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The Charming Michaelmas Daisy - Aster (Genus)

Aster is a genus of flowering plants in the family Asteraceae. Its circumscription has been narrowed, and it now encompasses around 180 species, all but one of which are restricted to Eurasia; many species formerly in Aster are now in other genera of the tribe Astereae.

Oorzwammetjes

 

Een kleine groep van schelp- tot niervormige, ongesteelde, witte of crème-gelige Plaatjeszwammen. Sporeekleur is witcrme, geelbruin, rozebruin, tabaksbruin. In Nederland komen 11 soorten van het genus Crepidotus voor. Enkele zijn alleen op grond van microscopische kenmerken van elkaar te onderscheiden.

 

Opgenomen taxa:

- Crepidotus epibryus, Klein oorzwammetje

- Crepidotus mollis, Week oorzwammetje

- Crepidotus roseoornatus, Roze oorzwammetje

- Crepidotus variabilis, Wit oorzwammetje

 

Uit : Soortenbank.nl

 

Fijne nieuwe week.

Swans, genus Cygnus, are birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae where they form the tribe Cygnini. Sometimes, they are considered a distinct subfamily, Cygninae. There are six to seven species of swan in the genus Cygnus; in addition there is another species known as a swan, the Coscoroba Swan, although this species is no longer considered related to the true swans. Swans usually mate for life, though 'divorce' does sometimes occur, particularly following nesting failure. The number of eggs in each clutch ranges from three to eight.The swans are the largest members of the duck family Anatidae, and are amongst the largest flying birds. The largest species, including the mute swan, trumpeter swan, and whooper swan, can reach length of over 1.5 m (60 inches) and weigh over 15 kg (33 pounds). Their wingspans can be almost 3 m (10 ft). Compared to the closely related geese they are much larger in size and have proportionally larger feet and necks.[2] They also have a patch of unfeathered skin between the eyes and bill in adults. The sexes are alike in plumage, but males are generally bigger and heavier than females.

  

Swan preening itselfThe Northern Hemisphere species of swan have pure white plumage but the Southern Hemisphere species are mixed black and white. The Australian Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) is completely black except for the white flight feathers on its wings; the chicks of black swans are light grey in colour, and the South American Black-necked Swan has a black neck.

 

The legs of swans are normally a dark blackish grey colour, except for the two South American species, which have pink legs. Bill colour varies: the four subarctic species have black bills with varying amounts of yellow, and all the others are patterned red and black, although most birds generally do not have teeth, swans are known to be an exception to this having small jagged 'teeth' as part of their beaks used for catching and eating fish. The Mute Swan and Black-necked Swan have a lump at the base of the bill on the upper mandible.Swans feed in the water and on land. They are almost entirely herbivorous, although small numbers of aquatic animals may be eaten. In the water food is obtained by up-ending or dabbling, and their diet is composed of the roots, tubers, stems and leaves of aquatic and submerged plants.[2]

  

A feeding Mute Swan in ice-covered pool, HanoverSwans form monogamous pair bonds that last for many years, and in some cases these can last for life.[4] Modern genetic techniques are starting to reveal that 'divorces' are more common than previously thought, as is mating with other swans outside of the social pairing, without breaking the social pair bond.[5] These bonds are maintained year round, even in gregarious and migratory species like the Tundra Swan, which congregate in large flocks in the wintering grounds.[6] The nest is on the ground near water and about a metre across. Unlike many other ducks and geese the male helps with the nest construction. Average egg size (for the mute swan) is 113×74 mm, weighing 340 g, in a clutch size of 4 to 7, and an incubation period of 34–45 days.[7] With the exception of the dendrocygninaes they are the only anatids where the males aid in incubating the eggs.

 

Mute swans have been observed to display homosexual or transgender behavior.

 

Swans, genus Cygnus, are birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae where they form the tribe Cygnini. Sometimes, they are considered a distinct subfamily, Cygninae. There are six to seven species of swan in the genus Cygnus; in addition there is another species known as a swan, the Coscoroba Swan, although this species is no longer considered related to the true swans. Swans usually mate for life, though 'divorce' does sometimes occur, particularly following nesting failure. The number of eggs in each clutch ranges from three to eight.The swans are the largest members of the duck family Anatidae, and are amongst the largest flying birds. The largest species, including the mute swan, trumpeter swan, and whooper swan, can reach length of over 1.5 m (60 inches) and weigh over 15 kg (33 pounds). Their wingspans can be almost 3 m (10 ft). Compared to the closely related geese they are much larger in size and have proportionally larger feet and necks.[2] They also have a patch of unfeathered skin between the eyes and bill in adults. The sexes are alike in plumage, but males are generally bigger and heavier than females.

  

Swan preening itselfThe Northern Hemisphere species of swan have pure white plumage but the Southern Hemisphere species are mixed black and white. The Australian Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) is completely black except for the white flight feathers on its wings; the chicks of black swans are light grey in colour, and the South American Black-necked Swan has a black neck.

 

The legs of swans are normally a dark blackish grey colour, except for the two South American species, which have pink legs. Bill colour varies: the four subarctic species have black bills with varying amounts of yellow, and all the others are patterned red and black, although most birds generally do not have teeth, swans are known to be an exception to this having small jagged 'teeth' as part of their beaks used for catching and eating fish. The Mute Swan and Black-necked Swan have a lump at the base of the bill on the upper mandible.Swans feed in the water and on land. They are almost entirely herbivorous, although small numbers of aquatic animals may be eaten. In the water food is obtained by up-ending or dabbling, and their diet is composed of the roots, tubers, stems and leaves of aquatic and submerged plants.[2]

  

A feeding Mute Swan in ice-covered pool, HanoverSwans form monogamous pair bonds that last for many years, and in some cases these can last for life.[4] Modern genetic techniques are starting to reveal that 'divorces' are more common than previously thought, as is mating with other swans outside of the social pairing, without breaking the social pair bond.[5] These bonds are maintained year round, even in gregarious and migratory species like the Tundra Swan, which congregate in large flocks in the wintering grounds.[6] The nest is on the ground near water and about a metre across. Unlike many other ducks and geese the male helps with the nest construction. Average egg size (for the mute swan) is 113×74 mm, weighing 340 g, in a clutch size of 4 to 7, and an incubation period of 34–45 days.[7] With the exception of the dendrocygninaes they are the only anatids where the males aid in incubating the eggs.

 

Mute swans have been observed to display homosexual or transgender behavior.

 

Swans, genus Cygnus, are birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae where they form the tribe Cygnini. Sometimes, they are considered a distinct subfamily, Cygninae. There are six to seven species of swan in the genus Cygnus; in addition there is another species known as a swan, the Coscoroba Swan, although this species is no longer considered related to the true swans. Swans usually mate for life, though 'divorce' does sometimes occur, particularly following nesting failure. The number of eggs in each clutch ranges from three to eight.The swans are the largest members of the duck family Anatidae, and are amongst the largest flying birds. The largest species, including the mute swan, trumpeter swan, and whooper swan, can reach length of over 1.5 m (60 inches) and weigh over 15 kg (33 pounds). Their wingspans can be almost 3 m (10 ft). Compared to the closely related geese they are much larger in size and have proportionally larger feet and necks.[2] They also have a patch of unfeathered skin between the eyes and bill in adults. The sexes are alike in plumage, but males are generally bigger and heavier than females.

  

Swan preening itselfThe Northern Hemisphere species of swan have pure white plumage but the Southern Hemisphere species are mixed black and white. The Australian Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) is completely black except for the white flight feathers on its wings; the chicks of black swans are light grey in colour, and the South American Black-necked Swan has a black neck.

 

The legs of swans are normally a dark blackish grey colour, except for the two South American species, which have pink legs. Bill colour varies: the four subarctic species have black bills with varying amounts of yellow, and all the others are patterned red and black, although most birds generally do not have teeth, swans are known to be an exception to this having small jagged 'teeth' as part of their beaks used for catching and eating fish. The Mute Swan and Black-necked Swan have a lump at the base of the bill on the upper mandible.Swans feed in the water and on land. They are almost entirely herbivorous, although small numbers of aquatic animals may be eaten. In the water food is obtained by up-ending or dabbling, and their diet is composed of the roots, tubers, stems and leaves of aquatic and submerged plants.[2]

  

A feeding Mute Swan in ice-covered pool, HanoverSwans form monogamous pair bonds that last for many years, and in some cases these can last for life.[4] Modern genetic techniques are starting to reveal that 'divorces' are more common than previously thought, as is mating with other swans outside of the social pairing, without breaking the social pair bond.[5] These bonds are maintained year round, even in gregarious and migratory species like the Tundra Swan, which congregate in large flocks in the wintering grounds.[6] The nest is on the ground near water and about a metre across. Unlike many other ducks and geese the male helps with the nest construction. Average egg size (for the mute swan) is 113×74 mm, weighing 340 g, in a clutch size of 4 to 7, and an incubation period of 34–45 days.[7] With the exception of the dendrocygninaes they are the only anatids where the males aid in incubating the eggs.

 

Mute swans have been observed to display homosexual or transgender behavior.

 

Swans, genus Cygnus, are birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae where they form the tribe Cygnini. Sometimes, they are considered a distinct subfamily, Cygninae. There are six to seven species of swan in the genus Cygnus; in addition there is another species known as a swan, the Coscoroba Swan, although this species is no longer considered related to the true swans. Swans usually mate for life, though 'divorce' does sometimes occur, particularly following nesting failure. The number of eggs in each clutch ranges from three to eight.The swans are the largest members of the duck family Anatidae, and are amongst the largest flying birds. The largest species, including the mute swan, trumpeter swan, and whooper swan, can reach length of over 1.5 m (60 inches) and weigh over 15 kg (33 pounds). Their wingspans can be almost 3 m (10 ft). Compared to the closely related geese they are much larger in size and have proportionally larger feet and necks.[2] They also have a patch of unfeathered skin between the eyes and bill in adults. The sexes are alike in plumage, but males are generally bigger and heavier than females.

  

Swan preening itselfThe Northern Hemisphere species of swan have pure white plumage but the Southern Hemisphere species are mixed black and white. The Australian Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) is completely black except for the white flight feathers on its wings; the chicks of black swans are light grey in colour, and the South American Black-necked Swan has a black neck.

 

The legs of swans are normally a dark blackish grey colour, except for the two South American species, which have pink legs. Bill colour varies: the four subarctic species have black bills with varying amounts of yellow, and all the others are patterned red and black, although most birds generally do not have teeth, swans are known to be an exception to this having small jagged 'teeth' as part of their beaks used for catching and eating fish. The Mute Swan and Black-necked Swan have a lump at the base of the bill on the upper mandible.Swans feed in the water and on land. They are almost entirely herbivorous, although small numbers of aquatic animals may be eaten. In the water food is obtained by up-ending or dabbling, and their diet is composed of the roots, tubers, stems and leaves of aquatic and submerged plants.[2]

  

A feeding Mute Swan in ice-covered pool, HanoverSwans form monogamous pair bonds that last for many years, and in some cases these can last for life.[4] Modern genetic techniques are starting to reveal that 'divorces' are more common than previously thought, as is mating with other swans outside of the social pairing, without breaking the social pair bond.[5] These bonds are maintained year round, even in gregarious and migratory species like the Tundra Swan, which congregate in large flocks in the wintering grounds.[6] The nest is on the ground near water and about a metre across. Unlike many other ducks and geese the male helps with the nest construction. Average egg size (for the mute swan) is 113×74 mm, weighing 340 g, in a clutch size of 4 to 7, and an incubation period of 34–45 days.[7] With the exception of the dendrocygninaes they are the only anatids where the males aid in incubating the eggs.

 

Mute swans have been observed to display homosexual or transgender behavior.

 

Genus: Stomorhina; Species: Obsoleta; Family: Calliphoridae.

After rain..........(තුත්තිරි)

Genus Numenius.

Curlews feed on mud or very soft ground, searching for worms and other invertebrates with their long bills. They will also take crabs and similar items.

The genus T 0 of the Prussian state railways were small omnibus tender locomotives with only one driven axle. It was developed of August von Borries, together with the railway management Hannover for the local railway traffic.

 

In 1880 the management of the Prussian state railways of Hannover put in service four small tank engines with luggage space of the wheel arrangement 1A which had been built by Fa. Schichau.

 

Of it two were explained in normal twin's design. With both other the group effect of the double steam stretch was explained by August von Borries for the first time in Prussia. The luggage space should save the baggage car, however, turned out impractical, because the capacity was only low. All four railroad engines were used in the branch line traffic in the space Hannover. Besides, the group railroad engines turned out clearly sparing in the coal consumption.

 

The railroad engines were taken out of service between 1897 and 1900 and sold.

Delphinium is a genus of about 300 species of perennial flowering plants in the buttercup family Ranunculaceae, native throughout the Northern Hemisphere and also on the high mountains of tropical Africa. The common name, Larkspur, is shared with the closely related genus Consolida.

 

Other names are, lark's heel (Shakespeare), lark's claw and knight's spur. The scientific name comes from the Latin for dolphin, alluding to the shape of the opening flower.

 

All parts of the plant contain an alkaloid delphinine and are very poisonous, causing vomiting when eaten, and death in larger amounts. In small amounts, extracts of the plant have been used in herbal medicine. Gerard's Herbal reports that drinking the seed of larkspur was thought to help against the stings of scorpions, and that other poisonous animals could not move when covered by the herb, but does not believe it himself. Grieve's herbal reports that the seeds can be used against parasites, especially lice and their nits in the hair. A tincture is used against asthma and dropsy. The juice of the flowers, mixed with alum, gives a blue ink. The plant was connected to Saint Odile and in popular medicine used against eye diseases. It was one of the herbs used on the feast of St. John and as such warded against lightning. In Transylvania, it was used to keep witches from the stables, probably because of its black color.

 

Die Rittersporne (Delphinium) sind eine Pflanzengattung aus der Familie der Hahnenfußgewächse (Ranunculaceae). Der botanische Gattungsname leitet sich vom griechischen delphínion für Delphinpflanze, denn die Knospe der Blüte soll einem Delphin ähnlich sehen.

 

Dream with me, dear flickr friends! Enjoy it! ;-))

 

Ich lade euch ein, mit mir zu träumen! Ein schönes Wochenende... hier ist es weiter nebligtrüb, Schnee...

Forest Genus Lepus. On black!

Swans, genus Cygnus, are birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae where they form the tribe Cygnini. Sometimes, they are considered a distinct subfamily, Cygninae. There are six to seven species of swan in the genus Cygnus; in addition there is another species known as a swan, the Coscoroba Swan, although this species is no longer considered related to the true swans. Swans usually mate for life, though 'divorce' does sometimes occur, particularly following nesting failure. The number of eggs in each clutch ranges from three to eight.The swans are the largest members of the duck family Anatidae, and are amongst the largest flying birds. The largest species, including the mute swan, trumpeter swan, and whooper swan, can reach length of over 1.5 m (60 inches) and weigh over 15 kg (33 pounds). Their wingspans can be almost 3 m (10 ft). Compared to the closely related geese they are much larger in size and have proportionally larger feet and necks.[2] They also have a patch of unfeathered skin between the eyes and bill in adults. The sexes are alike in plumage, but males are generally bigger and heavier than females.

  

Swan preening itselfThe Northern Hemisphere species of swan have pure white plumage but the Southern Hemisphere species are mixed black and white. The Australian Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) is completely black except for the white flight feathers on its wings; the chicks of black swans are light grey in colour, and the South American Black-necked Swan has a black neck.

 

The legs of swans are normally a dark blackish grey colour, except for the two South American species, which have pink legs. Bill colour varies: the four subarctic species have black bills with varying amounts of yellow, and all the others are patterned red and black, although most birds generally do not have teeth, swans are known to be an exception to this having small jagged 'teeth' as part of their beaks used for catching and eating fish. The Mute Swan and Black-necked Swan have a lump at the base of the bill on the upper mandible.Swans feed in the water and on land. They are almost entirely herbivorous, although small numbers of aquatic animals may be eaten. In the water food is obtained by up-ending or dabbling, and their diet is composed of the roots, tubers, stems and leaves of aquatic and submerged plants.[2]

  

A feeding Mute Swan in ice-covered pool, HanoverSwans form monogamous pair bonds that last for many years, and in some cases these can last for life.[4] Modern genetic techniques are starting to reveal that 'divorces' are more common than previously thought, as is mating with other swans outside of the social pairing, without breaking the social pair bond.[5] These bonds are maintained year round, even in gregarious and migratory species like the Tundra Swan, which congregate in large flocks in the wintering grounds.[6] The nest is on the ground near water and about a metre across. Unlike many other ducks and geese the male helps with the nest construction. Average egg size (for the mute swan) is 113×74 mm, weighing 340 g, in a clutch size of 4 to 7, and an incubation period of 34–45 days.[7] With the exception of the dendrocygninaes they are the only anatids where the males aid in incubating the eggs.

 

Mute swans have been observed to display homosexual or transgender behavior.

 

Oorzwammetjes

 

Een kleine groep van schelp- tot niervormige, ongesteelde, witte of crème-gelige Plaatjeszwammen. Sporeekleur is witcrme, geelbruin, rozebruin, tabaksbruin. In Nederland komen 11 soorten van het genus Crepidotus voor. Enkele zijn alleen op grond van microscopische kenmerken van elkaar te onderscheiden.

 

Opgenomen taxa:

- Crepidotus epibryus, Klein oorzwammetje

- Crepidotus mollis, Week oorzwammetje

- Crepidotus roseoornatus, Roze oorzwammetje

- Crepidotus variabilis, Wit oorzwammetje

 

Bron : Soortenbank.

Silhouette of Dipsacus Wild Teasel B genus of flowering plant Dipsacus fullonum

This type of plant was blooming in many parts of Florida in January. It forms the genus Ludwigia, which has many species. I found this one in Kissimmee Prairie Preserve State Park.

Genus: Evernia

Family: Parmeliaceae

Order: Lecanorales

Class: Lecanoromycetes

Kingdom: Fungi

... genera mostri...

  

Coloro che sognano di giorno

sanno tante cose che sfuggono

a chi sogna solo di notte

 

Edgar Alan Poe

 

Silhouette of Dipsacus Wild Teasel C genus of flowering plant Dipsacus fullonum

Dipsacus Wild Teasel B genus of flowering plant Dipsacus fullonum

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To witness a mating of the rare and vulnerable Mountain Apollo (Parnassius apollo) is one of the finest moments out in the nature.

This bug was in my garden. I was only able to get a couple shots and then he was gone. I know its not a great shot but it is the best of the two.

I didnt notice all the colors and details until I look on the computer.

Can anyone help me identify him.

 

Photo taken in my garden in Steger Illinois in June of 2009.

 

Looks like a fly in the genus Paracantha a fruit fly (Tephritidae) =Thanks to Marco Gaiani for the ID.

Avenue of elms at Radolfzell, Lake Constance

Ulmenalle in Radolfzell am Bodensee

Genus Dasychira Moth Caterpillar or commonly called "tussock moth Caterpillars", this group is taxonomically difficult (per BugGuide) in the larval stage. There is sixteen Dasychira species that occur in America north of Mexico and it is not completely known who belongs to whom.

 

The caterpillar, or larval, stage of these species often has a distinctive appearance of alternating bristles and haired projections. Many tussock moth caterpillars have urticating hairs (often hidden among longer, softer hairs) which can cause painful reactions if they come into contact with skin. Adult moths of this subfamily do not feed. Some females are flightless, and some have reduced wings.

Swans, genus Cygnus, are birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae where they form the tribe Cygnini. Sometimes, they are considered a distinct subfamily, Cygninae. There are six to seven species of swan in the genus Cygnus; in addition there is another species known as a swan, the Coscoroba Swan, although this species is no longer considered related to the true swans. Swans usually mate for life, though 'divorce' does sometimes occur, particularly following nesting failure. The number of eggs in each clutch ranges from three to eight.The swans are the largest members of the duck family Anatidae, and are amongst the largest flying birds. The largest species, including the mute swan, trumpeter swan, and whooper swan, can reach length of over 1.5 m (60 inches) and weigh over 15 kg (33 pounds). Their wingspans can be almost 3 m (10 ft). Compared to the closely related geese they are much larger in size and have proportionally larger feet and necks.[2] They also have a patch of unfeathered skin between the eyes and bill in adults. The sexes are alike in plumage, but males are generally bigger and heavier than females.

  

Swan preening itselfThe Northern Hemisphere species of swan have pure white plumage but the Southern Hemisphere species are mixed black and white. The Australian Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) is completely black except for the white flight feathers on its wings; the chicks of black swans are light grey in colour, and the South American Black-necked Swan has a black neck.

 

The legs of swans are normally a dark blackish grey colour, except for the two South American species, which have pink legs. Bill colour varies: the four subarctic species have black bills with varying amounts of yellow, and all the others are patterned red and black, although most birds generally do not have teeth, swans are known to be an exception to this having small jagged 'teeth' as part of their beaks used for catching and eating fish. The Mute Swan and Black-necked Swan have a lump at the base of the bill on the upper mandible.Swans feed in the water and on land. They are almost entirely herbivorous, although small numbers of aquatic animals may be eaten. In the water food is obtained by up-ending or dabbling, and their diet is composed of the roots, tubers, stems and leaves of aquatic and submerged plants.[2]

  

A feeding Mute Swan in ice-covered pool, HanoverSwans form monogamous pair bonds that last for many years, and in some cases these can last for life.[4] Modern genetic techniques are starting to reveal that 'divorces' are more common than previously thought, as is mating with other swans outside of the social pairing, without breaking the social pair bond.[5] These bonds are maintained year round, even in gregarious and migratory species like the Tundra Swan, which congregate in large flocks in the wintering grounds.[6] The nest is on the ground near water and about a metre across. Unlike many other ducks and geese the male helps with the nest construction. Average egg size (for the mute swan) is 113×74 mm, weighing 340 g, in a clutch size of 4 to 7, and an incubation period of 34–45 days.[7] With the exception of the dendrocygninaes they are the only anatids where the males aid in incubating the eggs.

 

Mute swans have been observed to display homosexual or transgender behavior.

 

Genus Neoscona (Spotted Orbweavers)

Genus Agapostemon - Metallic Green Bee Close up... Metallic Green Bee, Agapostemon texanus

The genus name (Aster) comes from the Greek and means "star-shaped flower". Today, one say, this doesn´t belong to the asters... a pretty eye-catcher in many gardens and parcs. A typical flower of fall in Europe.

 

Diese schönen Herbstastern, sie heißen wohl "Rosenwichtel" sollen nun wohl nicht mehr zur Gattung der Astern gehören... jedenfalls sind sie eine Augenweide in Gärten und Parks in der Herbstzeit.

 

Nice greetings to you, dear flickr-friends! Thank you for your visits!

 

All rights reserved - copyright :copyright: Sulamay Fillinger

Swans, genus Cygnus, are birds of the family Anatidae, which also includes geese and ducks. Swans are grouped with the closely related geese in the subfamily Anserinae where they form the tribe Cygnini. Sometimes, they are considered a distinct subfamily, Cygninae. There are six to seven species of swan in the genus Cygnus; in addition there is another species known as a swan, the Coscoroba Swan, although this species is no longer considered related to the true swans. Swans usually mate for life, though 'divorce' does sometimes occur, particularly following nesting failure. The number of eggs in each clutch ranges from three to eight.The swans are the largest members of the duck family Anatidae, and are amongst the largest flying birds. The largest species, including the mute swan, trumpeter swan, and whooper swan, can reach length of over 1.5 m (60 inches) and weigh over 15 kg (33 pounds). Their wingspans can be almost 3 m (10 ft). Compared to the closely related geese they are much larger in size and have proportionally larger feet and necks.[2] They also have a patch of unfeathered skin between the eyes and bill in adults. The sexes are alike in plumage, but males are generally bigger and heavier than females.

  

Swan preening itselfThe Northern Hemisphere species of swan have pure white plumage but the Southern Hemisphere species are mixed black and white. The Australian Black Swan (Cygnus atratus) is completely black except for the white flight feathers on its wings; the chicks of black swans are light grey in colour, and the South American Black-necked Swan has a black neck.

 

The legs of swans are normally a dark blackish grey colour, except for the two South American species, which have pink legs. Bill colour varies: the four subarctic species have black bills with varying amounts of yellow, and all the others are patterned red and black, although most birds generally do not have teeth, swans are known to be an exception to this having small jagged 'teeth' as part of their beaks used for catching and eating fish. The Mute Swan and Black-necked Swan have a lump at the base of the bill on the upper mandible.Swans feed in the water and on land. They are almost entirely herbivorous, although small numbers of aquatic animals may be eaten. In the water food is obtained by up-ending or dabbling, and their diet is composed of the roots, tubers, stems and leaves of aquatic and submerged plants.[2]

  

A feeding Mute Swan in ice-covered pool, HanoverSwans form monogamous pair bonds that last for many years, and in some cases these can last for life.[4] Modern genetic techniques are starting to reveal that 'divorces' are more common than previously thought, as is mating with other swans outside of the social pairing, without breaking the social pair bond.[5] These bonds are maintained year round, even in gregarious and migratory species like the Tundra Swan, which congregate in large flocks in the wintering grounds.[6] The nest is on the ground near water and about a metre across. Unlike many other ducks and geese the male helps with the nest construction. Average egg size (for the mute swan) is 113×74 mm, weighing 340 g, in a clutch size of 4 to 7, and an incubation period of 34–45 days.[7] With the exception of the dendrocygninaes they are the only anatids where the males aid in incubating the eggs.

 

Mute swans have been observed to display homosexual or transgender behavior.

      

Osteospermum is a genus belonging to the Calenduleae, one of the smaller tribes of the sunflower family (Asteraceae).

Osteosperum used to belong to the genus Dimorphotheca, but only the annual species remain in that genus; the perennials belong to Osteospermum. The genus Osteospermum is also closely related to the small genus Chrysanthemoides, such as C. incana and C. monilifera.

 

The scientific name is derived from the Greek osteon (= bone) and Latin spermum (= seed). It has been given several common names: African Daisy, South African Daisy, Cape Daisy and Blue-eyed Daisy.

There are about 50 species, native to Africa, 35 species in southern Africa, and southwestern Arabia. They are half-hardy perennials or subshrubs. Therefore they do not survive outdoor wintery conditions, but there is still a wide range of hardiness.

  

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - APRIL 10: Ruby Rose poses backstage ahead of the New Generation show at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia 2014 at Carriageworks on April 10, 2014 in Sydney, Australia. (Photo by Mark Metcalfe/Getty Images)

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