the southeastern edge of the Veluwe, a complex of terminal push moraines from the Saalian glaciation.

It has a pronounced relief by dutch standards, with the highest point in the park at 110 meters above sea level. The landscape of the park consists of forests and heathland.

 

Besneeuwde heidevelden nabij natuurgebied de Posbank in de Veluwezoom

De Posbank bij Rheden is de naam van een monument en uitkijkpunt op de rand van een met heide begroeide stuwwal op de zuidelijke Veluwe. Het monument ligt op een hoogte van 90 m boven NAP, van waaraf een uitzicht mogelijk is over het IJsseldal, de Achterhoek en de Liemers tot in Duitsland.

Ter vergelijking: het hoogste punt op de Veluwe is het nabijgelegen "Signaal Imbosch" (110 m).

De Posbank is onderdeel van Nationaal Park "De Veluwezoom", een natuurgebied van 5000 hectare noordoostelijk van Arnhem. De Posbank is in de volksmond vaak ook de benaming van het heidegebied waarin het ligt. De eigenlijke naam van het heidegebied is echter Herikhuizerveld.

__________________________

 

All rights reserved. Copyright :copyright: Martien Uiterweerd. All my images are protected under international authors copyright laws and may not be downloaded, reproduced, copied, transmitted or manipulated without my written explicit permission.

__________________________

 

.

.

Mount Herðubreið is a tuya mountain in the highlands of central Iceland, near the volcano Askja. From my second cycling tour across central Iceland in 2010.

Sunset light on the face of Half Dome, from Olmsted Point, Yosemite National Park, California

 

No HDR used. Single exposure on Fuji Velvia film.

 

Thanks for looking...

 

© Gary Crabbe

Enlightened Images

Enlightened Images Views (weblog)

 

Note: My images are posted here for your personal

viewing pleasure only. All Rights are Reserved. Please

contact me through flickr or my web site

if you are interested in using this image for any

reason. Thank You.

Here is a nine-image panorama of a particularly beautiful sunrise at Bow Lake.

 

Bow Lake is part of the Icefields Parkway and is at 1920 m above sea level. It is south of the Bow Summit where you can get great views of Wapta Icefield, Bow Glacier, Mount Thompson and the Crowfoot Glacier and Mountains.

 

If you have not yet stopped on the drive north from Lake Louise, then you are more than likely to do so at Bow Lake! On a fair morning, this vista ranks amongst the best at any roadside stop in the entire Rockies. When the ancestral Bow Glacier retreated from the Bow Valley at the end of the Late Wisconsin Glaciation, it left behind deposits of glacial rubble. Some of the rubble impounded the Bow river, creating the Bow Lake, which is now the third largest lake in the Banff National Park.

 

This panorama is really big... with loads of details... it's really worthwhile to view it large.

 

Nikon D300, Sigma 18-200mm at 22mm, aperture of f16, with a 1/60th second exposure.

 

Like many spires formed by glaciation in the Rocky Mountain National Park, ”Notchtop” stands among various glacial tarns making beautiful reflections after the ice melts. After spending a chilly night camping closeby, I composed the image with the brilliant glow from the cliff and the reflection, while at the same time a touch of fall color at the corner.

 

Canon 5D + EF 17-40mm f/4.0L USM. 24mm 5sec at f/19 with Grad ND 0.9, ISO100, tripod.

 

View Large On Black

Churfirsten is a mountain range in the Canton of St. Gallen, Switzerland. They form the natural boundary between the canton's Toggenburg and Sarganserland districts. They are the southernmost range of the Appenzell Alps, separated from the Glarus Alps by the Seez river and Lake Walen. They consist of a limestone ridge running east to west, with the individual peaks formed by erosion. The ridge is defined much more sharply to the south than to the north, with an almost vertical drop of several hundred meters towards Walenstadtberg and eventually Lake Walen at 419 m. The southern slope of the range was significantly formed by the Rhine Glacier during the Würm glaciation.

 

The name is a plural, indicating the peaks forming the historical boundary of the bishopric of Chur. It has historically also been folk-etymologized as Kurfürsten, i.e. the prince-electors of the Holy Roman Empire who in the later medieval period (until 1648) numbered seven, which in turn encouraged the count of seven main or "official" peaks.

  

Région située au sud ouest des Vosges, en Haute Saone. Ce fut, lors de la dernière glaciation, la limite septentrionale du glacier. La nature prend ici des airs nordique, d'ou son surnon de "petite Finlande". A voir absolument...et à plus forte raison en automne!.

Please note: The title refers only marginally to the eponymous play by Eugene O'Neill, but was meant to ring in the advancing glaciation of the North American East Coast.

Caltha palustris (kingcup, marsh marigold) is a perennial herbaceous plant of the family Ranunculaceae, native to marshes, fens, ditches and wet woodland in temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

It becomes most luxuriant in partial shade, but is rare on peat. In the United Kingdom, it is probably one of the most ancient native plants, surviving the glaciations and flourishing after the last retreat of the ice, in a landscape inundated with glacial meltwaters.

Height is up to 80 centimetres (31 in) tall. The leaves are rounded to kidney-shaped, 3–20 centimetres (1.2–7.9 in) across, with a bluntly serrated margin and a thick, waxy texture. Stems are hollow.

The flowers are yellow, 2–5 cm (1–2 in) diameter, with 4-9 (mostly 5) petal-like sepals and many yellow stamens; they appear in early spring to late summer. The flowers are visited by a great variety of insects for pollen and for the nectar secreted from small depressions, one on each side of each carpel.

Carpels form into green sac-like follicles to 1 cm long, each opening to release several seeds.

Caltha palustris is a highly polymorphic species, showing continuous and independent variation in many features. Forms in the UK may be divided into two subspecies: Caltha palustris subsp. palustris, and Caltha palustris subsp. minor.

It is sometimes considered a weed in clay-like garden soils, where every piece of its root will survive and spread. In warm free-draining soils, it simply dies away.

As is the case with many members of the family Ranunculaceae, all parts of the plant

Native Proverb "We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors, we borrow it from our Children."

 

View This Photo Large On Black

 

The Coast Salish people call this Koma Kulshan or Kulshan, it is an active glaciated volcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc and the North Cascades of Washington State in the United States. It is the second-most active volcano in the range after Mount Saint Helens. It is about 31 miles (50 km) due east of the city of Bellingham, Whatcom County, making it the northernmost volcano in the Cascade Range but not the northernmost of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, which extends north into the Coast Mountains. Mount Baker is the youngest volcano in the Mount Baker volcanic field. While volcanism has persisted here for some 1.5 million years, the current glaciated cone is likely no more than 140,000 years old, and possibly no older than 80-90,000 years. Older volcanic edifices have mostly eroded away due to glaciation.

 

Brimham Rocks are in the Nidderdale area of North Yorkshire. This is an area of outstanding natural beauty [AONB]. The unusual formations are the result of glaciation and erosion from wind and rain of the millstone grit that is found in the area. Geologists date the rocks at around 320 million years old.

The Rhine Falls (German: Rheinfall, singular) is the largest waterfall in Switzerland, Europe.

 

The falls are located on the High Rhine on the border between the cantons of Schaffhausen (SH) and Zürich (ZH), between the municipalities of Neuhausen am Rheinfall (SH) and Laufen-Uhwiesen/Dachsen (ZH), next to the town of Schaffhausen in northern Switzerland.

 

They are 150 metres (490 ft) wide and 23 metres (75 ft) high. In the winter months, the average water flow is 250 m3/s (8,800 cu ft/s), while in the summer, the average water flow is 600 m3/s (21,000 cu ft/s). The highest flow ever measured was 1,250 cubic metres per second (44,000 cu ft/s) in 1965; and the lowest, 95 cubic metres per second (3,400 cu ft/s) in 1921.

 

The falls can not be climbed by fish, except by eels that are able to worm their way up over the rocks.

 

The Rhine Falls were formed in the last ice age, approximately 14,000 to 17,000 years ago, by erosion-resistant rocks narrowing the riverbed. The first glacial advances created today's landforms approximately 500,000 years ago. Up to the end of the Wolstonian Stage approximately 132,000 years ago, the Rhine flowed westwards from Schaffhausen past Klettgau. This earlier riverbed later filled up with gravel.

 

About 132,000 years ago the course of the river changed southwards at Schaffhausen and formed a new channel, which also filled up with gravel. Part of the Rhine today includes this ancient riverbed.

 

During the Würm glaciation, the Rhine was pushed far to the south to its present course, over a hard Late Jurassic limestone bed. As the river flowed over both the hard limestone and the easily eroded gravel from previous glaciations, the current waterfall formed about 14,000 to 17,000 years ago. The Rheinfallfelsen, a large rock, is the remnant of the original limestone cliff flanking the former channel. The rock has eroded very little over the years because relatively little sediment comes down the Rhine from Lake Constance.

 

The north side of the falls is a millsite. In the 17th century, a blast furnace for smelting iron ore found in the limestone was built. It was in operation until the first half of the 19th century.

 

In 1887 the ironworks applied for permission to divert between one fifth to one half of the river's flow for electricity generation. The Swiss Alpine Club, the Schweizerische Naturforschende Gesellschaft (a nature group) and several scientific societies opposed the plan.

 

In 1913 an international competition was held for the best plan for a shipping route between Basel and Lake Constance.

 

In 1919, a company wanting to build power stations in northern Switzerland were told that any such station at the Rhine Falls "must serve the economic interest of the public".

 

In 1944, the Swiss Council of States granted permission to build the proposed power station. The permission was to become effective on 1 February 1948, with construction to begin in 1952. But in 1951, the Neuen Helvetischen Gesellschaft (New Swiss Society), under the leadership of Emil Egli, got 150,000 Swiss citizens to sign a petition protesting the project; among the signatories were 49 famous citizens, including Hermann Hesse and Carl Jacob Burckhardt. The petition not only scuttled the power station project, but effectively prevented all future hydropower and navigation engineering projects on the upper Rhine to the present day.

 

Today, the falls are still under consideration for hydropower projects. If the full water flow were used, the power generated would average approximately 50 MW. The economic value of the falls as a tourist attraction may be greater.

 

source: Wikipedia

A beautiful morning in the Sound of Mull

Glen Coe, Scotland

 

Glen Coe is a glen in the Highlands of Scotland. It lies in the southern part of the Lochaber committee area of Highland Council, and was formerly part of the county of Argyll. It is often considered one of the most spectacular and beautiful places in Scotland, and is a part of the designated National Scenic Area of Ben Nevis and Glen Coe. The narrow glen shows a grim grandeur. The glen, approaching from the east on the main A82 road, is surrounded by wild and precipitous mountains. Further west at Invercoe, the landscape has a softer beauty before the main entrance to the glen. The main settlement is the village of Glencoe.

 

The glen is U-shaped, formed by an ice age glacier, about 16 km (10 miles) long with the floor of the glen being less than 700 m (0.4 miles) wide, narrowing sharply at the Pass of Glen Coe about half way along.

 

Geologically-speaking, Glen Coe is the remains of an ancient supervolcano that erupted with a force of VEI-8. The eruption happened about 420 million years ago during the Silurian period, and the volcano has long since become extinct. The landscape was further shaped by the processes of glaciation during the last ice age, 10,000 years ago.

Source: Wikipedia

In 1524 the great Italian navigator Giovanni da Verrazzano was the first European to discover Cape Cod Bay, his claim proved by a map of 1529 which clearly outlined Cape Cod.

 

Most of Cape Cod is composed of glacially derived rocks, sands, and gravels. The last glacial period ended about 12,000 years ago. During the end of the last glaciation, Cape Cod Bay was probably a large freshwater lake with drainages across Cape Cod in places like Bass River and Orleans Harbor.

 

Immagine scattata durante la bassa marea a Cape Cod Bay in Massachusetts.

  

Thank you for your comments,

Gemma

  

Copyright :copyright:Maria Gemma June, 2015

  

About

 

From the vault.

 

This was, and still is the best sunset of 2009!

 

One of my favorite locations. I remember running back to this spot, as the sun was setting, all good fun.

 

Title stolen from my good mate Matt.

 

Enjoy.

 

- Canon 400D (yup, back in the 80's)

- ISO 100, f9, 1/60, 10mm

- Sigma 10-20mm f4/5.6 lens.

- Tripod.

 

Processing

 

- Off camera.

- Slight colour/temp shift in LR.

 

About Lakes

 

A lake (from Latin lacus) is a terrain feature (or physical feature), a body of liquid on the surface of a world that is localized to the bottom of basin (another type of landform or terrain feature; that is, it is not global) and moves slowly if it moves at all. On Earth, a body of water is considered a lake when it is inland, not part of the ocean, is larger and deeper than a pond, and is fed by a river. The only world other than Earth known to harbor lakes is Titan, Saturn's largest moon, which has lakes of ethane, most likely mixed with methane. It is not known if Titan's lakes are fed by rivers, though Titan's surface is carved by numerous river beds.

 

Natural lakes on Earth are generally found in mountainous areas, rift zones, and areas with ongoing or recent glaciation. Other lakes are found in endorheic basins or along the courses of mature rivers. In some parts of the world, there are many lakes because of chaotic drainage patterns left over from the last Ice Age. All lakes are temporary over geologic time scales, as they will slowly fill in with sediments or spill out of the basin containing them.

no photo shop :-)

 

Lake Matheson - definitely worth seeing in the real world

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

J'ai fait disparaîte par mégarde cette photo avec les commentaires qui l'accompagnaient. Je m'excuse auprès des personnes qui m'avaient fait des commentaires..Donc je cours la remplacer... voilà c'est fait,

Posté il y a 77 secondes. ( permalien | supprimer | modifier )

 

The gorse in full bloom at New Lough, one of the glacial tarns in the Gortin Glen nature reserve in the Sperrin mountains area of Co Tyrone, N Ireland.

We're going to visit our grandsons so we will be away for the rest of the week, so we will catch up when we get back!

 

This amazing collection of weird and wonderful rock formations makes a great day out for families, climbers and those wanting to enjoy the simple pleasures of fresh air and magnificent views over Nidderdale. Let your imagination run wild as you explore the labyrinth of paths through this unique landscape.

 

Keep an eye out for some fantastically shaped rocks. Spot the Dancing Bear, The Eagle and The Gorilla, crawl through The Smartie Tube and balance on the Rocking Stones. Walk over heather moorland or through beautiful woodland, and take in the fresh air and Yorkshire countryside.

 

www.nationaltrust.org.uk/brimham-rocks/

 

Brimham Rocks (at SE2065) are balancing rock formations on Brimham Moor in North Yorkshire, England. The rocks stand at a height of nearly 30 metres in an area owned by the National Trust which is part of the Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

 

The property is open all year around; typically from 8 a.m. until dusk. Entry is free but car parking is charged for visitors who are not members of the National Trust.

 

There are many variations of rock formations, caused by Millstone Grit being eroded by water, glaciation and wind, most of which have achieved amazing shapes. Many formations have been named, though imagination is required and the correct viewing angle is helpful. Examples include the Sphinx, the Watchdog, the Camel, the Turtle and the Dancing Bear.

 

Brimham Rocks feature in the Bee Gees' video 'You Win Again"'.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brimham_Rocks

 

my Facebook Clic Here

  

my 500px Clic Here

  

my google+ Clic Here

  

www.damail.fr

 

Une chute d'eau ou cascade est l'interruption du flot d'un cours d'eau par un dénivelé important et une chute verticale du flot.

Dans les cas les plus importants, il peut s'agir d'un spectacle tout à fait impressionnant où un flux important se précipite dans le vide avec un bruit considérable et des projections d'eau ou d'embruns à des dizaines ou des centaines de mètres.

Les chutes les plus impressionnantes proviennent souvent d'une géologie qui a apporté des dénivelés très marqués et qui croisent le flot d'une rivière ou d'un torrent. Par exemple, dans le parc national de Yosemite, les glaciations ont creusé deux vallées profondes et aux flancs pratiquement verticaux. Le moindre ruisseau est alors précipité verticalement sur plusieurs dizaines ou plusieurs centaines de mètres de haut.

Dans les zones tempérées, les chutes sont généralement plus impressionnantes au printemps, quand les rivières sont alimentées par la fonte des neiges.

Les plus hautes chutes du monde sont celles de Salto Angel avec 979 mètres.

 

Best rank #2 in Explorer

Brimham Rocks in Nidderdale borders the Dales National Park and is designated as AONB (Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty).

It is an area of Millstone Grit being eroded by water, glaciation and wind to form some amazing shaped rocks.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------

 

:copyright: Copyright 2014 Philip Hunter, All Rights Reserved.

  

You do NOT have the right to copy, reproduced, download, or exploit any of my images without my permission.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------

  

www.vividvista.co.uk

Didn't get a lot of color for sunset here, but the clouds really were great (and it's always nice to see Bridalveil roaring away at max flow).

Adjunto una veterana, pero hermosa composición que añade belleza a estos parajes.

 

Pulsar CTRL al mismo tiempo que el símbolo ♫♫

♫♫ M Knopfler ♫♫

 

www.linkingoo.com/foto/

www.fotoandros.com

www.fluidr.com/photos/35196188@N03

www.youtube.com/user/25elgaucho

www.youtube.com/user/25elgaucho/videos?tag_id=&view=0...

 

VER vídeo de la zona por el mismo autor:

youtu.be/kR01XggpzOs

 

Después de una vertiginosa e impresionante subida entre las cascadas del río Cinca, después de pasar por el Balcón de Pineta situado a 2550 m y haber caminado por un paisaje caótico con los restos de las ultimas glaciaciones, con la presencia del glaciar del monte Perdido en su cara Norte, llegamos al Lago Helado de Marboré de unas aguas azul intenso, situado a de 2600 m.

 

After a dizzying and impressive rise from Cinca River Falls, after going through the Balcon de Pineta located 2550 m have walked by a chaotic landscape with the remains of the last glaciation, with the presence of the lost mountain glacier at its North face, arrived at Lake Ice Marboré of blue waters, and whose height is 2600 m.

 

Háifoss waterfall (122m).

 

The waterfall is surrounded by geological layers which tell the story of past glaciations and deglaciations of South Iceland. The brownish hyaloclastite in the bottom half is formed during volcanic eruptions underneath a thick glacier. The gray top of the wall is however made out of products of effusive eruptions, occurring in ice-free conditions.

The Rhine Falls (German: Rheinfall, singular) is the largest waterfall in Switzerland, Europe.

 

The falls are located on the High Rhine on the border between the cantons of Schaffhausen (SH) and Zürich (ZH), between the municipalities of Neuhausen am Rheinfall (SH) and Laufen-Uhwiesen/Dachsen (ZH), next to the town of Schaffhausen in northern Switzerland.

 

They are 150 metres (490 ft) wide and 23 metres (75 ft) high. In the winter months, the average water flow is 250 m3/s (8,800 cu ft/s), while in the summer, the average water flow is 600 m3/s (21,000 cu ft/s). The highest flow ever measured was 1,250 cubic metres per second (44,000 cu ft/s) in 1965; and the lowest, 95 cubic metres per second (3,400 cu ft/s) in 1921.

 

The falls can not be climbed by fish, except by eels that are able to worm their way up over the rocks.

 

The Rhine Falls were formed in the last ice age, approximately 14,000 to 17,000 years ago, by erosion-resistant rocks narrowing the riverbed. The first glacial advances created today's landforms approximately 500,000 years ago. Up to the end of the Wolstonian Stage approximately 132,000 years ago, the Rhine flowed westwards from Schaffhausen past Klettgau. This earlier riverbed later filled up with gravel.

 

About 132,000 years ago the course of the river changed southwards at Schaffhausen and formed a new channel, which also filled up with gravel. Part of the Rhine today includes this ancient riverbed.

 

During the Würm glaciation, the Rhine was pushed far to the south to its present course, over a hard Late Jurassic limestone bed. As the river flowed over both the hard limestone and the easily eroded gravel from previous glaciations, the current waterfall formed about 14,000 to 17,000 years ago. The Rheinfallfelsen, a large rock, is the remnant of the original limestone cliff flanking the former channel. The rock has eroded very little over the years because relatively little sediment comes down the Rhine from Lake Constance.

 

The north side of the falls is a millsite. In the 17th century, a blast furnace for smelting iron ore found in the limestone was built. It was in operation until the first half of the 19th century.

 

In 1887 the ironworks applied for permission to divert between one fifth to one half of the river's flow for electricity generation. The Swiss Alpine Club, the Schweizerische Naturforschende Gesellschaft (a nature group) and several scientific societies opposed the plan.

 

In 1913 an international competition was held for the best plan for a shipping route between Basel and Lake Constance.

 

In 1919, a company wanting to build power stations in northern Switzerland were told that any such station at the Rhine Falls "must serve the economic interest of the public".

 

In 1944, the Swiss Council of States granted permission to build the proposed power station. The permission was to become effective on 1 February 1948, with construction to begin in 1952. But in 1951, the Neuen Helvetischen Gesellschaft (New Swiss Society), under the leadership of Emil Egli, got 150,000 Swiss citizens to sign a petition protesting the project; among the signatories were 49 famous citizens, including Hermann Hesse and Carl Jacob Burckhardt. The petition not only scuttled the power station project, but effectively prevented all future hydropower and navigation engineering projects on the upper Rhine to the present day.

 

Today, the falls are still under consideration for hydropower projects. If the full water flow were used, the power generated would average approximately 50 MW. The economic value of the falls as a tourist attraction may be greater.

 

source: Wikipedia

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 79 80